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G R E AT E R O W E N S B O R O C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E 2018

A publication of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce and the Messenger-Inquirer


                                                              

    

                   


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The Greater Owensboro Magazine is a publication of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce with advertising and editorial content produced by the Messenger-Inquirer.

wensboro

GREATER

ADVERTISING

Angela Mayes, Advertising Director EDITORIAL

Meghann Richardson, Special Publications Editor PHOTOGRAPHERS

Alan Warren, Photography Editor Evan Boggs Greg Eans Austin Ramsey AP Imagery GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Maegan Saalwaechter REPORTERS

Jacob Dick Bobbie Hayse Keith Lawrence Jim Mayse Kristi McCabe Beth Noffsinger Angela Oliver Austin Ramsey Stephanie Salmons Steve Vied Don Wilkins Greater Owensboro U.S.A. is published annually by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 825 Owensboro, KY 42302 This edition was produced by the Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro’s daily newspaper. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without permission from the Messenger-Inquirer.

PRINTED BY Greenwell Chisholm CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF

Candance Brake, President & CEO Susan High, Business Manager Jessica Kirk, Executive Director Leadership Owensboro/Programs & Events Manager Jaclyn Graves, Membership Development Manager Lauren Wood, Administrative Assistant Lydi Boone 270-926-1860 • chamber.owensboro.com

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G R E A T E R

Welcome to Greater Owensboro! The best small city you will find. We have continued making Owensboro greater throughout the past year, and we can’t wait to see all that’s in store for 2018! Here are just a few of the things happening in our All-American City: • Downtown businesses and residences thriving, growing and expanding. • Tremendous influx in the innovation and research and development sectors. • A huge growth of young professionals from Owensboro and abroad moving to and becoming involved in our community. • Sports and recreational events and activities for every age and interest. • Owensboro Health Regional Hospital’s phenomenal new campus focused on patient care is ranked in the top 2 percent in the nation for quality. • Job growth, business expansion and income growth exceeding our peers. • A retail sector which is both unique and niche oriented for an unparalleled boutique shopping experience. • New transportation networks being constructed to get more people and goods in and out of our community. • Education is at the forefront, with exemplary primary and secondary schools and world-class colleges and universities with diverse programs to advance our higher education, as well as workforce development and training opportunities. • An arts, entertainment and dining scene unparalleled in communities our size. It’s an amazing time to be a part of this community. We hope you find this annual publication inspiring and a way for you to experience a small piece of our community that we’re so proud to call our own. We’re honored to share it with you.

Sincerely, Candance Castlen Brake President and CEO Bart Darrell 2018 Chamber Board Chair O W E N S B O R O

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Owensboro AT A GLANCE

99,259 d a v i e s p s o p u l

a

c o u n t y t i o n

median household income

$45,989

4.6%

local unemployment rate

59,273 o f n p o p u l at i o o r o o w e n s b

$115,400

median

home

17 minutes

price

average commute time

Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Annual Estimates, Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, Bureau of Labor Statistics

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CONTENTS 6

14 18

44

46 G R E A T E R

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Business 14 International

Bluegrass Music Center

18 O.Z. Tyler distillery

29 Chamber

businesses of the year

Lifestyle 50

44 Farm Fresh

56

46 Trolley service 50 Riverfront

86

56 Hayden Farms

Health &Education 64 Teacher profile: Nate Stemle 70 Owensboro

Innovation Academy

76 Healthcare

professionals

Culture 86 Festival fun 88 Theatre

Workshop of Owensboro

92 Downtown art G R E A T E R

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Business


Businesses are the lifeblood of all communities. In Owensboro, local business owners are proud of the community and the people who live in it. Generations of family farmers and young entrepreneurs have found a place to call home in Owensboro. Our local businesses survive and thrive thanks to people who live, work, shop and play in Owensboro. With the downtown and Kentucky 54 areas experiencing phenomenal growth, more shops, boutiques and restaurants are opening, ready to serve you and your family. Whether you’re wanting to start a business venture or looking for a place to shop or stay, there are plenty of options. This section offers a glimpse of what Owensboro has to offer. PHOTO BY AUSTIN RAMSEY


all about

service

WRITTEN BY KRISTI MCCABE PHOTOS BY ALAN WARREN Salons and spas are essential for any community, and their services are invaluable. Salons rejuvenate, revitalize and help build relationships within a community. For those under constant stress in their jobs or at home, salons offer an escape and a place to be pampered. Owensboro’s All About You Salon & Spa, at 603 Salem Drive, is dedicated to making each visit a memorable experience. “We live in such a fast-paced world,” manager Bethany Norris said. “All About You is a safe haven where clients can come in and sit down with a cup of coffee, have a massage or get their hair done and just enjoy a little mini-vacation.” All About You offers a wide variety of services, including manicures, pedicures, lash extensions, massage, cupping therapy, all hair services, hair extensions, makeup application, spray tan and body waxing. Services are performed with a smile, and the sense of family found among employees makes clients feel immediately welcome.

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“We are a very close-knit group,” Norris said. “We celebrate each other; we have birthday parties, and we have a monthly potluck. This really serves to build a sense of community within our salon.” All About You employs 18 stylists, one nail tech, one massage therapist and one skin-care specialist. The stylists’ experi-

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ence ranges from one to 50-plus years, including the illustrious Joan Shearer, who is 72 years old and works six days a week. “She is just full of life,” Norris said. “She is a great asset.” Having an opportunity to touch the lives of clients in a special way is an honor. “At times we serve clients who have 2 0 1 8


All About You is a safe haven where clients can come in and sit down with a cup of coffee, have a massage or get their hair done and just enjoy a little mini-vacation.

— Bethany Norris

been undergoing cancer treatment,” she said. “It is so important to help them regain their self-esteem and sense of beauty.” Bridal parties are always welcome and are treated as special guests. “Each wedding party is just as unique as the last,” Norris said. “It is such an honor to be trusted with someone’s special day.” Giving back to the community is a vital role for any small business, and All About You always rises to the occasion. “Any time we hear of a benefit, we donate our services, our time or our products,” she said. “We sponsor our local sports teams, and we try to vary who we sponsor. We think it’s important to keep our money here in the community.” A project that’s especially meaningful to those at All About You is Cinderella’s Closet, an organization that provides formal wear for girls who wouldn’t otherwise be able to attend prom. “Last year, we put together 100 bags of health-care items for the girls participating in this program,” Norris said. For All About You Salon & Spa, opening its doors to clients each day is about much more than just running a business — it’s also about caring. “We are more than just a business,” Norris said. “We are part of a community that we love, and we see our mission as a very important one: to create the kind of atmosphere that welcomes each and every client with a smile and makes him or her feel like an honored guest.”

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bluegrass center

Dozens of concerts planned for new

WRITTEN BY KEITH LAWRENCE

When the $15.3 million International Bluegrass Music Center opens this fall at Second and Frederica streets, it will be as much of an entertainment center as a museum. “We want to have a lot of music,” Chris Joslin, executive director of the International Bluegrass Music Museum, said of the new center. “We’ll probably have 50 to 70 concerts the first year and grow from that,” he said. “But it depends on how many the region will support.” The idea, though, is to draw people from outside the region to Owensboro for regularlyscheduled bluegrass shows. The Center’s Woodward Theatre will be a state-of-the-art, 450-seat theater inside the center. Bluegrass shows are planned for every Saturday night. An outdoor stage will be on the northeast side of the center. And it will get plenty of action too, Joslin said. “The outdoor stage can be used for such things as one-day festivals, fiddling contests, things like that,” he said. “We’re exploring all kinds of ideas. We’re dreaming big.” The International Bluegrass Music Associa-

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make it.” Saturday night shows in the Woodward Theatre will begin immediately after the center opens, Joslin said. “It’s really built for live music — bluegrass and related roots music,” he said. The museum will close during the move to tion had its annual trade show and Fan Fest in the new center, which will take several weeks. Owensboro from 1987 through 1996. Joslin expects that to happen during the Then, it moved to Louisville, then Nashville first quarter of the year. and is now in Raleigh, North Carolina. The installation of exhibits should begin in Through the years, local officials have tried April, he said. to get the trade show and Fan Fest back. Joslin said the museum hopes to attract “We don’t have enough exhibits about the lives and careers of bluehotel rooms to get the grass musicians and some who started in blueIBMA back,” Joslin said. grass and moved into other We’re planning “But a lot of people who areas of music. came to Owensboro back The new bluegrass cena gala, special then r emember those ter will have a museum store, performances days. We want to give t h e 4 5 0 - s e a t Wo o d w a r d them an excuse to come Theater, areas for video and and a community back and make a pilgrimcelebration for the audio histories and rooms age to Owensboro.” where bluegrass archives grand opening. The opening of the new can be accessed by visitors, a bluegrass center had been library, a special event space, set to coincide with the a pair of large spaces where museum’s ROMP Fest in exhibits can be staged on a June. rotating basis and the International Bluegrass But the delayed opening will allow the cen- Music Association Hall of Fame. ter to take center stage. Plans call for a restaurant on the third floor “We were planning to open during ROMP,” of the center, facing the Ohio River. But at Joslin said. “But we’ve decided that the opening press time, the name of the restaurant and its will be big enough to be its own event. We’re theme hadn’t been announced. planning a gala, special performances and a Ed Ray, assistant city manager, said patrons community celebration for the grand opening. will enter the restaurant through an elevator on We’re talking about bringing back as many the north side of the building or they can use pioneers and Hall of Fame members as can another elevator in the museum’s lobby.

G R E A T E R

— chris joslin

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PHOTO SUBMITTED BY GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

FORTY

GROOMING THE NEXT GENERATION


WRITTEN BY RENEE BEASLEY JONES One of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce’s strategic goals is recruiting young talent and developing future leaders. For years, the chamber has offered programs, such as Leadership Owensboro and the Chamber Young Professionals, geared toward grooming the next generation for its role in the community.  But, the recent addition of the 40 Under 40 award provides another avenue for the community to embrace and encourage tomorrow’s leaders. “Our economy continues to evolve in a way where jobs are following people,” said Candance Castlen Brake, chamber president and CEO. “So building a community that is attractive and interesting to our Gen Ys and our millennials will pay dividends for generations.” Engaging these young professionals ensures continued growth at a time when other communities of Owensboro’s size are experiencing wage and population declines. The 40 Under 40 award recognizes leaders in their 20s and 30s who already contribute to the business community in important ways. “We feel it is a critical part of our role in the community to not only identify these individuals, but to support them in growing their professional careers and their avenues for civic engagement,” Brake said.

