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PROPORTION FOUNDATION

Annual report 2015


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INDEX FOREWORD 4 Our roots

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Our purpose

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Our strategy

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Our proposition

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Our approach

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Our funding strategy

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Our projects

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Our team

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Our partners

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Our board

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Our awards

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Our finance

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CONTACT 49

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FOREWORD D

ear reader,This is the first report of ProPortion Foundation. It will provide you with many insights in what we aim to achieve, what our strategy is, what our solutions are, and how we make it happen. Let me start by giving a short introduction about who we are. ProPortion is a creative organization that realizes social businesses that serve low-income consumer groups in upcoming? economies. ProPortion strongly believes in the power of social entrepreneurship; it combines the impact-first approach of the NGO sector, with the entrepreneurial approach of the private sector. Currently, ProPortion is incubating social businesses in Bangladesh, Kenya and Colombia. You may wonder; why set-up social businesses? In my view, a social business is best described as an approach that combines the best of both worlds: a social business aims to solve a societal problem in order to create positive social and/or environmental impact, like NGO’s do, but with the commercial principles that businesses apply. When a social business has more revenues than costs, the remaining profit is not used to enrich shareholders, but used to sustain its operations in the future. This leads to lasting impact, and to even scale operations geographically and/or to further invest in product and service development & innovation. Social businesses are everywhere in the world. They vary from a local bakery who includes mentally disabled people in their company, to social businesses that distribute affordable solar lamps to rural communities without electricity. There is a key difference in terminology between traditional NGOs and social businesses. NGO often consider low-income people as ‘beneficiaries’ that need help. most of the time free of charge. Social entrepreneurs approach the same people as ‘consumers’ who have aspirations and desires for consuming meaningful products and services, but with limited financial capacity or access. This change of vocabulary seems little, but is a radical paradigm shift. When designing for customers, you start by understanding their pains & gains, for which you develop a value proposition, a product and/or service, that people are able and willing to pay for. These customer-centric principles will constantly stimulate you to do better; to create better products, better

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services at a better price. How do we do that? Well, ProPortion has merged two proven methodologies; human-centered design and Lean start-up. Since we only apply these into low-income communities, we have contextualised the steps and tools for Base-of-Pyramid contexts. In this report, we share our strategy with you, and we will tell you more about the different social businesses we are currently developing. I am sure you will feel the excitement, passion and purpose that my team and myself are feeling when working on solutions to major societal problems in Kenya, Colombia and Bangladesh. Thank you for your interest in and support of ProPortion Foundation. In case you like to know more, just approach me or one of the ProPortion team members any time, and pop in for a cup of coffee in Amsterdam, Dhaka, Nairobi, Kakamega or Bogotá!

WARM REGARDS, THOMAS SCHUURMANS DIRECTOR PROPORTION FOUNDATION.


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OUR ROOTS ProPortion Foundation was founded in July 2009, as a spin-off from design agency reggs in Amsterdam. A small team of creative professionals experienced that a design process is not only effective in designing a physical product, but that it can also be used to design services or even business models. It all starts with empathy for the customers, understanding their pains and desires. This is followed by a phase in which ideas on how to solve these are created, converting problems into value propositions, products and services that can be prototyped and tested with potential customers. Finally, a pilot is initiated to see if such a new business model can actually become financially viable.

Joost Jaeger, director of Reggs, and Thomas Schuurmans, at the time new business developer at Reggs, were the driving force behind ProPortion. After a first project for FrieslandCampina to impact low-income children in Vietnam, Jaeger and Schuurmans decided to start ProPortion Foundation as a separate entity. Since then, applying human-centered design thinking to solve societal problems in low-income communities has become the core business of ProPortion Foundation. The first own social business project started in Bangladesh, after which ProPortion sat foot in Kenya to tackle youth unemployment. One year later, ProPortion initiated the process to design a solution for lowerleg amputees in Colombia. Since then, ProPortion Foundation is focussing on making these three social businesses a success, and further developing ProPortion’s methodology that consists of integrating the human-centered design and lean start-up in low-income community contexts.

