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DUBLIN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

BA (Hons) ENGLISH STUDIES AND LANGUAGES

YEAR 1 PROGRAMME HANDBOOK DT 517 2013-2014 SCHOOL OF LANGUAGES


First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

2013/2014

TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................................................................................2 EXAMINATIONS AND VACATIONS .........................................................................................................................................4 DIT ACADEMIC CALENDAR – SESSION 2013/2014 .......................................................................................................4 II. THE PROGRAMME...............................................................................................................................................................7 OVERALL STRUCTURE ................................................ ................................................................................................................8 THE PROGRAMME IN FIRST YEAR..........................................................................................................................................9 INDIVIDUAL MODULES ............................................................................................................................................................10 Composition and Writing Skills (Incorporating New Media Text Production) .................................................. 6 Text and Research ....................................................................................................................................................................... 14 Text and Narrative.......................................................................................................................................................................16 Introduction to Linguistics...................................................................................................................................................... 19 Introduction to the Cinema of the English-Speaking World .................................................................................... 22 Introduction to Cultural Image, Identity & Memory (I) ............................................................................................. 26 French Culture & Society ......................................................................................................................................................... 29 German Culture & Society ....................................................................................................................................................... 32 Spanish Culture & Society ....................................................................................................................................................... 34 French Communication ............................................................................................................................................................ 36 German Communication .......................................................................................................................................................... 39 Spanish Communication .......................................................................................................................................................... 42 Introduction to Modern French Literature ...................................................................................................................... 44 Introduction to Modern German Literature .................................................................................................................... 46 Introduction to Modern Spanish Literature.....................................................................................................................49 III. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS.............................................................................................................................51 General Questions.........................................................................................................................................................................51 Examinations..................................................................................................................................................................................54 PLAGIARISM..................................................................................................................................................................................54 THE COURSE TEAM...................................................................................................................................................................55

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

2013/2014

I. INTRODUCTION Welcome, Freshers! Welcome to the Dublin Institute of Technology. Congratulations on completing your second level education and obtaining your place on DT517, the BA Hons. in English Studies and Languages. The information contained in this handbook will help you to get an overview of the year ahead, its structure, aims and content. It contains essential information about modules and assessments and should be kept with other handbooks you receive about your course and its procedures. Apart from the academic aspects of your programme, there are many societies and clubs in the Institute, which represent a wide variety of interests and activities. We encourage you to broaden your horizons, avail of what is on offer and develop new interests. You will also meet new people from different parts of Ireland, Europe and across the globe and thus make new friends.

The DIT

The DIT has an enrolment of nearly 10,000 whole-time third level students, pursuing some 85 different programmes at certificate, diploma, degree and postgraduate levels. There are also 8,000 part-time day and / or evening students and 4,000 apprentices. This gives a total of 22,000 students and makes the DIT the largest higher education institution in the State. Its main centres are; Adelaide Road (Arts & Tourism), Aungier St. (Business, Arts & Tourism), Bolton St. (Engineering & Built Environment), Cathal Brugha St. (Arts & Tourism), Kevin St. (Science & Health, Arts & Tourism and Engineering & Built Environment), Mountjoy Square (Arts & Tourism, Business), Rathmines (Arts & Tourism).

The School of Languages

The School of Languages is one of the largest of its kind in the state and offers language courses at various levels. At present, languages taught include French, German, Spanish, Italian, Chinese, Irish and English as a Foreign Language. The School plays a major role in linking the College of Arts and Tourism to the other Colleges within the Institute. The School enables DIT students to take a foreign language as an integral part of their studies. You will find useful information on the School of Languages website http://www.dit.ie/schooloflanguages/. For student handbooks: http://www.dit.ie/schooloflanguages/currentstudents For information on the year abroad: http://www.dit.ie/schooloflanguages/internationalexchange/outgoingstudents For useful tips on study skills: http://www.dit.ie/study/mature/support/academic/studyskill

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http://www.dit.ie/campuslife/counselling

Timetables

For a tutorial on how to use webtimetables, see http://www.dit.ie/registration/studentclasstimetables. For direct access to webtimetables, see http://www.dit.ie/is/how/logintowebtimetables.

Examinations and Assessments For the details of assessments required, scheduled examinations and exam procedure, consult the individual modules (p. 10), the section on examinations and vacations (p. 4) and the FAQ section (p. 54).

Library Opening Hours Hours of opening vary between the seven different libraries across the Institute and according to the time of year. Generally during term the Library at Kevin St. is open from 09.00 to 21.30 Mondays to Thursdays, 09.00 to 17.00 on Fridays and from 10.00 to 17.00 on Saturdays. Up to date information on the library is accessible via the Internet at http://library.dit.ie.

The Students’ Union The students’ union will advise you on a wide variety of issues, offer support and is heavily involved in campus life. The key officers are to be found in Aungier Street, but the various sites have their own representatives and convenors. The President of DITSU for 2013/14 is Glenn Fitzpatrick (president@ditsu.ie), Rebecca Dempsey is Education Officer (education@ditsu.ie), William Meara is Events Officer (events@ditsu.ie) and Fiachrá Duffy is Welfare Officer (welfare@ditsu.ie).

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Examinations and Vacations Below you will find the calendar for the 2013-2014 academic session. Please read it carefully and note the following:  Attendance at class during the semester is compulsory. You must not arrange holidays or travel during the thirteen class contact weeks of each semester.  Examinations take place twice per year, in January and May/early June. Supplemental (repeat) exams take place in late August/early September.  January exams take place over the first two weeks of the second semester.  Summer exams take place over three weeks in May.  The dates for the supplemental examination session are normally available from late June. It is vital that you do not book holidays or plan to travel during the examination periods. It is equally important that you do not plan such activities for late August/early September until you are sure you have passed all modules for the year. It is not possible to reschedule missed exams. Missed exams are treated as a failed attempt. This will also apply to other forms of assessments such as presentations, oral exams, written tests and submission of assessed work. Rescheduling of such activities can only happen where certified medical evidence of illness has been supplied.

DIT Academic Calendar – Session 2013/2014 (The academic year comprises two semesters of 15 weeks during which learning and assessment take place.)

SEMESTER 1 September 2013

02/09/13

Session commences

09/09/13

1st Years commence including Orientation, Induction

16/09/13

1

23/09/13

2

30/09/13

3

07/10/13

4

14/10/13

5

21/10/13

6

28/10/13

7

04/11/13

8

11/11/13

9

18/11/13

10

Teaching commences for 2nd & subsequent years

0B

1 5 Weeks to Include: 12 Lecture Weeks +1 Review Week +Assessment 1B

October 2013

November 2013

U

Review Week (unless otherwise arranged)* Review week to be used either for revision, reading, field visits, lectures, interim tests, formative assessment feedback etc. To be applied in Week 7 except where otherwise arranged.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

December 2013

January 2014

25/11/13

11

02/12/13

12

09/12/13

13

16/12/13

Christmas

23/12/13

Christmas

30/12/13

Christmas

06/01/14

14

13/01/14

15

2013/2014

Week 14: Exams commence and marking commences

Module Boards and Progression and Award Boards

20/01/14

Student Feedback and Appeals Choice of Options and Electives for 2nd Semester

2B

SEMESTER 2 February 2014

March 2014

April 2014

May 2014

27/01/14

1

03/02/14

2

10/02/14

3

17/02/14

4

24/02/14

5

03/03/14

6

10/03/14

7

17/03/14

8

24/03/14

9

31/03/14

10

07/04/14

11

14/04/14

Easter

21/04/14

Easter

28/04/14

12

05/05/14

13

12/05/14

14

19/05/14

15

Teaching commences for all students

15 Weeks to Include: 12 Lecture Weeks +1 Review Week +Assessment 3BU

Review Week (unless otherwise arranged)*

Review week to be used either for revision, reading, field visits, lectures, interim tests, formative assessment feedback etc. To be applied in Week 13 except where otherwise arranged.

Week 14: Exams commence and marking commences

26/05/14 June 2014

02/06/14

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09/06/14 16/06/14

2013/2014

Module Boards and Progression and Award Boards Student Feedback and Appeals

(Dates for Apprenticeship and Failte Eireann Programmes differ from the above details can be obtained from the relevant Schools.)

The review week for first term in the School of Languages is scheduled for week 7 (commencing 28 October, 2013).

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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II. PROGRAMME Introduction to Programme The BA Hons. English Studies and Languages programme is a four-year Honours degree Programme. It is one of the only programmes of its kind in Ireland and will thus broaden Ireland’s educational provision. It equips students with a unique set of skills combining a range of applied English Studies skills with a high level of foreign language competency. One of the major strengths of the English side of the programme is the combination of three distinct discipline areas: literature, composition and language pedagogy. Graduates will be able to pursue opportunities and employment beyond the English-speaking environment. The programme is designed to provide an effective educative and training curriculum both in English studies and in foreign languages, and to develop students’ potential to work as professionals in the English language and foreign language sectors in Ireland and abroad.

Overall Aims The principal aim of the BA Hons. English Studies and Languages programme is to provide the individual student with the necessary skills set to operate as a linguist in a variety of sectors both at home and abroad. Graduates will be an asset to cultural organisations, small and large businesses, the public sector, NGOs, and language education. The mix of language learning, culture and literature will also enable them to act in a variety of cultural mediation roles and as professionals who will be capable of facilitating relationships between Irish and foreign citizens both at home and abroad. These professions may include educators, interpreters or organisers of cultural and educational events. While students acquire critical and analytical skills throughout the programme, the curriculum, more specifically, includes core strands in Teaching English as a Foreign Language, literature, writing skills and linguistics as well as an extensive and applied study of a foreign language. Language modules include Culture and Society, Communication, Professional Communication, Translation and Linguistic Proficiency, Language of Business, Current Affairs. Most importantly, students have the opportunity to spend an academic year abroad studying at a partner university or undertake a teaching placement abroad. The programme sets out to provide a comprehensive education which will result in the individual student achieving a professional standard in the area of English Studies and a foreign language. Graduates will also have the opportunity to pursue their education with postgraduate studies in a number of areas including the arts, social sciences and humanities, education, business studies and commerce.