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Bourbon reawakens in Owensboro, western Kentucky


STORY AND PHOTOS BY AUSTIN RAMSEY Owensboro is no stranger to the storied history of bourbon whiskey in the Bluegrass State. It’s been said that by the late 1800s, upward of 20 distilleries operated here, enabling farmers to produce larger corn crops and ship their excess to the southern ports via the Ohio River. Lured by government incentives and an increasingly competitive distilled spirit market in the country’s earliest history, colonial farmers saw Kentucky and its deep ties to sweet corn as a gold rush-opportunity. It was easier to send your corn to market mashed down and distilled into liquor, and it wasn’t long before old barges would sail back and forth on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, stacked high with new oak barrels filled to the brim. New Orleans had a taste for “that Bourbon County whiskey,” a name born as an ode to its Kentucky heritage. Soon enough, demand for whiskey’s sweeter cousin, named bourbon, grew strong enough for thousands of distilleries to spring up across the state. Nearly every corn farmer would distill his surplus and profit from old family recipes and an early fondness for pure, simple ingredients and time-honored traditions. When prohibition struck, however, only a few distilleries in the state — mainly those with money and influence near Louisville and Lexington — were able to muster medicinal contracts and keep their doors open. Most other operations, including every mash room, still and rick house in Owensboro, were shuttered. It stayed that way for years. Once prohibition laws were repealed and Kentucky counties slowly began realizing their distilled potential again, those giants who had survived stricter production and consumption laws had a step ahead of the competition, and they worked alone to meet what little demand was left for American whiskey. There were some newcomers that were able to break back into the game, even some in Owensboro. But it seemed like bourbon’s prime had long passed. Until recently. In the remains of Owensboro’s 100-year-old Medley Distillery near the banks of the river, South Carolina-based Terresentia Corp. has revived bourbon production in the western Kentucky city. O.Z. Tyler Distillery has helped shape what many are characterizing as a western Kentucky bourbon revival.  Joining it are a slew of up-and-comers in the region looking to claim their piece of the bourbon revival pie. “There’s a bourbon tradition in Owensboro,” said Jacob Call, O.Z. Tyler master distiller. “This facility dates back to 1885, and, knowing that, I wanted to carry on the tradition that had been started here. This was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for me to rebuild a place and make it thrive.” Call is a seventh-generation Kentuckian and third-generation distiller. Born in Bardstown, the

bourbon maker has worked in distilleries throughout the southern U.S., but he said when Earl Hewlett, the CEO of Terresentia, invested $25 million to purchase and refurbish the old Owensboro distillery, he saw it as his chance to take his skills in the industry back to where it all began. “We have a lot of pride in Kentucky,” he said. “It’s basketball, horse racing and bourbon in this state. There’s no better place to make it.” But there was something unique about Terresentia and the bourbon that Call would make here. Bourbon is a distilled spirit that draws its flavor and color from the years it spends aging in charred oak barrels stored in tall barns called rick houses. Terresentia, he said, was introducing its TerrePURE technology to the bourbon industry in Kentucky, whereby sonic energy would rapidly filter the liquor, naturally aging it to taste and quality levels that matched barrels, which had spent between four and six years in storage, in a relatively short time.   Now, O.Z. Tyler is beginning to introduce its locally-soured Kentucky bourbon onto the market after only a year’s worth of aging. Hewlett said he believes it’s a game-changer for an industry that often blends its spirits. There’s something unique and special about a 10- or 12-year-old aged bourbon, he added, and it’s something that the TerrePURE process isn’t looking to replicate. But when recipes call for a four-year-old blend, O.Z. Tyler and the like may be a more timely and costly alternative. It may not revolutionize the industry, he said. But O.Z. Tyler is still making its mark. “We make our bourbon like everyone else,” Hewlett said. “It’s pure and full of tradition, but we’re using science and chemistry to speed up the filtration process that, until now, only time could do. There’s a natural skepticism that comes with that. I believe you can’t argue with the taste, but we were prepared to deal with that skepticism.

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But within the Kentucky bourbon industry, I don’t think we’ve experienced that. Distilleries around that state have welcomed us with open arms.” Call characterized bourbon makers as a fraternity of brothers and sisters who enjoy camaraderie and share a love for the art. The distillery is working to get its facility listed on Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail — an honor that has been known to bring with it crowds of tourists to a community. But Owensboro, the men say, has given so much back to them that they want to be invested in the community.  “The first time I ever came to Owensboro, I wasn’t expecting what I found,” Hewlett said. “The downtown area looked great, and we were just really accepted by the community. We knew there were plenty of people who were eager to get back in the business of making bourbon, and so I think with that in mind, that’s how we made our decision.” Bourbon’s popularity is cyclical, experts say. Jeff Oldham, president of J’s Liquors in Owensboro, knows that all too well. He described himself as a bourbon drinker most of his life; his father was, and being a Kentuckian, it was almost expected. But for those who don’t live in the Bluegrass State or know it as their home, whiskey has waned and waxed. “Everything is cyclical in this industry,” he said. “Before the ’60s and ’70s, men drank bourbon a lot, but I think those decades introduced a lot rebellion, and young people didn’t want to drink what their parents did. But there’s something about the craftsmanship that goes into bourbon and just how natural it really is that has brought it back into the limelight.” It’s something Oldham said J’s Liquors’ two Owensboro locations are seeing every day. Bourbon is flying off the shelves like never before, he said. Now that a distillery is back into production locally, the local interest seems to have more than doubled. 2 0 1 8

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In 2016, 112 million people went out to shop at small businesses on Small Business Saturday. Hundreds of those par ticipants were in Owensboro — shopping, congregating and enjoying the holiday season with family, friends and neighbors. Shop Owensboro, sponsored by Independence Bank, which has become a staple event in the community, takes place the Saturday after Black Friday, with the goal of promoting local businesses and shopping. Shop Owensboro is powered by Independence Bank, lots of cof fee and the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. Waking before the sun rises, the crew is spread across town with free treats and prizes, spreading holiday cheer and Owensboro hospitality to everyone.  In previous years, promoters of Shop Owensboro have taken cupcakes and cookies to participating businesses and made personal visits in the days leading up to the event. It is truly an event that brings the community together. Men’s and women’s boutiques, home decor and gift shops, locally-owned restaurants and gyms participated in Shop Owensboro. Last year, local businesses surveyed by the Messenger-Inquirer reported that sales were running well ahead of a typical Saturday. While this event is a great thing for Owensboro, the professionals at the chamber encourage the community to shop local year-round.

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More development is on the way, including a new parking garage and several multi-million-dollar, condo-retail-restaurant developments.

In 2008, the Executive Inn Rivermont, once western Kentucky’s largest hotel, closed its doors in downtown Owensboro. The city was losing conventions, and downtown merchants were struggling. So, community leaders decided that it was time for a bold — and controversial — move to jump-start development along the riverfront. Gateway Planning of Dallas was hired to create a master plan for development. The Owensboro City Commission and Daviess Fiscal Court each voted in favor of doubling insurance premium tax rates to make it possible for them to borrow $80 million for downtown projects — like the Owensboro Convention Center and a rebuilt Smothers Park — that made downtown Owensboro a destination. Soon, the project grew even faster than community leaders had expected. Two hotels — the Hampton Inn & Suites by Hilton Owensboro Downtown and the Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront — were built on the former Executive Inn property, along with the convention center. A new Boardwalk Pipeline Partners-Texas Gas headquarters went up across the street. A $15.3 million International Bluegrass Music Center is under construction along with the Enclave at Riverfront Living, a condo complex with restaurants planned for the first floor. The BB&T Bank Building has been transformed into a glass-covered customer service center for Alorica Inc. Jack Wells said recently that The Enclave

22

at 101 Frederica St. should open in the second quarter of the year. Construction should begin this year on the third downtown hotel — across from the convention center — and its attached apartment complex, he said. “This will be a first-class ‘big city’ development,” Wells said. And, he said, “we have preliminar y plans for the property in front of the Holiday Inn.” And more development is on the way, including a new parking garage and several multi-million-dollar, condo-retail-restaurant developments. Three national chain restaurants have located in downtown in the past few years — Another Broken Egg Cafe, Mellow Mushroom and Bar Louie. At least five more restaurants are said to be on the way. Joe Berry, executive vice president of the Greater Owensboro Economic Development Corp., said the EDC doesn’t track private development in downtown as closely as it did when the process began. But he said, “based on what I know has occurred thus far and what is projected with the TIF investment, I can comfortably say that private investment downtown exceeds $200 million.” Local, state and federal governments have spent more than $100 million. Another $142 million in private and public investments is expected over the next

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private downtown

tops

development

$200M

WRITTEN BY KEITH LAWRENCE PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

few years. And it’s not just new construction. Robert Glyer, a California investor, recently bought the historic McAtee, Lyddane and Ray Building at 121 E. Second St. Randy Hayden, the Realtor who is managing the building for Glyer, said Glyer is looking into the possibility of putting a pub in the 7,650-square-foot basement to attract tourists. He’s also considering a rooftop garden or restaurant. Several other downtown buildings have been purchased in the past few years, and others are for sale. Local officials expect the current development to create more development in the future as businesses try to locate where the action is. 2 0 1 8


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Hotels in the Owensboro area A Quality Inn

9040 U.S. 60, Lewisport • 270-295-3234 Amenities at the hotel in Lewisport include free breakfast, free WiFi, a seasonal outdoor pool and a laundry facility.

Amenities include a breakfast buffet, weekday breakfast bags to go, a gourmet restaurant, fitness center and an indoor pool with a whirlpool, three meeting rooms, a 24/7 business center and a 24-hour convenience store.

Hampton Inn Owensboro South Comfort Suites Owensboro

230 Salem Drive • 270-926-7675 • 270-926-7616 Suites offer WiFi and flat-screen TVs, mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Upgraded suites add wet bars, separate living areas and/or pull-out sofas. Amenities include parking and a hot breakfast buffet. Other amenities consist of a heated indoor pool, hot tub and an exercise room.

Holiday Inn – Owensboro Riverfront

Country Inn & Suites

3220 W. Parrish Ave. • 270-685-2433 • 270-685-1054 Rooms offer flat-screen TVs, free WiFi, and sitting areas with sofas, as well as microwaves and mini fridges. Amenities include a breakfast buffet, fitness center and a seasonal, outdoor pool.

Courtyard by Marriott Owensboro

3120 Highland Pointe Drive • 270-685-4140 The contemporary rooms offer free WiFi, desks with ergonomic chairs, flat-screen TVs and iPod docks, plus mini fridges and coffeemakers. Suites add separate living areas. The on-site American restaurant serves breakfast, dinner and all-day drinks, including Starbucks coffee. Other amenities include an indoor pool and whirlpool, an exercise room and free on-site parking.

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Owensboro

800 Salem Drive • 270-688-8887 • 800-228-2800 • 270-688-8348 Relaxed rooms include free WiFi, microwaves, mini fridges and coffeemakers, plus flat-screen TVs. Some rooms have pull-out sofas. Amenities include hot breakfast, an indoor pool, whirlpool fitness center, a convenience store, business center and free parking.

Hampton Inn & Suites Downtown/Waterfront

401 W. 2nd St. • 270-685-2005 Rooms include free WiFi, flat-screen HDTVs, both full and lap desks (for working in bed), mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers.

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615 Salem Drive • 270-926-2006 • 270-684-0330 The rooms, decorated in soft neutrals with traditional mahogany woods, have free WiFi, flat-screen TVs with HD channels, work desks (plus ergonomic laptop desks), coffeemakers, mini fridges and microwaves. Amenities include free hot breakfast (or breakfast bags to go), a putting green and an outdoor pool and patio. There’s also a fitness center, a business center and free parking.

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701 W. 1st St. • 270-683-1111 • 270-683-1400 Rooms offer flat-screen TVs, free WiFi and mini fridges. All also provide microwaves and coffeemakers, and some include river views and balconies. Upgraded rooms add pull-out sofas. Amenities include a casual restaurant and an indoor pool, fitness center and business center.

Motel 6

4585 Frederica St. • 270-686-8606 Free morning coffee and parking are offered, as well as an outdoor pool and a coin laundry.

Ramada Inn

3136 W. 2nd St. • 270-685-3941 • 270-926-2917 Rooms have free WiFi and cable TV, plus mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Some rooms feature pull-out sofas, while suites add living areas. Kids 17 and under stay free with an adult. Amenities include free continental breakfast and a casual restaurant, an outdoor pool, fitness center, business center and meeting room and free parking.

Wingfield Inn & Suites

3220 W. Parrish Ave. • 270-685-2433 All rooms include free WiFi, refrigerator, microwave, coffeemaker, iron and a weekday newspaper. Studio suites include a sitting area, pull-out sofa and two TVs.

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High-Speed Internet and Phone Services for your Business

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Lure Seafood & Grill • Changes Salon & Spa • Adams & Sons Mens Fine Clothes Convention Center Adjacent • Meeting Rooms •LEED Certified “Now Open: Open of the Blue Specializing in Apparel, Gifts, and Kentucky Spirits.”

HAMPTON INN & SUITES by HILTON Owensboro - Downtown Waterfront 401 W. 2nd St. • 270-685-2005 www.hamptonowensborodowntown.com

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NEWLY RENOVATED, HAMPTON WALL OF FAME RECIPIENT, OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL & GAZEBO, SHOPPING, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT ADJACENT

Top-Ranked Hotels on Tripadvisor FREE Daily Breakfast 6-10a.m. FREE Parking Passes for Off-Site Fitness Facilites FREE Wireless Internet On-Site Fitness Room Available Discounts for Neighboring Restaurants

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byHilton

HAMPTON INN by HILTON Owensboro - South 615 Salem Dr. • 270-926-2006 www.hamptoninnowensboro.com

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For those who have supported us for over five decades we say thank you for allowing us to serve you and your family. We cannot exist without you. Green River Appliance is a locally owned full service appliance and furniture store born in 1964. We got our start from Green River Rural Electric now Kenergy. When the coop decided to exit the retail business, Elton Dawson with the help of J R Miller, then chairman of the board, put together Green River Appliance and moved operations to14th and Daviess streets. Frigidaire appliances were the only brand sold. A lot has changed in the last fifty three years. In 2014 the new showroom came to fruition along with the addition of more brands and furniture. We’re not just appliances anymore. Green River offers the area’s best selection

of appliances with over 250 to choose from and furniture to fit today’s lifestyle. Green River will continue to serve the needs of the community for decades to come with the personal touch you only get from a small business. With the support of our Hometown Choice group of ten dealers and the national buying power of Brandsource, one of the top buying groups in the nation, you can rest assured you are getting great value plus the service after the sale. If you are new to Owensboro, let me extend a personal invitation to visit our showroom. Come see why more and more people who shop Green River buy from Green River.


