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A G U I D E TO H E A R T H E A LT H

A special supplement to the

S AT U R DAY, F E B RUA RY 1 , 2 0 2 0


2 LOVE YOUR HEART

Messenger-Inquirer Saturday, February 1, 2020

‘We’re going to recover and get stronger’ THERESA ROWE’S RECOVERY FROM T WO OPEN-HEART SURGERIES PROVES THAT FITNESS CAN HELP SAVE YOUR LIFE BY JODI KEEN

MESSENGER-INQUIRER

T

heresa Rowe’s name is a familiar one. The McLean County resident’s “Shaped By Faith” exercise program, which espouses a “whole being” approach to health by aligning one’s physical health with spiritual peace, has expanded into television, radio, books, multiple fitness DVDs and a regular column in the Messenger-Inquirer’s Religion & Values section. But Theresa’s impressive fitness journey includes this lesser-known caveat: She was born with three holes in her heart — holes that stunningly went undiscovered until she was 24 years old. As it happens, her public love of fitness privately helped save her life. At age 23, Theresa was a mother of two living in Omaha, Nebraska. She owned a fitness company and taught exercise classes five days a week while also teaching modeling classes. Around that time, Theresa says she began feeling unusually tired and was advised to see a doctor. “(I remember thinking) that something’s going on, I feel short of breath,” she said. “My oxygen level was 100 percent. The doctors said, ‘You’re healthy as a horse. You shouldn’t be in here. Stop wasting our time.’ ” This routine continued for some time: Theresa felt extremely fatigued and ran a high fever; her tests at the hospital showed nothing out of the ordinar y; and the hospital staff sent her home. “One night — I don’t know how I got home — I walked in the door, and my temperature

“The doctors said, ‘You’re healthy as a horse. You shouldn’t be in here. Stop wasting our time.’ ” — Theresa Rowe Photo by Greg Eans, Messenger-Inquirier

was 105,” she said. “My friend drove me to hospital and told them, ‘You’ve got to admit my friend, she’s going to die.’ They took my temperature; it was 103. They looked at my file and thought, ‘She’s a hypochondriac,’ and they refused to admit me.” Instead of taking her home, Theresa’s friend instead drove her to another hospital, where she was

immediately admitted and even quarantined. Her oxygen level remained good, and all her tests showed nothing out of the ordinar y. A cardiologist was sent in to examine her, and while he found nothing wrong with her heart to the ear, a heart catheterization was ordered as a precaution. The results shocked ever yone.

“(The doctor) found a hole in my heart,” Theresa recalled. “He said, ‘I don’t believe it. ... I don’t think the film is correct.’ ” She went back for a followup heart catheterization, which showed the hole to be about the size of a dime — as well as two other separate holes that doctors didn’t tell Theresa about. An eight-hour

open-heart surger y was conducted four weeks after that, patching the largest hole and leaving the other two as they were with the thought that they would close on their own. Once home, and with her mind set on recover y, Theresa’s fitness background kicked in, and she began making a plan. “If you sit around in a chair and wait for weeks, that’s not good for the body,” she said. “I knew that I had to move. I made myself walk, I made myself move. I started doing exercises in my home. You can’t move your arms over your head — it’s almost impossible because it’s so painful — so I’d do it little by little.” Even with her natural agility, recover y wasn’t easy — “I couldn’t (raise my arms to) wash my hair the first week,” she said, and “coughing and sneezing were hard.” After four weeks of rest, Theresa began teaching fitness classes again, but not without some difficulty. “(In my regular classes) I was doing jumping jacks, bringing my arms over my head. This was 1987 — we were doing high-impact aerobics,” she said. “Doing sit-ups (after my surger y), it felt like my chest was going to rip open.” Over time, Theresa gradually recovered, and all was assumed to be well with her heart. But it wasn’t. “20 years later — same thing, I started feeling breathless,” she said. “I was running 3-5 miles before I taught fitness classes in the morning. I remember feeling, ‘I think I’m going to faint.’ I