Programme Objectives The programme is designed to

o

provide an attractive suite of modules that will appeal to students who are interested in the practical application of their English studies knowledge and foreign language skills.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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o

provide students with a survey course in literature both in English and in the foreign language.

o

develop a high level of communication skills in the students’ foreign language.

o

develop students as competent writers.

o

familiarise students with the cultures of the languages studied.

o

deepen students’ understanding of how cultural variation affects communication in a professional international environment.

o

develop in students the ability to act as facilitators between their own and foreign cultures, so that they may seek employment in companies which place a high value on physical and cultural mobility.

o

cultivate in the students the creativity necessary for the development and implementation of successful and innovative projects in an international environment and to develop in students the analytical, conceptual and critical skills that will enable them to operate effectively in a diverse fields of employment.

Overall Structure of the Programme BA (HONS) ENGLISH STUDIES AND LANGUAGES Semester 1

Semester 2 Composition and Writing Skills (10 ECT - Core) Text and Research Text and Narratives (5 ECT - Core) (5 ECT - Core) Introduction to the Cinema of the English-Speaking World (5 ECT Option) Introduction to Linguistics (5 ECT or Core) Introduction to Cultural Image, Identity & Memory (5 ECT - Option) Foreign language – Culture & Society (10 ECT – Core) Foreign language - Communication (10 ECT - Core) Introduction to Modern Literature - Foreign language (10 ECT - Core)

Year 2 American Vantage Points: Poetry and Prose of the 19th and 20th Centuries (10 ECT - Core) Introduction to Language Learning and Communicative Expressive Fluency Teaching (5 ECT - Core) (5 ECT - Core) Texts for Stage and Screen (5 ECT - Core)

Intercultural Studies (5 ECT - Core)

Foreign language - Translation & Linguistic Proficiency (10 ECT - Core) Foreign language - Professional Communications and Preparation for the Year Abroad (10 ECT - Core) Classic and Contemporary Literature - Foreign language (10 ECT - Core)

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Year 3 ERASMUS STUDY VISIT or TEACHING ENGLISH ASSISTANSHIP LANGUAGE COMPETENCE COUNTRY NOTEBOOK (60 ECT - Core)

Year 4 English Literature of Ireland (5 ECT - Core)

Modernism and 20th Century English Literature (5 ECT - Core)

Writing for Professional Purposes Creative Writing Workshop (5 ECT - Core) (5 ECT - Core) Teaching English as a foreign language and Drama for the Class (10 ECT- Option) OR Dissertation (10 ECT - Option) Foreign language – Translation Studies (10 ECT - Core) Foreign language – Current Affairs (10 ECT - Core)

The Programme in First Year Semesters 1 & 2 provide foundation modules in both the English studies and languages spheres. Year One English Studies modules provide a good transition from secondary school to third level learning. These modules include Composition and Writing Skills, Text and Research, Text and Narratives, Introduction to Linguistics, Introduction to the Cinema of the English Speaking World or Introduction to Cultural Image, Identity and Memory. The three language modules in first year each carry 10 ECT credits and the modules span the entire academic year. The three core modules (total of 9 hours language tuition) in each of the languages offered include Culture & Society, Communication and Literature. The latter module allows students to focus on their foreign language skills while developing an appreciation of literature in the foreign language.

BA (Hons) English Studies and Languages - YEAR 1 Module Code

Module Title

ENGA1010 Composition and Writing Skills ENGA1011 Text and Research Introduction to the Cinema of the English-Speaking World Introduction to Cultural Image, CULT1000 Identity & Memory ENGA1013 Introduction to Linguistics

ENGA1014 Text and Narrative Foreign Language - Culture and Society Foreign Language - Communication

Semester.

Contact Hours

Self Directed Learning

Total Learning. Hours

ECTS Credits

1&2

72

128

200

10

1

36

64

100

5

1

36

64

100

5

1

36

64

100

5

2

36

64

100

5

2

36

64

100

5

1&2

72

128

200

10

1&2

72

128

200

10

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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BA (Hons) English Studies and Languages - YEAR 1 Module Code

Module Title

Foreign Language - Introduction to Modern Literature Total Credits Year 1

Semester.

Contact Hours

Self Directed Learning

Total Learning. Hours

ECTS Credits

1&2

72

128

200

10 60

In first term, you can choose between the following: BA (Hons) English Studies and Languages

Optional Modules Module Title

Semester.

Contact Hours

Self Directed Learning

Option – Year 1 Introduction to the Cinema of the English-Speaking World1&2 Introduction to Cultural Image, Identity & Memory 1&2

Total Learning. Hours

36 36

64 64

ECTS Credits

100 100

5 5

Individual Modules

Module Title

Composition and Writing Skills (Incorporating New Media Text Production)

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Dr Sue Norton and Odette Gabaudan

Module Description

Through a year-long series of in-class and out-of-class exercises, students will acquire more sophisticated literacy skills, become competent in recognising and using standard English grammar, become adept at applying particular prose writing strategies, and become acquainted with appropriate on-line modes and methods of written delivery in a professional context. In so doing, students will also develop basic document editing and formatting skills.

Level

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Aims

2013/2014

The aim of this module is to • help learners gain confidence and competence in writing clearly and effectively in both conventional and on-line fora. • take “text production” as a central term, students will seek to match form and style to register in any given or imagined writing scenario. • present documents in a professional manner and develop critical thinking skills in opting for appropriate online modes of text delivery. On completion of this module, learners will be able to

Learning Outcomes

Learning and Teaching Methods

• recognise, identify, and correct errors of grammar and punctuation in their own writing and in the writing of others. • understand the importance of observing the conventions of standard English grammar when writing in ordinary professional circumstances. • distinguish and imitate various patterns of organisation in ordinary prose writing including: example, description, definition, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, narrative, and classification. • write well developed paragraphs, skilfully paraphrase and summarise, avoid plagiarism, reckon with contrary arguments, analyse rhetorical strategies used in sample readings, and effectively deploy rhetorical strategies in their own writing. • present documentation to a professional standard using Microsoft Office programmes. • appraise various social media for professional purposes. • communicate effectively through social media in a professional context. To that effect, they will be required to produce text using a range of new media including blogs, wikis, sharing applications, free online audio and video capturing tools. Emphasis will be placed on quality of prose writing, creativity and the integration of a range of new media. Roundtable discussions and critical appraisals of in-class readings; in-class and out-of class writing exercises; frequent oral delivery of written work; informal peer review; computer laboratory work; independent online learning; interactive discussions; collaborative learning in class through discussions and out of class through social media.

·

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Grammar: Eight parts of speech. Phrases, clauses, sentences. Concise writing: junk phrases, redundancies, and excessive qualification. Forceful writing: needless self-reference, the passive voice, weak openings, vague language, jargon and clichĂŠs. Correct Writing: shifting narrative voice, sentence fragments, run-on sentences, subject / verb agreement, pronoun reference, clear modification, correct punctuation, parallelism, syntax.

Indicative Content

Organisational Patterns: Narrative, Description, Compare and Contrast, Cause and Effect, Classification, Analysis, Persuasion. Document production: Editing and formatting documents using MS Word including numbering and bullets, borders and shading, headers and footers, bookmark, footnotes and endnotes, proofreading tools, document layouts, creation of tables and columns. New and Social media content: Identifying and appraising range of social media and their usability in a professional setting (e.g. blogs, wikis, Twitter and Facebook). Producing texts for a range of social media. Maintaining a blog which will integrate audio and video capturing; audio and video editing; podcasting; videocasting.

Module Assessment Assignments will include: Three written essays over the year 30%: These will be traditional essays of 600 – 1000 words in length. They will be marked for grammar, spelling, punctuation, syntax, clarity of thought, and content. Assessment New and Social Media assignments over the year 30%. These may for instance include Tweets phrased to summarize readings in class, podcasts or/and videos for the oral submission of a written essay, wikis for collaborative learning, development of a blog to archive coursework and / or profile the academic and professional life of the blogger. Examination

Written Exam 40%: Under exam hall conditions, students will compose a single essay without reference to secondary material and answer grammatical questions

Reassessment

100% Written exam

Special Instructions Required / Core Reading

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Graff G. (2008) “They Say / I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing with Readings, WW Norton & Company. Michael A. (2010) Reading the World: Ideas that Matter, Second Edition, WW Norton & Company Ni Anluain C (2004-2006; 2006-2008; 2008-2011), Sunday Miscellany Collections, New Island Books. Journal New Media and Society, Sage Publications Supplemental Reading

Further details Further Details: Lab time will be essential, both for the New Media lectures times and the ‘conventional’ content of the module. The textbooks chosen have crucial web support that can be exploited only via Internet access.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Text and Research

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 5

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Noel Deeney, Sascha Harris

Module Description

This course introduces the student to post-secondary level study of literature in English and textual analysis across the different genres and media. The course provides a review of the key terms and definitions required for the discussion and study of literature at this level. Particular attention is paid to the dependence of definitions and classifications on the evolution of historically grown terms, ideas and genres. The course focuses on the practical interpretative and critical presentation, use and evaluation of primarily literary texts in English on the basis of these definitions, fostering critical and autonomous engagement with canonical texts. Texts used will be largely from the 20th century, but the student will also be introduced to texts constitutive of genre and epoch.