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OUR PURPOSE

PROPORTION’S IMPACT AREAS ARE

The purpose of ProPortion Foundation is improve the quality of life of people earning only a couple of dollars a day, through making meaningful products & services affordable and available to them.

Increase people’s health by providing daily access to safe drinking water Increase inclusivity of disabled people by providing access to prosthetic care for more mobility with less pain and access to entrepreneurial training and business development support. Increase (self-)employment of youth and women by providing access to entrepreneurial training, finance & business development support

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OUR STRATEGY Our strategy is based on 5 core elements:

OUR PASSION

OUR POWERS

we believe in a world for all, that includes people with a low-income, men and women, young and old, people with and without disabilities. But often education, health, clean drinking water are not equally accessible for every individual. Solving these challenges sustainably is our passion. Currently we are active in 3 regions of the world, with a base in Bangladesh, Kenya and Colombia. We love to observe and better understand people; what do they like, what do they find important, what are their challenges in live, what are their dreams and aspirations. When you have deep understanding and empathy, you can actually design solutions that are really impactful and valuable.

We have the skills and tools to observe and research people’s desires and challenges, the creativity to come up with innovative ideas and concepts. With our pragmatic design skills, we are able to quickly prototype and test them with actually customers and users.

OUR PURPOSE we believe in the effectiveness of the social business approach in delivering valuable products & services. We are do-ers. We don’t give up, and pivot multiple times till we get it right. But once we have realised a self-sustainable social business, can you then imagine what lasting and growing impact we can realise? This is what makes us determined and get out of bed each day.

In Bangladesh, 50 million Bangladeshi citizens are daily exposed to arsenic-contaminated drinking water. This results into skin cancer and death eventually, making it a mass killer in Bangladesh. A lot of the shallow tube wells owned by households are contaminated, but unfortunately you cannot taste, see or smell arsenic contamination. The problem is so huge that interventions from the Bangladeshi government and NGOs cannot solve the problem alone. Colombia has one of the highest rates of landmine victims in the world. The majority of them live in rural areas and do not have access to orthopedic care. They have to travel for hours, if they are lucky enough that their health insurance company covers for their cost. Colombia is not the only country that suffers from this problem; The World Health Organization has estimated there are 30 million amputees living in low-income countries, which often have limited to no access to prosthetic provision.

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(SOCIETAL) PROBLEMS We have deliberately chosen to work on three continents. It allows us to learn from different cultures, from different societal problems to constantly improve our skillset and design tools and to easily test whether our social business solution are replicable in the regions where we have our footprint: Bangladesh, Kenya and Colombia.

In Kenya, in 9 years’ time, the unemployment rate grew from 12% to over 40% today. The majority (72%) is youth between 18-35 years. Youth living in rural areas can't find jobs and seek their luck in Nairobi or migrate elsewhere. However, there is a large opportunity in the agri-sector; the current productivity of farmers is relatively low as compared to farm practices abroad. But youth in general are not attracted to get into farming. They simply find it uncool and hard work. So, who are going to produce the food of tomorrow? Hence, not only youth unemployment is at stake. Food security is at large as well.


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OUR PROPOSITION. When integrating passion, power, purpose and problems, we have developed four propositions; four social businesses, each in different stages of the incubation process.

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Sujol is a social business in Bangladesh where micro-entrepreneurs are supplied with an water quality test kits, enabling them to test the water quality of wells owned by households. The testing service is priced affordably, and allows the micro-entrepreneurs to partly be self sustainable. In a second phase, the Sujol entrepreneurs will also provide services to the households on how to access safe water solutions in case their water is contaminated. When a Sujol entrepreneur is proven to be a viable micro-business, we believe we can easily recruit more entrepreneurs to adopt the Sujol business and grow our impact.

