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wensboro 2017

GREATER

A publication of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce and the Messenger-Inquirer


HEALTHCARE EALTH HCARE CAREERS CAREER ARE CAREERS THAT PAY

HEALTHCARE FACILITIES LEADERSHIP

$34,025 Medical Records, Health Information Tech $58,293 Registered Nurse $28,340 Paramedics $50,425 Radiologic Technologist $35,852 Respiratory Therapy Technician $38,087 Surgical Technologist $27,300 Veterinary Technologist

MEDICAL INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY NURSING PARAMEDIC RADIOGRAPHY RESPIRATORY THERAPY 1+1 with Madisonville Community College SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

Wage data from KY Labor Market Information, www.kylmi.ky.gov

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OCTC is an equal opportunity employer and educational institution.

Y19E86A- 20R16 S www.owensboro.kctcs.edu

KENTUCKY COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE SYSTEM


wensboro

GREATER The Greater Owensboro Magazine is a publication of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce with advertising and editorial produced by the Messenger-Inquirer. ADVERTISING

Mike Weafer, Advertising Director EDITORIAL

Meghann Richardson, Special Publications Editor Alan Warren, Photography Editor PHOTOGRAPHERS

Greg Eans Austin Ramsey

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Maegan Saalwaechter REPORTERS

Bobbie Hayse Keith Lawrence Jim Mayse Angela Oliver Austin Ramsey Stephanie Salmons Steve Vied Don Wilkins Greater Owensboro U.S.A. is published annually by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 825 Owensboro, KY 42302 This edition was produced by the Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro’s daily newspaper. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without permission from the Messenger-Inquirer.

PRINTED BY Greenwell Chisholm CHAMBER OF COMMERCE STAFF

Candance Brake, President & CEO Susan High, Business Manager Jessica Kirk, Executive Director Leadership Owensboro/Programs & Events Manager Jaclyn Graves, Membership Development Manager Lauren Nunez, Administrative Assistant 270-926-1860 • chamber.owensboro.com

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Welcome to Greater Owensboro! The best small city you will find. We have continued making Owensboro greater throughout the past year, and we cannot wait to see all that is in store for 2017! Here are just a few of the things happening in our All-American City: • Downtown businesses and residences thriving, growing and expanding. • Tremendous growth in the innovation and research and development sector. • A huge growth of young professionals from Owensboro and abroad moving to and becoming involved in our community. • Sports and recreational events and activities for every age and interest. • Owensboro Health Regional Hospital’s phenomenal new campus focused on patient care is ranked in the top 2 percent in the nation in quality. • Job growth, business expansion and income growth exceeding our peers. • A retail sector which is both unique and niche oriented for an unparalleled boutique shopping experience. • New transportation networks being constructed to get more people and goods in and out of our community. • Education is at the forefront with exemplary primary and secondary schools and world-class colleges and universities with diverse programs to advance our higher education as well as workforce development and training opportunities. • An arts, entertainment and dining scene unparalleled in communities our size. It’s an amazing time to be a part of this community. We hope you find this annual publication inspiring and a way for you to experience a small piece of our community that we are so proud to call our own. We’re honored to share it with you. Sincerely,

Candance Castlen Brake

President and CEO

Wade Jenkins

Market President, Old National Bank, 2017 Chamber Board Chair

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Owensboro

AT A GLANCE

59,042 Population of Owensboro

99,259 Population of Daviess County

4.2% Local unemployment rate 5.5% nationwide

$45,760 Median household income $113,100 Median home price 14.8 minutes Average commute to work

Sources: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Annual Estimates, Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development, Bureau of Labor Statistics G R E A T E R

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Contents

YOUNG PHYSICIANS

Owensboro Health Regional Hospital committed to recruitment

PAGES 94-95

COMMUNITY FOCUSED

Cecil Farms growing home delivery service

PAGE 58

FARM TO TABLE

Local farmers take pride in serving the Owensboro area

PAGES 64-65

FESTIVALS

PARISH PICNICS

Owensboro home Catholic churches to a number of coordinate cooking cultural, musical teams, raise funds celebrations PAGE 78

PAGES 52-53


OWENSBORO BUSINESSES

Young business Locals awarded for owner blossoms services, support in women’s retail and involvement

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PAGES 29-35

GATEWAY TO DOWNTOWN Brescia University receives renovation and expansion

PAGE 90

WESLEYAN WAY

President Bart Darrell makes impact at KWC

PAGE 92

TRADITION

Owensboro Dance Theatre keeps the Christmas cheer alive

PAGE 44

THE CITY’S ‘LIVING ROOM’

RiverPark Center hosts plays to private events

PAGE 46


Business Businesses are the lifeblood of all communities. In Owensboro, local business owners are proud of the community and the people who live in it. Generations of family farmers and young entrepreneurs have all found a place to call home in Owensboro. Our local businesses survive and thrive thanks to people who live, work, shop and play in Owensboro. With the downtown and Kentucky 54 areas experiencing phenomenal growth, more shops, boutiques and restaurants are opening, ready to serve you and your family. Whether you’re wanting to start a business venture, or looking for a place to shop or stay, there are plenty of options for you. This section offers a glimpse of what Owensboro has to offer.


Sodalicious

RILEY SODA CO. BECOMING A HOMETOWN LEGACY WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE SALMONS

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On a September afternoon in his craft soda parlor on Kentucky 54, Steven Riley’s 2-year-old son, Grayson, explores. “What are you doing, Daddy?” he asks. Grayson, Riley said, is the reason for Riley Soda Co. It’s “a legacy to pass down to my son.” Riley, 30, is a self-proclaimed “soda fanatic,” even though he said he only has one kidney and, because of that, isn’t supposed to have a lot of soda himself. The company, though, is something “I can attach my name to, that I can feel confident behind to pass down,” he said. “When you have children it changes your outlook on life, and it changes what’s important to you. I want to make a dif ference, I want to put a stamp on the world, I want to be remembered, and I want my son to be proud of what his father’s remembered for and everything to that extent.” Riley Soda Co. began as an all-natural soda company, but after running into “shelflife problems” early on, they moved from 100-percent all-natural recipes with ever y flavor they of fer to ones that are more “shelf-stable,” he said. But they still use pure cane sugar and triple-filtered water. “So the best materials we can still put into them, we do that, but we do add preser vatives currently,” Riley said. “We do still of fer limited-edition runs of our allnatural flavors.” Because he was born and raised around Owensboro, he chose to open his shop here. “As far as Owensboro, we’re just on the cur ve of the craft aspect of things — the craft beer, the craft sodas and the craft small-batch coffees ... The doors are still open for newcomers here.” The company got its start a little over a year ago, “just on a whim really,” Riley said. “An epiphany hit me at 2:30, 3 o’clock in the morning. I woke up and just started writing recipes down, and it’s gone from there.” Riley Soda is currently in four states, and Riley said they’re working on expanding to two more, as well as to a second country. “But our goal is to be here, to have a presence here in Owensboro,” he said. “We want to give our city something to be proud of. Say you go to Indianapolis and you see Riley Soda on the shelf with Owensboro, Kentucky, written on the label, that’s something you’re proud of. You’re going to grab for that, you’re going to tell people ‘That’s my hometown.’ Whatever we can do to attach our town to it is fantastic. That’s why ever y one of our bottles still has Owensboro, Kentucky, on it. We’re not required to do that — we just do that because we’re proud of it.” In the soda shop itself, Riley also offers unique floats, made with Dippin’ Dots Ice Cream, custom sodas with mix-and-match flavors, coffee, teas and more.

We want to give our city something to be proud of. That’s why every one of our bottles still has Owensboro, Kentucky, on it.

— Steven Riley BIMBO BAKERIES USA is... OVER 29 BRANDS

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Boutique Renaissance LIL BIT SASSY

Lil Bit Sassy is a children’s boutique in downtown Owensboro. With suckers, snacks and the Disney Channel for the children, owner Lisa Johnson-Miles created a space that was friendly for children and adults. The boutique carries a wide selection of clothes ranging from preemie to teens. While it mainly carries girl’s clothing, it also has some boy’s clothing. Lil Bit Sassy also loves bows and has a “bow bar” with hundreds of styles and colors to choose from.

BELLA RAGAZZA Bella Ragazza Boutique is a unique ladies boutique that carries styles at every price and size with an elegant atmosphere and welcoming, friendly experience. You’ll find merchandise at Bella Ragazza unlike anything else in town. Located downtown, the boutique encourages shopping locally and promoting other downtown shops. Drop on by and shop a while — you won’t be disappointed.

BUSHAY’S

Bushay’s LLC is locally owned and operated by Lauren Hauser. She was working in insurance sales when she decided it was time to follow her dreams — to open her own boutique and operate her own business. Bushay’s — a men’s clothing and home décor boutique, is not only oneof-a-kind, it’s the perfect shopping destination that the entire family can enjoy. From men’s clothing and home décor to a play area for children, there’s something for everyone.

STUDIO SLANT Studio Slant is a one-of-akind boutique and art studio. From birthday gifts to a little something special for yourself, it has you covered. The studio even offers painting classes and private parties. Studio Slant was started by sisters Christy Taylor Chaney and Katherine Taylor, who graduated college with art degrees and wanted to share their passion for art with Owensboro.

THE BAKERS RACK The Bakers Rack opened as a plant shop in 1974 and has transformed into one of Owensboro’s leading sources for fine gifts. The Bakers Rack is tucked in the corner of Wesleyan Park Plaza, a fixture on Frederica Street. When you walk in, you will see sparkling Waterford Crystal, Arthur Court’s pewter creations, the highly popular Vera Bradley handbags, unique antique furniture, hundreds of china patterns and a wide variety of fine home accents.

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Greater Owensboro WRITTEN BY JESSICA KIRK

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO PROGRAM & EVENTS MANAGER

FRONT FROM LEFT: JESSICA KIRK AND CANDANCE CASTLEN BRAKE BACK FROM LEFT: LAUREN NUNEZ, JACLYN GRAVES AND SUSAN HIGH

Why we invest in Young Professionals • YPs share creativity that gives our community character. • YPs’ inclusion of others strengthens bonds within our community. • YPs’ innovation improves our standard of living. • YPs advocate for our community, find meaningful ways to give back. YPs are Owensboro’s next leaders and they create a dynamic, inclusive and integrated community.

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When I began working at the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce three years ago, someone much wiser told me that chamber work is never done. At the beginning, I thought I understood that. I knew that I signed on to endless events and countless hours that required around-the-clock attention. I knew that as an employee of the chamber you knowingly agree to a mandator y “always on” mentality that requires your full consideration at all times. I even knew that more times than not, the days, weeks and months strapped you with expectations that leave you just above the surface, tr ying to catch your breath before the next wave plows through. I really thought I knew. What I didn’t know? It is the heart and soul of the team at the chamber that drive it each and ever y day — that, and the potential. You see, at our chamber, we dream. We dream for a stronger workforce, an innovative community and a place where all people feel welcome — somewhere that is open for business and supports it, period. At the chamber, we dream of what we can be, where we can go and how we can grow. What keeps us up at night? The continual dreams of how we achieve these things. The events, the programs, the education and the advocacy — the list goes on and on. We believe that our potential as a community is endless, and therefore our dreams are as well. We believe that our role at the chamber is to be one of the biggest cheerleaders for our community, our businesses and our people. We know that people are our bottom line, and we understand that by investing in our people across the board — our community succeeds. The best part of investing in our people is the collaboration between community organizations. The more involvement we have, the bigger difference we know we will make. We realize that our investment in people directly correlates with the quality of life in Owensboro. We dream about the growth of both. Since 1982, Leadership Owensboro 2 0 1 7


Chamber of Commerce has carried the tradition of investing in people. The Leadership Owensboro Program is a joint program of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce and Economic Development Corporation focused on educating and engaging individuals to reach their leadership potential and maximize their impact in the community. Each participant that goes through the program is tasked with the responsibility to work with classmates and create projects that move our community for ward. Year after year, businesses encourage employees to apply for the program and invest in them as an individual, but in return their investment in Leadership Owensboro pays dividends not only to their business, but also to the community. Recently at the chamber, we have taken grasp and restored Chamber Young Professionals or CYP. We notice that most young professionals bring something special to the table. Whether it’s loads of energy, a fresh perspective or a fearless approach — young professionals are ready and willing to make their mark.

leadership owensboro program projects Leadership Owensboro projects typically address the big picture. • Business leaders committing to have lunch at school twice a month with under-privileged children in our community. • Farmers adopting schools in our community to work alongside educators to give students a real-life learning experience. More and more, businesses want to know what to do to capture young talent. Even more than that, they want to know how to keep them. Our chamber focuses on building programs that are inviting and inspiring to young professionals. We’re building a platform that provides them with resources to help them get a seat at the table because we recognize that they are our future. Our mission at the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce is to provide leadership, advocacy and member ser vices that foster growth and economic

prosperity for our region. For over a centur y we have worked hard towards this mission. People have come and gone, but our mission remains the same. The team at the chamber is truly passionate about the future of our community and the unique role that we have the honor to play. We trust that one day we’ll look back and see that our dreams came true. For now, we will continue dreaming, brainstorming and facilitating ways to collaborate and work with others in our community to lay the foundation for generations to come.