An Employee-Owned Company

Your town is my town.

We Put Technology to Work

Industries Served: · State, Local & International Law Enforcement · US Defense Agencies · Federal Contractors · Industrial/Commercial

Now proudly serving Owensboro. I live and work here just like you. So I’m right around the corner when you need me. I can help protect the things you own and the people you love. Call or stop by today for a free quote.

Subsidiaries: Components

Paula W. Hayden 270-926-7007 728 Carlton Drive Owensboro paulahayden@allstate.com

2017 Kentucky Governor’s Health & Safety Award Winner 228201

© 2014 Allstate Insurance Co.

Proud Community Supporters of:

270-231-8160 1030 Cedar Street Owensboro, KY 42301

Employee-Owned Since 1997 For more information regarding MPD, Inc., its subsidiaries, products & careers, visit: www.mpdinc.com

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businesses GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

OF THE YEAR 2017 GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

2017 Business of the Year Each year, the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce presents awards to local businesses for their outstanding services, support and involvement in the community. The awards program is designed to celebrate outstanding businesses and their efforts. 2 0 1 7 B U S I N E S S O F T H E Y E A R AWA R D W I N N E R S • Business of the Year (1-10 employees) — Blossom’s Apparel & Gifts • Business of the Year (11-50 employees) — Keller Williams – Kelly Anne Harris Team • Business of the Year (51+ employees) — Independence Bank • Emerging Business of the Year — Dalishas Desserts • Nonprofit of the Year — Boulware Mission • Education and Workforce Development Program of the Year — Owensboro Community & Technical College GO FAME and GO CAREERS

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Blossom's

BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

1-10

EMPLOYEES

A P PA R E L & G I F T S

Blossom’s Apparel & Gifts, 805 Frederica St., opened in August 2004 as Blossom’s Maternity & more. In 2006, it took its current name to reach out to all women — not just those who were pregnant. The motherdaughter duo of Vicki Mills and Jessica McKinley always served their customers with a smile, and their positive attitude is what helped them become a 2017 business of the year. Blossom’s offered stylish and affordable young contemporary clothing, as well as apparel for the professional and young at heart. On July 31, 2017, the business closed its doors after 13 years serving Owensboro and beyond.

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BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

Kelly Anne Harris Team 11-50 EMPLOYEES The Kelly Anne Harris Team, the No. 1 real estate team in the Owensboro area, is one of the fastest-growing real estate companies in western Kentucky. The Kelly Anne Harris Team had over $30 million in gross sales in 2015 and surpassed that in 2016. The Kelly Anne Harris Team is a tight-knit, committed organization of highly-skilled real estate professionals with a passion for making their client’s real estate

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dreams a reality. The Kelly Anne Harris Team specializes in residential homes, new construction homes, first-time home buyers, relocation and condos. Service areas include Beaver Dam, Calhoun, Falls of Rough, Hartford, Hawesville, Henderson, Island, Lewisport, Livermore, Maceo, Owensboro, Philpot, Reynolds Station, Utica and West Louisville.

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Independence Bank BUSINESS

51+

OF

G R E A T E R

YEAR

EMPLOYEES

The history of Independence Bank is a history of people who shared a dream of creating a strong community bank. They envisioned a bank that would provide extraordinary service to its customers and grow along with its communities. Today, Independence Bank continues to break new ground with new locations and innovative financial products. For your personal needs, it offers free checking and free savings accounts, as well as the convenience of online banking. For businesses, it offers online banking, business checking and a range of business and agriculture loans. Independence Bank provides the communities it serves with the best financial tools and expertise available. It constantly invests in technology, so its customers can bank quickly, conveniently and securely.

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Dalishas Desserts is a bakery and lunch cafe, specializing in high-quality, southern-accented, creative options. Desserts are always made from scratch, including cakes, pies, cookies and more. Lunch options are made from the finest ingredients and include sandwiches, wraps, soup, salad and quiche. The bakery enjoys being the place where friends and family gather regularly for lunch, where brides-to-be order their dream wedding cake and where businesses and party hosts turn to for catered events. Dalishas Desserts is located at 1010 Allen St. inside the Center for Business.

Dalishas Desserts EMERGING BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

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Boulware Mission

N O N PR O FIT O F TH E Y EAR

The Boulware Mission is a faithbased, nonprofit shelter. It offers longterm, comprehensive services for homeless and near-homeless men and women. Boulware primarily serves the Green River Area Development District of western Kentucky, which includes the counties of Daviess, Hancock, Henderson, McLean, Ohio, Union and Webster. The shelter is located in Owensboro. The services provided by Boulware Mission are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Boulware provides clients with three nutritious meals per day, snacks, emergency clothing, personal hygiene items, secure shelter, case management services, outreach, advocacy and referrals to local and regional resources along with follow-up services. Money from the United Way, local and federal grants, churches and private contributors pay for the cost of daily operations and services.

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GO FAME and GO CAREERS

E D U C AT I O N A N D W O R K F O R C E D E V E L O P M E N T P R O G R A M O F T H E Y E A R

GO FAME, the Greater Owensboro chapter of the Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education, pairs students from Owensboro Community & Technical College with partnering businesses to learn complementary skills and have part of the cost their education sponsored by the employer. Enrolled students attend college at OCTC two days a week while working three days a week at a sponsoring company, earning an Associate in Applied Science degree in about five semesters. Some students also pursue related technical certificates to better qualify themselves for specific jobs. The sponsoring members of GO FAME are Castlen Steel, Domtar, Hunter Douglas, Ken-tron Manufacturing, Kimberly Clark, Metalsa, National Office Furniture, Omico Plastics, Precision Roll Grinders, Sun Windows, The Hines Group, Toyotetsu Mid America (TTMA) and WPT Nonwovens. G R E A T E R

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Lifestyle While Owensboro is a great place to live, it’s also a great place to play. From award-winning parks to one-of-a-kind restaurants, your time in Owensboro, whether it’s just overnight or for an extended stay, is sure to be memorable. In this section, you’ll explore life in Owensboro. We have everything you’re looking for — churches and sanctuaries, parks and pools, bourbon and beer, food and festivals. Stop in any of our locally-owned restaurants and taste the Owensboro difference. Our hospitality is high-quality, and we treat visitors as if they’re lifelong friends. We ‘d love for you to explore our city, walk around the downtown riverfront and stay a while. PHOTO BY GREG EANS


Brasher his own biggest critic Local musician overcomes crippling self doubt, embarrassment to market songs STORY AND PHOTO BY fur ther from the truth. Brasher has inde- like “House of the Rising Sun” in the original AUSTIN RAMSEY pendently released five albums and fronted key without any hesitation. Most musicians seem born for the spotlight. It doesn’t take much for your gardenvariety country-star-to-be to take a stage and put on a show — cowboy hat atop and acoustic guitar in tow. But Andy Brasher isn’t a typical music artist. For Brasher, 37, of Owensboro, celebrity wasn’t what the music was about. It was an expression, he said — a passion he struggles sometimes to share with others even to this day. “I have to overcome the doubt and embarrassment ever y day,” Brasher said. “I’m my own biggest critic. But, to be honest, I’ve been told ‘no’ so many times. I’ve had so many meetings that I’ve gone in thinking they would be so great for my career, and then I’ve left disappointed.” To say that the father and band leader hasn’t enjoyed success, though, couldn’t be

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a number of high-profile acts. He’s jetted with Kenny Chesney, opened for Kid Rock and toured the country time and time again, all the while keeping his music and humble roots at the forefront of the person he is on and off the stage. Brasher was raised in Knottsville the next to youngest of four children. He started his education at the Mar y Car rico Memorial School before his family moved to Pleasant Ridge, nearer to where his father worked at Big Rivers Electric in Centertown. He graduated from Ohio County High School in 1999 and earned an associate’s degree in the arts from what was then Owensboro Community College a few short years later. His earliest introductions to music, however, came from the single-wide trailer he and his family occupied off Indian Hill Road in Knottsville, he said. His father made it a habit to walk around the house singing, and Brasher said he could belt out old classics

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On long car rides to Owensboro ever y few days, his family would encourage his ability to remember each lyric and ever y note to the songs that played on the radio, and it carried over to his high school days when he picked up the guitar, like his father and grandfather had, too. By age 16 or 17, Brasher was a local favorite, and he would book local venues in Ohio and McLean counties with the earliest bands he could remember — like one named Dicky Swift, which the high school group named after a local insurance agent. Booking those early shows gave him the experience he needed, however, to self market, and it was something he carried with him later in life. Through college, Brasher said he started to sustain himself with music, playing college bars in Bowling Green and local Owensboro shows. After he graduated, he had a threeyear stint meeting collaborators and music

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friends in Nashville before moving back to Owensboro in 2006 to establish himself as a serious local artist. His biggest shift came when local music producer Mike Hamilton, a Daviess County High School graduate who had studied music production at Middle Tennessee State University, approached him about laying down his first album. That wasn’t something he’d ever really considered doing prior to that point. His original songs were copyrighted, he says, but he labored then under the weight of selfdoubt and elusive lyrics. “At that point, I was still sor t of in this mode where, to me, the music was this art form and it was the expression of myself, and I was a little embarrassed about that, to be quite honest,” he said. “I was a little embarrassed about some of the things that I was confessing in these songs. I would share them for my friends, and I would play them for people when we would get together at parties or bonfires, but my music wasn’t something that I thought I would put on a CD to live forever and to be just that publicly available.” But Hamilton and Brasher spent a few sessions in Hamilton’s Owensboro studio and laid down what would become his first independent release — “Crows and Buzzards.” It kicked of f a musical roller coaster he would have never expected. Within months, he had reconnected with a Nashville collaborator and Iowa-native Dustin Bogue. The two began approaching songwriting like a job, which Brasher said he remembers being particularly difficult, since it bucked a personal trend of writing he had developed, where lyrics would evolve while he was cleaning his house or mowing the lawn. But after months of trying to market themselves as songwriters, Brasher and Bogue released an album, “The Brasher/Bogue Project,” and the project that neither had ever really intended to create took the alt-country folk scene in Nashville by surprise. They were slated soon after ward to tour with Chesney and later released “By God: Par t One” and “By God: Part Two.” Their songs got picked up and played across the world. Over his career, he’s turned down two separate record label contracts and interest from a number of management agencies. He said he’s always been suspicious of the idea of a company that may not work as hard as he has and believed in his music. But his success and notoriety on a broader scale is making self-management more difficult, and he said plans are finally in the works to sign on to something bigger. He said the music industry is seemingly impossible to break into, but he knows overcoming adversity and facing personal doubts have taken him far already. He’s ready for the next big adventure.

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JoAnn Risner Broker/Owner

RISNER & ASSOCIATES REALTY, INC.

joannrisner@email.com

1010 Frederica Street Owensboro, KY 42301 270-926-1400 Cell: 270-570-3939 www.risnerrealtors.com

Specializing in:

Residential Commercial & Farms

I appreciate the opportunity to represent you in all your real estate needs

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CELEBRATING

Over 6 Years Serving Owensboro! First Vape Shop in Owensboro Area! Helping Smokers for over 6 Years Most Recognized and Respected eCig Source

TM

eCig Source Owensboro Locations: 426 Salem Drive 3120 Hwy 54 2601 West Parrish Ave

Locations also in Henderson, Bowling Green, Madisonville, Hopkinsville and Oak Grove

Murphy Excavating LLC is a locally owned company that strives to meet the needs of individuals, farmers and businesses within the Owensboro and surrounding areas.