went back and taught my class, and one of my friends told me I looked a different color.” A visit to Vanderbilt University’s medical center confirmed not only that the previously patched hole failed to heal properly, but she had had two other holes in her heart all along and all three holes had gotten larger through the years. Given the severity of her heart issues, Theresa said, “I should not have sur vived past the age of 12.” This time, a nine-hour surger y patched the three holes, and problematic veins were cauterized and blood rerouted through the remaining active veins. Because the holes were so close to her heart’s electrical wiring, a pediatric cardiologist was called in who had expertise operating in such a small area. Theresa faced another long, arduous recover y. Because of her overall sterling health, she wasn’t required to go to a cardiac lab for recover y, which gave her freedom to develop her own rehab plan — but it also shifted more responsibility for her overall recover y onto her. And while she again had a positive mindset and fitness knowledge to aid her, her body had aged two decades since her first operation. “I’m 44 at this point. I didn’t feel older, but your body’s different 20 years later,” she said. “As an instructor, I’m helping people get their strength back .... (I knew) it’s important to move and start raising those arms over your head. I knew all this from my other surger y and from knowing people who’d had surgeries.” So she started small. “I’d take both hands in front of me like I’m going to do a pushup, and inch them up the wall,” she said. “I used deep breathing techniques through the pain.” Once able to return to exercise classes, she dialed up the intensity of her rehab routine. “I started using 3-pound weights (at around five weeks post-operation). They felt like 20 pounds,” she said. “I did lateral raises, shoulder presses. I knew how important that was to use weights, to use a stretch band, use a stability ball and different resistance.” That type of experience has helped Theresa relate to her fitness students, particularly senior citizens. “Senior strength training class really helped my recover y — I just

Saturday, February 1, 2020 Messenger-Inquirer

Photo courtesy of Theresa Rowe

used my body for resistance,” she was running through my body. I said. “If someone’s in their 80s (and still don’t know why. It must have has limited shoulder mobility), that been my body adjusting. The first would take a toll time, I felt on someone’s warmth around “It’s real important that body. ... If you’re my heart, and not mindful I could feel it people do strength training of exercising, beating while at least twice a week (and) it’ll hurt the resting. I cardio — walking is free, and thought, ‘I don’t body more than anything.” like this; I want it’s so good for the heart. ” “It was harder my old heart — Theresa Rowe to recover from back.’ It took the second about a year to surger y,” fully recover.” Theresa added. “That first year, I She recalled, with a laugh, “I’d felt like I was being electrocuted. pray, ‘Lord, if you’re going to take It would zap me — this electricity me out now, at least I’m teaching

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pilates, doing what I love to do!’ ” Years after her second surger y, Theresa said there are only slight indications of what her body’s been through. “I cannot completely straighten (my) arm,” she says. “The only thing that really, really bothered me was my shoulders. ... I had tubes coming out under my left shoulder, tubes down below my chest. That left area was really affected.” She also has to be conscious of her sodium intake. “I have to eat more salt than most people. Some people (post-op) are like that,” she said. “It’s because of when I exercise and sweat so much, I lose that sodium. I get dizzy once in a while, and I know to eat more salt. The body is a machine; it’s programmed to take care of itself.” More than 10 years after her second surger y, Theresa said, “I feel ver y, ver y young, and my body feels stronger than ever.” “I’m glad I pursued (fitness),” she said, noting that it taught her to be more in tune with her body. “If you think something is going on with your body, if you get that gut instinct, make sure you check it out. Do not let that go. Just because someone looks healthy, it doesn’t mean something’s not going on in their heart.” For those with recover y from open-heart surger y in the recent past or near future, Theresa emphasizes a foundation of fitness is crucial. “It’s real important that people do strength training at least twice a week (and) cardio — walking is free, and it’s so good for the heart,” she said. “If people don’t have an exercise base at all, I tell them to just walk the first month, and then come into class.” Above all, Theresa stresses the importance — heart condition or no — of moving your body. “I’ve had so many people in my senior classes that have gone through heart surgeries ... and they recover through exercise and being mindful,” she said. “You have to move, you can’t just lay around — even if it doesn’t feel good, you have to do it.” “That’s why I’m so passionate about doing what I’m doing, helping people with their health,” she added. “(Recover y is) a mindset — you can think, ‘I’m not going to get better,’ but if you tell yourself, ‘I’m going to get healthier and stronger,’ you’ll move in the direction. We’re going to recover and get stronger.”