Owensboro, Kentucky

1-800-489-1131 G R E A T E R

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spotlight

MALCOLM BRYANT

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n its nearly 30-year history, The Malcolm Bryant Corporation has grown exponentially to become one of Owensboro’s most dynamic, innovative and entrepreneurial companies. Its success in the commercial real estate, property management and hospitality sectors has resulted in the company having a presence in 15 communities in two states. Even as a young man with a promising corporate career stretching before him, Bryant decided the big company, career-ladder-climbing lifestyle was not what he wanted. What was missing was the devotion and closeness of family life in his home state. “I was single, but as I watched people with families move, it looked difficult to be married and have a family,” Bryant said. “It looked unsettling, and I loved Kentucky.” The turning point came when Bryant married Sally Barron of Owensboro in 1980. They decided to live in Owensboro. “I remember it being a discussion, a conscious decision, choosing here,” Sally Bryant said. “He was on a fast track, but we loved Kentucky.” For Malcolm Bryant, the pull of Owensboro was strong. “Owensboro looked wonderful,” he said. “No. 1 was Sally. With my love for Sally and our future together, I had confidence in what I knew to be a good place to raise a family.” Sally Bryant was already working for her father, Jarred Barron, in the family home-building business, Barron Homes, that he had established decades before. Malcolm Bryant joined the company. A few years later, with the blessing and encouragement of family

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members, the Bryants ventured out on their own. “We both worked for the family business, but we had the freedom to branch out and in the late 1980s we did,” Sally Bryant said. “Our families — my dad — encouraged all of us to do our own thing. We started a property management company.” That support and the opportunity that came with it meant everything, Malcolm Bryant said. The road wasn’t easy. By the time The Malcolm Bryant Corporation was born, its owners had been tested by hard economic times with sky-high interest rates and plenty of uncertainty. “It taught us how to survive,” Malcolm Bryant recalled. “The future was certainly questionable, for Owensboro and the entire nation.” Today, The Malcolm Bryant Corporation’s properties include The Springs Health Center, 200 E. Third St. (the Commerce Center), the Corporate Center, 100 W. Third St. (new BB&T Bank location), Courtyard Office Park, The Centre for Business and Research, the Hampton Inn & Suites Owensboro Downtown/Riverfront, the Hampton Inn of Owensboro and many more. Malcolm Bryant credits his adopted city for providing him with inspiration. “I am nothing special, and while I appreciate all of this, I am just a combination of all the people who have been a part of my life,” Malcolm Bryant said. “I am nothing more than the person my family and friends have made me.”

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— WRITTEN BY STEVE VIED

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DRIVING

FORCE WRITTEN BY DON WILKINS

MOORE AUTO SALES FAMILY HEADING INTO FIFTH GENERATION

The Don Moore family is a driving force when it comes to local and regional automobile sales. For brothers Don, David and John Moore, Owensboro is not only their home but it’s where their family’s automobile sales business has grown and flourished for nearly 100 years. Don Moore III, who has led the company and has been the dealership’s face for three decades, said he and his brothers are taking steps to ensure their successes continue well into the future. “We’ve been in business 97 years as a family,” said the 55-year-old auto dealer who’s best known for his “It’s hot, Don,” television commercials. “What we’re looking at is how do we get to 150 years?” Helping toward that goal is John Moore, who joined the family business in July 2016 after spending 10 years pursuing other business ventures. John Moore’s role will be one of looking at ways the company can expand its operations, whether that’s in Owensboro or in other communities. “...Ultimately, it’s to grow the business, and that’s where I want to spend my time,” said John Moore, who at 45 is the youngest of the siblings. For years, David Moore, 50, has been a constant and “the people person” behind the business with older brother, Don Moore III. “I didn’t have any desire to do anything else,” David Moore said. “This is what I’ve known and what I’ve always done.” The bulk of the company’s success has been achieved in Owensboro. The company was founded in 1919 by the Moore brothers’ great-grandfather, Percy Short, and his two brothers, Kelly Short and Harry Short. In 2000 the Moore family reached beyond the borders of Daviess County by acquiring what was then Thompson Ford-Mercur yChrysler-Plymouth-Dodge-Jeep of Hartford. In its 97 years, the company has grown to more than 300 employees, six dealerships and 13 franchises with $175 million in annual sales. And now, David Moore’s 26-year-old daughter Kaitlyn has joined the family business, ushering in a fifth generation of Moores. “It’s great to work in your family business because you feel like you’re adding extra value when it’s something your family has worked on for 97 years,” said Kaitlyn Moore, who’s employed in the accounting side of the company. Although the Moores may one day add more dealerships outside of OwensboroDaviess County, they said this community will remain their home. “Owensboro has been very, very good to our family,” Don Moore III said. “And our family has been extremely dedicated to Owensboro because of that.”

FROM LEFT, JOHN, DAVID, KAITLYN AND DON MOORE AT THE DON MOORE GM CENTER ON KY 54. G R E A T E R

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WRITTEN BY MEGHANN RICHARDSON In 2015, 95 million people shopped at small businesses on Small Business Saturday. Many of those participants were in Owensboro — shopping, congregating and enjoying the holiday season with family, friends and neighbors. Shop Owensboro, which has become a staple event in the community, takes place the day after Black Friday with the goal of promoting local businesses. Shop Owensboro is powered by Independence Bank, lots of coffee and the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce staff and ambassadors. Waking before the sun rises, the crew spreads out across town with free

treats and prizes, spreading holiday cheer and Shop Owensboro enthusiasm to everyone. In previous years, promoters of Shop Owensboro have taken cupcakes and cookies to participating businesses and have made personal visits in the days leading up to the event. It’s truly an event that brings the community together. “Our small local businesses got a lot of love,” said Jessica Kirk, programs and events manager for the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. “It was great.” Men’s and women’s boutiques, home

decor and gift shops, locally-owned restaurants and gyms participate in Shop Owensboro. In 2015, several people won prizes and gift certificates. “This year, instead of a passport, we are going to do some type of bingo card that will encourage people to possibly visit a store at which they may not normally shop,” Kirk said. “It will also add a little bit more fun to the day.” Last year, local businesses reported that sales were running well ahead of a typical Saturday. Kirk said Shop Owensboro was a huge success.

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Edward Ungacta Operations Manager Shop Services

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Keith Gatewood Shop Supervisor


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meat-ing the needs GILLES EXPANDS HIS FAMILY FARM INTO RETAIL BEEF, PORK & POULTRY BUSINESS Jim Gilles grew up as part of a Daviess County farm family that cultivated corn, soybeans and tobacco. But now, the 28-year-old entrepreneur has found his own success in a retail meat business called Hill View Farms Meats. Gilles said his father, Jimmy Gilles, began raising Angus cattle about 10 years ago, giving him the idea for the ready-made venture. They have since started raising their own chickens to add to the beef products. “We saw the need and where this retail meat business could go,” Gilles said. “... So this became my portion of the family business.” Since 2013, Gilles has been mainly selling his USDA-approved prime ribeye cuts, pork and chicken breasts out of a large freezer maintained on his family’s Lee Rudy Road farm.

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“So far, I’ve been taking appointments, and we have a lot of customers coming here to the farm,” Gilles said. “But primarily, I’ve been doing the Owensboro Regional Farmers Market.” Gilles graduated from the University of Kentucky in 2010 with a business degree “tailored toward agriculture.” “I had originally planned to go do marketing for an ag company,” he said. Gilles has also broadened his base by partnering with other local farm outlets such as Reid’s Orchard, Trunnell’s Farm Market on Kentucky 54 and Cecil Farms’ home delivery service. But it was this past fall that Gilles decided to expand further with his own storefront. He converted a house on Lee Rudy Road into a small market to sell his Hill View Farms Meats’ products as well as being a

G R E A T E R

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WRITTEN BY DON WILKINS

distributor for J.D. Country Fresh Milk of Russellville and Boone Creek Creamer y Cheese of Lexington. “It’s similar to a Reid’s Orchard or a Trunnell’s, but ours is more meat-based than vegetables and produce,” Gilles said. “...We’ll also have barbecue sauces and meat rubs to go with our products.” Hill View Farms Meats has a website — hillviewfarmsmeats.com — for selling its meats and uses Facebook to promote its products as well. Although Gilles never intended to go into selling meats, he credits his growing retail business to returning home. “I always thought I’d come back to Owensboro and to the farm,” Gilles said. “I just didn’t think it would be as early as I did. But things just fell into place, and it’s been a good decision ever since.” 2 0 1 7


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Business owner

'Blossoms'

in women’s retail WRITTEN BY ANGELA OLIVER

On “the happiest corner in Owensboro,” as Jessica McKinley calls it, sits Blossoms Apparel & Gifts, a soft peach building that houses on-trend women’s apparel and accessories. Just behind it, The Shoe Garden showcases women’s favorite footwear. With both stores, Vicki Mills and McKinley, who is Mills’ daughter, offer contemporary styles and brands that are usually associated with bigger cities. Mills opened Blossoms in 2004 after 20 years of being a stay-athome mother and wife. Two years later, McKinley, her only daughter and oldest child, graduated from the University of Kentucky with a degree in business and joined her mother’s venture. “My mom is obviously my best friend — I’m the only girl out of five so we’re very close and have that connection,” McKinley said. “Over the years, we’ve found a way to balance home and work life.” She said both women like to be present at the store to get to

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know customers. “She’s been a lifelong resident and really loves this community, and people like to see the owners care about their customers,” McKinley said, “so it’s very important for us to be there, to interact with people who support us and to get to know them because that helps us serve them better. We learn their likes and needs.” Blossoms offers brands such as Kendra Scott Jewelry, Frye, Jessica Simpson, BB Dakota, IT! Jeans, Spanx and Moon & Lola. And The Shoe Garden, which opened in February 2015, a natural extension of Blossoms since they owned the space, offers TOMS (including a few for men), Hunter Boots and Steve Madden, among other lines. “Having those brands keeps people from having to go to Evansville or Nashville to shop; their dollars stay in Owensboro,” McKinley said. “We outfit everyone from middle school girls to grandmas.” Like her mother, McKinley said she was committed to staying in Owensboro. “I always knew I wanted to raise my family here; there’s no greater town to raise children, and I don’t know if I would’ve been able to do that and run a business anywhere else,” said the mother of 6- and 3-year-old sons. Her husband, Brady McKinley, co-owns Bowen Tires, another local business. “We’re both small business owners, so we realize the importance of shopping local,” she said. “I’m so grateful for a kind community that does support local businesses.” Beyond the success of the stores, McKinley, 32, said she’s happy to be part of the growing crowd of young professionals. “We have a lot of young people who choose to stay here,” she said. “Or those who find professional opportunities and never thought they’d be here, but they love it.” Blossoms and The Shoe Garden, at 805 Frederica St., are open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.