We provide:

grade work, site work, lake digging, land clearing, we build waterways to stop erosion, clean and support ditch banks, perform demolition services, mowing and much more. Gary Murphy 270-929-6283 Jamie Murphy 270-929-2987 Website: murphyexcavatingky.com

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EVERGREEN LAWN CARE

2900 Fairview Dr • Owensboro, KY 42303 270-926-2649

2017

EEN EVERGR2017 POOLS

© 2009-2018 Messenger-Inquirer All Rights Reserved

AND SUPPLIES AND

The world awaits. (You don’t.) Next time you travel, hop on a fast, daily flight to Lambert International for easy connections to wherever you’re going. Visit the Artisan Cafe in the Owensboro Convention Center and try our delicious Kentucky Proud family of foods

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$ from

St. Louis

*

each way

Owensboro Enjoy the ride.

capeair.com

800-CAPE-AIR

*Including all taxes and fees. Fares are subject to availability and other conditions. Fares may change without notice, and are not guaranteed until ticketed.

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success COOKING UP Other restaurants in Owensboro, such as Colby’s Fine WRITTEN BY BETH NOFFSINGER Food and Spirits, Fetta Speciality Pizza and Spirits and the Campbell Club have also become staples in the comOwensboro-Daviess County’s culinary scene contin- munity. ues to evolve, with new restaurants becoming part of the From barbecue, to seafood and home-style meals, region’s food map each year. Owensboro restaurants offer a bit of everything. So as you Some restaurants, however, have made their marks and make your way through town, be sure to stop and stay a have become staples in the community. while and check out some of the wonderful food we have The Miller House and Famous Bistro are well-known to offer. for their extensive menus, and their chefs have spent No matter where you go, you are sure to be greeted years keeping area residents and visitors well fed. We went with a warm smile and a great plate of food. behind-the-scenes with their chefs to see what makes their Visit the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce restaurants and menus so special. website for a full list of great places to eat in the city.

eat

THE CULVER’S DOUBLE

local

TURTLE SUNDAE

STRAWBERRY SHAKE

3020 Highland Point Dr. • 270-689-4040

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Owensboro’s Favorite 8 yrs in a row! 3023 Highland Pte. (off Hwy 54), 270-684-5595 4820 Frederica Street 270-685-5950 Hours: Sun.-Thurs. 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 11 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.

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KASEY KIRK DILLOW: THE MILLER HOUSE

The Miller House features many southern-inspired dishes in a renovated mansion at Fifth Street and J.R. Miller Boulevard. Chef Kasey Kirk Dillow, an Owensboro native and Kentucky Wesleyan College graduate, was working as a chef in North Carolina when her father, Larry Kirk, asked if she would move back home if he opened a restaurant — and within a couple of months he had purchased the house that would become their eatery. Dillow, who went to culinary school at Sullivan University, was inspired by her time in North Carolina when developing the menu for The Miller House. “When I was living in North Carolina, I fell more in love with the southern foods. ... Being in the Carolinas, where grits are on every menu, corn meal, fried green tomatoes, I just fell in love with the southern foods,” she said. The Miller House is “more like American-style, but everything has a southern influence on it.” Dillow credits the Owensboro commu-

PHOTO BY GREG EANS nity for The Miller House’s success. She said they’re fortunate to have many regulars who eat there on a weekly basis. “We would not be here if it wasn’t for our regulars,” she said. “We even have regulars from across the bridge. When you

open a restaurant, the statistics of a restaurant being successful aren’t great. “When you get lucky enough that your work has paid off, I can’t even tell you how great it is and how much we appreciate the people that come.”

JARED BRADLEY: FAMOUS BISTRO A West Virginia transplant has spent more than four years putting his touches on some classic dishes and adding his own flavor to the menu at Famous Bistro, 102 W. Second St. Jared Bradley graduated from Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia, and then Marshall Culinary Academy, before starting his career in his home state. He moved to Owensboro to take the job at Famous Bistro after spending a few months working at an Evansville restaurant. “I’ve always liked cooking,” Bradley said. “As soon as I could see over a stove, I wanted to help. I wanted to cook if I could. I wanted to scramble my eggs when I was 7 years old. ... I’ve tried ‘traditional’ jobs, and it became obvious quickly, in my opinion, that’s not for me.” Bradley enjoys the freedom of being a chef. While there are staples that stay on the menu, he likes to build specials based on what they have on hand in the restaurant. “My goal, in a perfect world, would

PHOTO BY GREG EANS

be for Bistro to sell fine dining food in a casual atmosphere — come in in shorts and be able to get a $40 prime-cut steak,” he said. “My food is direct. The flavor is direct.” A self-described moody cooker, he’s inspired by flavors and tries not to plan his specials too far in advance. He pur-

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chases ingredients locally or from other Kentucky sellers when possible; he purchases his fish from Hawaii. Famous Bistro is a scratch kitchen — they make everything from the breads to the salad dressings in-house from scratch. “You cannot knock the quality here, ever,” he said. 2 0 1 8

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Kentucky Proud

FARM FRESH

Across Owensboro, you can find locally-grown produce at farmers markets and roadside stands. Our hope is that you refer to the list when buying produce in and around Owensboro. Our local farmers are an important piece of the puzzle that makes up our community.


Cecil Farms produce delivery

9408 Mulligan Road, Owensboro 270-929-1445

Cecil Farms has grown produce for more than 30 years on the western side of Owensboro. Gary and Ryan Cecil have grown a variety fruits and vegetables on both a commercial and local level. Cecil Farms delivers locally-grown, farm-fresh produce to local homes,

businesses, restaurants, schools and more in Owensboro and surrounding areas. You can order a variety box to be delivered on a weekly basis throughout the harvest season (typically May through October.) The produce you buy will be at your home within hours of being picked, versus multiple days or weeks. Each week’s share consists of what’s in season.

Owensboro Regional Farmers Market trunneLl’s farm market

270-733-2222

The market has the ability to take EBT and debit card transactions at certain locations and times. Cabbage, salad onions, zucchini, greenhouse grown tomatoes, yellow squash, jams, jellies, bedding plants, perennials, vegetable transplants and baked goods are available. MID-APRIL — END OF OCTOBER 6:30 a.m. to noon Saturdays at the corner of Triplett Street and Parrish Avenue JUNE — AUGUST 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at Owensboro Health Regional Hospital.

WINTER SEASON: DEC. 26 TO MARCH 31 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday — Saturday Closed Sunday and Monday SPRING SEASON: APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday SUMMER SEASON: JULY 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday

Trunnell’s Farm Market now has three FALL SEASON: AUG. 1 — DEC. 24 locations in Owensboro. Its main location is the farm at 9255 U.S. 431 in Utica. It also has 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday locations on Springhill Drive, off Kentucky Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day 54, and in Towne Square Mall.

reid’s orchard Reid’s Orchard produces strawberries, apples, peaches, blackberries, pears, cherries and all types of vegetables for its farm market. In 1986, the family initiated a gathering for the community; the “Apple Festival,” which today hosts 25,000 people on the third weekend in October. The festival has been named Top 10 in Kentucky and a Top 20 event by the Southeast Tourism Society, which covers 11 states. The Reid family wants to continue to diversify, grow and serve the community, but most especially to pass the traditions on to a sixth generation.

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4812 Kentucky 144, Owensboro 270-685-2444 JANUARY — MARCH 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday APRIL — MID-MAY 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday MID MAY — END OF OCTOBER 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday NOVEMBER — DECEMBER Noon to 4 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday

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TAKE A

RIDE ON THE trolley

FOR REAL TIME TROLLEY LOCATION VISIT

WWW.OWENSBORO.ORG/TRANSIT Stop times are about every 20 minutes at the following downtown locations: Convention Center Holiday Inn Walnut and 3rd 3rd and Locust 3rd and Frederica

3rd and St. Ann 3rd and Daviess 2nd and Crittenden 2nd and Daviess 2nd and Allen 2nd and St. Ann 2nd and St. Elizabeth Hampton Inn

Seeing all that downtown Owensboro has to offer is a breeze on the Owensboro trolley. The trolley route circles by all of the main attractions, so you can enjoy a nice meal at one of the many downtown restaurants and then pay a visit to the RiverPark Center, International Bluegrass Music Museum, Smothers Park or the Owensboro Convention Center.  The regular, free trolley service is offered from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, and from 10 a.m. to midnight Thursday through Saturday. The city’s newest trolley was purchased in the fall of 2012 with $226,542 from federal transportation grant funds.

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PHOTO BY ALAN WARREN G R E A T E R

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SOLUTIONS Channel Partner

2035 E Parrish Avenue I Owensboro, KY 42303

270-683-4963

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McCarty’s Towing & Automotive Repair Inc. 24 Hr. Towing Available 927 Crabtree Ave.

Herbert Mccarty, President Anthony McCarty, Vice President

270-683-1118 Owensboro, KY Fax: 270-688-8641

1101 01 W 22nd nd SStreet treet · 2270.684.7800 70.684.7800 mellowmushroom/store/owensboro m ellowmushroom m/store//owensb boro

“Where local Folks Bring Visitors for Owensboro’s Best Bar-B-Q” Mutton • Chicken • Ham Pork • Ribs • Beef Dine In or Carry Out Custom Cooking & Catering Gift Certificates Banquet Room

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US PLATINUM 8 YEARS IN A ROW!

2017

A Fine Tradition for Six Generations 338 Washington Ave. at 25th & Frederica 926-9000

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Smothers Park — the undisputed heart of Owensboro’s revitalized downtown riverfront and the object of affection for many local residents, as well as visitors — turned 5 years old in 2017, a period of time that has seen it evolve from an instant hit to a place still growing in popularity. The park, built at a cost of $68 million over a period of more than three years beginning in 2009, continues to attract thousands of people to its dramatic fountains, inlet waterfall, riverside swings and overlooks, the Col. Charles E. Shelton Freedom Memorial and the award-winning Lazy Dayz Children’s Playground, voted the No. 1 playground in the world two years ago by an international website that specializes in landscape architecture. Smothers Park, on the southern bank of the Ohio River, must also be considered an economic engine for the downtown “placemaking” initiative. The $20 million Hampton Inn & Suites Owensboro Downtown/Waterfront, the $38 million Owensboro Convention Center (construction costs alone), the $15 million Holiday Inn Owensboro Riverfront, the $9.5 million The Enclave at Riverfront Living, a four-story restaurant/condo complex at 101 Frederica St. now under construction, and the $15.3 million International Bluegrass Music Center, also under the construction, all are in close proximity to Smothers Park.


Riverfront HEART OF THE

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HunterDouglas, Inc. is the U.S. subsidiary of the HunterDouglas Group, a Dutch based international industrial group. The HunterDouglas Group is the leading manufacturer and marketer of window coverings, home improvements and architectural products in manufacturing operations and assembly facilities throughout the world. We are the established worldwide design leader and most sought after name in custom window fashions. The Owensboro HunterDouglas Plastic & Die Casting facility has manufactured and assembled plastic injection moldings and extrusions since 1981. All Hunter Douglas brand products are designed, developed and custom-crafted in the U.S.

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Closing the gap Knottsville poultry producer first in the nation to offer consumer education center, viewing room One of those will contain a consumer viewing room with WRITTEN BY RENEE BEASLEY JONES PHOTOS BY ALAN WARREN a large span of windows, and Hayden Farms invested in a Daniel Hayden, a Knottsville poultr y producer, worries that many residents no longer understand how their food is grown. Today’s consumers are several generations removed from their agriculture roots. In larger metro areas, people commonly think eggs and milk come from a supermarket. They’ve lost touch with chickens and cows — and the people who raise them. “A bridge has to be built between the producer and the consumer,” Hayden said. Hayden, 29, and his wife, Danielle Hayden, 27, recently came up with a first-in-the-nation idea to close that gap. Hayden Farms built a consumer viewing room and education center at its new Whitesville poultry operation.  Hayden manages Hayden Farms, which has been a Perdue Foods producer for 20 years. The family operation, which includes his parents, Martin and Joan Hayden, has four poultry barns in Knottsville that contain nearly 100,000 chicks. But Hayden Farms more than doubled its poultry production this year by recently building four new barns in Whitesville.

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40-foot-by-50-foot education center. “The poultry industry has never done anything like this,” Hayden said. It’s a proactive idea to stamp out consumer doubt. Daniel Hayden is quick to credit his wife with the idea.  She earned a degree in agriculture communication and economy from Oklahoma State University.  In 2015, Oklahoma ranked second nationwide for cattle production, so Danielle Hayden was familiar with that industr y, which takes a more proactive approach to public relations.  “I had a lot of preconceived notions about poultry production,” she said. But once she became involved with Hayden Farms, she realized most of her perceptions stemmed from a lack of knowledge about the industry.   “If the rest of the world could see it in person, then they would see this is not this bad big thing hidden in barns,” Danielle Hayden said. That’s when her education in communications took over.  When the family decided to expand in Whitesville, she presented her public relations idea — build a viewing area

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A bridge has to be built between the producer and the consumer.