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Messenger-Inquirer Saturday, February 1, 2020

WHAT ARE CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS? Congenital heart defects, or CHDs, can affect the structure of a person’s heart and how it functions. For example, a CHD may affect how blood flows through the heart and out to the rest of the body. Some CHDs are considered mild, while others are classified as severe.

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE BORN WITH HEART DEFECTS? The CDC notes that CHDs affect nearly 1 percent of births in the United States each year. Roughly one in four of those babies is born with a critical CHD, the treatment of which requires surgery or other procedures in the first year of life.

WHAT CAUSES CHDS? According to the Centers for Disease Control, the causes of CHDs are unknown, though some theorize that CHDs are caused by a combination of genes and other factors. Those additional factors may include the mother’s diet or her medication use during pregnancy. Mothers’ preexisting health conditions, such as diabetes and obesity, have been linked to heart defects in babies, as has smoking during pregnancy.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF CHDS? The type and severity of CHDs may dictate the symptoms. The CCHA notes that there are more than 40 types of CHDs, some of which may produce no symptoms at all, which only further underscores the

STEPS FOR ADMINISTERING CPR STEP 1 Make sure the scene is safe, then tap the person on the shoulder and ask “Are you OK?” in an amplified voice to ensure that the person needs help.

STEP 2 If it’s evident that the person needs help, call (or ask a bystander to call) 911, then send someone to get an AED. (If an AED is unavailable, or a there is no bystander to access it, stay with the victim, call 911 and begin administering assistance.)

STEP 3 With the person lying on his or her back, tilt the head back slightly to lift the chin to open their airway.

STEP 4 Listen carefully, for no more than 10 seconds, for sounds of breathing. (Occasional gasping sounds do not equate to breathing.) If there is no breathing, begin CPR.

STEPS FOR GIVING CPR STEP 1 Place your hands, one on top of the other, in the middle of the chest. Use your body weight to help you administer compressions that are at

least two inches deep and delivered at a rate of at least 100 compressions per minute.

STEP 2

WHAT IS THE PROGNOSIS FOR CHILDREN DIAGNOSED WITH A CHD? The CCHA notes that 60 years ago only about 20 percent of children diagnosed with a CHD survived to adulthood. Since then, that figure has improved to roughly 90 percent.

STEPS FOR USING AN AED

FROM THE RED CROSS

BEFORE GIVING CPR

importance of prenatal and postnatal care. If a CHD is not diagnosed prior to a child being born, parents who recognize any of these potential CHD symptoms should report them to their child’s pediatrician immediately: • blue-tinted nails or lips • fast or troubled breathing • tiredness when feeding • sleepiness

FROM THE RED CROSS

Automated external defibrillators (AED) can help save lives during sudden cardiac arrest. The following AED steps should be used when caring for a nonbreathing child at least eight years old who weighs more than 55 pounds, or an adult. After checking the scene and ensuring that the person needs help, ask a bystander to call 911 for help and then:

STEP 4 Make sure no one, including you, is touching the person. Tell everyone to “stand clear.”

With the person’s head tilted back slightly and the chin lifted, pinch the nose shut and place your mouth over the person’s mouth to make a complete seal. Blow into the person’s mouth to make the chest rise. Deliver two rescue breaths, then continue compressions. NOTE: If the chest does not rise with the initial rescue breath, re-tilt the head before delivering the second breath. If the chest doesn’t rise with the second breath, the person may be choking. After each subsequent set of 30 chest compressions, and before attempting breaths, look in their throat for an object and, if seen, remove it.

Turn on the AED and follow the visual and/or audio prompts.

If the AED recommends that you deliver a shock to the person, make sure that no one, including you, is touching the person and again tell everyone to “stand clear.” Once clear, press the “shock” button.