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Lake Forest Town Center expansion on a fast track

WRITTEN BY STEVE VIED

Since constr uction began more than two years ago on Lake Forest Town Center at Kentucky 54 and Millers Mill Road, the strip center on the easter n end of the rapidly expanding commercial corridor has grown at a brisk pace. The first 12,000-square-foot section opened in 2015 and is nearly full with eight businesses. It will soon be joined by a 24,000-square-foot second phase. The newest section, expected to be finished in early 2017, will include an 8,000-square-foot USA Bridal store, and Vince Hayden, president of Hayden Construction Co., the builder of both phases, said in September that several prospective businesses were looking at the remaining 16,000 square feet of available space. Greg and Aimee Garrard opened a second Great Har vest Bread location in Lake Forest Town Center in 2015, with 3,000 square feet of space and seating for about 70 people inside and 20 on the patio. Great Har vest was joined at that time by Peacocks and Pearls boutique, becoming the center’s first two tenants. In Februar y 2016, Orange Leaf Frozen Yogurt opened its second Owensboro location in the center. Since then, Bushay’s Men’s Boutique and Home Decor, Big O Bike Shop and Tr unnell’s Farm Market have joined the lineup on the south side of

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Kentucky 54. Jason Deweese, manager and one of the three owners of the Big O Bike Shop, said the nearness of the David C. Adkisson Greenbelt Park biking and walking trail was an attractive feature of the center, as well as the other stores. “We love our neighbors,” Deweese said. “We all complement each other in some form or fashion. It’s been amazing. We’ve been blessed. We’ve had tremendous community suppor t. We have three or four group rides a week, with as many as 40 riders this summer. ... Most of our custom-

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ers are our friends or become our friends.” Roger Ellis, who manages Orange Leaf Frozen Yogur t, said he and the other investors in the businesses were encouraged to open a second location on Kentucky 54 by their South Frederica Street store customers. “So many of our customers begged us to come out here,” Ellis said. “They kept asking us. We heard it ever y day. It has worked out great. This is the growing end of the county. We’ve had great response from this area, and it didn’t af fect the other location all that much.”

Owensboro Converting & Distribution 1500 Ragu Drive Owensboro, KY 42303

Proud to be part of Owensboro for 30 years! 1986-2016 O W E N S B O R O

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Hotels in the Owensboro area

Comfort Suites Owensboro

230 Salem Drive • 270-926-7675 Suites offer Wi-Fi and flat-screen TVs, mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Upgraded suites add wet bars, separate living areas and/or pull-out sofas. Amenities include parking and a hot breakfast buffet. Other amenities consist of a heated indoor pool, a hot tub and an exercise room.

Country Inn & Suites

3220 West Parrish Avenue • 270-685-2433 Rooms offer flat-screen TVs, free Wi-Fi and sitting areas with sofas, as well as microwaves and mini fridges. Amenities include a breakfast buffet, fitness center and a seasonal, outdoor pool.

Courtyard by Marriott Owensboro

3120 Highland Pointe Drive • 270-685-4140 The contemporary rooms offer free Wi-Fi, desks with ergonomic chairs, flat-screen TVs and iPod docks, plus mini fridges and coffeemakers. Suites add separate living areas. The on-site American restaurant serves breakfast, dinner and all-day drinks, including Starbucks’ coffee. There’s also a business center with workstations and printers and a meeting room. Other amenities include an indoor pool and whirlpool, an exercise room and free on-site parking.

Days Inn

3720 New Hartford Road • 270-684-9621 All rooms and suites include en suite bathrooms with showers and tubs and have free Wi-Fi, TVs, mini fridges and coffeemakers.

Lure Seafood & Grill • Changes Salon & Spa • Adams & Sons Mens Fine Clothes Convention Center Adjacent • Meeting Rooms •LEED Certified “Now Open: Open of the Blue Specializing in Apparel, Gifts, and Kentucky Spirits.”

HAMPTON INN & SUITES by HILTON Owensboro - Downtown Waterfront 401 W. 2nd St. • 270-685-2005 www.hamptonowensborodowntown.com

Children 17 and under stay free with a paying adult. Amenities include continental breakfast buffet, an outdoor pool, business center and meeting rooms and free parking.

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott Owensboro

800 Salem Drive • 270-688-8887 Relaxed rooms include free Wi-Fi, microwaves, mini fridges and coffeemakers, plus flat-screen TVs. Some rooms have pull-out sofas. Amenities include hot breakfast, an indoor pool, hot tub, fitness center, a convenience store, business center and free parking.

Hampton Inn & Suites Downtown/Waterfront

401 West Second Street • 270-685-2005 Rooms include free Wi-Fi, flat-screen HDTVs, both full and lap desks (for working in bed), mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Amenities include a breakfast buffet, weekday breakfast bags to go, a gourmet restaurant, fitness center, indoor pool and hot tub, three meeting rooms, a 24/7 business center and a 24-hour convenience store.

Hampton Inn Owensboro South

615 Salem Drive • 270-926-2006 Amenities include Wi-Fi, flat-screen TVs with HD channels, work desks (plus ergonomic laptop desks), coffeemakers, mini fridges and microwaves; some also have pull-out sofas, free hot breakfast (or breakfast bags to go), a putting green and an outdoor pool and patio. There’s also a fitness center, a business center and free parking.

See more hotels page 28

NEWLY RENOVATED, HAMPTON WALL OF FAME RECIPIENT, OUTDOOR SWIMMING POOL & GAZEBO, SHOPPING, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT ADJACENT

Top-Ranked Hotels on Tripadvisor FREE Daily Breakfast 6-10a.m. FREE Parking Passes for Off-Site Fitness Facilites FREE Wireless Internet On-Site Fitness Room Available Discounts for Neighboring Restaurants

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by Hilton

HAMPTON INN by HILTON Owensboro - South 615 Salem Dr. • 270-926-2006 www.hamptoninnowensboro.com

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fitness center, business center, meeting room and free parking.

more hotels listed page 27

Holiday Inn — Owensboro Riverfront

701 W. First Street • 270-683-1111 Rooms offer flat-screen TVs, free Wi-Fi and mini fridges. All also provide microwaves and coffeemakers, and some include river views and balconies. Upgraded rooms add pull-out sofas. Amenities include a casual restaurant and an indoor pool, fitness center and business center.

Ramada Inn

3136 W. Second Street • 270-685-3941 Rooms have free Wi-Fi and cable TV, plus mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Some rooms feature pull-out sofas, while suites add living areas. Children 17 and under stay free with an adult. Amenities include free continental breakfast and a casual restaurant, an outdoor pool,

Sleep Inn Owensboro

51 Bon Harbor Hills • 270-691-6200 Rooms come with free Wi-Fi and flat-screen TVs, as well as mini fridges, microwaves and coffeemakers. Suites add separate living rooms with pull-out sofas and extra TVs. Amenities include hot breakfast, free parking, an indoor pool, a hot tub and a fitness center.

Super 8 Motel

1027 Goetz Drive • 270-685-3388 All rooms include TVs with cable channels and desks, plus coffeemakers, mini fridges and microwaves. There’s free Wi-Fi in every room and children 17 and under stay free with an adult. Amenities include complimentary continental breakfast, a business center, laundry room and free parking.

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Design solutions to enrich your environment.

A R C H I T E C T U R E 1010 Allen Street • Owensboro 270.663.1256

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Ben Grove • ben@axiom-architecture.com Aaron Nacey• aaron@axiom-architecture.com

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2016

BUSINESS of the

YEAR WINNERS Each year, the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce presents awards to local businesses for their outstanding services, support and involvement in the community. The awards program is designed to celebrate outstanding businesses and their efforts. 2016 BUSINESS OF THE YEAR AWARD WINNERS • Business of the Year (1-10 employees) — The Scrub Shoppe • Business of the Year (11-50 employees) — Fetta Specialty Pizza & Spirits • Business of the Year (51+ employees) — Hartz Contracting • Emerging Business of the Year — Studio Slant • Non-Profit of the Year — Junior Achievement of Western Kentucky • Education and Workforce Development Program of the Year — University of LouisvilleOwensboro School of Nursing BENEFITS OF WINNING AN AWARD INCLUDE • Award presented at annual celebration • Winner logo that can be placed on marketing materials and on the Chamber website • Profile in GO Business Magazine • Recognition at Rooster Booster Breakfast • Can present award to winner the following year at annual dinner • Press via press release, Chamber website, Chamber Matters email and newsletter • Icon by name in business directory as winner G R E A T E R

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THE SCRUB SHOPPE BUSINESS OF THE YEAR (1-10 EMPLOYEES)

Kandi Stephens decided to start her own business — The Scrub Shoppe — in 2009 with a dream and a 1,100-square-foot store where she embroidered everything herself. Since then, Stephens has tripled the size of her business, and she has adapted, added and expanded. The Scrub Shoppe carries brands such as Grey’s Anatomy, Cherokee, KOI, NRG, Wink, Dickies, White Cross, White Swan, Jockey, Dansko, Landau, Littman and more. The Scrub Shoppe offers clothing for men and women with sizes ranging from XXS - 5XL, petite and tall.

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FETTA PIZZA

BUSINESS OF THE YEAR (11-50 EMPLOYEES)

Owners Tim Turner and Mike Baker are proud to serve, what many are saying, is the best pizza in the Midwest. Turner said only the finest ingredients go into their pizzas, complemented by an excellent atmosphere and spectacular service. You are guaranteed to leave full, yet craving more. Fetta Specialty Pizza and Spirits opened its doors in September 2013. While there are many places that make pizza in Owensboro, Fetta wants to be your hometown pizzeria. Locally owned and operated and ready to serve you, Fetta is your home for riverfront entertainment and dining.

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BUSINESS OF THE YEAR (51+ EMPLOYEES)

HARTZ CONTRACTING

Since its beginnings in 1983, the former Scott, Murphy & Daniel has evolved and emerged as a construction industry leader in south central Kentucky, western Kentucky and northern Tennessee area, covering a full range of needs including: designing, building, construction management, general contractors, renovations, conversions, expansions and pre-engineered steel buildings. Hartz Contracting has built the Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline headquarters, the Green River District Health Department building, Daviess County Public Library and both downtown parking garages.

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STUDIO SLANT EMERGING BUSINESS OF THE YEAR

The “Sisters of Slant,” as they call themselves, wanted to bring fun art and good times to Owensboro. After more than five years in business, Katherine Taylor and Christy Taylor Chaney’s Studio Slant has succeeded in doing just that. Along with the art store, the sisters also started an art festival. The business, at 624 Emory Drive near the Kmart in Wesleyan Park Plaza, is filled with lots of handmade items and unique gifts that can’t be found anywhere else in Owensboro. Prices in the boutique-gallery range from $5 to $200 and feature many Owensboro-area and Kentucky artists. G R E A T E R

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NONPROFIT OF THE YEAR

JUNIOR ACHEIVEMENT

The goal of JA of West Kentucky is to inspire young people to succeed in a global economy and to ensure that every student in western Kentucky has a fundamental understanding of the three pillars of success: financial literacy, work-readiness skills and entrepreneurship. Core values include: • Belief in the boundless potential of young people • Commitment to the principles of market-

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based economics and entrepreneurship • Passion for what we do and honesty, integrity, and excellence in how we do it • Respect for the talents, creativity, perspectives, and backgrounds of all individuals • Belief in the power of partnership and collaboration • Conviction in the educational and motivational impact of relevant, hands-on learning

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EDUCATION AND WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OF THE YEAR

UofL-OWENSBORO SCHOOL OF NURSING

The UofL-Owensboro BSN Program began as a partnership between the University of Louisville and Owensboro Health, providing students in the Owensboro area with the opportunity to earn a bachelor of science degree in nursing in a traditional format. The bachelor of science in nursing program prepares students for a career in professional nursing by providing a dynamic course of study that is both theoretical and practical. G R E A T E R

As citizens of a larger community, the focus is to address the complex health care needs of diverse and dynamic populations through nursing education, research, scholarship and service. Students graduate prepared to demonstrate excellence in nursing science, practice and leadership in a variety of settings for the benefit of clients across the lifespan and to meet the evolving health care needs of society.

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Culture From performing arts to food festivals, there is entertainment for everyone in Owensboro. Art, music, dance and food events showcase the culture and diversity of the city while relating to everyone — local residents and visitors. In this section, you’ll learn how the Owensboro Symphony Orchestra has grown since its beginning more than 50 years ago and what changes are coming, how art and dance have transformed the downtown scene and a comprehensive listing of all the annual festivals and events in Owensboro. Our hope is while you’re in Owensboro, whether it’s for a visit or for life, you’ll embrace our culture and celebrate it with us.


WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE

work hard,

dream big

LeAnne Musick believes in saving children. Her dance studio, Musick Studios, was founded nine years ago and today caters to more than 400 students each week. In 2015, it was named the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Business of the Year in the one-to-10 employees category. Musick has lived in Owensboro her entire life. She grew up in her family’s restaurant, The Royce, and after several years of working in the restaurant industry, she decided to pursue her passion for dance. “We are saving a lot of kids,” she said. “We are loving them, hugging them, helping them and doing homework with them when they are taking an hour break. We are here for whatever they need.” She sought out the space at 411 E. Second St. for her dream, and that is where her business remains. Dance students can train in hip-hop, ballet, lyrical and jazz. From beginners to advanced, ages 2 through adult, Musick Studios has been a force in the lives of hopeful dancers for nearly a decade. As the studio founder, owner and dance coach, Musick says she has high hopes for the youngsters who find themselves in her dance space. She says that moving into this studio space when she did was a prime time in Owensboro, which was on the cusp of physical and societal change in the downtown area. With the growth experienced in the community over the past few years, Musick said that creative minds have really begun to flourish with the city’s and county’s continued support for the arts. “I feel like we turned a page, went against the grain of what is to be expected and brought in an entirely different industry here in

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Owensboro,” she said. “That’s what sets us apart from everyone.” She’s okay with taking the risk and challenge because the culture in Owensboro is changing, she said, and that “we have to change with it and make it the best it can be. “We’ve done a great job of building the uniqueness that we have here in Owensboro.” The foundation of Musick Studios is catering to children and providing a safe space for them to thrive and flourish, she said. “The sky is the limit,” she said. “We not only teach dance, but we also teach morality, honesty, trust, communication.” Children are not only learning the elements of movement, they are also learning to be better humans. “We teach them the tools to be able to succeed,” Musick said. “It’s a great place to be.”

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spotlight

O

AARON KIZER

wensboro is inspiration for local artist Aaron Kizer. Kizer said he has no background or formal training as an artist, but his process has always been to paint what he likes “and use every painting as a way to teach myself. I’ve never approached painting as something I needed rules for, I’ve just painted what I felt the want to paint.” He began painting in 2010 when his dad was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. “My dad didn’t have health insurance, so I painted to pay for his chemo,” he said. “My first real live show was a fundraiser for him at Gambrinus in downtown Owensboro. The plan was to take the ticket money and sales from the painting and pay for his treatment. Instead, it was used to pay for his funeral. He passed away the day before the event.” Outside of his art, Kizer operates Kizer Construction. “The construction company does well, but my painting has become my most lucrative business,” he said. Some of his successes in painting have been working with people such as Karl-Anthony Towns, hip-hop artist T.I. and doing an album cover for hip-hop artist Talib Kweli as well as organizations like Jim Beam, Makers Mark, the American Cancer Society, Kids Cancer Alliance, NASA, The Aria in Las Vegas, French Lick Casino, Loews Hotels, the Grand Ole Opry, University of Kentucky, Rupp Arena, University of Louisville, Wright State University, Western Kentucky University Ronald McDonald

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House and more. And as far as sales, Kizer said he’s sold paintings for more than $45,000 in auctions. Kizer is known for his speed painting performance events. He has painted the likes of Steve Jobs, Mick Jagger, American Pharoah, Hank Williams Sr., Lebron James and more. But, as far as his art career, Kizer said he doesn’t look too far into the future. “I’ll just keep painting as long as I have an audience that cares, and if it gets to the point no one cares, I’ll still paint for the love of it.” Kizer, 34, was born in Owensboro. He’s married with two children — son Kaden, 10, and daughter Airen, 16. “My main reason for staying in Owensboro is family,” he said. “I travel all over all the time and no matter where I go, I see Owensboro as home. To be 100-percent honest, I wouldn’t have been able to do any of the things I’ve done without the support of the people in Owensboro.” Kizer said he’s in Chicago frequently, and although “I love Chicago and the city has been great to me, I’m always ready to come back to Owensboro. Everything I love and everything that inspires me is in Owensboro. It would be almost impossible to get me to change my address.” Visit aaronkizer.com for more information about Kizer and his work. Kizer Arts can also be found at facebook.com/kizerarts. — WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE SALMONS

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lifting spirits OWENSBORO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SERVES THE REGION FOR MORE THAN HALF A CENTURY Owensboro Symphony Orchestra is what CEO Dan Griffith calls “the community’s orchestra.” With more than 50 years in the area, the orchestra is looking forward and placing a major focus on community engagement. Griffith said the orchestra is here for the people because the community has made an investment in the arts organization. “For a city of our size to have an orchestra of this caliber is absolutely phenomenal,” Griffith said. “Owensboro has been blessed to be able to have such an orchestra.” With such cultural success in the area, Griffith said what is ahead for it is to serve not only Owensboro, but the region, and this has been his main focus in recent years. “We are tr ying to do more rather than

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always asking people to come and see us,” Grif fith said. “We feel like we ser ve the region.” With this in mind, the orchestra travels to several of the surrounding counties. It has also been involved in other local outreach programs, such as health and wellness programs that “lift spirits,” Griffith said. One such program is Music On Call, which is designed to heighten, change lives and bring ease to those who are experiencing difficult situations. The symphony orchestra visits nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and the Daviess County Detention Center where its reaches out to those in the community who could benefit from musical therapy. OSO also is involved in providing music

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WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE access for the area’s children. Owensboro Symphony Academy’s Kindermusik programs include in-house classes at Hager Elementar y School and the H.L. Neblett Community Center. The goal of outreach programs such as these are to connect to at-risk youth. Along these lines, the symphony orchestra provides a number of programs for several area schools, including live performances, storytimes, instrument classes and more. “Our quest is to be more than ever the region’s orchestra in all avenues,” Griffith said. “We are an important part in economic development and hold an important role in the state.” The Owensboro Symphony Orchestra was honored in 2016 when it was asked to per form for Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin’s inauguration in Frankfort. “We are an ambassador for Owensboro, and we are on the road serving Owensboro well,” Griffith said. 2 0 1 7


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tradition that lives on the

Since its inception in 1982, the Owensboro Dance Theatre founders dreamed of showcasing the talent in the area with a premiere annual event. Thus, “The Nutcracker” began. In its beginning, the dance company held events at area high schools because they lacked the proper space, and its first “Nutcracker” experience was excerpts. In 1992, the RiverPark Center was built with its Cannon Hall — a 1,479-seat theater. From that point, “The Nutcracker” became a yearly event that Owensboro Dance Theatre’s Jaysie Beth Royal, the assistant artistic director, says is a highlight of the Christmas season. “For me, it’s always been the opening of the season,” Royal said. “It’s the first weekend of December every year, and it is really what starts that holiday.” Joy Johnson, director and owner of Johnson’s Dance Studio and co-founder and managing artist director of Owensboro Dance Theatre, said it took about five years for the show to gain momentum. She remembers one of its first “big” purchases — a rotating bed built from a wheelchair motor that was maneuvered via remote control from backstage.

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WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE

ODT’S ‘THE NUTCRACKER’ HELPS RING IN CHRISTMAS CHEER SINCE 1992 From then on, the show gained notoriety, and the company began hosting performances for area schools. Families began the tradition of attending the show and looked forward to starting the Christmas season that first weekend in December. “Once it was so successful, it just kept growing and growing,” Johnson said. “It still sells well.” She said the show is important for the community because it brings everyone together. To this day, she said she has ODT alumni whose children perform in their previous roles. So the show is just as much for adults as it is for children, she said. Elderly communities, assisted-living facilities and nursing homes bring clients each year, and it has become a shared artistic experience, she said. Twenty four years later, the tradition lives on. In the beginning, there were 80 performers on stage. Now, there are more than 150 involved in the show. It takes a lot to put something like that on, but Johnson says it’s worth it. She said everyone involved in the production enjoys contributing to the holiday spirit and cheer. “We help families make memories, and that’s what makes it all so special,” she said.

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Owensboro’s

The nearly 100,000-square-foot facility includes the state-ofthe-art, 1,479-seat Cannon Hall that is home to the symphony, ODT, Back Alley Musicals and hosts Broadway and other touring productions; the 300-seat, multipurpose Jody Berry Cabaret Theatre; an entertainment patio overlooking the Ohio River; meeting rooms; and a bricked courtyard. The center also offers two stages for Friday After 5, Downtown After Dark concerts, a New Year’s Eve party and the Taste of Owensboro. Beyond the arts, it’s often rented for class reunions, proms, receptions and other private events. “We are so fortunate to live and work in Owensboro/Daviess County,” Witt said. “We have many amenities of much larger cities WRITTEN BY ANGELA OLIVER but without the hassles.” Witt, who began at the RiverPark Center nine months before it opened, said she’s proud of its evolution, particularly in educational outreach. It ser ves more than 20,000 students from 100 schools in 18 counties through field trips, the Missoula Children’s Theatre and more. The center also won a grant to hire its first full-time education director a little more than a year ago. The Arts Teach Kids program, lower-priced Broadway tickets Known as a gem in Owensboro’s crown — the downtown river- and the pay-what-you-can option help make the RiverPark Center front — the RiverPark Center is home to many of the city’s most accessible, Witt said. The staff regard it as “Owensboro’s living popular arts and entertainment events. room,” which all residents and visitors can enjoy. The $17 million facility, at 101 Daviess St., opened in 1992 as the “(It’s) here because the citizens wanted it to be here and gave solution to a challenge for many of Owensboro’s arts organizations. until it hurt to make that possible,” she said, noting more than $11 “The RiverPark Center was built because Owensboro had a million in donations in the original capital campaign and continued tremendous performing arts histor y — Owensboro Symphony giving freed the center of its original building debt. Orchestra, Owensboro Dance Theatre and Theatre Workshop of People also give their time — about 100 volunteers donate 9,000 Owensboro,” Executive Director Roxi Witt said. “Those groups hours as ticket takers and greeters each year. only had poorly-equipped high school auditoriums to do great per“We are very grateful to our donors, as well as our volunteers,” formances.” Witt said. “Our donors feel like this is their building, and it is.”

LIVING ROOM

RIVERPARK CENTER SERVES ART ORGANIZATIONS, COMMUNITY

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Downtown Art Take a stroll through downtown Owensboro and you are sure to see some of the wonderful pieces of art that are spread across the city. From sculptures to murals, the artwork displayed gives you a glimpse of life in our town

local pieces “Transformation,” a 16-foot-by-12-foot-by10-foot abstract sculpture made of stainless steel and bronze, is on the southeast side of the Owensboro Convention Center. A bronze sculpture entitled “Hometown,” depicting a young couple seated on a limestone park bench looking at blueprints for a home sits on the north lawn of the Daviess County Courthouse on Second Street. “Escape,” a limestone sculpture by Stephensport, Kentucky, artist Meg White is located in downtown Owensboro behind Fetta Specialty Pizza and part of the Owensboro Museum of Fine Art Riverartes revolving showcase of public art.

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OWENSBORO

TROLLEY

The Owensboro Trolley makes shopping a breeze since the route circles through the historic downtown area with its antique, specialty shops and diners. The regular, free trolley service is offered from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Wednesday and from 10 a.m. to midnight Thursday through Saturday. Stop times are approximately every

20 minutes at the following downtown locations: Second and Crittenden streets; Second and Daviess streets; Second and Allen streets; Second and St. Ann streets; Second and Locust streets; Convention Center Drive; Third and Walnut streets; Third and St. Ann streets and Third and Daviess streets. On July 1, 2014, the City of Owensboro opened the downtown trolley service.


DISCOVER DOWNTOWN For real time trolley location visit

www.owensboro.org/transit


What’s your festival? _ Owensboro’s got it _

For a city with almost 60,000 people, Owensboro has something for ever yone, from music to barbecue to art. Kicking off the festival season is Friday After 5, a free music event that occurs every Friday night from May until September. With 16 consecutive Fridays, visitors can come to the downtown riverfront and enjoy entertainment at six different venues. About the same time that Friday After 5 starts its season, the International Bar-B-Que Festival welcomes visitors from across the region. For the first time in its 37-year histor y, promoters and organizers of the 2016 festival brought Kentucky-native John Michael Montgomer y to perform on opening night. The festival’s long-standing tradition brings about friendly competition

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and good eats to the downtown area each year, garnering tens of thousands of patrons. The International Bluegrass Music Museum celebrates Owensboro’s unique bluegrass music connection each year in June with the ROMP Music Festival at Yellow Creek Park. Headliners in the past have included John Prine, Steve Martin, Vince Gill, Earl Scruggs, Merle Haggard and Old Crow Medicine Show, among others. Folks come from across the country and throughout the world to enjoy a weekend of camping and bluegrass fellowship. For country music fans, there’s the Big O Music Fest at Reid’s Orchard in August. Jason Aldean, Hank Williams Jr., Chris Stapleton, Jake Owen and Billy Currington have headlined the event that has grown exponen-

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tially in its eight-year history. About the time Friday After 5 closes its season, the East Bridge Art and Music Festival opens downtown to celebrate fine art across the tri-state. Since its first festival in 2010, the East Bridge Art and Music Festival has brought artists from all over Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois and more to town for what has grown into a two-day event. Kicking in the fall season, Reid’s Orchard presents the Reid’s Apple Festival that typically takes place in the middle of October. The family-owned orchard has been passed down through the generations since the late 1880s. The Apple Festival offers arts and crafts booths, food booths and fun events for the whole family. 2 0 1 7


Festivals in Owensboro

May 2017 Blue Bridge Music Festival

101 Daviess Street • 270-687-2770 Regional student music ensembles will perform in Cannon Hall at the RiverPark Center.

Trunnell’s Festival of Flowers

9255 U.S. 431 • 270-733-2222 • www.trunnellsfarmmarket.com Trunnell’s Farm Market will have fun for the family with activities for all ages. The Festival of Flowers is one of many events Trunnell’s offers on the weekends throughout spring, summer and fall.