Level The aim of this module is to

· provide the student with the essential terms and definitions necessary · Module Aims

· ·

for the study of literature at third level provide the student with a broad outline of contemporary and historical approaches to literary criticism establish a theoretical and terminological framework in which the student operates when accessing and researching literary texts enable the student to examine representative, key literary texts according to and against genre-, subject- and context-specific values and theoretical expectations

On completion of this module, the learner will be able to

· independently use key terms and definitions in the evaluation, discussion and critical treatment of representative texts

· produce technically and terminologically informed interpretations of Learning Outcomes

· · ·

representative texts argumentatively identify generic, epochal and compositional traits of specific texts formulate structured essays, including critically summative accounts of texts employ basic terms of literary theory and history in written and oral argument

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The course is delivered in a combination of short lectures, interactive seminar and in-class group workshops, in which declarative contents are put into practice, using exemplary texts and supporting material (multimedia where appropriate). Each weekly topic involves some in-class (close) reading, Learning and Teaching but it is expected of the student to read short key texts autonomously in Methods preparation for these topics. Students are expected to contribute orally and to regularly present to the class working notes and summaries prepared in class or autonomously.

路 A possible format of delivery:

Indicative Content

Week 1: The Literary Tradition: From Myth to Story-Telling Week 2: The Literary Tradition: Genre Week 3: The Literary Tradition: Tropes, Themes, Figures The Text as Subject of Research Week 4: Linking Texts Week 5: Text in Context Week 6: Evaluating and Comparing Texts Week 7: Purpose, Function and Nature of Text Week 8: Critical Approaches Week 9: An Outline of Key Texts of Literary Theory Week 10: Key Ideas of Literary Theory Week 11: Working with Texts Week 12: Presentations

Module Assessment Assessment

50% Continuous Assessment, to include small group presentation with written and oral component.

Examination

50% Written Exam

Reassessment

In case the student fails overall, failed components must be resat/resubmitted.

Special Instructions

Command of syntax and advanced lexis, dexterity in argumentative language, clarity of expression, appropriate register and accurate spelling are assessed as part of all submissions and exams, written and oral.

Core Readings

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Barry, Peter (2002), Beginning Theory: An Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory, Manchester: Manchester University Press. Bronner, Stephen Eric (2011), Critical Theory, A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Butler, Christopher (2010), Modernism, A Very Short Introduction, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Cavanagh, Dermot et al. (2010), The Edinburgh Introduction to Studying English Literature, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Eagleton, Terry (2006), How to read a Poem, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Klarer, Mario (2004), An Introduction to Literary Studies, London: Routledge. Lennard, John and Luckhurst, Mary et al. (2002), The Drama Handbook: A Guide to Reading Plays, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Punter, David (2007), Modernity, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Roberts, Phil (2000), How Poetry Works, London: Penguin. Stott, Rebecca and Chapman, Peter (2001), Grammar and Writing, Harlow: Longman. Tyson, Lois (2006), Critical Theory Today, London: Routledge. Supplemental Readings Web references, journals and other:

Further details To be delivered in the first semester of year 1 with a duration of 3 hours per week. In view of the textual work and the delivery formats of the course, it is desirable that this includes a two-hourblock

Module Title

Text and Narrative

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 5

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Noel Deeney, Sascha Harris

Module Description

This course explores the narrative construction of literature, especially in the context of its cultural function, while continuing to engage the students with critical and theoretical developments in textual analysis and cultural theory. Although the course concentrates on English literature, it also confronts the student with paradigmatic and comparative texts of other literary traditions (in English). Texts used will be largely from the 20th century, but the student will also deal with texts and formats constitutive of various genres, epochs and media. The course will focus on short prose, but will also engage with drama, poetry and non-literary media.

Level

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The aim of this module is to identify and and extrapolate significant components of story-telling, particularly in prose, but also in the other genres · explicitly relate narrative construction to cultural identity construction and document their interdependence · identify and document the interplay and dialectic of universality and literary tradition (e.g. local, national, generic, plot) in literature and other media · provide and equip the student with key concepts, ideas and terms for the study and debate of narrative and narratology On completion of this module, the learner will be able to

·

Module Aims

· formulate a coherent analysis of narrative structure of key texts · formulate a critical narrative comparison of exemplary texts of different Learning Outcomes

traditions, within and across genres and epochs argumentatively explore and identify elements of cultural-literary determination of key texts autonomously interpret key texts in English in the context of literary and cultural tradition with due regard for local, generic and epochal distinctions and the appropriate critical terminology

· ·

The course is delivered in a combination of short lectures, interactive Learning and Teaching seminars and workshops. Students are encouraged to introduce other media Methods and non-literary narratives to help contextualise literary production and highlight the cultural role of story-telling.

· Possible format of delivery:

Indicative Content

Week 1: Popular Stories: The Story-Telling Tradition Week 2: Medium and Story Week 3: Traditional and Modern Week 4: Rhetoric and Literary Device Week 5: Narrator and Report Week 7: From different Angles: Culture and Perspective Week 8: English and the Others Week 9: Cultural Origins Week 10:Narrating Culture and Identity Week 11: Narrating History and Present Week 12: Presentations

Module Assessment Assessment

50% Continuous Assessment, to include individual presentation with written and oral component.

Examination

50% Written Exam

Reassessment

In case the student fails overall, failed components must be resat/resubmitted.

Special Instructions

Command of syntax and advanced lexis, dexterity in argumentative language, clarity of expression, appropriate register and accurate spelling are assessed as part of all submissions and exams, written and oral.

Core Readings

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Angus, Sylvia et al. (1996), Great Modern European Short Stories, New York: Ballantine. Bal, Mieke (2009), Introduction to the Theory of Narrative, Toronto: University of Toronto. Byatt, A. S., ed. (2009), The Oxford Book of English Short Stories, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Daley, James (2006), The World’s Greatest Short Stories, New York: Dover. Damrosch, David (2003), What is World Literature? Princeton: Princeton University Press. Damrosch, David (2008), How to Read World Literature, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. Damrosch, David et al. (2009), The Princeton Sourcebook in Comparative Literature: From the European Enlightenment to the Global Present, Princeton: Princeton University Press. Fallaize, Elizabeth, ed. (2010), The Oxford Book of French Short Stories, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Genette, Gerard (1983), Narrative Discourse, An Essay in Method, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Jay, Paul (2010), Global Matters, The Transnational Turn in Literary Studies, Ithaca: Cornell University Press. Peck, John and Coyle, Martin (2002), Literary Terms and Criticism, London: Palgrave. Porter Abbott, H. (2008), The Cambridge Introduction to Narrative, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pritchard, V. S., ed. (2010), The Oxford Book of Short Stories, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Verga, Giovanni (2006), Cavalleria Rusticana and Other Short Stories, Harmondsworth: Penguin. Worthen, William B., ed. (2004), Wadsworth Anthology of Drama, Boston: Thomson/Wadsworth. Supplemental Readings Web references, journals and other:

Further details To be delivered in the second semester of year 1 with a duration of 3 hours per week. In view of the textual work undertaken, it is preferable that this includes a two-hour-block.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Introduction to Linguistics

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 5

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Valerie Hascoet

Module Description

This module is an introduction to the discipline of linguistics. It will present students with an overview of the subject, its main components, its development, its theories. It will encourage reflection on topics of general linguistic interest, such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, language policies, etc. It will equip them with knowledge and skills in the 5 areas of phonetics, morphology, the lexicon, syntax and semantics. Above all, it will support the development of the students’ competence as language learners.

Level

Module Aims

The aim of this module is to · introduce students to the founding principles of linguistics as a science; · encourage reflection on language issues in general; · enable students to use linguistics as a reflective tool for their language studies. On completion of this module, the learner will be able to demonstrate

· an awareness of the categories of linguistics; of the development of the discipline, of its main schools of thought and of its future directions

· an ability to reflect on language issues such as linguistic identities, Learning Outcomes

language development and acquisition, social and educational policies, etc. · basic competence in the parsing and analysis of English and other languages they are learning, across the 5 linguistic categories · the transfer of theory to practice in their own language acquisition process.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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This class will combine short lectures with class discussions and problemsolving activities.

Learning and Teaching Methods

It will present material from academic sources as well as media representations of issues of linguistic interest (articles from magazines and television documentaries for instance). It will encourage students to draw on the two languages they are studying (and any other languages they have experience of) in order to develop as language learners.

· Introduction: What is language? What is linguistics? Founding principles of linguistics Phonetics and phonology: the phonetic alphabet; the sounds of English; Received Pronunciation and “accents” Morphology: morphemes; rules of word formation, how new words are created The lexicon: classes of words; parts of speech; how dictionaries are written Syntax: phrase structure grammar; transformational generative grammar; generative semantics and the syntax-semantics interface Meaning: polysemy, homonymy and other word phenomena; set phrases, idioms and clichés; what is linguistic determinism? Indicative Content

Discourse, linguistic cooperation, speech acts Spoken vs. written language Sociolinguistics: gender, social and stylistic variations; language varieties (code-switching, language prescription); languages vs. dialects, creoles and pidgins Differences and similarities in languages: the indo-european source; mapping languages of the world; is there a universal grammar? Psycholinguistics: language and mind; language and brain; computational linguistics and corpora Language acquisition and development: first language acquisition; second language acquisition; bilingualism and multilingualism Change in language: why languages change; “degeneration”, loss, death and revival of languages; forensic linguistics

Module Assessment Assessment

· Assessment 1 (see below) · Assessment 2 (see below)

50% 50%

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Examination Reassessment

Special Instructions

Re-assessment of assessment 1 will reproduce the same format. Re-assessment of assessment 2 will be in an oral format. · Assessment 1 will be a home assignment around mid-semester. It will include questions about the theories of linguistics, some practical exercises (phonetic transcriptions, morphemic, semantic and lexical analyses, syntactic parsing) and a reflective element (issues of general interest and/or students’ reflection on their own language-learning) · Assessment 2 will repeat this structure in a class assessment so that students may gauge their own progress. It is not envisaged that students would have any prior knowledge of the content of this module. Any request for RPL should be examined on a caseper-case basis.