STEP 3

STEP 2

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Keep performing cycles of chest compressions and breathing until the person exhibits signs of life, such as breathing, an AED becomes available, or EMS or a trained medical responder arrives on scene. End the cycles if the scene becomes unsafe or you cannot continue performing CPR due to exhaustion. Concerning the latter, it’s helpful to partner with another person and take turns administering CPR to avoid exhaustion from rendering assistance. More information about performing CPR is available at redcross.org.

STEP 1

Open the person’s shirt and wipe his or her bare chest dry. If the person is wearing any medication patches, you should use a hand (gloved, if possible) to remove the patches before wiping the person’s chest.

STEP 3 Attach the AED pads and plug in the connector (if necessary).

STEP 5 Push the “analyze” button (if necessary) and allow the AED to analyze the person’s heart rhythm.

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Begin CPR after delivering the shock. If a shock is not advised, begin CPR. Perform two minutes (about five cycles) of CPR and continue to follow the AED’s prompts. If you notice obvious signs of life, discontinue CPR and monitor breathing for any changes in condition. More information about using AEDs can be found at redcross.org.


Saturday, February 1, 2020 Messenger-Inquirer

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6 LOVE YOUR HEART

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Messenger-Inquirer Saturday, February 1, 2020

‘It’s a lifestyle change’

GENE’S HEALTH FOOD OFFERS ADVICE FOR GE T TING YOUR HEART INTO SHAPE THROUGH NUTRITION STORY BY JODI KEEN PHOTOS BY GREG EANS MESSENGER-INQUIRER

ating healthfully is a good idea no matter your overall physical condition. But for better heart health, a diet rich in the right nutrients can lessen your risk of heart disease and even help symptoms. Getting started, however, takes time and can also be confounding. We asked Olivia Vancil and Karissa Costello, two of the three co-owners of Gene’s Health Food, how to make heart-healthy tweaks to your daily diet. Their advice? Start small.

DIET

Olivia holds a holistic health coach certification through the New York-based Institute of Integrative

Nutrition. The program emphasizes “crowding out” unhealthy foods by slowly incorporating healthier ones into your health and making small changes over time. Gene’s follows the “crowding out” method, encouraging customers to make slight tweaks in their diet to address a health issue or boost a nutrient they’re lacking. For example, the shop’s smoked salmon tacos are not only a simple, tasty meal — they also incorporate protein and Omega-3s needed for heart health. “Start (by changing) one meal a day, one snack a day, or one a week — whatever works for you,” Karissa said. She also stresses that “quality and quantity are of equal importance,” so in your quest for better heart health, avoid cutting out one for the sake of the other.

SMOOTHIES

One of the best ways to pack a nutritional punch in your diet is through smoothies, which combine nutrient-rich foods into a palatable serving. Smoothies are often tailored to a specific health aim (maybe upping your intake of greens, getting more iron or addressing a fiber deficiency), but they’re also easily customized for a particular goal. “Smoothies are convenient, tasty nutrition,” Olivia said. For health health, Olivia recommends Gene’s “Pump Up the Beet” smoothie, which mixes carrot, beet, orange and ginger into a heart-healthy blend. “Beets are good for your heart, and the smoothie uses orange and ginger to cut the rootiness of the beets,” Olivia said.


Saturday, February 1, 2020 Messenger-Inquirer

• walnuts and pecans on salads, instead of croutons • olive, avocado and nut oils, instead of canola oil • vinaigrettes, instead of salad dressings

... NOT THAT • carbs alone — always balance a carb with protein • pre-packaged meals, which are often high in sodium

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Olivia suggests being mindful of what foods you’re putting in your body, starting at the grocery store. “Pay attention to everything,” she said, “from picking out the food at the grocery store, setting it out on the plate at home, chopping it, smelling it as it cooks. Your body’s starting to prepare itself to eat it,” which elongates the entire culinary experience. “The digestion process is about so much more than just eating,” she said. Karissa and Olivia also encourage adopting a positive mindset, since making diet changes for better health is often a difficult adjustment. “Don’t forget to pat yourself on the back (for your progress),” Karissa said. And with implementing healthier habits the goal, Olivia said, “Dwelling on the bad (thoughts) is just as harmful.” With small steps and positivity, Karissa said, “You’ll be more likely to continue. Because it’s not a diet change. It’s a lifestyle change.