International Bar-B-Q Festival

www.bbqfest.com On the second weekend in May, the Owensboro riverfront is a center of activity when local cooking teams gather to compete with their secret recipes for barbecue. There is also musical entertainment, children’s activities, a car show, carnival rides, arts and crafts sales and more.

Friday After 5

fridayafter5.com Friday After 5 is a summer-long series of free outdoor concerts held every Friday on the downtown riverfront beginning May 19. Friday After 5 was named one of the “Top 10 Summer Festivals” in Kentucky. The festival includes live bands, family events, food and entertainment and a “Toast to the Sunset” at each Friday After 5.

June 2017

Owensboro Multicultural Festival

1328 Griffith Avenue • 270-684-1467 Hosted by First Presbyterian Church, this annual event is a celebration of cultures that educates the public through dance, music, arts and more.

September 2017 East Bridge Art & Music Festival

Dazzling Daylilies

199 W. Veterans Blvd. • 270-684-3570 25 Carter Road • 270-852-8925 • www.wkbg.org Studio Slant hosts the annual East Bridge Arts and Music Festival in A festival presented by the Western Kentucky Botanical Garden, this Smothers Park. The festival will begin during the last Friday After 5 of event features hot air “Balloons Over the Garden,” a Walk and Talk, plant the year. sale and more.

October 2017

ROMP: Bluegrass Roots & Branches Festival

5710 Kentucky 144 • 270-926-7891 • www.RompFest.com The 14th Annual River of Music Party features four days of music, with most concerts held at Yellow Creek Park. Past performers include John Prine, The Punch Brothers, Steve Martin, LeAnn Womack, 23 String Band and Sam Bush.

July 2017

www.owensboroairshow.com An aircraft display and aerial demonstrations are at the OwensboroDaviess County Regional Airport, 2200 Airport Road. The air show is on the Owensboro riverfront.

Reid’s Orchard Apple Festival

Daviess County Lions Club Fair

6191 Kentucky 54, Philpot • www.daviesscountyfair.com The Daviess County Lions Club Fair is held annually at the Daviess County Fairgrounds. There will be tractor pulls, rides, food and more.

August 2017 Big O Music Fest

Owensboro Air Show

4812 Kentucky 144 • www.bigomusicfest.com The Big O Music Fest is held each year at Reid’s Orchard. Past performers include Dierks Bentley, Travis Tritt, Jason Aldean and Billy Currington.

4812 Kentucky 144 • 270-685-2444 • www.reidorchard.com Reid’s Orchard has been celebrating apples and the fall season for more than two decades. Visitors can sample a variety of apple-themed treats, and there are many family activities.

November 2017 81st Annual Owensboro-Daviess County Christmas Parade

www.ChristmasParade.net This is the largest Christmas parade in Kentucky and the tri-state area. Bands, lighted floats and Santa Claus will entertain all ages starting at 4:30 p.m. in downtown Owensboro.

Every effort was made to ensure the accuracy of the information as of the date of publication.

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Lifestyle While Owensboro is a great place to live, it’s also a great place to play. From award-winning parks to one-of-a-kind restaurants, your time in Owensboro, whether it’s just overnight or for an extended stay, is sure to be memorable. In this section, you’ll explore life in Owensboro. We have everything you’re looking for — churches and sanctuaries, parks and pools, bourbon and beer, food and festivals. Stop in any of our locally-owned restaurants and taste the Owensboro difference. Our hospitality is high quality and we treat visitors as if they’re our lifelong friends. We would love for you to explore our city, walk around the downtown riverfront and stay a while.


CECIL FARMS

growing

home delivery

Suzanne Cecil White never intended to work in the family business of growing commercial fruits and vegetables in the St. Joseph area of Daviess County. And for 10 years, she managed to stay with that plan by becoming a high school math teacher in Bowling Green. “That was a shock to everyone, including myself,” said White about her time teaching math. “Teaching has always been my passion, and it still is. But after I was married and had a child, we decided to move home. My intention was to take a year off and apply for a (teaching job) the next year.” White returned home in 2011. And it was almost immediately that she joined her father, Gary Cecil, and brother, Ryan Cecil, in the family business. White began developing a new concept

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for Cecil Farms that focused on communitysupported agriculture. “... I was home for two days and took a go at the home-produce delivery,” said White, who’s now the farm’s director of operations. “And it just took off, and that’s where I am.” Cecil Farms created a website — www. cecilfarmspd.com — to allow local and regional customers to sign up for a half-share or full-share of produce that is delivered to their homes each week during the spring, summer and fall seasons. Since beginning the home-delivery service, Cecil Farms has started growing more fruits and vegetables such as lettuce, asparagus, honeydew, okra, spinach, kale and strawberries. “We were always a vegetable farm, but we just did the basics — squash, peppers,

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Cecil Farms is now accepting new subscribers for its 2017 spring, summer and fall seasons. To sign up, visit www.cecilfarmspd.com. cucumbers,” said White about what was grown before creating the home-delivery service. “We just grew the popular items. We didn’t have our own tomatoes before. In the last five years, we’ve added seven greenhouses.” Subscribers can choose to have deliveries once a week or every other week. White said the produce will depend on the season but it is all picked and delivered to the subscribers’ doorsteps the same day. Along with local residents, the service has been discovered by schools, businesses and restaurants. “It’s always fresh and local,” White said. “... We have a huge variety that we grow now that we didn’t before. We now have a market of people who want our produce. I think people appreciate that what we sell is what we grow.” 2 0 1 7


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MATT WEAFER

ampbell Club executive chef Matt Weafer was born and raised in Owensboro, and although he went to school to be a writer, Weafer said he worked in restaurants from the time he was a teenager. “I’ve just always loved food,” he said. “Even when I worked at the newspaper, all I did was think about food, so eventually I found myself back in the kitchen because it’s what I’m passionate about.” Weafer has been at the Campbell Club for more than three years and said the restaurant is “so just laser-focused” on customer satisfaction. “We’re member-owned, private dining ... and that’s what it’s all about, taking care of them,” he said. “I get to go out and meet with them, mingle with them, and I’ve got free rein in the kitchen to kind of play, experiment and do things like focus on farm-to-table.” His farm-to-table initiative is also something about which Weafer said he’s passionate. The idea of farm-to-table is “multi-faceted for so many different reasons,” but for the chef, it boils down to quality food that’s good for the environment, the economy and taste. One thing members pay for “is to have that confidence in me that I’m serving them the best of the best,” he said. When buying local produce and goods, Weafer said money stays local and you develop relationships with local farming families. “You get to know the family, and it becomes part of what you do on a daily basis, and it puts a lot more heart, a lot more sentiment to what you’re doing

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because I know the person and their kids who grew the tomatoes ... . To me, it helps me care even more about the food.” And for Weafer, that’s what it’s all about. “I care about the members, I care about where the food comes from, and I care about the people who grow the food,” he said. For instance, he said, produce sections at large chain stores remain unchanged through the year, and “that’s not the way the world works, that’s not the way vegetables grow. It’s not natural, essentially.” So “when you’re simply talking about taste,” those ingredients aren’t as good as they should be, said Weafer. “The best way to make sure the food is as good as it can be is to get it at its ripest, at its freshest,” he said. “And the only way that I can do that consciously, knowingly is (purchase) from somebody local, from somebody I know by name and I know where they grow their food, how they grow their food, that sort of thing.” As much as possible, Weafer said he uses Kentucky Proud products. Weafer said it wasn’t necessarily a decision to focus on farm-to-table dishes, but he’s always been particular about ingredients. “That’s always been the obvious and best choice,” he said. “They just go hand-in-hand. Good food and farm-to-table go hand-in-hand. There’s no separation of the two.” — WRITTEN BY STEPHANIE SALMONS

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Great Har vest Bread Co. owner Greg Garrard left a job in corporate America and moved to Owensboro with the idea of opening a bakery. At the time, Garrard had an accounting degree and a job that didn’t seem like the correct fit for his personality. “My mom’s side of the family were farmers, and my dad’s side were small business owners,” Garrard said. “It was kind of hard working in a big company.” Garrard opened the Great Harvest Bread Co. store on Frederica Street in December 2001. Since then, the store has more than doubled in size, and Garrard has opened a second cafe-style Great Harvest on Kentucky 54. Meanwhile, he has been recog-

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nized by the company for the quality of his bread and for bringing innovative ideas to the company’s business model. “The great thing about Great Harvest is it’s a franchise system, but it’s a ‘freedom franchise,’ ” Garrard said. “It’s as close to being a mom and pop as you can get.” Garrard received some initial training at the company’s headquar ters out west, but was given few instructions beyond the requirement that he receive the wheat for his bread from the company. “Once they give you some training wheels, you go off on your own, and that suited my personality,” Garrard said. “The customer is the one that tells us what to do

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and what to make.” To make the business successful, Garrard decided to bake sweeter, southernstyle breads rather than breads that are more popular in other Great Harvest stores. In 2005, the company added sandwiches to its menu — something other Great Harvest stores hadn’t tried yet — and branched out to hot sandwiches and catering in 2007. The Great Harvest cafe on Kentucky 54 opened in 2015. “If I’d looked at our business (today) 16 years ago, I would have been overwhelmed,” Garrard said. But the store has been able to roll with the expansions and new ideas because they “just evolved,” he said. “Owensboro blew my CEO away that we were able to generate all the sales we can in a 50,000 (population) city,” Garrard said. “We’re one of the top stores in the system. “Where we were ahead of the cur ve is when we got into catering. Garrard said the business has lasted for 16 years because the staff pays attention to the details, such as grinding the wheat daily and focusing on making the best-quality product. “My dad, he taught us there’s only one way to do things — the right way,” Garrard said. “There’s no magic pill (to success), but what we’ve always emphasized is quality and customer service.” 2 0 1 7


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Kentucky Proud From farm to table

Across Owensboro, you can find locally-grown produce at farmers markets and roadside stands. Our hope is that you refer to the list when buying produce in and around Owensboro. Our local farmers are an important piece of the puzzle that makes up our community.


reid’s orchard

Reid’s Orchard produces strawberries, apples, peaches, blackberries, pears, cherries and all types of vegetables for its farm market. In 1986, the family initiated a gathering for the community; the “Apple Festival,” which today hosts 25,000 people on the third weekend in October. The festival has been named Top 10 in Kentucky and a Top 20 event by the southeast Tourism Society, which covers 11 states. The Reid family wants to continue to diversify, grow and serve the community but most especially to pass the traditions on to a sixth generation.

4812 Kentucky 144, Owensboro 270-685-2444 JANUARY — MARCH 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday APRIL — MID-MAY 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday MID MAY — END OF OCTOBER 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday NOVEMBER — DECEMBER Noon to 4 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday

WINTER SEASON: DEC. 26 TO MARCH 31 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday — Saturday Closed Sunday and Monday

trunneLl’s farm market

SPRING SEASON: APRIL 1 TO JUNE 30 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon to 5 p.m. Sunday SUMMER SEASON: JULY 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon — 5 p.m. Sunday

270-733-2222

Trunnell’s Farm Market now has three locations in Owensboro. Its main location is the farm at 9255 U.S. 431 in Utica. It also has locations on Springhill Drive, off Kentucky 54, and in Towne Square Mall.