— Daniel Hayden

and education center. When groups visit, they see into the center of the barn, where Daniel Hayden is outfitted with a mic. He explains the methods used and takes questions from the audience. The Haydens’ target audience is dietitians, bloggers and moms, for starters.  Perdue of ficials applaud Hayden Farms’ innovative approach. “We support the Haydens’ willingness to share the story of how our chickens are raised and have helped with the project,” said Mike Levengood, Perdue’s chief animal care officer and farm family advocate. “Our company’s commitment to accelerate our advancements in animal care includes being more transparent, and we can’t do that without farmers such as Daniel and Danielle, who are willing to share with others their passion for raising healthy chickens.” G R E A T E R

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Better together Faith groups build bridges through ecumenical worship, interfaith ministry WRITTEN BY ANGELA OLIVER There’s no one way to tell Owensboro’s faith story. Perhaps it begins with locals forming mainline Protestant churches on the banks of the Ohio River in the 19th century. From those grew various congregations in every corner of town, making Evangelical Protestants the city’s largest religious group. Maybe it was a journey of five Ursuline Sisters, who traveled from Louisville by flatboat in 1874 to establish a Catholic school in western Daviess County. Later years transformed the small academy into Brescia University, and the sisters have reached thousands since. Or, it could’ve been German immigrants, who established Temple Adath Israel, the longest-standing Kentucky synagogue and secondoldest Jewish congregation in the state. While that congregation has dwindled, the stories within the aging walls of the Temple Adath live on. No matter its start, the local tapestry of faith is woven together by many beliefs, many people and many spirits.  Some religious groups in particular work to highlight and celebrate all faiths, pushing the community toward ecumenical worship, godly love and brotherly understanding.

THE DIOCESE OF OWENSBORO

Since the beginning of The Diocese of Owensboro in 1937, the Diocese has grown from 33 parishes and 19 missions of western Kentucky to 78 parishes and two Newman Centers. Church attendance rates in the Diocese of Owensboro are among the highest in the nation, with an average of 60 percent of registered members attending Mass on a typical Sunday. The Diocese of Owensboro supports 18 Catholic schools (which includes three high schools and a university), a hospital, one retirement home, one personal care home, and several religious orders. The Diocese benefits from an abundance of ministries and opportunities for Catholic education and faith formation. These opportunities include Brescia University credit-bearing classes, small group faith sharing, and retreats for young and old.

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The Most Reverend William Francis Medley was appointed to serve as the fourth Bishop of the Diocese of Owensboro on Dec. 15, 2009. Bishop Medley was ordained to the episcopacy on Feb. 10, 2010.

OWENSBORO-DAVIESS COUNTY MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION

With its focus on interfaith ministry and collaboration, the Owensboro-Daviess County Ministerial Association has reached across the community in many ways. After a lengthy study of other associations nationwide, the local group voted in 2011 to amend its bylaws to become interfaith. The Rev. Randy Jones, association president and pastor at Woodlawn Methodist Church, said he’s always been open to interfaith collaboration. But the ideal was further strengthened by developing relationships with local faith groups who aren’t Christian, said Jones, who moved to Owensboro more than five years ago from Louisville. The association is open to leaders of any church, mosque, synagogue, temple or the like, as well as religious and spiritual organizations. Small dues are paid annually, and the members meet each month to pray, share ideas and hear from guest speakers whose missions align with the association’s community outreach.  Educating the public about various faiths and cultures, fostering friendships across religious lines and promoting services that help the economically disadvantaged are among the ministerial association’s priorities. 

ISLAMIC CENTER OF OWENSBORO

On Daviess County’s east side, a unique house of worship sits quietly off of a busy road. Its slanted worship room, covered in ornate red and gold carpet, faces the northeast, toward Mecca, the birthplace of the Prophet Muhammad and thus, the heart of the Islamic world.  More than 100 members gather there for prayers each Friday afternoon, greeting each other in peace, and at other times for holy feasts and celebrations. The local Muslim community established the Islamic Center of Owensboro with about 10 families in 2003 at a small Moseley Street loca-

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tion and moved to its current home, 3131 Alvey Park Drive West, a few years later. Having a place of worship creates a way for fellow Muslims to bond and get to know each other. That’s especially important given the range of countries from which some of the ICO members hail: Palestine, Syria, Tunisia, Morocco, Pakistan, India, Jordan, Sri Lanka, Egypt, South Africa, Indonesia, Burma, Somali and the U.S. One of the ICO’s chief outreach efforts is promoting the correct understanding of Islam to its neighbors. They do so through open houses, tours of the mosque and having various ICO leaders participate in community events. The ICO is also generous in its support of organizations like the Owensboro Human Relations Commission. Overall, its aim remains being a tool of peace and brotherly love.

UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST CONGREGATION OF OWENSBORO

While worship and reverence to God are central to many faiths, putting that reverence in action — honoring God through taking care of the people — is also central to the philosophy of many local faith groups like the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Owensboro. The UU church’s social arm has driven various programs, theatrical events and a minigrant, all tackling issues like sexual assault, global torture, hunger, illiteracy, sustainability, homelessness and more. Trying to find solutions to the problems is easier when many perspectives are represented, according to the Rev. Claudia Ramisch, pastor of the UU church at 1221 Cedar St. Thus, interfaith ministry is also a major focus. “Our mission is to be faithfully interfaith,” said Ramisch, an Ohio native who has been in Owensboro since 1991 and at the helm of her congregation since 2008. “This means that we are an interfaith congregation with people of many faiths and theologies all in the room together every week.” The work isn’t easy. But the Owensboro religious community is robust, she said.  “We truly have great diversity blossoming in our community; it’s very exciting that world religions are also Owensboro religions,” she said.  2 0 1 8


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WRITTEN BY JIM MAYSE PHOTO BY ALAN WARREN Jason and Katie Ebelhar have been running The Ozone Laser Tag, 533 Triplett St., for almost 10 years. But the business still remains something of a well-kept secret. “We get that ever y weekend, ‘We didn’t know you guys existed,’ ” Jason Ebelhar said.  The Ozone Laser Tag will celebrate 10 years in business in March. Jason Ebelhar said the business, which is open Tuesday through Sunday, draws fans of the game from across the region, and even from cities that have laser tag facilities. The idea for The Ozone came from a friend with whom Jason Ebelhar had ser ved in the U.S. Navy started a laser tag business. The Ebelhar’s spent about $75,000 on equipment and eventually settled on the Triplett Street location, which gave them 4,000 square feet of playing area. The playing area is lit with black lights and fluorescent paint. A haze machine helps illuminate the “lasers,” which are really just lights. The laser itself is not dangerous, Jason Ebelhar said. It’s about the same as having a flashlight shined in your eyes.  ‘It’s a class 2 laser,” he said. “It’s totally safe.” While there are different variations of the game, the goal is the same — to take out opponents by shooting the sensors on their vests. Unlike other laser tag facilities, a person who is shot is only out of the game for a few moments before being able to rejoin the action.  “Brescia (University) does student activity events here,” Katie Ebelhar said. “A couple of elementary schools come here sometimes, as a reward.” Businesses even hold special team building exercises at the facility from time to time. “That’s one of the things I like about our laser tag facility, it’s fun for ever ybody from 3 to 93 (years old),” Jason Ebelhar said.  The Ozone is ADA compliant, so anyone can play, he said. While the business advertises through various outlets, it gets a lot of patrons simply through word of mouth, Jason Ebelhar said.  “We still, at least weekly, get a phone call that says, ‘Johnny’s friend had a birthday party there, and now Johnny wants his bir thday party there, too,’ ” he said.  Parents who bring their children can watch the action, but often end up playing themselves. “When you take your kid to see a Disney movie, you enjoy being with your kid, but you don’t enjoy the movie,” Katie Ebelhar said. “But here, your kid is having a blast, and so are you.” “It’s like a live video game,” Jason Ebelhar said.

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In Owensboro, being active and staying healthy means more than just hitting the gym. With so many athletic complexes and health facilities, there is something for everyone. Yoga, Pure Barre, running groups, bike shops and more can be found throughout the area. In this section, you’ll find just a glimpse of what Owensboro has to offer in health care and education. Three physicians talk about what drew them to the Bluegrass State and why they’ve chosen to stay. Business leaders explain why they’re getting involved with students and their career plans.  Our award-winning educational systems range from pre-kindergarten to post-secondary. Whether you’re wanting to educate your children or yourself, there are possibilities available to everyone. Learn about all of the health and education opportunities in Owensboro or visit our award-winning facilities to learn even more. PHOTO BY EVAN BOGGS


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OWENSBORO HAS ‘HOMETOWN FEEL’ FOR APOLLO HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

B A L A N C E

“And I keep on talking about the people WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE SALMONS teaching at Apollo High School, where he now of Apollo, but the people of Owensboro are teaches 11thand 12th-grade English, serves PHOTO BY ALAN WARREN For first-year teacher Nate Stemle, Owensboro has become home. Stemle, 23, originally hails from New Albany, Indiana, just across the Ohio River from Louisville. He attended Kentucky Wesleyan College, where he played baseball and went through the school’s education program. “That’s the main reason why I came to Owensboro, so I could go to KWC,” Stemle said. It was a good fit, too, he said, because it was “far enough away to be, like, away for college,” but the 1.5-hour drive was close enough he could return home if he needed to. But after graduating in Spring 2017, Stemle stayed. The first-year teacher did his student

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as head golf coach and will also help with the baseball program. “I student-taught during my senior season of baseball, so that was just insanely packed,” he said with a small chuckle. “I figured if I could do that, I can do anything. But I also coach golf here, and I’m going to help out with baseball, so it kind of gave me a trial run on how to balance two things — sports and school.” Stemle said he wanted to stay in Owensboro because of Apollo and the people there.  “That’s just kind of the thing that’s been amazing for me at Apollo, just the people,” he said. “ ... The people from the front office, down to all my students, they’re all pretty amazing.” Owensboro, he said, has “such a hometown feel” and reminds him of home.

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really great too. Every single time my family comes down, they’re shocked at how warm and embracing and welcoming ever yone is. Ever yone’s so kind — all that southern hospitality. And there’s great food here — great food in Owensboro. I love barbecue, and I love Fetta Pizza.” For Stemle, teaching is a family trade. He said both of his parents are teachers and his grandfather was a principal. “It’s essentially kind of the family business,” he said. “But just the idea of coming here every day and having a relationship with my students and getting to help them grow as learners and people, it’s just what I like to do.”  When people in the hall ask how it’s going, Stemle said he jokingly replies “living the dream,” but “I really do feel like I’m living the dream whenever I’m doing my job.”

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SCHOOLS DAVIESS COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS

1622 Southeastern Parkway Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: 270-852-7000

OWENSBORO CATHOLIC SCHOOLS 1524 West Parrish Ave. Owensboro, KY 42301 Phone: 270-686-8896

OWENSBORO PUBLIC SCHOOLS 450 Griffith Ave. Owensboro, KY 42301 Phone: 270-686-1000

OWENSBORO INNOVATION ACADEMY 1010 Allen St. Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: 270-686-1085

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COLLEGES OWENSBORO COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE 4800 New Hartford Road Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: 270-686-4400

WRITTEN BY moral presence in the community and maintain MEGHANN RICHARDSON a commitment to identify and meet the educaPHOTO BY ALAN WARREN tional needs of others. Owensboro is unique in the fact that it has two four-year, faith-based colleges. Not only are the schools huge draws for students, but when the graduating classes often stay in Owensboro for post-college life, the workforce benefits too.