EAT THIS ...

REA

RESEARCH

As with any new approach to one’s health, research is critical before making any moves. Many of the providers with supplements for sale

at Gene’s include information on ingredients and optimal usage. “A lot of the literature we offer have websites or clinics and seminars that you can tune into to further your knowledge,” Olivia said. “We also have a lot of information on the AIP (Autoimmune Protocol) diet,” Karissa said. The staff at Gene’s also encourages customers to speak up if they want to lead a healthier life but don’t know where to start. “We’re always happy to help,” Karissa said.

M E

SUPPLEMENTS

For an incremental approach to heart health, supplements can provide the perfect introduction. Many vitamins and minerals can aid overall health, but for your heart, it’s hard to beat CoQ10. According to the Mayo Clinic, your body naturally produces the antioxidant coenzyme Q10, and research has shown it to improve congestive heart failure symptoms. Since it may be produced at a lower level in people who have heart disease, it’s especially critical to make sure your levels are steady if you have a heart condition. Another heart-healthy nutrient is magnesium. “Magnesium helps with regulating your heartbeat and nourishing your heart” and is a mineral people can really be deficient in, Olivia said. Among magnesium’s added benefits, Karissa said, are relaxation and muscle health. Supplements may also be a more cost-effective approach to diet change, since a bottle includes more servings and has a longer shelf life than fresh food. Plus, it allows consumers to up their nutrient levels without consuming foods they don’t care for. One such supplement is Omega-3, found in salmon and other cold water fish. “Omega-3s are really good for your heart,” Olivia said, with Karissa adding that “they’re also good for inflammation, the brain — they’re good for lots of things.”

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Messenger-Inquirer Saturday, February 1, 2020

H O W TO I N CO R P O R AT E

HEART-HEALTHY FOODS D

iet and heart health go hand in hand. The American Heart Association notes that a healthy diet and lifestyle are the best weapons to fight cardiovascular diseases, which the World Health Organization says kill more people across the globe each year than any other disease. A diet that is rich in fruits and vegetables is a hallmark of a healthy lifestyle. And supplementing such a diet with other heart-healthy foods is a great way to reduce one’s risk for cardiovascular disease.

EATING HEALTHY IS JUST THE START. TURN TO PAGE 10 TO LEARN WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO GET AN ANNUAL PHYSICAL.


Saturday, February 1, 2020 Messenger-Inquirer

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services notes that fruits and vegetables are healthy whether they’re fresh, frozen, canned, and/or dried. The AHA advises eating fruits and vegetables with every meal and snack, and that may require a little creativity as you sneak them into favorite dishes. For example, the AHA suggests replacing half the

DAIRY PRODUCTS

When purchasing dairy products, the DHHS recommends sticking to fat-free or low-fat options. Replace whole milk with fat-free or 1 percent milk and buy only fatfree or low-fat cheese. When snacking, reach for fat-free or low-fat plain yogurt or cottage cheese. You can even add fruit or vegetables to such snacks to make snack time even more heart-healthy.

PROTEINS

Healthy proteins are another way people can promote heart health with their daily die ts. When choosing proteins at the grocery store, the AHA recommends choosing chicken and fish over red meats. That’s because red meats, which include beef and lamb, have more saturated fat than

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ground meat in recipes for burgers, meatloaf or meatballs with cooked chopped mushrooms. The mushrooms can be finely chopped with a knife or food processor, and then sautéed in some olive oil until they’re soft. They can then be mixed in with the lean meat, and the meal can be cooked as it normally would. At the breakfast table, add fruit to a bowl of cereal to make for a more flavorful morning meal.

GRAINS

When buying grains, the DHHS recommends reading the ingredients list on the package before purchasing. Make sure whole wheat or another whole grain is the first item listed in the ingredients list, and choose only those products that say 100 percent whole grain. Instead of preparing white rice as a side dish, serve brown or wild rice, quinoa or oats.

chicken and fish. Saturated fats increase blood cholesterol levels and can worsen heart disease, while the unsaturated fats in fish like salmon can actually reduce the risk for cardiovascular issues like heart failure and ischemic stroke. When preparing poultry, remove the skin, as most of the saturated fat in poultry is found just beneath the skin.