Core Readings Blake B.J. (2008), All about Language, Oxford: Oxford University Press Crystal D. (2006), How Language works, London: Penguin Aitchison J. (2010), Aitchison’s Linguistics, London: Teach yourself Bauer L. and Trudgill P. (1998), Language Myths, London: Penguin McGregor W.B., (2009)Linguistics: an introduction, London: Continuum Pinker S., (1994), The Language Instinct, London: Penguin Supplemental Readings Web references, journals and other: http://www.langsci.ucl.ac.uk/ipa http://www.irishdeaf.com/?category_name=sign-language Further details This module will comprise 36 contact hours delivered weekly in one semester.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Introduction to the Cinema of the English-Speaking World

Module Title Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 5

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Jesús Urda

Module Description

This module presents an overview of Cinema in the English language through its main eras and stages since its early days until the present day. The emphasis of the course is on the chronological development of cinema as an art through the study of the most representative films and authors of the English-speaking world. Students will also be introduced to the principal theories of film criticism and will learn to analyse and discuss films drawing on elements such as genre, form, style, mise-en-scene, content, narrative, structure and character. The module also seeks to give a clear insight into the cross-cultural influences between films, authors, and movements within the English-speaking world.

Level The aims of this module are as follows:

· To introduce students to the culture of film history, film movements and film anlysis.

· To provide students with a clear overview of the development of film Module Aims

as an art

· To provide students with the necessary skills so as to comment, discuss and formally analyse films · To encourage students’ analytical and interpretative skills · To encourage students’ written and oral accuracy in their understanding and production of formal English language.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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On completion of this module, the learner will be able to:

· Demonstrate a general knowledge of the history and development of cinema of the English-speaking world

· Appraise a range of film/texts drawn from different film genres and film movements

· Demonstrate an understanding of key films and film movements · Place and classify films within film movements or essential key Learning Outcomes

historical moments in the history of film.

· Express themselves correctly in formal and academic English specific to the field of Film studies and Film analysis

· Develop coherent written and oral arguments both in coursework and under examination research

· Apply critical and analytical skills to a range of films and texts derived from the discipline of Film Studies

· Convey complex ideas within the field of Film Studies in speech and in writing. The module will be developed through the combination of the following: lectures, individual and group work, oral presentations, independent reading Learning and Teaching and research, in-class film screenings and individual film viewings outside the Methods classroom, in-class debates.

·

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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· Film foundations: understanding film from the idea to the screen · Introduction to film genres and their conventions · Introduction to Film Studies and film analysis · Early Cinema: Pioneers, D.W. Griffith, Chaplin · From Classic Hollywood to the end of the studio system: Capra, Hawks,John Ford, William Wyler, Minelli, Welles, Nicholas Ray, John Huston, Elia Kazan

· European migrations to English-language cinema:Ernest Lubisch, Billy Wilder

· Post-world War II British Cinema: Carol Reed, David Lean, Powell &Pressburger

· British Free Cinema: 1960’s, 1970’s · The cases of Hitchcock and Kubrick · The 1960’s revolution in American cinema: Easy Rider, The Last Picture Show

· 1970’s : Taxi Driver, The Godfather I &II · Steven Spielberg’s Jaws: the birth of the modern blockbuster · Hollywood in the 1980s & 1990s: the blockbuster. · Woody Allen: European cinema made in the USA · Postcolonial narratives and globalization in Contemporary Irish cinema : Jim Sheridan, Neil Jordan, Lenny Abrahanson, John Carney Indicative Content

· Peripheral English-language cinema (Canada, Australia, New Zealand): Atom Egoyan, George Miller, Peter Weir, Jane Campion

· Independent hits: Kevin Smith, Danny Boyle, Gus Van Sant, Richard Linklater, Shane Meadows Key Films: The Birth of a Nation,1915. D.W Griffith, USA, D.W.G.Corp. It Happened One Night, 1934. Frank Capra, USA,Columbia Pictures. Stagecoach,1939. John Ford, USA,Walter Wanger Productions. Citizen Kane ,1942. Orson Welles, USA, Mercury Productions &RKO. Brief Encounter, 1945. David Lean,UK,Cineguild. A Matter of Life and Death, 1946. Emmerich &Pressburger,UK, The Arches Paths of Glory ,1957. Kubrick, USA,Bryna Productions. This Sporting Life,1963. Lindsay Anderson, UK, Independent Artists. Bonnie and Clyde,1967. Arthur Penn,USA, Warner Bros. Easy Rider, 1969. Dennis Hopper,USA,Columbia Pictures. The Last Picture Show. 1971, Peter Bodanovich, USA, Columbia Pictures. Walkabout, 1971. Nicholas Roeg, Australia, Si Litvinoff Film Production. Jaws, 1975. Steven Spielberg, USA, Zanuck/Brown Productions. Taxi Driver, 1976. Martin Scorsese,USA, Columbia Pictures. Annie Hall ,1977. Woody Allen,USA, Rollins-Joffe Productions. Gallipolli, 1981. Peter Weir, Australia, AFC, R&R Films. My Own Private Idaho,1981. Gus Van Sant,USA, New Line Cinema. Angel ,1982. Neil Jordan, Ireland,IFB, Channel Four Films

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Module Assessment Assessment 1

Written: 20%

Assessment Assessment 2

Oral:

Examination

Written exam : 60%

Reassessment

Written exam : 100%

20%

Special Instructions Core Readings Bennet, P., Hickman, A.,& Wall,P., (2007) Film Studies: The Essential Resource, Routledge,New York Cousins, M. (2004), The Story of Film, Pavillion, London Supplemental Readings Bordwell, David. (2006) The Way Hollywood Tells It, University of California Press, BerkeleyLos Angeles Web references, journals and other:

www.scene360.com; www.cineaste.com Further details 3 contact hours + 2 hours of screening time per week (students will have access to a screening room previously arranged by the lecturer and the School office to view films that are essential for class development. Some films will have to be viewed as part of students’ homework.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Introduction to Cultural Image, Identity & Memory (I)

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 5

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Catherine Spencer

Module Description

This module introduces students to a range of questions and issues surrounding cultural imagery, identity and memory and develops student understanding of the formation and mediation of cultural identity and memory. The module also explores how cultural memories and both dominant and more marginalized narratives of the past are represented and reflected in tourism and heritage industries.

Level

Module Aims

Learning Outcomes

Learning and Teaching Methods

The aims of this module are as follows: · To develop student understanding of cultural identity and collective memory and to explore processes of formation, mediation and marginalization · To engage students in critical exploration of the contested cultural and collective memories that are reflected in heritage and tourism industries (both in Ireland and the Target Language countries they study) · To engage students in critical exploration of selected heritage sites and ‘sites of memory’ On completion of this module students will be able to do the following: · Define, describe and discuss processes of cultural imagery, cultural identity and cultural memory formation · Critically engage with a selected range of scholarly texts that address cultural imagery, identity and memory · Identify and critically comment on aspects of policy, heritage and memory (in Ireland and in the Target Language countries) · Discuss in some detail (such as through individual or group project/presentation work) and as appropriate, the debates and controversies that surround issues of identity, collective memory and developments in heritage and tourism in Europe Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of multimedia & a variety of texts, student (individual and group) project work and presentation

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Indicative Content

· · · · · · · · · ·

2013/2014

Cultural identity – constructions of collective (national) identity ‘Social’ remembering and forgetting – collective memory Historical consciousness and collective memory Identity & difference Agents and mediators: Media, Historiography, Education, Government Collective memory and memorial culture Tourism/Heritage/memory – responsibilities & representations Tourists as cultural travellers The tourist ‘gaze’, heritage and questions of (in)authenticity Case studies – European identity, heritage and ‘sites of memory’

Module Assessment Components Assessment 1

50%

Assessment 2

50% (end-of-semester written paper)

Examination Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Written examination 100% (learning outcomes best reassessed with a written exam) A range of assessment modes will apply: written assignments, research activities, synthesis of material Students will for both formative and summative assessments be assessed on the basis of the following criteria: comprehension of subject area, critical analysis of content, research & analysis (individual class group projects), presentation.

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions to be answered Duration

Special Instructions

semester-long module (linked modules) Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Bauman, Zygmunt (1996) From Pilgrim to Tourist – or a short history of identity. In Questions of Cultural identity. Eds. Stuart Hall & Paul du Gay. London: Sage publications, pp 18 – 37 Giesen, Bernhard & Schmuel Noah Eisenstadt (1995) The construction of collective identity. Archives Europeens de Sociologie. Vol 36 (1) , pp 72 – 102 Hall, Stuart (1995) The question of Cultural identity. In Modernity. An introduction to modern societies. Eds. S Hall, D Held, D Hubert, K Thompson (1995). Cambridge: Polity press, pp 595 – 635 Hottola, Petri (2004) Culture confusion. Intercultural adaptation in tourism. In Annals of Tourism Research. Vol 31 (2) pp 447 - 466 McCarthy, Mark (2005) Ireland’s heritages. Critical perspectives on Memory & Identity. Aldershot: Ashgate publishing Niven, Bill & Chloe Palmer (2010) Memorialisation in Germany since 1945. London: Palgrave Macmillan Urry, John (2002) The Tourist Gaze London: Sage publications Winter, Jay (1995) Sites of memory, Sites of mourning. Cambridge: Cambridge university Press

Supplemental Readings Colleen Ward, S Bocher & A Furnham (2001) Varieties of Culture travelers: Tourists. In The Psychology of Culture Shock. Eds. C Ward, S Bochner & A Furnham, pp127 – 142 Selected literary and scholarly texts, documentary and feature films, tourism and heritage literature specific to languages studied.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

French Culture & Society

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) French Communication

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Michèle Boisbourdin, Isabelle Soudry