BRESCIA UNIVERSITY 717 Frederica St. Owensboro, KY 42301 Phone: 1-877-BRESCIA

Brescia’s mission has steadfastly remained student-centered. Students provide service within the community, demonstrate character-driven athleticism and offer the Owensboro community a sense of optimism for the future. “The people of Brescia University are its greatest asset,” said Kayla Altman, director of public relations and marketing at Brescia. “Brescia alumni are making a difference every day right here in Owensboro, across the commonwealth, the United States and beyond. Brescia faculty and staff are leaders in the Owensboro community by serving on boards, being in churches, providing educational opportunities and diverse perspectives on topics of interest, and by sharing art, culture, literature and much more. Altman said Brescia and the people who comprise its campus seek to serve as a just and

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For Brescia University, being faith-based means being rooted in the Catholic Church and embracing the Ursuline teaching tradition, while at the same time embracing individuals from all walks of life and faith traditions. “That translates into what is known as the four tenants of Brescia Difference — Respect for the Sacred, Devotion to Learning, Commitment Growth in Virtue and Promotion of Ser vant Leadership,” Altman said. “As such, Brescia treats all students as individuals to whom the university is responsible to uphold its promise to educate. Students are not a number or name on a roster at Brescia University, but a child of God.” Brescia University is a family with a strong sense of home and community permeating every facet of the campus.

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE 3000 Frederica St. Owensboro, KY 42301 Phone: 800-999-0592

Owensboro Community & Technical College is a public, two-year, open admissions college accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges and is one of the 16 colleges that make up the Kentucky Community & Technical College System. The OCTC Workforce Solutions division provides training for the region and sets the pace for the nation. Workforce Solutions is currently working with the Gates Foundation sponsored Jobs for the Future and PBS station WGBH-Boston to create work-based learning activities in industry that will be disseminated on a national level.

WKU OWENSBORO 4821 New Hartford Road Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: 270-684-9797

WKU Owensboro is a regional campus of Western Kentucky University offering public post-secondary education. The school offers students an affordable and convenient way to earn a degree close to home. The campus is a one-stop shop and studentfocused to help students start and finish their degree. Since most of the students at WKU Owensboro are the first in their family to attend college, its faculty and staff are committed to connecting students to the resources necessary to help them succeed in the classroom, on the job and in life.

Kentucky Wesleyan College is a private Methodist college in Owensboro. With 29 majors and 13 pre-professional curriculums, they offer almost anything a student could want. President Bar t Darrell said prospective students can take a look at those who have

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graduated from KWC to see the greatness that has come from the small school. The senior vice president of human resources for The Coca-Cola (Japan) Company in Tokyo, a former justice of the United State Supreme Court, countless coaches, professors and executives all hail from KWC. “It’s pretty amazing,” Darrell said. “The proof is there. The rankings, the graduates, all that shows how good of a school we are.” Year after year, KWC receives accolades such as top 10 regional college in south, No. 3 for value and desire. “Those kinds of things don’t happen unless you’re good,” Darrell said. Darrell said KWC offers so much culture and

economic value to the community. With athletics, diversity and the leadership from faculty and students to be involved with the community, Darrell said the college and its students and faculty “bring a lot to the table.” KWC provides diversity for the community and the region. Darrel said the school also provides a positive economic impact and education. “Owensboro is a pretty special place,” Darrell said. “We have the benefits of a larger city, but not all the traffic. It doesn’t take an hour and a half to get across town. What has happened in this community in the last five to six years has been amazing.” If you’re looking to further your education, look no further than Owensboro.

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OIA on cutting edge

of

education WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE PHOTO BY GREG EANS The Owensboro Innovation Academy has changed the way Jonathan Brown learns. The 16-year-old junior has been attending the school, which has been referred to as a 21st-century trade school, since its opening day in 2015. He now views education in a new light. “Middle school was just a lot of note-taking, standardized testing and things like that,” he said. “Here, we have more of an open feel, and we get more freedom to learn. We get more time to learn.” The high school is unique in that it’s not just a school for Owensboro residents, as students from Owensboro Public Schools, Daviess County Public Schools and Hancock County Schools are enrolled. The school follows a project-based model that’s been likened to a public charter school focusing on the pathways of informational technology, engineering technology and biomedicine.  The school is part of the New Tech Network, an 18-year-old network based in Napa, California, with 190 schools in 27 states and Australia. It was the first in the commonwealth to be selected as part of the network.  It’s a standalone school with 239 students enrolled and is projected to grow to at least 400 students by next year.  The school also partnered with Brescia University so that students could take dual-credit courses and potentially graduate high school with associate’s degrees.  Beth Benjamin, the school’s director, likes to think the OIA has found a niche for students who want a different approach to education. While traditional schools in the area are wonderful, she said, there was a need for another option. “We wanted to base our pathways around needs in the community,” she said. “We wanted to provide students with the opportunity to

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learn about a skill or trade or take these skills to college.” Like most schools in the country, the OIA focuses on making students college- and career-ready. But one thing that sets them apart is the projects in classes are often connected with the community in some way. No matter the project, someone from an organization with ties to it will come in and talk with students. That means what Benjamin is hearing less frequently from students is “Why do I need to learn this?” “It gets that information right in front of

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them,” she said. Also, students are learning that failure shouldn’t be avoided at all costs because it’s not only part of life, but part of the learning experience. “Sometimes you’re biggest learning experience comes from failures,” she said.  She said the students know they’re on the cutting edge of education, and it’s not uncommon to walk into a classroom and see students sometimes taking the lead on certain lessons.  Students are constantly pushed out of their comfort zone, in a good way, and they learn to be OK with that.

www.owensboro.kyschools.us

450 Griffith Ave., Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 686-1000 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

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GO FAME Speculating on what the future holds can be tough for everyone. For high school students, the question of continuing their education or entering the workforce can be frightening. Meanwhile, industry leaders are wondering how to fill jobs requiring advanced technical skills. One educational program in Owensboro is making those questions a little easier. GO FAME, the Greater Owensboro Chapter of the Kentucky Federation for Advanced Manufacturing Education, pairs students from Owensboro Community & Technical College with partnering businesses to learn complementary skills and have part of the cost their education sponsored by the employer. Frank Anderson, current president of GO FAME and president of Sun Windows, said the program is adding opportunities for the community as well as local manufacturers. “It’s really been a win-win situation all around,” Anderson said. “The community is getting better-educated people that earn more, OCTC is getting students encouraged to maintain enrollment, and employers are getting highly-skilled works.” Enrolled students attend college at OCTC two days a week while working three days a week at a sponsoring company, earning an Associate in Applied Science degree in about five semesters. Sponsoring companies help pay for books and contribute to a student’s tuition, allowing some applicants to graduate debt free. Justin Johnson joined Sun Windows in the fall of 2017 and is pursuing an industrial maintenance certificate with his associate degree. Johnson said he had never used power tools or performed technical work before the program, but was being exposed to new opportunities. “I’ve learned if you’re interested in something, you can immerse yourself and accomplish things you never thought you could,” Johnson said. “That’s why I got into this program. It’s made it easier to come to class and work, knowing I can head in whatever direction I want.” The sponsoring members of GO FAME are Castlen Steel, Domtar, Hunter Douglas, Kentron Manufacturing, Kimberly Clark, Metalsa, National Office Furniture, Omico Plastics, Precision Roll Grinders, Sun Windows, The Hines Group, Toyotetsu Mid America (TTMA), and WPT Nonwovens.

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connecting learning and the workforce

WRITTEN BY JACOB DICK

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Breadth of Care WRITTEN BY JACOB DICK PHOTOS BY ALAN WARREN AND GREG EANS L i k e a n y t h r i v i n g c i t y, Owensboro is made up of residents from diverse backgrounds in a variety of stages of life. The city is home to college students, seniors, professionals, farmers, manufacturers and artists. There are people who have been here for generations and people who have made Owensboro their first home in the United States. A population with so many dif fering concer ns needs a health-care community equally diverse. We all have dif ferent approaches that work best for us, whether it’s a straightfor ward physician that can tell us what we need to hear or a comforting caregiver to walk us through a diagnosis. Sometimes our needs can shift as we age, star t families or try to make a change in ourselves. Whatever the situation may be, Owensboro has a bevy of medical professionals with ideas and temperaments as varied as the patients they ser ve. Some are bright young professionals blazing a path toward better care for their patients. Others are practiced physicians dedicated to perfecting their approach. Their experience, backgrounds and specialties may differ, but they share a commitment for their community. Meet three of Owensboro’s own health-care professionals representing the breadth and quality of care available.

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DR. KHAHN NGUYEN: ONE HEALTH Dr. Khahn Nguyen is the Primar y Care medical director more than 20 providers for Owensboro Health and medical director for the Owensboro Health Healthpark. Nguyen is also a participating representative for the local Accountable Care Organization, the Health Network of Western Kentucky, which provides care and aid for Medicare patients. He lends guidance and leadership to his colleagues, but if you ask him, he’s just a physician. Despite his active role in the medical community, Nguyen sees patients just like any other primar y care physician and said he wouldn’t have it any other way. “It may sound like a cliche, but I really got into this because I wanted to help others,” Nguyen said. Nguyen and his family came to the United States from Vietnam when he was 4 and lived in Portland, Oregon. When he was a young man, he joined the United States Navy, in which he rose to the rank of lieutenant commander and served as G R E A T E R

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a flight surgeon for the United States Marine Corp. After an internship at Naval Aerospace Medical Institute and a residency at Southwest Medical Center, Nguyen practiced in large cities. “I had grown up and practiced in cities, but I always felt I could make a larger impact in smaller communities,” Nguyen said. “I didn’t realize how welcome this community would be in return.” When he first came to Owensboro, Nguyen was surprised by how accepting patients were. He assumed people were being cordial until he learned that when patients insisted he come to dinner, it was a request and a compliment. Nguyen said the patients he sees are intuitive and warm, so he always tries to be transparent with them about their needs. “You want to make sure people feel like they are being listened to, but I have to be upfront with them,” Nguyen said. “These recommendation aren’t going to benefit me, they are for the health of the patient.” 2 0 1 8


DR. ANDREA MOORE: WOMEN’S PAVILION

Dr. Andrea Moore takes the concer ns of her patients seriously. So much, in fact, that she decided to learn more about a subject troubling her patients so she could give authoritative advice. Moore is the cur rent president of the Women’s Pavilion and practices obstetrics and gynecology. Women in her care rely on her for basic surgery and primary-care needs. A few years ago, Moore noticed she was receiving a lot of questions she couldn’t answer. She said most of her patients were frequently asking about weight loss or nutrition, but she wasn’t sure of the answers, so she decided to learn. “I was seeing issues with hormones and insulin or women asking for weight control, but I didn’t have anything they could use that I knew would work for them,” Moore said. Moore now specializes in obesity medicine and studies the most ef fective and healthy ways women can maintain their weight as their lives change. Her newest specialty is just another example of the approach to patient care Moore has brought to her practice since joining Women’s Pavilion in 2002. Moore said she was fortunate to come into a practice with people she trusted and from whom she could learn, but was even luckier to find a community she enjoyed.

“You can’t stay anywhere you don’t want to stay,” Moore said. “I really feel like I know this place, and I love the people.” Moore earned a degree in biochemistr y from Tulane University before earning her medical degree from the University of Louisville. She completed her residency at the Medical College of Georgia at the University of Augusta and is a fellow and member of medi-

cal associations across the state and nation. Moore said doctors in women’s health can have a change of interest as they go forward in their careers, sometimes shifting to academic research or medicine. For Moore, being with her patients is where she wants to be for now. “I have much more interest in the people than in the lab,” Moore said.