Thank You Owensboro For Your Confidence

Roshan K Mathew, MD, FACC, FACP, FSCAI General and Interventional Cardiology

3110 Fairview Drive Owensboro, KY 42303

AdvancedCardiologyofOwensboro.com

Phone (270)240-2129 Fax (270)240-1227


10 LOVE YOUR HEART

Messenger-Inquirer Saturday, February 1, 2020

Why annual checkups are so important N

utritious diets and routine exercise are two hallmarks of a healthy lifestyle. Combining the two can lower people’s risk for various diseases and contribute to a high quality of life. But food and physical activity are not the only things people should do to improve their chances of living long, healthy lives. Preventive care is important. One of the most effective principles of preventive care is to schedule an annual checkup with a physician. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, routine health exams and tests can find problems before they start. During annual check-ups, doctors may notice some red flags, such as high cholesterol, that people won’t detect on their own. These warning signs could be increasing people’s risk for disease and/ or discomfort. Many of these red flags are undetectable without proper screenings,

which is why annual checkups are integral to maintaining one’s health. Annual checkups also serve as a great time for adults to be screened for certain cancers. The American Cancer Society notes that cancer screenings are used to find cancer before a person develops symptoms. That’s a vital benefit of annual checkups, as cancers caught in their early stages are more easily treated. In addition, catching cancer before it has metastasized greatly improves patients’ prognosis. Another reason to schedule annual checkups is that they make perfect opportunities for patients to discuss their family histories with their physicians. This is especially important for adults over 40, as age and family history are significant risk factors for a host of conditions and diseases. People concerned about conditions and diseases that their family members have had can discuss those concerns with their physicians during their annual checkups. Physicians can then recommend ways for patients to balance their risk, calming patients’ concerns and giving them a road map to reduce their risk for conditions and diseases that seem to run in their families.

BE ALERT TO ATRIAL FIBRILLATION Atrial fibrillation, commonly known as AFib, is a heart condition characterized by a quivering or irregular heartbeat, called arrhythmia. Millions of people across the globe currently live with AFib. When a person has AFib, the heart’s two upper chambers, known as the atria, beat chaotically and do not coordinate with the two lower chambers. AFib can cause heart palpitations, shortness of breath and weakness. AFib is not often life-threatening, and symptoms may come and go. However, side effects of the condition can be dangerous. AFib often results in poor blood flow, which can cause pooling of blood in the atria. The American Heart Association notes that the risks of clotting increase as blood pool. If a clots forms in the atria, it can be pumped out of the heart and reach the brain, potentially blocking off the blood supply to an artery in the brain. This is known as an embolic stroke. AFib also can reduce the heart’s pumping capacity. An otherwise healthy heart may be able to compensate for this reduction in efficiency. But those with damaged heart muscle or valves cannot. AFib can trigger breathlessness and exercise intolerance and potentially coronary artery disease, offers Harvard Medical School. Other problems from

poor pumping can cause blood to back up into the pulmonary veins, the vessels that return oxygen-rich blood from the lungs to the heart. This can cause fluid in the lungs. Fluid also can build up in the feet, ankles and legs. There are various potential causes for AFib, including the following conditions: • high blood pressure • abnormal heart valves • previous heart attack • congenital heart defects • overactive thyroid • exposure to stimulants • previous heart surgery • lung disease Some people with AFib do not have any heart defects or damage, and the cause is unclear. The Mayo Clinic says treatment goals for AFib include resetting the rhythm or controlling the rate of the atrial valves, known as cardioversion. This can be done electrically or through the use of drugs. Sometimes, other therapies to control atrial fibrillation do not work. In these cases, a doctor may recommend a procedure to destroy the area of heart tissue that’s causing the erratic electrical signals and restore the heart to a normal rhythm. Medication to prevent blood clots and reduce the risk for stroke often are prescribed.