Module Description

This module is structured around student understanding of French Language culture while developing their language and intercultural competencies. The module provides students with an understanding and awareness of social customs and practices in target-language countries and seeks to improve student survival skills while on trips and short stays in French language countries.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To stimulate students’ curiosity about French Language cultures, to familiarise them with key cultural and social issues in French Language countries and to develop their awareness of cultural differences in general. Module Aims · To enhance students’ written and oral skills as required for language production; presentation, discussion, summary etc. · To make students phonetically accurate On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: · Demonstrate awareness of cultural differences, particularly with regard to the social customs, habits and lifestyles in the French Language culture · Access, process, present and explain information on French Language countries Learning and cultures in a formal and structured manner and communicate effectively in Outcomes the target language on a variety of topics · Demonstrate satisfactory comprehension of factual or argumentative French Language texts that address social, topical or cultural matters · Discuss freely aspects of French Language culture Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of Learning and Teaching Methods multimedia & a variety of texts

· Introduction to the social customs and habits of French Language cultures through analysis and discussion of a variety of texts and media

· Introduction to the issues, questions and cross-cultural understanding likely to Indicative Content

arise while travelling in the French Language country. · Issues of cultural and historical importance in French Language countries – including, for example, geography, history, politics and media-arts - through analysis of a variety of texts and media · Communication and presentation of factual information and argument · Phonetics and pronunciation

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Module Assessment Components

Percentage

Assessment 1

40%

Required

Assessment 2 Examination

60% (oral) Oral - 100% (Focus of this module is on oral while its corequisite core foreign language module is on written) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Short oral and written presentations; individual/group research activities; descriptive and comparative work relating to Target Language culture Assessment criteria: Understanding of Target Language culture, textual comprehension, communicative competence, appropriateness and extent of lexis/grammar, ability to analyse & synthesise Target Language material

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings Grand-Clément Odile, Civilisation en Dialogues, Niveau Intermédiaire, Clé International, 2008. Garnier M., Picard J., The French Experience 2, BBC Active, 2004.

Supplemental Readings

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Steele Ross, Civilisation Progressive du Français, Niveau Intermédiare, Clé International, 2004. Pécheur Jacques, Civilisation Progressive du Français, Niveau Avancé, Clé International, 2009. Mauchamp Nelly, La France de toujours, Clé International, 2008 Miquel Claire, Communication Progressive du Français, Niveau Intermédiaire, Clé International, 2004. Charliac L., Motron A-C., Phonétique Progressive du Français, Niveau Intermédiaire, Clé International, 2007. Charliac L., Motron A-C., Phonétique Progressive du Français, Niveau Avancé, Clé International, 2006. DVD : Grandet E., Angéniol R., Morieux, I, Communication en Images, Clé International, 2008. Web references, Journals, etc. http://phonetique.free.fr/indexvir.htm http://exercices.free.fr/francais/orth/index.htm http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/french http://www.cortland.edu/flteach/civ/ http://adfle.free.fr/exercices.html http://www.lefigaro.fr http://www.liberation.fr http://www.marianne2.fr http://www.lenouvelobs.fr http://www.radiofrance.fr http://www.tv5.org

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

German Culture & Society

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) German Communication

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School: School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Dagmar Fischer, Dore Fischer

Module Description

This module is structured around student understanding of German Language culture while developing their language and intercultural competencies. The module provides students with an understanding and awareness of social customs and practices in target-language countries and seeks to improve student survival skills while on trips and short stays in foreign language countries.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To stimulate students’ curiosity about German Language cultures, to familiarise them with key cultural and social issues in German Language countries and to develop their awareness of cultural differences in general. Module Aims · To enhance students’ written and oral skills as required for language production; presentation, discussion, summary etc. · To make students phonetically accurate On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: · Demonstrate awareness of cultural differences, particularly with regard to the social customs, habits and lifestyles in the German Language culture · Access, process, present and explain information on German Language Learning countries and cultures in a formal and structured manner and communicate Outcomes effectively in the target language on a variety of topics · Demonstrate satisfactory comprehension of factual or argumentative German Language texts that address social, topical or cultural matters · Discuss freely aspects of German Language culture Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of multimedia Learning and Teaching Methods & a variety of texts

· Introduction to the social customs and habits of German Language cultures through analysis and discussion of a variety of texts and media

· Introduction to the issues, questions and cross-cultural understanding likely to Indicative Content

arise while travelling in the German Language country. · Issues of cultural and historical importance in German Language countries – including, for example, geography, history, politics and media-arts - through analysis of a variety of texts and media · Communication and presentation of factual information and argument · Phonetics and pronunciation

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Module Assessment Components 40%

Assessment 1 Assessment 2

60% (ORAL)

Examination

Oral exam: 100% (Focus of this module is on oral while its corequisite core foreign language module is on written) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Short oral and written presentations; individual/group research activities; descriptive and comparative work relating to Target Language culture Assessment criteria: Understanding of Target Language culture, textual comprehension, communicative competence, appropriateness and extent of lexis/grammar, ability to analyse & synthesise Target Language material

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings R. Luscher (2009) Landeskunde Deutschland. Von der Wende bis Heute. München: Verlag für Deutsch Discover GermanY, German online activities on the DIT eLearning platform Webcourses Videos/ Films: 1. Zeitworte (Deutschland 1933 - 1945) (Video and Website) 2. Good-bye, Lenin 3. “Unsere Besten” - Die Lieblingsorte der Deutschen. ZDF 2006. Web ressources www.deutschland.de www.deutschewelle.de

Supplemental Readings J. Moeller et.al. (2007) Kaleidoskop. Kultur, Literatur und Grammatik. Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin. D. Sevin, I. Sevin (2006) Wie geht’s? An Introductory German Course. Heinle & Heinle Publishing Inc.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Spanish Culture & Society

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) Spanish Communication

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Jesús Urda, Mariá-José González

Module Description

This module is structured around student understanding of Spanish Language culture while developing their language and intercultural competencies. The module provides students with an understanding and awareness of social customs and practices in target-language countries and seeks to improve student survival skills while on trips and short stays in Spanish Language countries.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To stimulate students’ curiosity about Spanish Language cultures, to familiarise them with key cultural and social issues in Spanish Language countries and to develop their awareness of cultural differences in general. Module Aims · To enhance students’ written and oral skills as required for language production; presentation, discussion, summary etc. · To make students phonetically accurate On completion of this module, the learner will be able to: · Demonstrate awareness of cultural differences, particularly with regard to the social customs, habits and lifestyles in the Spanish Language culture · Access, process, present and explain information on Spanish Language Learning countries and cultures in a formal and structured manner and communicate Outcomes effectively in the target language on a variety of topics · Demonstrate satisfactory comprehension of factual or argumentative Spanish Language texts that address social, topical or cultural matters · Discuss freely aspects of Spanish Language culture Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of multimedia Learning and Teaching Methods & a variety of texts

· Introduction to the social customs and habits of Spanish Language cultures through analysis and discussion of a variety of texts and media

· Introduction to the issues, questions and cross-cultural understanding likely to Indicative Content

arise while travelling in the Spanish Language country. · Issues of cultural and historical importance in Spanish Language countries – including, for example, geography, history, politics and media-arts - through analysis of a variety of texts and media · Communication and presentation of factual information and argument · Phonetics and pronunciation

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

2013/2014

Module Assessment Components 40%

Assessment 1 Assessment 2

60% (ORAL)

Examination

Oral exam: 100% (Focus of this module is on oral while its corequisite core foreign language module is on written) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Short oral and written presentations; individual/group research activities; descriptive and comparative work relating to Target Language culture Assessment criteria: Understanding of Target Language culture, textual comprehension, communicative competence, appropriateness and extent of lexis/grammar, ability to analyse & synthesise Target Language material

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

3 hours

Special Instructions

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings López Moreno, Cristina (2005) España Contemporánea, ESGEL, Educación, ISBN 978-84-9778-186-2 Madrid. Quesada, S. (2004) España Siglo XXI. Madrid, Editorial Edelsa. Cortés, M. (2004) Guía de usos y costumbres de España. Madrid, Editorial Edelsa. Tamales, R. y Quesada, S. (2001) Imágenes de España. Madrid, Editorial Edelsa.

Supplemental Readings Socios y colegas 1. (2002) 2 DVD con escenas reales de la vida laboral en España. Barcelona, Difusión. García, M, Andreu, A. and Labrador M J (2002) CD-ROM- La cultura en juego. Barcelona, Difusión.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

French Communication

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) French Culture & Society

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Michele Boisbourdin, Isabelle Soudry

Module Description

The module develops all 4 key skills; oral, listening, reading and writing skills, and progresses student understanding of selected topics. It builds on student understanding of fundamental aspects of English and Target Language grammar systems and develops students’ ability to identify and apply essential grammatical structures in the foreign language.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To develop self-directed learning, independent learning skills and student awareness in relation to their language learning · To advance student competence in written and oral expression in the Target Module Aims Language on familiar topics · To improve students’ decoding and analysis skills · To develop and consolidate students’ grammatical and lexical competence On completion of this module, learners will be able to: · Comprehend and respond appropriately to texts provided through discussion, explanation and summary · Engage in conversation in the Target Language that address familiar and predictable matters, everyday experiences and issues of student interest · Communicate and organise factual information Learning · Express personal opinion Outcomes · Communicate effectively in the target language using grammatical structures and a developed lexicon correctly · Demonstrate competence with regard to both English and Target Language grammar system (ie. identify, describe and accurately use grammatical forms and structures) and apply that understanding in the production of Target Language texts Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of Learning and Teaching Methods multimedia & a variety of texts

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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· Written expression to develop students’ critical understanding of a variety of topics and themes

· Development of student reading & writing and oral production skills (including pronunciation) through analysis of different texts and materials Indicative Content

· Communication of factual information and expression of personal opinions on topics such as society, work and leisure, accommodation, student life and education · Expansion and consolidation of essential vocabulary and grammatical structures

Module Assessment Components 40%

Assessment 1 Assessment 2

60% (written)

Examination

100% (written) (Focus of this module is on written while its corequisite core foreign language module is on oral) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Written assignments, Individual/group research activities, textual analysis and production, oral presentation Assessment criteria: Grammatical & linguistic accuracy, learner awareness/autonomy, standard of analysis

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings Girardet, J., Pécheur, J., Echo 2, Niveau A2, Clé International, 2008. Stillman, David M., Gordon, Ronni L., Reprise: A French Grammar Review Worktext, 2nd edition, McGraw-Hill, 2007. Collins-Robert French Dictionary, Collins, 2008.