DR. ROSHAN MATHEW: ADVANCED CARDIOLOGY Dr. Roshan Mathew has had the opportunity to see Owensboro grow along with his practice. Mathew arrived in the city to join Green River Heart Institute in 2005 after a residency at Jack D. Weiler Hospital of the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. Mathew said he was drawn to the community based on the recommendation of his colleagues. “I was told it was a warm community and a nice place to raise a family,” Mathew said. “It seemed like a good change of pace.” When he first started practicing in Owensboro, Mathew thought he might not have enough business in a small city. Soon after, he said his fears were dispelled. Now more than half of his patients are from Owensboro while the rest are from surrounding counties. Mathew became the executive director of cardiac services for Owensboro Health in 2011 before leaving to start his own practice, Advanced Cardiology of Owensboro, in 2016. He said the move helped him make changes, like integrating technology and spending quality time with patients that keeps his love for medicine alive. Without that passion, Mathew said he would have to move on. “It isn’t always easy, but I love what I do,” Mathew said. “I don’t think about it as a job. I spend time doing what I love.” Mathew starts his days with early morning rounds at the hospital. He then sees patients during the day, reviews records for the next day’s appointments and finishes with late-evening rounds. He said time management is important for him and his family, but his love for cardiology helps keep him going. “There isn’t a single field of medicine where you can follow a patient from the beginning of their treatment to the end like cardiology,” Mathew said. “I get to help people through their heart failure into long-term care.” G R E A T E R

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TAKE A

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The 15-mile long Adkisson Greenbelt Park is designed to encircle the city linking neighborhoods, business districts, parks and schools. The trails that make up the Greenbelt Park offer a 10-foot wide asphalt surface that will easily accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists and meets the American with Disabilities Act standards. Whether you enjoy walking, running, skating or bicycling for recreation or to reach a destination, the Adkisson Greenbelt Park is an enjoyable and healthy place to be. To access the Greenbelt, there are designated parking areas at the GRADD offices on East 60, the trailhead at the end of Higdon Road, Higdon Yewell-Heritage Park in Hillbrooke subdivision and the trailhead on Miller’s Mill Road. Jack C Fischer Park, Kroger Starlite, Shifley Park and the Dairy Queen on U.S. 231 are also good places to park if you’re just wanting to use a section of the trail. G R E A T E R

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WRITTEN BY JACOB DICK PHOTO BY ALAN WARREN

EdgeFit Sports and Fitness is a full-service gym with equipment for both beginners and advanced athletes at 4036 Frederica St. It’s also a business dedicated to being a healthy home to the people of Owensboro. Tonya Warner, manager of the gym, said staff work to create a learning environment where people can G R E A T E R

be themselves. “When Dustin (Edge) created the gym, he wanted it to be something that was a part of the community,” Warner said. “He wanted it to be a place where people get fit, have fun and can give back.” EdgeFit is a part of a three-gym network including Edge Body Boot Camp and Iron Edge Gym, both geared toward more intensive exercise. Each independent location specializes in different approaches to fitness but adheres to a commitment to Owensboro, hometown of founder Dustin Edge. In the middle of EdgeFit, a wall facing the cardio machines outlines the cause sponsored by the gym for the next six weeks and lists the hashtags patrons can post when they check in on social media. A donation is made for the cause with every check-in the gym receives. EdgeFit also encourages members to suggest their own initiatives in which the gym could participate. Warner said the gym is in the process of starting activities such as races or charitable challenges that connects members and staff with the community for a good cause. EdgeFit offers cardio machines, weightlifting equipment, hydrotherapy and tanning among its varied services. Warner said the most important thing staff strive to offer is a connected and comfortable environment. “We try to talk to everyone that comes in the door and get to know them,” Warner said. “Here, everyone is equal, and everyone is family.”

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Find us On


From performing arts to food festivals, there are entertainment offerings for everyone in Owensboro. Art, music, dance and food events showcase the culture and diversity of the city while relating to everyone — local residents and visitors. In this section, you’ll learn about the growth of bluegrass music in the community, along with the construction of the International Bluegrass Music Center, how an earlyevening event has become a community staple after 20-plus years, how art and dance have transformed the downtown scene and a comprehensive list of all the annual festivals and events in Owensboro. Our hope is while you’re in Owensboro, whether it’s for a visit or for life, you’ll embrace our culture and celebrate it with us. PHOTO BY GREG EANS


Culture


Festivals in Owensboro May 2018

Blue Bridge Music Festival

101 Daviess St. • 270-687-2770 Regional student music ensembles will perform in Cannon Hall at the RiverPark Center.

International Bar-B-Q Festival

www.bbqfest.com On the second weekend in May, the Owensboro riverfront is a center of activity when local cooking teams gather to compete with their secret recipes for barbecue. There is also musical entertainment, children’s activities, a car show, carnival rides, arts and crafts sales and more.

Friday After 5

fridayafter5.com Friday After 5 is a summer-long series of free outdoor concerts held every Friday on the downtown riverfront beginning May 19. Friday After 5 was named one of the “Top 10 Summer Festivals” in Kentucky. The festival includes live bands, family events, food and entertainment and a “Toast to the Sunset” at each Friday After 5.

June 2018 ROMP: Bluegrass Roots & Branches Festival

5710 Kentucky 144 • 270-926-7891 • www.RompFest.com The 15th Annual River of Music Party features four days of music, with most concerts held at Yellow Creek Park. Past performers include John Prine, The Punch Brothers, Steve Martin, LeAnn Womack, 23 String Band and Sam Bush.

Dazzling Daylilies

25 Carter Road • 270-852-8925 • www.wkbg.org A festival presented by the Western Kentucky Botanical Garden, this event features hot air “Balloons Over the Garden,” a Walk and Talk, plant sale and more.

July 2018 Daviess County Lions Club Fair

6191 Kentucky 54, Philpot • www.daviesscountyfair.com The Daviess County Lions Club Fair is held annually at the Daviess County Fairgrounds. There will be tractor pulls, rides, food and more.

Freedom Festival Fireworks Spectacular

An incredible display of fireworks in downtown Owensboro celebrating Independence Day.

August 2018 Big O Music Fest

4812 Kentucky 144 • www.bigomusicfest.com The Big O Music Fest is held each year at Reid’s Orchard. Past performers include Dierks Bentley, Travis Tritt, Jason Aldean and Billy Currington.

Owensboro Multicultural Festival

1328 Griffith Ave. • 270-684-1467 Hosted by First Presbyterian Church, this annual event is a celebration of cultures that educates the public through dance, music, arts and more.

September 2018 East Bridge Art & Music Festival

199 W. Veterans Blvd. • 270-684-3570 Studio Slant hosts the annual East Bridge Arts and Music Festival in Smothers Park. The festival will begin during the last Friday After 5 of the year.

Dragon Boat Festival

Thousands come to English Park to watch the dragon boat competition on the Ohio River.

October 2018 Owensboro Air Show

www.owensboroairshow.com An aircraft display and aerial demonstrations are at the Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport, 2200 Airport Road. The air show is on the Owensboro riverfront. Event is held late September or early October.

Reid’s Orchard Apple Festival

4812 Kentucky 144 • 270-685-2444 • www.reidorchard.com Reid’s Orchard has been celebrating apples and the fall season for more than two decades. Visitors can sample a variety of apple-themed treats, and there are many family activities.


PHOTO BY EVAN BOGGS

monsters on the ohio

English Park boat dock • www. monstersontheohio.com The premiere catfishing tournament in the country since 2010, in beautiful Owensboro, Kentucky. The Monsters on the Ohio tournament is a team event, it holds the opportunity for catfish anglers from across the country to compete against the best, of the best for cash and prizes.

PHOTO BY GREG EANS

Boo Fest

7301 Hobbs Road • 270-229-4900 Diamond Lake Resort’s annual Boo Fest is the last three weekends in October. Activities include hayrides, pumpkin painting, crafts, games and lots of candy.

November 2018 82nd Annual Owensboro-Daviess County Christmas Parade

www.ChristmasParade.net This is the largest Christmas parade in Kentucky and the tri-state area. Bands, lighted floats and Santa Claus will entertain all ages starting at 4:30 p.m. in downtown Owensboro. G R E A T E R

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WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

There is a reason Theatre Workshop of Owensboro is known as the longest running show in town.  For more than 60 years, Owensboro’s premiere theater company has been performing several productions a year, including those done with area children and school groups. In 2011, the group purchased what is now known as the Empress Theatre and since then, its board of directors and staff members have been devoted to preserving more than the art of theater in Owensboro.  Running an operation out of a historic theater isn’t new to the theater company, said Todd Reynolds, TWO’s executive director. The Trinity Centre, at 407 West Fifth St., has been a permanent home for TWO since the early 1970s. Built in 1875, the building is one of the oldest area examples of Gothic architecture, Reynolds said.  “We were already acclimated to historical buildings,” Reynolds said. “When we had a chance to get another iconic building downtown, we took it.” He said a lot of people have been entertained in the Empress Theatre building, at 418 Frederica St., which was built in 1912 and was the Empress and Malco movie theaters and then home to Goldie’s Best Little Opryhouse for several years.

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For the past few years, TWO has been renovating the facility with grant funds and donations from sponsors and local individuals. The series of makeovers included roof work, boiler and air-conditioning work and the replacement of the old curtains that hung inside. The well-known cream color of the facade has been restored back to its original red brick. And then began the process of “tuck pointing,” which Reynolds said is the process of repairing mortar joints. Work was also done to the marquee, with paint reapplied, broken and cracked spaces replaced and the neon and florescent lights replaced with LED. The display windows out front have been replaced, new seating was installed and TWO did a complete overhaul of the bathrooms. The group also worked on building a new green room and bathrooms in the back of the theater for those participating in productions.  All of this, Reynolds said, is just part of the responsibility of being owners of a historic building. And TWO’s board of directors, he said, feel it’s something owed to the residents of Owensboro. “A lot of people made some good memories in the building,” he said. “We felt it was important to take good care of it.” TWO performs six or more plays a year. In 2018, the group will produce “12 Angry Men” at the Empress. It’s the story of one man in a jury who is trying to prevent a miscarriage of justice by having his colleagues reconsider the evidence. Performance dates are Feb. 23-24 and March 2-4.  Rounding out the season will be “The (Female) Odd Couple” at the Trinity Centre. This show is modeled after Neil Simon’s “The Odd Couple,” only with ladies. Audition dates are Feb. 18-19 and performances are April 13-15 and 20-22. All performances are at 7:30 p.m. except Sunday matinees. For more information about TWO, visit www.theatre workshop.org.   O W E N S B O R O

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FA S T F A C T S A B O U T

T W O • The Empress was built in 1912 and was previously the Malco movie theater and Goldie’s Best Little Opryhouse.

• The Trinity Centre, built in 1875, is one of the oldest examples of Gothic architecture in the commonwealth. • TWO’s tagline, “The longest running show in town,” is actually true! It’s been around since 1955. • TWO holds children’s theater performances several times a year and teams up with area high schools to perform at least one production yearly. TWO also hosts camps and clubs during school breaks.


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TOP MAN PREPS FOR

‘EPIC’ SEASON

Quinn strives to appeal to wide audiences WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE of thrilling and exciting performances Quinn’s words, epic. “Cosmic ConverPHOTO BY ALAN WARREN together and making music in the Blue- gence” will wrap up the season April 21

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Troy Quinn has big plans for the Owensboro Symphony Orchestra. Quinn, the symphony’s new music director and conductor, says he strives to create shows that will appeal to a wide audience and be popular for both musicians and the community, and the 2017-18 season promises to deliver just that.  Quinn, of Los Angeles, was named to the symphony’s top spot in May 2017, and he’s excited for his first season with the orchestra. He’s also the music director and conductor of the Juneau Symphony in Juneau, Alaska, and music director and conductor of the Ocean State Symphony in Newpor t, Rhode Island. He received his bachelor of fine art in music from Providence College, master’s in music at Manhattan School of Music and his doctorate in conducting at the University of Southern California, Thornton School of Music. “I am looking forward to many years G R E A T E R

grass State,” he said. Kicking off 2018 will be the Jan. 18 performance of “Shakespeare In Love,” which is a show based on William Shakespeare’s writings. “There are a lot of classical composers that wrote pieces inspired by Shakespeare’s epic literary writings,” Quinn said. Tchaikovsky’s “Romeo and Juliet Fantasy Overture” and Stephen Warbeck’s “Shakespeare in Love” are among the pieces the orchestra will perform. Quinn’s most anticipated concer t of the season, he said, is the March 3 show “The Music of John Williams,” which will pay a special tribute to the film composer. Music from the Harr y Potter films, “Jurassic Park” and “ET” will be performed along with some of Williams’ lesser-known pieces, such as those from “Angela’s Ashes” and “Far and Away,” Quinn said. The season finale is very much, in O W E N S B O R O

with an outer-space adventure that will “engage through a full-sensory concert experience accompanied by high-definition video and celestial images taken by NASA,” according to a show description provided by the OSO. This program will not only include music from “Star Trek” but also Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s “Jupiter” and Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Audience members will have the opportunity to listen to “The Planets” while viewing images of the solar system on a screen set up behind the performers. There will also be an interdisciplinary laser show, Quinn said. All in all, Quinn is excited to bring something new to the already vibrant arts community in Owensboro, he said. For more information about the OSO or the purchase tickets, visit its website www.theoso.com or contact the RiverPark Center, where the symphony orchestra performs, at 270-687-2787 or www.riverparkcenter.org.  