FALL SEASON: AUG. 1 — DEC. 24 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday — Saturday Noon — 5 p.m. Sunday Closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day

Owensboro Regional Farmers Market

The market has the ability to take EBT and debit card transactions at certain locations and times. Cabbage, salad onions, zucchini, greenhouse grown tomatoes, yellow squash, jams, jellies, bedding plants, perennials, vegetable transplants and baked goods are available. MID-APRIL — END OF OCTOBER 6:30 a.m. — noon Saturdays at the corner of Triplett Street and Parrish Avenue JUNE — AUGUST 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays at Owensboro Health Regional Hospital.

Cecil Farms produce delivery

9408 Mulligan Road, Owensboro 270-929-1445

Cecil Farms has raised produce for more than 30 years on the western side of Owensboro. Gary and Ryan Cecil have grown a variety fruits and vegetables on both a commercial and local level. Cecil Farms delivers locally-grown, farm-fresh produce to local homes,

businesses, restaurants, schools and more in Owensboro and surrounding areas. Order a variety box to be delivered on a weekly basis throughout the harvest season (typically May through October.) The produce you buy will be at your home within hours of being picked, versus multiple days or weeks. Each week’s share consists of what’s in season.

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20 years of Friday After 5 WRITTEN BY BOBBIE HAYSE

FREE SUMMERLONG MUSIC FESTIVAL IS STRONGER THAN EVER Friday After 5 Executive Director Kirk Kirkpatrick said the 2016 season of the free summerlong music festival in downtown Owensboro was the biggest in its 20-year histor y. For the 20th-anniversar y season, Kirkpatrick says the event’s planners and board of directors “pulled out all the stops” to make the most out of ever y entertainment venue each Friday. It’s a task to put on a show like Friday After 5 each week, Kirkpatrick said, and it’s still surprising to him how many folks attend each week from out of town. The contributions of 100 volunteers and a commitment of 16 straight Friday nights by more than two dozen committee members create the magic of Friday After 5. It has taken a lot for the event to grow to its current status, however. The first Friday After 5 was in 1996. Besides the RiverPark Center and a deteriorating Executive Inn Rivermont, there were few reasons to even go downtown. A band was set up in the RiverPark Center Courtyard and for four consecutive Fridays that June, a band played for about 150 people. The event has spread the length of the Owensboro riverfront, spanning six venues for entertainment, including the Party Pier, Plaza Patio, Courtyard, a street fair, a gospel concert in the RiverPark Center and the Overlook stage. Friday After 5 was named Platinum Award Winner for Best Community Event and honored as being of the top 10 summer festivals in Kentucky. “I think our success now and where we can help the most in the future is to be a springboard for other events in Owensboro,” Kirkpatrick said. “Not only by example, but by actually collaborating with other events.” Friday After 5 is unique for providing an opportunity for young professionals in the area to have a leadership opportunity. Young 20- and 30-somethings take on roles of venue and performance producers, chairmen and vice-chairmen. “We want them to move on and be a leader in other parts of the community,” Kirkpatrick said. “That’s one of the hidden benefits of Friday After 5, giving younger people a chance to be in that true leadership role of an event that has really become a signature event for Owensboro.” Friday After 5 runs from May to September and is free and open to the public ever y Friday night in downtown Owensboro, where it has hosted more than 50,000 visitors each season. For more information, visit fridayafter5.com.


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Smothers Park A place to relax and play


Smothers Park is located on the Ohio River, providing a gorgeous view for everyone to enjoy. One highlight of the park is the three signature fountains that have cascading waterfalls and four water shows every hour. Take a seat on one of the many swings overlooking the river and enjoy the breeze and colorful sunset. The Lazy Dayz playground and Smothers Park were renovated as part of the 2013 multi-million dollar riverfront upgrade in Owensboro that includes two hotels and a convention center. Since opening, the playground has garnered praise and awards including “The 50 Best Playgrounds in America” and “Top 10 playgrounds in the U.S.” G R E A T E R

Lazy Dayz playground The Lazy Dayz Children’s Playground is wheelchair accessible and has a splash pad area that provides fun for kids of all ages. The playground also features unique 30-foot elevated walk through trees. The playground system features slides, climbing apparatus, tubes, observation decks and a central, two-story “mega-tower.” Kids of all ages will love the park and all it has to offer — Smothers Park is truly unique.

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We Put Technology to Work An Employee-Owned Company

MPD, Inc. traces its origin to 1899, with predecessor companies on the same site manufacturing electrical machinery, electric lamps and electron tubes.

Components

On January 1, 1987, General Electric sold the assets of the Owensboro business to private investors who renamed the company MPD, Inc. At the time of the sale, MPD, Inc.’s product offering was exclusively electronic components with 85% of total sales directed to military avionics. In 1988, to diversify into nonmilitary product lines, MPD, Inc. acquired MPH Industries, Inc. and CMI, Inc. Lion Laboratories Limited, in Barry, Wales, was acquired in 1990. In 1996, MPD, Inc. established MPD (Singapore) PTE LTD to better serve the Asian marketplace. After ten years of ownership by private investors, the management of MPD, Inc., led by Gary Braswell, established an Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) and purchased essentially all of the outstanding shares of MPD, Inc. stock. As a result, in 1997, MPD, Inc. became an ESOP company. Today, the employee-owners of MPD, Inc. not only enjoy competitive pay and benefits, but also an opportunity to share in the company’s financial success through the ESOP.

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Murphy Excavating LLC is a locally owned company that strives to meet the needs of individuals, farmers and businesses within the Owensboro and surrounding areas.

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WRITTEN BY ANGELA OLIVER

GOOD

EATS CAUSE GOOD

ANNUAL PICNICS A KEY FUNDRAISER FOR LOCAL CATHOLIC CHURCHES Summer for most in the local Catholic community means a chance to follow a long tradition of bringing people together for good fellowship, good eats and a good cause. Annual parish picnics are held at about two dozen churches in the Diocese of Owensboro as fundraisers. Local historians date the tradition back to approximately 1877, when St. Martin Catholic Church in Rome — on Daviess County’s southwest side — hosted the first such gathering. The picnics raise sizeable amounts for the parishes, among them about $20,000 for Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, $35,000 for St. Mary Magdelene Parish, which celebrated its 100th picnic in 2015, and an average of $100,000 for St. Pius X Catholic Church. Bob Freels, 69, remembers him and his three brothers volunteering at the St. Pius Picnic as boys. “We weren’t that old yet, but our father always put us to work; it was like our job every year,” he said. Many young members used to volunteer to work the parish picnics. “Ours used to have a carnival, so we would save up money and look forward to the rides all year. It was great fun for us as little kids.” Enjoyment of the picnic didn’t stop in his youth, though. Freels has coordinated the cooking team for the picnic for more than 20 years now. But the team’s reach stretches far beyond the walls of St. Pius X. The team has competed in Owensboro’s International Bar-B-Q Festival every year since it began in 1979 and barbecues for the Reid’s Orchard Apple Festival in October. The team also volunteers to cook meats for such charitable causes as the Ursuline Sisters of Mount St. Joseph annual picnic, which supports retired sisters at the Mother House in Maple Mount, and the barbecue at Pitt Academy for special-needs children every May in Louisville. “We love a friendly competition at the Bar-B-Q Fest, and any way we can help out another group, we will,” he said. Some parishes use the funds raised to support youth sports teams or other various ministries. St. Pius X picnic proceeds go to its general fund. “The picnic provides for different parish needs,” he said. While the number of volunteers has dwindled at parish picnics throughout the diocese over the years, as the cost of food rises — leading the Ursulines to host their 46th and final picnic this past September — some have looked at more innovative ways of funding, and most are optimistic about the future of annual picnics. One thing the picnic brings can’t be replaced, Freels said. “It’s one of the only times you’ll get all the members together, even old members coming in from out of town, and all your family for a day of just having fun,” he said.


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Returning to pastor COY FUHR BACK IN CITY TO LEAD HER CHILDHOOD CHURCH WRITTEN BY ANGELA OLIVER The Rev. Christine Coy Fohr has fond childhood memories of attending First Presbyterian Church with her parents and siblings. Now, she has an office there. “Not many people get an opportunity to do that,” said Fohr, who became pastor of First Presbyterian in November 2015. “I believe God sent her,” said Samuel Tandy, a member of six years. “She’s ver y welcoming and with her background in this church, she has a special connection.” Fohr, 33, had been away fr om Owensboro since graduating from Apollo High School in 2001. She studied sociology at Rhodes College in Memphis, where she picked up a love of ser vice and joined the denomination’s Young Adult Volunteer (YAV) program. After graduating, she spent a year in Belfast, Nor thern Ireland, as a youth minister at a boys home. “That’s where I really felt the call (to become a preacher),” she said. “I felt God leading me.” Through YAV, she also met her husband, Rob Fohr, who ser ved in Argentina. The Tucson, Arizona, native is an ordained ruling elder — a lay position — and works on the Mission Responsibility Through Investment committee for the Presbyterian Mission Agency. “We’re blessed to both be able to work for God and the church,” Fohr said. The couple have a 2-year-old daughter, Madeline, and said it’s an exciting time to be back in Owensboro. B e f o r e m o v i n g h e r e , F o h r, a Louisville Pr esbyterian Theologi cal Seminar y alum, was an associate


I believe God sent her. She’s very welcoming and with her background in this church, she has a special connection.

— Samuel tandy Church member

pastor at Highland Presbyterian Church in Louisville. “So much has changed here, but there are still familiar faces,” she said. “It’s interesting to walk these same halls — my grandmother started the kindergarten program here in the 1960s. I feel such a connection to this church. It has always been a very warm place.” Fohr is adjusting well to her first pastorship. And she’s looking for ward to her second year, after a re-energizing of the congregation — the church raised more than $25,000 in one week to sponsor and build a Habitat for Humanity home for a local family earlier last year, a first for the church to Fohr’s knowledge. Fohr said she also enjoyed her first experience as pastor during the church’s annual Multicultural Festival. “It’s a wonderful, necessary event for our community, especially with ever ything going on in our country,” she said. “It’s not just to say ‘Yaaay, diversity!’ but for a church to acknowledge that diversity is a God-given gift we should embrace and celebrate.” The church, at 1328 Grif fith Ave., can lead some to hesitate to attend because of its prominent location, Fohr said. “But First Presbyterian is a very welcoming, mission-minded place, and our hope is ever yone feels that when they come here,” she said.

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Health and Education In Owensboro, being active and staying healthy means more than just hitting the gym. With so many athletic complexes and health facilities, there is something for everyone. Yoga, Pure Barre, running groups, bike shops and more can be found throughout the area. In this section, you’ll find just a glimpse of what Owensboro has to offer in health care along with meeting some of the young professionals who decided to make Owensboro their home. Three physicians talk about what drew them to the Bluegrass State and why they’ve chosen to stay. Our award-winning educational systems range from pre-kindergarten to post-secondary. Whether you’re wanting to educate your children or yourself, there are institutions available for everyone. Learn about all of the health and education opportunities in Owensboro or visit our award-winning facilities to learn even more.


spotlight

COREY CELLURALE

C

orey Cellurale, a Delaware native, first came to Owensboro as a student. A job opportunity brought her back just a few years later. Cellurale, a music teacher at Foust Elementary School, enjoys being involved in the community. In addition to teaching music at Foust, she is a director at Back Alley Musicals and assistant music director at First Presbyterian Church. Cellurale also is involved in music across the river as a director for the Evansville Children’s Choir. “I went to school in North Carolina, at Catawba College,” Cellurale said. “Going into my senior year, my choral director and music supervisor both transferred to (Kentucky) Wesleyan. “They asked us if we wanted to finish (our studies) with them,” Cellurale said. At the time, Wesleyan was expanding its music department and then-KWC President Craig Turner — who had previously been president at Catawba College — reached out to his former Catawba colleagues and brought them to Owensboro. Cellurale said a lot of Catawba music students decided to follow their instructors. “Twenty-five East Coast people all got transplanted here,” she said. Cellurale was a senior in music education at the time. Although most of her credits transferred correctly, the switch added another year to college for her. During her final semester, she taught music at Newton Parrish Elementary School. After graduation, Cellurale took a teaching job in Nashville, partly because Tennessee honors Kentucky

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teaching certificates, which meant she didn’t have to be recertified when she moved out of state. The Nashville school was a school in transition and one at which the teaching staff experienced almost complete turnover every year. Not too long after she started, the school announced it was cutting its music programs for budgetary reasons. Right about that time, however, Cellurale got a call from Tom Stites, fine arts coordinator for Owensboro Public Schools. Stites had an opening for a music teacher at Foust Elementary. “This kind of appeared and happened,” said Cellurale, who was familiar with and impressed by OPS, so the chance to return to Owensboro was “almost too perfect.” In addition to teaching at Foust Elementary and working with choirs and Back Alley Musicals, Cellurale is also busy pursuing a Master’s degree in music from Florida State University. While Cellurale works with adults and children in her various musical roles, she said she loves seeing how music positively affects her young students at Foust Elementary, particularly “the confidence they get” from music. A child who is quiet in other classes “will be the first to stand up” in music class, Cellurale said. “Especially the Foust Singers. They walk out and feel like a group, and they love that sense of pride in representing their school and representing themselves.”