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Vijana Reloaded (VR) is a social business in Kenya that offers entrepreneurial training and business development support to youth to start and grow their own business. VR focuses on young women & men (18-30) living in rural Kenya to create their own jobs and jobs for their peers.


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LegBank aims to increase access to affordable, qualitative prostheses to low-income amputees in upcoming economies, starting in Colombia. We have developed innovative patented technology to increase the quality of prosthesis that we aim to sell to urban prosthesis makers, and reach out to rural clients by providing services in rural areas.

ProPortion Enterprise a business development service provider to organisations who embrace the social business philosophy. The creative professionals of ProPoriton offer trainings, bootcamps and design workshops to on the one hand, companies who desire to create more social impact and on the other hand NGOs who desire to develop revenue models for their programs to become financially self-sustainable.

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OUR APPROACH The red thread between all the four social businesses of ProPortion is our approach. The approach consists of a structured process, with a lot of creative techniques, tools and creative freedom per phase, conducted by creative professionals of ProPortion. When starting a social business, you first address and explore a societal problem which you like to solve as an entrepreneur. To truly understand that problem we use techniques from the human-centered design approach;

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Dreaming Phase 1 is about dreaming. A dream for us is a first idea for a business, which is still a hypothesis, created by a concrete consumer insight, closely connected to the passion, purpose and strength of the entrepreneur. But from there, we project that hypothesis on the future. We dream big. Why? It gives you direction, it is inspiring for the entrepreneur and for others to step aboard. From the future, we use 'backcasting' techniques, that helps the entrepreneur in designing the proper strategy to reach their dream.

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Exploring Phase 2 is about Exploring. Based on your hypothesis and future dream, you can actually start exploring which stakeholders are and/or could be involved in your business. These are potential customer segments, potential partners, government bodies, peers. By further exploring their stakes, desires and needs, you get a better sense of the level of playing field, which we often visualise in a colourfull context map.

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Ideating In phase 3, you are further developing your ideas. You take your hypothesis as starting point and combine this with gathered insights from the Exploration phase. You will now focus primarily on your potential customer segment via focus groups, deep dives, home visits, drawing exercises, interviews, etcetera. You will create lots of ideas, and then select the one(s) that lead to your 'unique value proposition'; which value will you bring, which product(s) and/or service(s) can deliver that value, and how can you distribute those products & services to your customers.

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Concepting Now you have your idea for your Unique Value Proposition (UVP), you will further develop this idea into a concept. A business concept so to say. For this we often use the Lean Canvas Model or Business Model Canvas, depending on which stage you are in. The concept will contain a 'company purpose' statement (the "Why?" of your business). This will most probably strongly relate to your future dream. But on a strategic level, you will think how you will reach your dream (the "How?" of your business). And thirdly, you will define the design challenges and requirements for your products & services (the "What?" of your business). From this phase onwards, we embrace the principles of lean start-up. When you have a concept for a solution, you start as lean as possible. This means, with limited money and time, and maximum customer interaction to learn and improve your product or service. You better test your prototype sooner than later. In case customers don’t appreciate your prototype, you at least know that you need to pivot. If they do value it, you know you are on the right track.


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Prototyping In phase 5 you will create a prototype of your product/ service. This is the minimal viable product which you need to test it with potential customers to get their feedback. It is very effective to use the Javelin board for this phase. It guides you in defining what the riskiest assumptions behind your product/service are, and how to validate those assumption. This will lead to multiple improvement cycles, till you have reached an improved prototype that shows good results on validating on desirability, technically feasibility and financially viability.

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Planning Now the prototype has been developed, and ideas for a business strategy have explored, it is time to connect the dots by drafting a business plan. This will not only guide you before you dive into a pilot, it will also help in telling your stories and attracting funding for your pilot phase. We love to make a business plan that contains a lot of illustrations, graphs and images, instead of lengthy texts. We convert the full business plan into a pitch book that tells (& sells!) the business story in about 10 slides.