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Kimberly-Clark Corporation is proud to be a part of the Owensboro Community Kimberly-Clark and its well-known global brands are an indispensable part of life for people in more than 175 countries. Every day, nearly a quarter of the world’s population trust K-C’s brands and the solutions they provide to enhance their health, hygiene and well-being. With trusted brands such as Kleenex, Scott, Huggies, Pull-Ups, Kotex, and Depend, Kimberly-Clark holds the No. 1 or No. 2 share position in 80 countries.


Downtown Art Take a stroll through downtown Owensboro and you’re sure to see some of the wonderful pieces of art that are spread across the city. From sculptures to murals, the artwork displayed gives you a glimpse of life in our town.

local pieces CELEBRATION (above)

Sculptor: Gary Alsum - 2015 Location: Island on Daviess at Veterans Blvd near the RiverPark Center Sponsor: Dr. & Mrs. Wathen Medley, Jr. and Dr. and Mrs. Bill Jansing This life-size bronze depicts a young girl expressing the movement of dance.

OBERON (left)

Sculptor: Don Lawler - 2015 Location: Riverwalk Sponsor: Marilyn and William Young Charitable Foundation This giant stone head is a whimsical depiction of the “King of the Fairies,” a Shakespearean character from the play “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and was carved from a single block of Indiana Limestone.

WHITE DEER OF AUTUMN (far left)

Sculptor: Denny Haskew - 2016 Location: Riverwalk Sponsor: Marilyn and William Young Charitable Foundation This life-size bronze sculpture depicts a young Native American woman expressing the ideology of concerns for the environment.

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The dramatic growth and development of the Owensboro Museum of Fine Art in its first 40 years has enhanced Owensboro’s quality of life by its contributions to education, economic development and cultural tourism. In just four decades, it has become recognized as a regional center for the visual arts, and its programming offers excellence in arts and culture of a quality not usually found outside major urban centers. The generosity of Owensboro’s corporate, private and public sectors has enabled it to become the second largest art museum in Kentucky and a premiere educational resource for western Kentucky. One of Owensboro’s oldest holiday traditions, the holiday forest festival of trees, opens every November at the Owensboro Museum of Fine Art. The forest of trees features 20 Christmas trees and special decorations designed and created by local artists, florists and organizations. With the continued support of local corporations, philanthropic families and elected officials, the museum will continue building a legacy for future generations. The Owensboro Museum of Fine art is open noon - 5 p.m. Tuesday - Friday and 1 - 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The museum is closed on Mondays. Adults $3 and admission for children under 13 years is $2.

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Advertiser Index 270 Power Yoga.....................................................................................................79 Affordable Care Health Insurance LLC........................................................95 Allstate Insurance.................................................................................................28 Audubon Area Community Services...........................................................68 Axiom Architecture.............................................................................................74 Backers Rack...........................................................................................................71 BB&T...........................................................................................................................23 Cape Air.....................................................................................................................41 Castlen Steel...........................................................................................................53 Century 21 Partners.............................................................................................81 Cheetah Clean.......................................................................................................71 Cherokee Millwright...........................................................................................12 City of Owensboro ..............................................................................................49 Culver’s Restaurant..............................................................................................42 Danco Construction Inc.....................................................................................95 David Taylor Antiques........................................................................................15 Daviess County Board of Education............................................................75 Daviess County Extension Office..................................................................53 Daviess County Public Library........................................................................98 Daviess County Teacher’s Federal Credit Union.....................................65 Deaconess Hospital.............................................................................................72 Deaconess Hospital.............................................................................................79 Domtar......................................................................................................................47 Dr. Richard C. Good................................................................................................ 2 eCig Source.............................................................................................................40 Edward Jones...................................................................................... Inside Back Envision Contractors LLC..................................................................................83 Evergreen Lawn Care..........................................................................................41 First Baptist Church of Owensboro..............................................................55 First Security Bank ................................................................................................. 1 Foundation for Daviess County Public Schools......................................75 Gardner Engineering..........................................................................................67 Glenn Funeral Home and Crematory..........................................................74 Green River Appliance.......................................................................................26 Greenwell Chisholm............................................................................................73 Haley McGinnis Funeral Home & Crematory...........................................81 Hampton Inn..........................................................................................................25 Hasgoe......................................................................................................................93 Hayden Farms........................................................................................................57 Helton Insurance..................................................................................................11 Hollison LLC............................................................................................................52 Home Builders Association of Owensboro..............................................54 Home Realty...........................................................................................................55 Hunter Douglas Plastics & Die........................................................................54 Independence Bank............................................................................................21 James H. Davis Funeral Home........................................................................55 Kentucky Legend.................................................................................................41 Kentucky Wesleyan College............................................................................67 Kimberly Clark........................................................................................................91

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L. Steve Castlen Realtors....................................................................................99 Lanham Brothers General Contractors.......................................................68 Lil Bit Sassy...............................................................................................................13 Limos by Knight....................................................................................................11 LinGate Hospitality Group...............................................................................98 Malco Owensboro Cinema..............................................................................95 Marcus W. Bosley & Associates.......................................................................59 McCarty’s Pro Towing and Automotive......................................................48 Mellow Mushroom..............................................................................................48 Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn..........................................................................................54 MPD............................................................................................................................28 Murphy Excavating..............................................................................................40 Norman King Electric..........................................................................................79 O’Bryan Contracting...........................................................................................28 Ohio Valley 2-Way Radio...................................................................................47 Old Hickory Bar-B-Que.......................................................................................48 Olive Garden...........................................................................................................48 OMICO Plastics Inc...............................................................................................65 OMU...........................................................................................................................25 Owensboro Catholic Schools..........................................................................75 Owensboro Community & Technical College....................Inside Cover Owensboro Convention and Visitors Bureau..........................................17 Owensboro Dermatology Associates.........................................................95 Owensboro Health Regional Hospital......................................Back Cover Owensboro Municipal Utilities......................................................................69 Owensboro Museum of Fine Art...................................................................93 Owensboro Public Schools..............................................................................70 Owensboro-Daviess County Regional Airport.......................................17 PBU Bank..................................................................................................................39 Phil’s Custom Cabinets.......................................................................................68 RBS Design..............................................................................................................69 Real Hacienda........................................................................................................42 Regional Water Resource Agency.................................................................54 Risner Realty...........................................................................................................39 RiverPark Center....................................................................................................52 Scott, Murphy & Daniel...................................................................................100 ServPro of Daviess County...............................................................................82 Shoe Stop.................................................................................................................20 Sip Owensboro......................................................................................................23 South Central Bank,.............................................................................................89 Tony Clark Realtors..............................................................................................12 Tri-State Mailing Systems Inc..........................................................................89 U.S. Bank..................................................................................................................... 5 Upper Room Music..............................................................................................74 Valor Oil.....................................................................................................................61 Wendell Foster.......................................................................................................53 Western Kentucky Regional Blood Center................................................82 Western Kentucky University – Owensboro............................................75 Winsupply.................................................................................................................. 5

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AFFORDABLE CARE HEALTH INSURANCE, LLC

We offer the following great products!!!!

Medicare Supplement Products • Individual Health Insurance • Term Life Insurance • Life Insurance with Long Term Care Benefits • Burial Insurance 2,000 - 25,0000 • Long Term Care Insurance • Home Health Insurance • Fixed Annuities (Better than CD rates)! • Accident and Cancer Policies • Dental Insurance

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dancoconst.com Celebrating 35 Years        

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O W E N S B O R O

Owensboro Healthplex

Owensboro, KY

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By the numbers Q U I C K

P O P U L AT I O N

FA C T S

S U M M A RY D A V I E S S

C O U N T Y

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2016 American Community Survey 1-year Estimates

U N E M P L O Y M E N T

D A T A

P R O V I D E D

B Y

200 E. Third Street, Suite 200 Owensboro, KY 42303 270-926-4339 edc.owensboro.com Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, August 2017

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R A T E


A V E R A G E

W E E K L Y

W A G E

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Use the Daviess County Public Library 24/7!

Checkout Audiobooks, Books, Comics, Magazines, Movies, and Music. Research anything. Anywhere! Anytime! All you need is: • a Daviess County Public Library Card and PIN * • a Smartphone, Tablet, or Computer • an Internet connection Want Audiobooks? You can: • Search the Catalog at dcpl.bibliocommons. com and filter results by “Things I can Access Online”. • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Downloads. • Download the DCPL Mobile app. • Download the Hoopla Digital, Libby, RBdigital apps. Want Books? You can: • Search the Catalog at dcpl.bibliocommons. com and filter results by “Things I can Access Online”. • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Downloads. • Download the DCPL Mobile app.

• Download the BibloBoard Library, cloudLibrary, Hoopla Digital, Libby, TumbleBooks** apps. Want Comics? You can: • Search the Catalog at dcpl.bibliocommons. com and filter results by “Things I can Access Online”. • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Downloads. • Download the DCPL Mobile app • Download the BibloBoard Library, Comics Plus Library Edition, Hoopla Digital, Libby, and TumbleBooksCloud apps. Want Magazines? You can: • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Downloads. Click on Digital Magazines. • Download the DCPL Mobile app. Go to eBooks & More � RBdigital. • Download the RBdigital app. Want Movies? You can: • Search the Catalog at dcpl.bibliocommons. com and filter results by “Things I can Access Online”. • Download the DCPL Mobile app. • Download the Hoopla Digital and Libby app. Want Music? You can: • Search the Catalog at dcpl.bibliocommons. com and filter results by “Things I can Access Online”. • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Downloads. • Download the DCPL Mobile app. • Download the Freegal Music and Hoopla Digital apps.

Need to Research Something? You can: • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Genealogy for family and local history. • Go to dcplibrary.org and click on Online Resources for scholarly and personal research, newspaper articles, home and auto repair, and background checks, and practices tests. Need help? Contact the Library! Daviess County Public Library 2020 Frederica Street Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 684-0211 www.dcplibrary.org Hours • Monday-Thursday, 9 am – 9 pm • Friday, 9 am - 8 pm • Saturday, 9 am - 6 pm • Sunday, 1 pm - 5 pm Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and SnapChat, and subscribe to our YouTube channel! * Visit the Library Circulation Desk if you do not know your PIN (or password). **TumbleBooks and TumbleBooks Jr offers regular and read-a-long audiobooks for kids. Includes Accelerated Reader (AR) levels

42303

98

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• • • • • •

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St. Stephen Cathedral Restoration

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Owensboro Riverport Authority

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Southern Star

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Toyotetsu

OHRH Site Concrete

Curbs • Sidewalks • Pavement

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Foundations • Containment Structures Concrete Demolition • Site Grading Retention & Storm Drainage

Swedish Match

Erb Equipment Company


Tycen R Brock Rusty Burton, AAMS® 2200 East Parrish Ave 2900 Veach Road Ste 1 Bldg C LL109 Rusty Burton, 270-926-9700 AAMS® 270-926-7454 Mary G Embry, CFP®, Financial Advisor Dathan R Deisher AAMS® . 2806 New Hartford Rd 3811 Highway 2900 Veach Road Ste 1 54 Suite 104 270-684-9738 270-684-2316 David W Renshaw, AAMS® KY 42303 Owensboro, Tracy B Thacker, AAMS® 1115 Tamarack 270-926-9700 201 West 2nd Street Suite 900 270-684-5722 270-684-4150

Robynn J Clark 4921 Goetz Dr Suite 6 270-240-2968 Katie Kolonich 3811 Highway 54 Suite 104 270-684-2316 Kevin J Young 1605 Scherm Rd Suite 2 270-926-9516

Grant Collins, CRPC® 1401 C Spring Bank Dr Ste 201 270-926-3626 Brooke Obermann 2601 W Parrish Ave Suite H 270-852-6627

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC


TOGETHER. Great happens…when we work together. From state-of-the-art cancer care to best-in-class treatments and technology, all administered by people who care – at Owensboro Health, we encourage and empower all of the best in life. And now, working together with UK’s Markey Cancer Center Research Network, we’ll offer a wealth of additional cancer research studies, evidencebased findings and clinical trials for patients under the direct care of trusted, local physicians and near those you love. UK’s Markey Cancer Center Research Network and Owensboro Health: Working together today... to provide better tomorrows.

OWENSBOROHEALTH.ORG/MARKEY-RESEARCH

2018 Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Magazine  
2018 Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Magazine  
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