Saturday, February 1, 2020 Messenger-Inquirer

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AREA CARDIOLOGY SPECIALISTS Advanced Cardiology of Owensboro Roshan K. Mathew, MD, PSC 3110 Fairview Drive Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: (270) 240-2129 Phone: (844) 940-2129 Fax: (270) 240-1227 www.advancedcardiologyofowensboro.com

Owensboro Health Medical Group — Cardiology (Owensboro) 1301 Pleasant Valley Road, Suite 202 Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: (270) 417-5700 Phone: (800) 304-0808 Fax: (270) 417-7509 www.owensborohealth.org

The Muhlenberg Clinic Kishor Vora, MD, FACC, FSCAI, CCDS 1100 West Everly Brothers Blvd. Central City, KY 42330 Phone: (270) 757-9991 Fax: (270) 757-9943 www.OwensboroMedical.com

Owensboro Health Medical Group — Cardiology (Greenville) 440 Hopkinsville St. Greenville, KY 42345 (270) 377-2384 www.owensborohealth.org

Owensboro Health Medical Group — Cardiothoracic Surgery 1301 Pleasant Valley Road, Suite 201 Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: (270) 417-7510 www.owensborohealth.org Owensboro Heart and Vascular Clinic Kishor Vora, MD, FACC, FSCAI, CCDS Lior Shamai, DO, MPH, FACC, FSCAI 1200 Breckenridge St., Suite 101 Owensboro, KY 42303 Phone: (270) 683-8672 Fax: (270) 685-8223 www.OwensboroMedical.com

SUPPORT GROUPS FOR HEART DISEASE PATIENTS AND SURVIVORS American Heart Association The American Heart Association offers online support networks for anyone who has experienced cardiac arrest, cardiac arrhythmia, cardiomyopathy, heart attack, heart failure, heart transplant, heart value disease, peripheral artery disease (PAD) and venous thromboembolism. www.heart.org

WomenHeart HeartSisters Online HeartSisters is a support program led by WomenHeart Champions, women heart disease survivors who have committed to becoming leaders in their communities and providers of support for other women with heart disease.  Online support meetings are conducted using web-conferencing

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instead of chat rooms or forums. Two monthly online meetings are offered: heart disease and women; and heart disease, AFib and women. hwww.womenheart.org/page/ virtualsupportsgc Heart Support Group at Norton Healthcare Norton Healthcare also offers

monthly WomenHeart support group meetings on the first Wednesday of every month. Each session is free and covers a different topic to help women better their heart health. nortonhealthcare.com/servicesand-conditions/heart-and-vascularcare/patient-resources/heart-supportgroup

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Our heart’s in the right place,

And, your heart’s in good hands.

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JOHNNY MAKHOUL, MD

LESLIE OBERST, MD

BRIAN PRICE, MD

AL SALAH, MD

TSEDAY SIRAK, MD

KEBEDE SHIRE, MD

G. SCOTT READER, MD

KERRY PAAPE, MD

FADY WANNA, MD

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY

INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY MUHLENBERG COUNTY

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

OWENSBORO HEALTH’S HEART CARE TEAM HAS A STRONG REPUTATION FOR CLINICAL EXCELLENCE, advanced technology, and care that always puts the patient first. We offer the latest minimally invasive techniques, and with locations in Owensboro and Greenville, advanced heart care is available, close to home. OWENSBOROHEALTH.ORG/HEART 270-417-7510 I CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

RICHARD SETH ERICA SHANNON ALEX ELLEN BEN BURGAN, PA-C BURNETTE, PA-C DEHAVEN, PA-C GLEASON, APRN JOHNSON, PA-C MCLIMORE, APRN RHODES, PA-C CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

CARDIOLOGY

KATIE WATKINS, APRN CARDIOLOGY MUHLENBERG COUNTY

270-417-7500 I CARDIOLOGY

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2020 Love Your Heart  

Our annual special sections dedicated to protecting your heart. We interview "Shaped by Faith" fitness instructor Theresa Rowe on her recove...

2020 Love Your Heart  

Our annual special sections dedicated to protecting your heart. We interview "Shaped by Faith" fitness instructor Theresa Rowe on her recove...

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