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MORE THAN JUICE Wheatgrass Juice Bar and Kitchen has been promoting healthy living in Owensboro since April 2014. From selling individual juice bottles around town to its own store off Kentucky 54, this local juice bar has been a big hit across the town. Shauna Dever Jones, who began the business in her kitchen while on maternity leave, researched the effects of juicing in order to help with some stomach issues she was experiencing. She said she tinkered with recipes to get everything just right. “It took a lot of trial and error and researching other recipes, but we now have a solid base of drinks we offer every day,” Jones said. Some of the more popular drinks include Green Lemonade — apples, lemons, kale, spinach, parsley and cucumber; Turn Up the Beet — beets, carrots, apples, cucumbers, ginger and mint; and Sunshine In a Cup — carrots, celery, apples, cucumbers, lemons, ginger and mint. Most of the fruits and vegetables come from local area farmers. But, after more than two years, Jones said her plate is getting too full with four jobs that

For more info on Wheatgrass Juice Bar, visit its Facebook page or drop by the store at 3115 Commonwealth Court. include being a dance professor at Western Kentucky University, working for Owensboro Dance Theatre and leading and teaching the Rising Stars Dance Therapy Program with ODT (the tri-state’s only dance program geared for children and adults with special needs and physical disabilities), so she has passed the business on to Melissa Phillips, a friend she met through Wheatgrass Juice Bar. Phillips, who has worked in the health and wellness industry for more than seven years, sells Young Living Essential Oils and has started displaying them at the juice bar. “I think the business changed a lot when we brought it to 54,” Phillips said. “We are bringing more health consciousness to this area. We have Planet Fitness down the road and Balance 54 right here, so I think we are just trying to

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WRITTEN BY MEGHANN RICHARDSON

reach as many people as possible. We want to be accessible to everyone.” Along with the juices and the oils, Wheatgrass Juice Bar and Kitchen also offers salads, wraps and protein balls — all made fresh daily. One way Wheatgrass Juice Bar has been getting out into the community and influencing others is by going into the schools and teaching the youngsters about juicing. “A lot of people are scared of juices because they think ‘green juice — ew,’ ” Phillips said. “But that’s not the case, juice can be tasty, no matter if it’s green, blue or brown. So many kids are raised on fast food and processed food that we think it’s important to offer healthy options and get the word out that juice is good for you. There is nothing wrong with juice.” She said the goal is to help Owensboro get healthy. “Hopefully more people learn about juicing and the positive effects,” Phillips said. Wheatgrass Juice can also be found around Owensboro at Legends Outfitters, Cecil Farms, EdgeFit, Trunnell’s Farm Market and Riley’s Soda Co.

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HEALTHY LIVING

ENCOURAGED

BIG O BIKE SHOP AIMS TO BRING PEOPLE TO THE CYCLING WORLD WRITTEN BY MEGHANN RICHARDSON

Passionate about healthy living and active lifestyles, the guys at the Big O Bike Shop are hoping to share their enthusiasm with the people of Owensboro and beyond. The shop opened in March 2016 but found a new home three months later in the Lake Forest Town Center. Ryan Hawley, who co-owns the shop with Jason DeWeese and Larry Myles, said the move was crucial to the business. “It was a night and day difference,” he said. “Where we were was a destination place, you had to know we were there to find us. Out here we’re surrounded by other great businesses like Great

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Harvest and Trunnell’s. They all just bring in a ton of traffic, so that helps us out a lot.” Hawley said the decision to locate the shop in Lake Forest Town Center was based on what they believed the area could be. “Where it is now and where it’s going — it’s only going to keep growing at a high rate,” he said. While the Big O Bike Shop offers bikes, active wear, nutrition and more, they want to offer more than physical products. “Our main goal is to bring more people into the cycling world,” Hawley said. “We want to encourage everyone to get outside and live an active lifestyle.” The crew created weekly rides that cater to families and provide a fun environment for all. Some rides are for women only, while others are open to everyone. DeWeese, Hawley and Myles decided to open the Big O Bike Shop because they felt that Owensboro needed a bicycle shop that encouraged more people to join the cycling world. “Before we opened, we didn’t feel like the Owensboro biking scene was too friendly to newcomers or women,” Hawley said. “What we try to do is cater to everyone — men, women and people who are new to the sport. We provide rides that are not intimidating for them — whether it’s women or men who are beginners.” With the David C. Adkisson Greenbelt Park just steps from its back door, the Big O Bike Shop is the perfect place to shop, hang out and meet new friends. Hawley said the guys at the shop promote community and try to give back whenever they can. “In the future we want to provide a facility where people can ride their bikes indoors and out of the weather,” he said. “Whether it’s winter or 100 degrees outside, we want a place where people can come in and still get their exercise. Maybe we can keep more people on bikes and living a healthier lifestyle.”

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Daviess County Public Schools Kentucky District of Distinction 1622 Southeastern Parkway P.O. Box 21510 Owensboro KY 42304-1510 Visit us online: www.dcps.org

wku.edu/owensboro

For information about DCPS: (270) 852-7000 or contact@dcps.org

I want to advance my career. WKU Owensboro is dedicated to bringing quality education to business and industry and helping your employees succeed in their careers.

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primary playing floor. Two new team locker rooms are also being added. The Moore Center will feature an open concept living and dining area on the first floor, which includes a remodeled cafeteria that is already in use. A new snack bar and Spirit Shop are being added along with a new Athletics Hall of Fame, an enrollment center, a health and wellness center, an expanded walking track WRITTEN BY KEITH LAWRENCE and updated office space that includes a new counseling center. Brescia University is in the midst of a highest enrollment ever. Altman said construction of the $6.7 million Kayla Altman, Brescia’s director of public “signature building” on the northeast corner $12 million to $14 million building program that its president, the Rev. Larry Hostetter, relations and marketing, said the first phase of of Frederica and Ninth streets is scheduled to says will turn the Frederica Street campus into the construction project, which began March begin in May 2018. 31 and is expected to be completed by May, “the gateway to downtown Owensboro.” That building will feature “an innovative The construction is necessar y, he said, is a $4.8 million renovation and expansion of digital learning studio, an auditorium that will The Moore Center — formerly known as the be available for community use, state-of-the-art because the university is growing rapidly. In August, Brescia was named the fifth- Campus Center. classrooms and computer laboratories and will The Campus Center was built in 1988-89 house the School of Business, the School of fastest-growing Catholic college in America by at a cost of $3 million, but it had become out- the Education and the School of Social Work,” the Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac. Between 2004 and 2014, Brescia’s enroll- dated. she said. Now, the gym is being expanded to seat ment grew by 56.7 percent — from 674 stuAltman said, “Innovation and technology 1,000 fans. dents to 1,056, the publication said. will be hallmarks of this new state-of-the-art It includes two full practice courts plus the facility.” The 2014 figure was the school’s second-

Brescia becoming the ‘Gateway to Downtown’

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Innovation and technology will be hallmarks of this new state-of-the-art facility.

— Kayla Altman

Brescia’s director of public relations and marketing



www.owensboro.kyschools.us

450 Griffith Ave., Owensboro, KY 42301 (270) 686-1000 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter

WE ARE

270-686-8896 www.owensborocatholic.org

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The Wesleyan Way BART DARRELL MAKES IMPACT AT KWC

WRITTEN BY KEITH LAWRENCE

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On Sept. 23, 2014, days after he became the 34th president of Kentucky Wesleyan College, Bart Darrell got together with all the students, faculty and staff to talk about what he wanted to accomplish. In less than five minutes before the meeting, Darrell jotted down four things that he called “The Wesleyan Way.” • “We do everything with HONOR. That is a word thrown around too loosely these days, but we take it seriously. Conducting oneself with honor breeds self-confidence and validates our accomplishments.” • “We always SUPPORT EACH OTHER. The singer in the Wesleyan Singers will attend her classmate’s volleyball game; the volleyball player will be at the play; the actor will be at the football game; the football player will be at the debate; and the debater will be at the Wesleyan Singers concert. Together, we are truly better and a community will always prevail over individuals.” • “We will COMPETE WITH INTEGRITY. We know that regardless of a person’s chosen career or profession, he or she will have to compete. From the ministry, to the board room, to the operating room, to the courtroom, to the field of play, nobody will succeed unless they have learned to compete in a way born in integrity and good intention.” • “We LOVE EACH OTHER in Christ. We know that love of others is the critical piece of good works and successful service. We believe that God has blessed each of us with unique talents and we are to care about each other and use our talents to better the lives of others. We watch out for one another on campus and love each other as we have been commissioned by God.” “It’s what I believe,” said Darrell, a 1984 KWC graduate. “It’s what we’ve always done at Kentucky Wesleyan. It’s what Wesleyan has always meant to me.” Few college presidents have as close a relationship with their school as Darrell. He grew up on the KWC campus. His father, Bob Darrell, taught English there from 1969 to 2000. The Wesleyan Way was something Darrell absorbed through the years. “It’s the underpinning of everything,” he said. In 2016, the city renamed Wesleyan Drive on the campus, making it Wesleyan Way. And Wesleyan Way shirts and memorabilia can be found all over the campus. Darrell’s five-minute writing project has had a major impact at the school. G R E A T E R

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It’s what I believe. It’s what we’ve always done at Kentucky Wesleyan. It’s what Wesleyan has always meant to me.

1901 Frederica Street, Owensboro, Ky. 42301 www.graywolfindustrial.com

— Bart Darrell KWC President

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KEN T U CKY WES L EYAN CO L L EGE

st

16th

Top institution for a bachelor’s degree in Kentucky — Washington Monthly

in the nation

Best Value Online College for Criminology Degrees — OnlineU

A Best in the Southeast College — Princeton Review

13th in the South

Best Regional College in Kentucky Best Value Regional College in Kentucky Best Regional College for Veterans in Kentucky — U.S. News & World Report

3000 Frederica Street, Owensboro, KY 42301 • kwc.edu • 1-800-999-0592 G R E A T E R

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Owensboro excellent for

YOUNG

PHYSICIANS REGIONAL HEALTH SYSTEM COMMITTED TO RECRUITMENT WRITTEN BY AUSTIN RAMSEY

What sets one community’s quality of life apart from another is often its health care system. The greater Owensboro area is the proud host of a dynamic, growing health care sector, and at its helm is Owensboro Health. The region’s largest employer and, indeed, the largest nonprofit health care provider in western Kentucky, Owensboro Health delivers a wide range of medical services through advanced care and unique regional strategies. OH owns and operates a regional hospital in Owensboro and a network of providers known as One Health, with offices throughout western Kentucky and southern Indiana. Part of what makes the regional health system so successful, leaders say, is its commitment to recruiting some of the nation’s top minds. Young, talented and driven physicians ensure a lasting footprint in the region while bolstering credibility and reliability in an ever-changing health care industry. It’s up to communities such as Owensboro to create an environment that’s well-suited to attract those young men and women who are often looking to start their medical careers. Owensboro and the surrounding region, they say, is the perfect place.