Supplemental Readings

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

2013/2014

Poisson-Quinton, Sylvie, Mimran, Reine, Exercices: grammaire expliquée du français, Niveau intermédiaire, Clé International, 2003. Poisson-Quinton, Mimran, Reine, Compréhension écrite, Niveau A2, Clé International, 2005. Poisson-Quinton, Sylvie, Mimran, Reine, Expression écrite, Niveau A2, Clé International, 2006. Humberstone, Paul, Mot à Mot: New Advanced French Vocabulary, Hodder Education, 2006. Web references, Journals etc. www.languageguide.org/français/grammar/ www.laits.utexas.edu/tex/ www.utm.edu/~globeg/gramm.shtml www.french-linguistics.co.uk/grammar www.libération.fr www.leparisien.fr www.lefigaro.fr www.lemonde.fr www.lesoir.be

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

German Communication

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) German Culture & Society

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Dagmar Fischer, Catherine Spencer

Module Description

The module develops all 4 key skills; oral, listening, reading and writing skills, and progresses student understanding of selected topics. It builds on student understanding of fundamental aspects of English and Target Language grammar systems and develops students’ ability to identify and apply essential grammatical structures in the foreign language.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To develop self-directed learning, independent learning skills and student awareness in relation to their language learning · To advance student competence in written and oral expression in the Target Module Aims Language on familiar topics · To improve students’ decoding and analysis skills · To develop and consolidate students’ grammatical and lexical competence On completion of this module, learners will be able to: · Comprehend and respond appropriately to texts provided through discussion, explanation and summary · Engage in conversation in the Target Language that address familiar and predictable matters, everyday experiences and issues of student interest · Communicate and organise factual information Learning · Express personal opinion Outcomes · Communicate effectively in the target language using grammatical structures and a developed lexicon correctly · Demonstrate competence with regard to both English and Target Language grammar system (i.e. identify, describe and accurately use grammatical forms and structures) and apply that understanding in the production of Target Language texts Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of Learning and Teaching Methods multimedia & a variety of texts.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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· Written expression to develop students’ critical understanding of a variety of topics and themes

· Development of student reading & writing and oral production skills (including pronunciation) through analysis of different texts and materials Indicative Content

· Communication of factual information and expression of personal opinions on topics such as society, work and leisure, accommodation, student life and education · Expansion and consolidation of essential vocabulary and grammatical structures

Module Assessment Components 40%

Assessment 1 Assessment 2

60% (written)

Examination

100% (written) (Focus of this module is on written while its corequisite core foreign language module is on oral) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Written assignments, Individual/group research activities, textual analysis and production, oral presentation Assessment criteria: Grammatical & linguistic accuracy, learner awareness/autonomy, standard of analysis

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

2013/2014

Dodd, Bill & Waltraud Coles (1997) Reading German: A course book and reference grammar. Oxford: Oxford University Press Dreke / Lind (1990) Wechselspiel. Sprachanlässe für die Partnerarbeit. Berlin: Langenscheidt Em neu 2008 Brückenkurs: Deutsch als Fremdsprache Niveaustufe B1. Ein Lehrwerk im Baukastensystem. Hueber Verlag Web references, selected texts, journals and other: Discover GermanY, German online activities on the DIT eLearning platform Webcourses · www.bbc.co.uk/languages · http://www.tatsachen-ueber-deutschland.de/en/content-home/book.html www.deutschewelle.de

Supplemental Readings Grammatik zum Üben (Mittelstufe): Horst Jentsch. Ellen Jentsch Verlag (2000) Benson, Phil & Peter Voller (1996) Autonomy and independence in Language Learning. Longman

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Spanish Communication

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s) Spanish Culture & Communication

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Jesús Urda, Mariá-José González

Module Description

The module develops all 4 key skills; oral, listening, reading and writing skills, and progresses student understanding of selected topics. It builds on student understanding of fundamental aspects of English and Target Language grammar systems and develops students’ ability to identify and apply essential grammatical structures in the foreign language.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

The aims of this module are: · To develop self-directed learning, independent learning skills and student awareness in relation to their language learning · To advance student competence in written and oral expression in the Target Module Aims Language on familiar topics · To improve students’ decoding and analysis skills · To develop and consolidate students’ grammatical and lexical competence On completion of this module, learners will be able to: · Comprehend and respond appropriately to texts provided through discussion, explanation and summary · Engage in conversation in the Target Language that address familiar and predictable matters, everyday experiences and issues of student interest · Communicate and organise factual information Learning · Express personal opinion Outcomes · Communicate effectively in the target language using grammatical structures and a developed lexicon correctly · Demonstrate competence with regard to both English and Target Language grammar system (i.e. identify, describe and accurately use grammatical forms and structures) and apply that understanding in the production of Target Language texts Interactive lectures, self-directed learning, class-room discussion, use of Learning and Teaching Methods multimedia & a variety of texts

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· Written expression to develop students’ critical understanding of a variety of topics and themes

· Development of student reading & writing and oral production skills (including pronunciation) through analysis of different texts and materials Indicative Content

· Communication of factual information and expression of personal opinions on topics such as society, work and leisure, accommodation, student life and education · Expansion and consolidation of essential vocabulary and grammatical structures

Module Assessment Components 40%

Assessment 1 Assessment 2

60% (written)

Examination

100% (written) (Focus of this module is on written while its corequisite core foreign language module is on oral) A range of continuous assessment and summative assessment modes will apply: Written assignments, Individual/group research activities, textual analysis and production, oral presentation Assessment criteria: Grammatical & linguistic accuracy, learner awareness/autonomy, standard of analysis

Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions answered

to

be

Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module Interactive class: 72 hours Self-study: 128 hours

Core Readings Club Prisma (A2/B1), Método de español para jóvenes (2008), Madrid, Edinumen.

Supplemental Readings Uso de la Gramática española: Nivel intermedio (2007, last edition) , Madrid, Edelsa. Aula Internacional 3: Libro del alumno -B1-, (2007), Barcelona, Difusión. Web references, Journals etc.

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Module Title Module Code ISCED Code

2013/2014

Introduction to Modern French Literature Lang/lit 101 Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Hélène MacElroy

Module Description

Introduction to Modern French literature presents an overview of French Literature through the ages, but with an emphasis on Contemporary literature in its varied forms. Students are introduced to a variety of literary forms and read a range of narratives drawn from fiction, short story, poetry, plays, novels, bande dessinée, song and film. They study elements of style, structure and character. The course is presented within a broad cultural and social context. By including singers/songwriters, the module also seeks to give insight into a vibrant aspect of Francophone popular culture and looks at their contribution to French cultural identity

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

Module Aims

Learning Outcomes

Learning and Teaching Methods

Indicative Content

The aims of this module are as follows · To introduce students to literary texts representative of a range of periods and genres as well as contemporary French literature · To provide students with an overview of issues pertaining to French literature · To develop students’ critical and analytical thinking · To encourage students’ written and oral accuracy in their understanding and production in the target language. On successful completion of this module students should be able to: · Demonstrate a general knowledge of the main aspects of French and Francophone culture and literature · Appraise a range of literary texts drawn from different genres · Apply critical and analytical skills to a range of literary texts · Express themselves correctly in basic oral and written French. · Demonstrate grammatical accuracy in their written production · Develop coherent written arguments, both in coursework and under examination conditions The module will be developed through a range of the following: Lectures, tutorials, individual and team work, oral presentations, independent readings and research Module Content This module concentrates on reading and analysis of a range of literary texts: novels, short stories, poetry, theater, traditional song / Chanson, film Themes covered may include: Literary places. The writer and the city. Travel narratives. Landscape and narrative. Food and drink in literature, the coming of age novel ( voyage of self discovery)

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Module Assessment Components Assessment 1

50%

Assessment 2 Examination Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details

Written exam: 50% Written exam: 100% (learning outcomes best reassessed with a written exam) A range of the following modes of continuous assessment will apply: Short written assignments and essays, individual and group research projects, oral presentations, in-class assessment. Assessment criteria: Knowledge and understanding of subject, Linguistic accuracy Comprehensiveness and standard of analysis, Relevance of content

Exam may include topical questions, essay and comprehension question.