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Janae Kittinger Dr. Janae Kittinger, 34, is a plastic and reconstructive surgeon for One Health, an Owensboro Health provider. Kittinger, who has been practicing in Owensboro since 2014, earned a medical degree from the University of Kansas and completed her residency training at Texas A&M University. She’s originally from Chanute, Kansas, but has family in Louisville, which, she says, it partly what led to her interest in this area. Plastic surgery was always something in which Kittinger said she had an interest. She said she was the most focused on plastic surgery while performing surgery rotations in medical school. “When I was in high school, I was in a gifted education program, and my teacher wanted me to figure out what I wanted to do with my life,” she said. “I actually was a little annoyed, because she was asking me to do an extra project, so I took a magazine and kind of threw it on the desk. It opened up to a big article

G R E A T E R

on Operation Smile — plastic surgeons going to various countries to do cleft palate repair. I was just intrigued. Being able to have that kind of impact on patients’ lives was immediately what I wanted to do.” Her position at Owensboro Health was her first out of residency. She said she wanted to move to a place that would remind her of the small-town atmosphere in which she grew up, but still offer the unique types of surgeries more common in big cities or academic centers. Owensboro, she said, was unique in that it offered both. “It’s an amazing facility with interests in surgeries that I wanted to do, like breast reconstruction,” she said. “But it’s in a facility that is more of a fit for my family. My daughter, for example, instantly loved the downtown (Smothers) park.” She’s married to Benjamin Kittinger. She has one daughter and two stepdaughters.

Your one Stop Scrub Shop! 4760 Frederica Street Owensboro, KY 42301

(270) 683-3333 O W E N S B O R O

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Matthew Golden

Dr. Matthew Golden, 33, is a One Health general surgeon who has been practicing since 2009 and joined the Owensboro team in 2014. He went to medical school at Mercer University and completed his residency at the University of Louisville. There, he said, professors with connections to the Owensboro area recommended it. Golden said he never envisioned himself becoming a surgeon. He knew he wanted to study medicine as an undergraduate at Mercer, but as he garnered more experience in the medical arts, surgery just stuck out. “Eventually, I realized that surgical problems just make sense to me,” he said. “I feel like God placed me in a position where I could have an influence on some of the biggest complications in peoples lives. Surgery is a big event for someone. It’s not a small deal at all. And I can be there for people in their biggest situations — their deepest moments. I can help them. It was my calling.” That calling eventually led to Owensboro. Golden said there is something nice about the Owensboro community that attracted him and his family. He grew up in Macon, Georgia, and the area reminded him of his hometown. For months before he accepted any offers, he and his family, he

said, would visit the area and browse shops and restaurants. “I’d strike up a conversation with someone and everyone I talked to seemed so genuine,” he said. “I’ve come to realize that’s everywhere in Owensboro. It’s such a nice community where people seem to really care. You can go down any neighborhood and everybody seems to take care of their

yards and take pride in what they have and what they do.” His family was impressed by the schools and parks in the area, he said. It’s a family-oriented community where all were welcome. It’s what makes Owensboro special, he said. Golden lives in Owensboro with his wife Hope and their two children.

ence it together. But when they began thinking about children and moving back to Kentucky, Dulabh said, Owensboro was a logical choice. “It’s still a small community,” he said. “They respect their physicians here, and they appreciate what we do for them. Having practiced outside the south, I can tell you I like it here most. I respect patients’ wishes, and they respect mine. It’s a good overall experience. Plus, there’s a need

here. (My wife and I) knew we wanted to practice outside the bigger cities, because there’s a need for doctors in rural parts of the country.” The couple have a 1-year-old boy, and Dulabh said he is excited to raise him in the area. Owensboro, he said, is family friendly and perfect for the their lifestyles. The schools, he said, are excellent, and he and his wife are looking forward to raising their family here.

Amit Dulabh

Dr. Amit Dulabh, 32, is a One Health pediatrician who says Owensboro has become the perfect place to practice medicine. Dulabh was born in Texas, but his parents moved to Louisville to manage a hotel when he was young. That, he said, is where he considers home. Growing up, when other kids his age would wake up early in the mornings to watch cartoons, Dulabh said he would clean hotel rooms or help wash sheets with his siblings or cousins. It gave him an important sense of family pride and a strong work ethic. He said he always knew he wanted to be a doctor, but he didn’t know what field of medicine he would study until he began volunteering at hospitals and clinics in high school. He has a goofy personality, he says, and it meshed well with pediatric care. So, after he graduated from medical school at the University of Kentucky, he began a pediatric residency in Greenville, South Carolina. After residency, Dulabh and his wife Candace, a physicians assistant and Breckinridge County native, began their practices in Brooklyn, New York. Both of them had little experience with a big-city life, but they wanted to get the chance to experi-

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Dr. Richard C. Good Obstetrics and Gynecology Board Certified

NO REFERRAL NEEDED

SERVICES OFFERED: • Annual Gyn Exams

Hab la Esp mos año l

• Essure Procedure

• All Gynecologic • Contraception (Birth Surgery Including Control) Including IUDs Robotic Da Vinci and Nexplanon Implants Hysterectomies • Complete Evaluation and Care of Abnormal Pap Smears • Infertility Evaluation and Basic Treatment • Menopausal Care • Endometrial Ablations

• Evaluation & Treatment of Pelvic Pain • Care of Abnormal Bleeding or Discharge • Complete Pregnancy Care (Delivers Babies)

~ NEW AND ESTABLISHED PATIENTS ALWAYS WELCOME ~

*Dr. Good and his staff are dedicated to providing excellent care for the special needs of women in their friendly office* 3500 Villa Point - Suite 110 B Owensboro, Kentucky 42303 * Next to Kohl’s on Highway 54 *

Office Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:30-5:00 • Friday 8:30-12:00

(270) 926-4449

SAME DAY APPOINTMENTS

AVAILABLE

ALL INSURANCES ACCEPTED INCLUDING MEDICAID


Advertiser Index

Affordable Roofing ............................................... 1 All Care Equipment & Rental .............................. 63 Allstate Insurance ................................................ 41 Amedisys Home Health ...................................... 83 Audubon Area Community Services ................... 77 Axiom Architecture ............................................. 28 BB&T ................................................................... 13 Bimbo Bakeries USA ........................................... 11 Century 21 Partners ............................................ 67 City of Owensboro ................................................ 3 Culver’s Restaurant ............................................. 68 Danco Construction ............................................ 63 Daviess County Extension Service ...................... 45 Daviess County Farm Bureau .............................. 66 Daviess County Teachers Federal Credit Union ........................................................ 91 Daviess County Public Schools ........................... 89 Diggers Inc. ......................................................... 74 Domtar Paper Company ..................................... 26 Edward Jones ........................................Inside Back E.M. Ford ............................................................ 79 Envision Contractors LLC ................................... 25 First Baptist Church of Owensboro .................... 81 First Security Bank .............................................. 71 Gray Wolf Industrial/Titan Contracting .............. 93 Green River Appliance ........................................ 15 Greenwell Chisholm .............................................. 2 Haley-McGinnis Funeral Home & Crematory ..... 75 Hampton Inn & Suites by Hilton Owensboro Downtown ........................................................... 27 Hartz Construction Company ........................... 100 Helton Insurance ................................................. 66 Home Builders Association of Owensboro ........ 81 Independence Bank ............................................ 61 James H. Davis Funeral Home ............................ 21 Kentucky Wesleyan University ............................ 93 L. Steve Castlen Realtors .................................... 59 Lanham Brothers General Contractors ............... 77 Lea Matthews Furniture and Interiors ................ 76 Lil Bit Sassy .......................................................... 14 Limos by Knight .................................................. 83 Lingate Hospitality .............................................. 55 Marcus W. Bosley & Associates .......................... 70 Mellow Mushroom .............................................. 79 Messenger-Inquirer.............................................. 28 Moonlite Bar-B-Q Inn........................................... 79 G R E A T E R

MPD, Inc. ............................................................. 74 Murphy Excavation, LLC ..................................... 76 Nations Medicines - Kentucky 54 ....................... 41 Norman King Electric........................................... 43 O’Bryan Contracting ........................................... 41 Ohio Valley 2-Way Radio ..................................... 55 Old Hickory Bar-B-Q ........................................... 63 OMICO, Inc. ........................................................ 40 ONTIMEFAB INC. ............................................... 20 Owensboro Catholic Schools .............................. 91 Owensboro Community and Technical College .......... ..............................................................inside cover Owensboro Community Health Network ........... 91 Owensboro Daviess County Convention & Visitors Bureau ................................................. 17 Owensboro Dermatology ................................... 67 Owensboro Health Regional Hospital ....................... ...............................................................Back Cover Owensboro Public Schools ................................. 91 PBI Bank .............................................................. 23 RBS Design .......................................................... 23 Real Hacienda ..................................................... 68 Real Living Home Realty, Inc. .............................. 66 Republic Bank...................................................... 48 Richard C. Good MD ........................................... 96 Risner & Associates ............................................. 49 RiverPark Center ................................................. 48 Shoe Stop ............................................................ 13 Shogun of Owensboro ........................................ 49 Sign Pros ............................................................. 43 South Central Bank ............................................. 77 Speciality Food Group ........................................ 89 Springs Urgent Care ........................................... 82 Storm Insurance .................................................. 40 The Crème Coffee House ................................... 68 The Scrub Shoppe ............................................... 94 Tom Blue Furniture .............................................. 63 Tony Clark Realtors ............................................. 21 Trison’s ................................................................. 63 Upper Room Music ............................................. 43 US Bank ............................................................... 45 Valley Truck Equipment ....................................... 83 Valor Oil ............................................................... 54 Wendell Foster’s Campus ................................... 75 Western Kentucky Regional Blood Center ......... 49 Western Kentucky University - Owensboro ........ 89

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Owensboro Health                            4125 US Bank Home Mortgage                 2120 Titan Contracting & Leasing               900 Specialty Foods Group                       600 Wal­Mart (2 superstores)                    541 Toyotetsu MidAmerica LLC                500 Glenmore Distillery                             420 Metalsa                                               400 R&B Foods Inc.                                  400 Kimberly­Clark Corp                           370 UniFirst                                               335 Canteen Service Company                315 Swedish Match North America           275 MPD, Inc.                                            250 The Hines Group, Inc.                         240 Boardwalk                                           215

2016 ­ Alorica announced location to Downtown Owensboro and the hire of approximately 840 people over a three­year period.

44% of U.S. population is within 600 miles of Owensboro, KY

Data provided by

200 E. Third Street, Suite 200 Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926­4339 edc.owensboro.com


• • • • • •

INDUSTRIAL - COMMERCIAL MEDICAL - INSTITUTIONAL CHURCH

St. Stephen Cathedral Restoration

Erb Equipment Company

Brescia Moore Center

Owensboro Riverport Authority

Southern Star

Owensboro Municipal Utilities

United States of America, Inc.

General Contracting Design/Build Construction Construction Management Services Renovations/Conversions/Expansions Pre-Engineered Buildings Engineering/Architectural/Design Services

Considering A New Facility? “Plan & Save Wisely” Let us Perform a Logistic & Economic Feasibility Study for You

BUILDING THE LANDMARKS OF OWENSBORO FOR OVER THREE DECADES

1855 Old Calhoun Road • Owensboro (270) 926-6554 • Fax (270) 685-2854 www.hartzcontracting.com

CONCRETE & EXCAVATION SPECIALIST

The Heartford House

Toyotetsu

First Christian Church

Swedish Match

Curbs • Sidewalks • Pavement

Foundations & Slabs • Retaining Walls Tilt-Up Panels • Basements • Bridges Culverts • Catch Basins • Equipment

Foundations • Containment Structures Concrete Demolition • Site Grading Retention & Storm Drainage

OHRH Site Concrete

Beaver Dam Amphitheater


Everyone has milestones to celebrate. Be prepared to make the most of each one. Join the nearly 7 million investors that trust us with their ďŹ nances and their aspirations. Call or visit any of our eleven financial advisors in the Owensboro area. To find an Edward Jones office near you, call 1-800-ED-JONES or visit www.edwardjones.com.

www.edwardjones.com

Member SIPC


Our orthopedics and sports medicine team just got stronger.

Lauren Mahoney, PA

Jody Mitchell, MD

Nathan Polley, MD

One Health proudly welcomes three new providers to our orthopedics and sports medicine team. Each day, we strive to provide the best care possible for our patients. From sports injuries to advanced joint replacement procedures, we can help you get back to living a happy and healthy life. Visit www.owensborohealth.org for more information about our providers and locations.

Now Welcoming Patients At All Locations ORTHOPEDICS & SPORTS MEDICINE OWENSBORO | GREENVILLE | HENDERSON MADISONVILLE | TELL CITY

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT, CALL TOLL-FREE 844-44-MY-ONE (844-446-9663).

2017 Chamber Magazine  

2017 Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Magazine

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