Questions to be set Questions to be answered Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

To be delivered as a year-long module in year 1

Core Readings Key passages from some of the texts will be given as handouts. - Anglard, Veronique: Anthologie de contes et de nouvelles modernes 1999 Methuen - Applebaum, Stanley (ed.) (2006) Great tales of French fantasy. Dover publications - Coward, Richard : Short stories in French, Penguin parallel texts 1999 -Gratton, Johnie et Le Juez, Brigitte (eds.) (1994) Modern French short story fiction. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press. - Hackett, CA de : An anthology of modern french poetry from Baudelaire to the present day Note: Some of the works will be studied through key selected passages

Supplemental Readings A selection of CD and DVD will be provided for in class viewing and listening as well as independent study Contemporary fiction: Camus : L’Etranger (excerpts) Bande dessinée : Asterix, Brétécher, Hergé -Saint-Exupery: le petit Prince Folio Gallimard 2007 -Gary, Romain La vie devant soi. Folio, Gallimard 1982 -Beckett: En attendant Godot editions de minuit 1995 Simenon : Maigret et la jeune morte, Cle International 2004 - Grimbert, Philippe Un secret. Paris: Poche 2004

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Introduction to Modern German Literature

Module Code ISCED Code

School Module Author(s)

Module Description

Level

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School of Languages Sascha Harris, Noel Deeney The course introduces the first-year student to the study of the literature, literary criticism and literary history of the German-speaking world. It broadly examines the role and institutions of the German-speaking media to highlight the relevance of the literary contribution to cultural and political life. The course surveys key ideas, concepts and terminology pertaining to genre, epoch and discourse essential for the study of literature. The course focusses on texts of the period 1945 to 2010, linking literary practice and production to their historical background and their role in contemporary society. Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level The aims of this module are to

· Guide the first year student through the treatment of generally shorter,

Module Aims

representative texts towards confident, independent use of literary material · Equip the student with the essential concepts and terms for approaching, interpreting and evaluating literary texts · Introduce the student to the reading of modern german literary texts in their context · Improve the student’s language skills through the internalisation of grammatical structures and acquisition of vocabulary registers On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

· Identify major epochs, genres and forms of German literature · Use key terms and definitions in discussing and summarising texts and their Learning Outcomes

specific contexts

· Competently read exemplary German texts from various literary genres of the period 1945-2010

· Develop an appreciation of German contemporary thought and recent historical experience.

· formulate literary text-based arguments in written and oral format Learning and Teaching Methods

The course will be delivered in a combination of lectures and seminars. Materials will be presented in a variety of media, offering students the possibility of contributing presentations on the basis of individual and group study.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Indicative Content

2013/2014

Historical Introduction, Abriß der deutschen Geschichte (800 bis zur Gegenwart), Literary Epochs, Genre and Literary Theory (Prose, Poetry, Drama, Essay), The German Media and its Institutions; Literature and Critique, Introduction to the reading of modern German literary texts

Module Assessment Components Assessment 1

50%

over year-long module

50%

over year-long module at end of year

Assessment 2 Examination Reassessment Assessment Criteria

100% Exam (learning outcomes best assessed with written exam) Accuracy of terminology; knowledge of key ideas and concepts; structure in argumentation; evidence of background knowledge

Exam Details Questions to be set Questions to be answered Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

Year-long module, consisting of two semesters

Core Readings Two of the following works to be read in full, covering the genres. The remaining material will be discussed in excerpts. Frisch, Max (1996), Biedermann und die Brandstifter, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp. Kunze, Reiner (2005), Die wunderbaren Jahre, Frankfurt am Main: Fischer. Böll, Heinrich (2003), Das Brot der frühen Jahre. Cologne, Kiepenheuer und Witsch Timm, Uwe (2008), Die Entdeckung der Currywurst, Munich: dtv. Weiss, Peter (2004), Marat/Sade, Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp. Rivkin, Julie & Ryan, Michael (Eds.) 2004: Literary Theory; An Anthology, Oxford, Blackwell The following will be supplied to students as handouts, together with other short supplementary texts: Bachmann, Ingeborg: Ihr glücklichen Augen Borchert, Wolfgang : Die Ratten, Das Brot Enzensberger, Hans Magnus: Mittelmaß und Wahn Grass, Günter: (Die Blechtrommel (film + extracts from novel) Poetry by Brecht, Bergengruen, Biermann, Bobrowski, Celan, Eich, Enzensberger, Huchel, Kirsch

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

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Supplemental Readings Beutin, Wolfgang (2008): Deutsche Literaturgeschichte, Von den Anfängen bis zur Gegenwart, Stuttgart/Weimar: Metzler. Bogner, Ralf Georg (2009): Deutsche Literatur auf einen Blick : Darmstadt, wbg Boyle, Nicholas (2008) : German Literature : A Very Short Introduction, Oxford : Oxford University Press. Burdorf, Dieter et al. (2007), Metzler Lexikon Literatur: Begriffe und Definitionen, Stuttgart/Weimar: Metzler. Craig, Gordon (1991): The Germans. London, Meridian. Eckoldt, Matthias (2007), Medien der Macht – Macht der Medien, Berlin : Kulturverlag Kadmos. Klarer, Mario (1999): Einführung in die neuere Literaturwissenschaft, Darmstadt: Primus. (English version: Introduction to Literary Studies. Routledge 2004.) Krobb, Florian and Morrison, Jeff, eds. (2003): Poetry Project: Irish Germanists interpret German Verse, Oxford/Berne: Peter Lang. Krobb, Florian and Morrison, Jeff, eds. (2008): Prose Pieces: Irish Germanists interpret German Short and Very Short Stories, Konstanz: Hartung-Gorre Verlag. Jeßling, Benedikt and Köhnen, Ralph (2007): Einführung in die Neuere Deutsche Literaturwissenschaft, Stuttgart: Metzler. Meyn, Hermann (2004) : Massenmedien in Deutschland, Konstanz : UVK-Verlag. Ozment, Steven (2004): A Mighty Fortress. A New History of the German People from 100BC to the 21st Century.London, Granta Books. Sagarra, Eda and Skrine, Peter (1999), A Companion to German Literature, Oxford: Blackwell. Segebrecht, Wulf (2007): Was sollen Germanisten lesen? Berlin, Erich Schmidt Verlag Wallraff, Günter (1997), Der Aufmacher, Cologne: Kiepenheuer & Witsch. Watanabe-O’Kelly, Helen (1997): The Cambridge History of German Literature, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Müller, Rainer A. et al., ed. (2008), Deutsche Geschichte in Quellen und Darstellung, 12 Bände, Ditzingen : Reclam. Schrag, Wolfram (2007), Medienlandschaft Deutschland, Konstanz : UVK-Verlag. www.bpb.de www.goethe.de www.litrix.de www.wdr.de

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Module Title

2013/2014

Introduction to Modern Spanish Literature (Spanish and Latin-American literary texts)

Module Code ISCED Code

Pre-Requisite Module Code(s)

Co-Requisite Module Code(s)

Last Revision Date

ECTS Credits 10

School

School of Languages

Module Author(s)

Jesús Urda, Alma Conway

Module Description

Introduction to Spanish and Latin-American literary texts presents an overview of Spanish Literature through the ages. The emphasis is on the chronological development of Spanish and Latin-American literature through the study of the most representatives authors. Students are introduced to a variety of literary genres and read and discuss a range of narratives drawn from poetry, plays, novels, short stories, and films. They study elements of style, structure and character. The course is set within a broad cultural, social and historical context. By including film versions of literary works, the module also seeks to give insight into a vibrant aspect of Hispanic popular culture and looks at their contribution to Hispanic cultural identity.

Level

Common European Framework of Reference for Languages: A2 minimum exit level

Module Aims

Learning Outcomes

Learning and Teaching Methods

The aims of this modules are as follows · To introduce students to Spanish and Latin-American literary texts representative of a range of periods and genres. · To provide students with an overview of issues pertaining to Spanish and LatinAmerican literature. · To develop students’ reading, analytical and interpretative skills. · To encourage students’ written and oral accuracy in their understanding and production in the target language. On successful completion of this module students should be able to: · Demonstrate a general knowledge of the main aspects of Hispanic culture and literature · Appraise a range of literary texts drawn from different genres · Apply critical and analytical skills to a range of literary texts · Express themselves correctly in basic oral and written Spanish · Demonstrate grammatical accuracy in their written production · Develop coherent written arguments, both in coursework and under examination conditions The module will be developed through a range of the following: Lectures, tutorials, individual and team work, oral presentations, independent readings and research,

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Indicative Content

2013/2014

This module concentrates on reading and analysis of a range of literary texts: novels, short stories, poetry, drama, film Themes covered may include: literary places and literary characters; writer’s lives, fantasy in literature, landscape and narrative, politics and literature.

Module Assessment Components Assessment 1

50%

Assessment 2 Examination Reassessment

Assessment Criteria

Exam Details

Written exam 50% Written exam : 100% (learning outcomes best reassessed with a written exam) A range of the following modes of continuous assessment will apply: Short written assignments and essays, individual and group research projects, oral presentations, in-class assessment. Assessment criteria: Knowledge and understanding of subject, linguistic accuracy, comprehensiveness and standard of analysis, relevance of content

Exam may include topical questions, essay and comprehension question.

Questions to be set Questions to be answered Duration

Special Instructions

3 hours

To be delivered as a year long module in year 1

Core Readings

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Key passages and extracts from some of the texts below will be given as handouts *El cantar de Mio Cid – anonymous *Jorge Manrique’s “Coplas”. *Cervantes Don Quijote de la Mancha: discussion and reading of different chapters and TV-film version. *Francisco de Quevedo’s selected poems. *Románticismo : Gustavo Adolfo Becquer’s Rimas y Leyendas *El Realismo: Emilia Pardo Bazán ‘s Las medias rojas. *La generación del 98: Miguel de Unamuno and the “noventayochismo”. *Pío Baroja’s El árbol de la ciencia (extracts). *Juan Ramón Jimenez’s selected poetry. *La generación del 27: España antes de la Guerra Civil: Poesía :selected poems by Federico García Lorca and Antonio Machado . *Literature during the years of Francoism: ‘La narrrativa social’. Ignacio Aldecoa, Martín Gaite, Sánchez Ferlosio( short-stories and extracts from selected works) *Narrativa Hispanoamericana: realismo mágico y realismo fantástico. Gabriel García Marquez’s Isabel viendo llover en Macondo *Poesía Modernista Hispanoamericana: Selected poems by Ruben Darío and Pablo Neruda *Tendecias actuales: Javier Marías’ Los dominios del lobo y Todas las Almas (extracts) , Julian Madrid (Crime short stories), Juan José Millás (short stories), Soledad Puertolás (short stories), Enrique Villa-Matas(short stories) Note: Some of the works will be studied through key selected passages

Supplemental Readings The Oxford Companion to Spanish Literature. Ward, Philip, ed. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1978. Additional reading and documents : A selection of DVD will be provided for in class viewing as well as independent study Films and TV-films: El Cid (Anthony Mann, 1961) Don Quijote de la Mancha (TVE, Gutierrez Aragón, 1995) Lorca, muerte de un poeta (J.A.Bardem, 1987) Exilio (Pedro Carvajal, 2002) Selection of News-reels from NO-DO Note: Some of the works will be studied through selected passages

III. FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS General Questions The following notes are not intended to represent a definitive interpretation of the Institute's regulations. In all cases students should read the full regulations, especially DIT's General Assessment Regulations, to be found under: http://www.dit.ie/qualityassuranceandacademicprogrammerecords/student-assessment-regulations/. 1. What do I do when I have questions about, problems or any other issue relating to a particular module? In the first instance, you should contact your lecturer and obtain the information you require or discuss the issue. For issues concerning the overall programme, contact the year coordinator. 2. What is the Year Coordinator’s role? If you have a problem with a module, you should in the first instance discuss the matter with the lecturer concerned. If this does not solve the problem, you should approach the Year Co-ordinator. There are also student representatives on the Programme Committee who can be approached for

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advice. The year coordinator can also give you advice on a range of other issues you may experience during the year. 3. What is the role of the Head of School? The Head of the School of Languages (Ms María-José González-Acting) has overall responsibility for the programme. 4. Can students contact lecturers or talk to them outside of lecture time? Students are encouraged to approach their lecturer about any concerns they may have during the course of the programme. Lecturers’ contact details are available on the DIT website. 5. Who can I talk to about personal problems? Student counsellors are available for problems of a personal nature. This service is free of charge. 6. Who sets and marks the examinations? The examination for each module is normally set and marked by the lecturer who teaches it. Where there are two or more lecturers for a module, the paper is jointly set and corrected by both lecturers. Exam scripts are anonymous. 7. How many subjects are there on the programme in the first year? On the foreign language side there are three mandatory all-year modules; on the English Studies side, there are five mandatory modules of varying duration, with a choice between Culture and Film Module in first term. 8. Can I repeat any failed modules? Any courses you fail can be repeated in the supplemental exams at the end of August /beginning of September. You may compensate up to 15 ECTS provided all marks for those 15 ECTS are between 35% and 39%. You have a maximum of four attempts in total to pass a module. Firstly there are repeat examinations (called "Supplemental" Exams, starting at the end of August) where failed modules can be taken again. Modules still not passed can be repeated at the following sitting and finally the following autumn. Please read the General Assessment Regulations carefully on this point It is important to strive towards passing all subjects at the first attempt, as students who repeat a module in the Supplemental Examinations will only be awarded a maximum mark of 40% for a module passed at a second or subsequent sitting. Individual student results are issued in a transcript of results. This is an official document frequently sought by employers to establish your academic record. 9. Do I simply have to pass each module to progress to the next year of the programme? Students can progress to subsequent years of the programme by simply achieving 40% in each module. However, it is very unwise to simply seek to achieve 40%. The classification of your degree is largely determined by what you learn in each year. The opportunity to progress to higher level courses is determined by your results. Even if you choose not to continue with further study, potential employers seek out students who have a track record of good marks throughout their programme. 10. Can I move on to the next year of the programme carrying failed modules and repeat them subsequently? Students can only proceed to the next year of the programme if they have passed all modules. In addition to the sessional exams, you have an opportunity to repeat modules at the supplemental

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sittings at the end of the summer. You will not be allowed to progress to Year 2 if you have failed a module. 11. What is the relevance of getting good marks in year 1? As you know, Year 3 of your degree programme is a compulsory year abroad. You will spend the year studying at a partner institution in a country of your chosen foreign language. The School of Languages has well established bilateral agreements with partner institutions in China, France, Germany, Italy, Taiwan and Spain. You should be aware that results for Year 1 will be used to inform the decision making process in the selection of a partner university, as well as affecting your chances in the competition for teaching assistantships. The Erasmus coordinator will use the averaged mark for end of year 1 modules. Students with a high average mark will be able to select their destination university ahead of students with lower average marks. 12. What exactly is the examination board? This is a formal meeting of all examiners on a programme, held after the papers have been marked. At the examination board each candidate's marks are reviewed and recorded. A decision is made as to whether a student should pass, pass by compensation or repeat. 13. How is the degree graded at the DIT? The award of an Honours Degree is made within four grading bands: First Class Honours, Second Class Honours or Pass as set out below. 70%+  First Class 60% - 69%  Second Class First Division 50% - 59%  Second Class Second Division 40% - 49%  Pass / Third Individual marks for assignments and assessments reflect these grades.

14. How do I get my examination results? You receive an email in your DIT email student account once results are released. You are then able to access your results on EGB. For further details, please check http://modularisation.dit.ie/studentinfo.htm. 15. What happens if I am unable to take an exam due to illness or other unforeseen circumstances? You should read chapter 13, section 1, of the General Assessments Regulations. Relevant forms can also be downloaded from the same link. 16. Are continuous assessments compulsory? Continuous Assessments are compulsory. A module is evaluated through a combination of continuous assessment(s) and / or an examination. The final mark for a module is an aggregate of the various assessment marks. Failure to submit or sit any assessment component of a module results in marks lost for that module. 17. What happens if I am late submitting material for continuous assessments? Materials for assessment may be subject to a penalty or may not be accepted, unless you have a valid

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and documented case. 18. Do I have to attend all lectures? It is compulsory to attend lectures and take part in any coursework required by lecturers. The correlation between attendance and passing exams is well documented. This is particularly true for languages as the learning is cumulative. Constant engagement with the material in class and homework is essential to make progress and gain competence in the language. Attendance is monitored in all language classes and letters are sent to students with poor attendance. If there are serious issues affecting your attendance, please contact your year coordinator.

EXAMINATIONS 19. Do I have to register for my exams? During each year of the programme you must register for your examinations. Registration forms are available in Kevin St. Examinations Office. You will be advised of the deadline well in advance. Late registration will incur a fine. 20. Examination Results See question 14. 21. Is there an appeals procedure? Should you wish to have a re-check or re-mark of your paper, please read chapter 14 of the General Assessments Regulations. If you feel you have grounds for appeal, details on the process and forms are available on the same link. 22. Repeat Examinations If you fail any modules, you must repeat those modules at the next available sitting. You only have to repeat the courses which you fail. Supplemental examinations take place at the end of August / beginning of September. A registration form for the supplemental examinations will be posted with your examination results in early July. If you have failed some modules, and if you have not received an examination registration form by 30 July, you should contact the examinations office in order to get an entry form and register for your supplemental examinations. There is a registration fee for supplemental examinations. 23. Results of Supplemental Examinations These are normally published in the third week of September. The results are available on EGB.

PLAGIARISM PRACTICAL GUIDELINES In accordance with DIT Plagiarism statement which expressly forbids all forms of plagiarism, it is the policy of the School of Languages to refuse work which is plagiarised. In simple words: plagiarism is the unacknowledged use of someone else’s work. That ‘work’ may be a published book or article, information downloaded from the Internet, or the work of another student. Plagiarism can take various forms: copying, paraphrasing (summarising in one’s own words a passage of someone else’s work), or adopting someone else’s detailed line of argument, without acknowledging the source. Plagiarism is a form of ‘unfair practice’ (see General Assessment Regulations, Chap.11), and a student found guilty by the Panel of Investigation may face serious penalties. In written essays, projects or presentations students should:

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- append a bibliography listing all sources used; - place any portions of text directly quoted between quotation-marks; - identify and correctly reference the source of ideas and arguments presented; In written essays, projects or presentations students should not: - submit language assessments corrected by a native speaker, as work so corrected and re-written may not in the end be one’s own, and is therefore a form of plagiarism;1 - resort to translation engines under any circumstances.

Format of oral examinations - Students should note that neither reading from notes nor the unbroken presentation of material evidently learned off by heart will be acceptable. The examiners may therefore ask the examinee to leave any notes aside, to cover the same point(s) again or to discuss points further without reference to such notes. All students must be prepared to take questions from the examiners during their presentation and demonstrate that they are able to cope with such interruptions. These are designed to give students a chance to show that they fully understand what they are presenting and are able to discuss it in a meaningful two-way exchange, such as would occur in a real life situation. Accordingly, delivery and active participation on the part of the examinee are just as much under assessment in oral examinations as are content and linguistic accuracy, and these elements are not to be understood as separate from each other. For more information on how to avoid plagiarism, please consult: http://www.dit.ie/media/library/documents/researchersandplagiarism.pdf. Also refer to the information leaflet in Appendix 1 of the General Assessment Regulations (see link below). In the same document (chapter 11 and Appendix 1), you will find the procedure for suspected cases of plagiarism and other breaches of DIT’s regulations. (http://www.dit.ie/qualityassuranceandacademicprogrammerecords/student-assessmentregulations/general/).

COURSE TEAM

Dr Alma Conway (Spanish) Noel Deeney (English/German) Dagmar Fischer (German) Dore Fischer (German) Odette Gabaudan (English) Dr Sascha Harris (English) Course Chair

Valerie Hascoët (English) Dr Marty Meinardi (English) Hélène MacElroy (French) Dr Gerardine Montgomery (French) Dr Sue Norton (English) Carmel O’Reilly (English)

Email

Extension

noel.deeney@dit.ie

4943

sascha.harris@dit.ie marty.meinardi@dit.ie

susan.norton@dit.ie

4712

1

Tuition in the School of Languages is designed to help you learn the language; Native-speaker competence is not expected of language students.

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First Year Handbook English Studies and Languages

Paloma Perez Valdes (Spanish) Isabelle Soudry (French) Dr Catherine Spencer (English/German)

isabelle.soudry@dit.ie catherine.spencer@dit.ie

JesĂşs Urda (Spanish/English)

jesus.urda@dit.ie

2013/2014

4858 4556

First Year Coordinator

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English studies year 1 handbook