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Pilot Step 7 is the pilot: a commercial operation at small scale. A pilot's objective is to proof the viability of your value proposition and strategy and to further validate assumptions of your draft business plan. It might run for 6-18 months.

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Optimizing During and after the pilot, you will be able to optimise and detail your business plan. You will have actual commercial proof that you are able to sell your product(s) and/or service(s). Your pricing strategy will have crystallise. Your business case will be more solid. Your strategy might become very sharp by now. You have experienced to work with (new) partners, and know if you want to continue or change partnerships before 'getting married'. Your optimised and elaborated business plan contains the strategy for scale and also the need for growth capital. The business plan can be summarised and pitch via an appealing pitch book.

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Scaling Finally, when you have attracted financiers based on your elaborated business plan, it is time to scale up! This also might lead to register your organisation as a separate entity (in case you haven't done that in an earlier stage). Stay focussed on your strategy, but be responsive to day-to-day changes in the local context. And stay continuously focussed on getting the best team for the job. Only a winning team will make your dream and business plan come true.


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OUR FUNDING STRATEGY GRANT FINANCING

INVESTMENTS

ProPortion Foundation raises grants to finance the start of a new social businesses. When incubating a new social business, at first these activities are managed in projects under ProPortion Foundation. Once an idea is converted into a business concept, it will be piloted in the country. Depending on the viability and the legal constraints in the specific countries, we aim to register a local company, with ProPortion Foundation as majority shareholder at first, also opening up ownership for a local entrepreneur in the specific country. This is the start of an exit strategy, where ProPortion slowly handsover the ownership to a local team that can fully run and scale the social business in that country. ProPortion Foundation will continuously seek opportunities to further scale-up these social business to other countries, with logically a first emphasis on scaling to the countries where we already have footprint. But only if there is a similar problem at stake, and where our solution can be contextualised. We seek desirable, feasible and viable solutions after all.

To allow further scale of PP’s social businesses, we move from grant money to investments. This can be a hybrid form of grants, debt and equity. Once an investor steps in, ProPortion Foundation sells it shares. This management buy-out allows ProPortion to recoup its own investment and re-invest that cash into the development of new social enterprises in the future. Up to 2020, ProPortion Foundation will fully focus on making the current social businesses a success and do its first exit, allowing ProPortion to start a 5th. social business.

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OUR PROJECTS

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CHALLENGE In Kenya, the unemployment rate grew with an extreme speed from 12% in 2006 to 42% nowadays. Of all the unemployed people, 70% (!) are between the age of 15 and 35 years old. There is a relatively agri-productivity in Kenya; youth leave their villages and look for jobs in cities where unemployment rules. There are smart ICT based farming solutions that can help increating production and access to market, that are not widely spread in practice. Often, the traditional curriculum of schools in Kenya, don't cater for creativity, entrepreneurship and ICT skills. A teacher broadcasts the content and students reproduce it. We want to challenge this.

MISSION

OUR APPROACH

Vijana Reloaded offers youth training in entrepreneurship & ICT throughout rural Kenya, leading to over 100.000 jobs and increased food security by 2020.

We train youth in boosting their entrepreneurial, ICT and social skills during 6 months, in order to become successful entrepreneurs introducing new or better agri-products &services. In this picture you see the second batch of Vijana Reloaded students. Educational approach; pragmatic entrepreneurship. In this picture you see students participating in a Vijana Reloaded Workshop.

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WE OFFER 5 SERVICES TO YOUTH 1. EXPLORE YOUR DREAM TRAINING (4 WEEKS)

2. MAKE IT HAPPEN TRAINEESHIP (4 MONTHS)

3. SAVING & CREDIT (TO FINANCE PROTOTYPING COSTS & SEED CAPITAL)

4. ALUMNI SERVICES

5. BELONGING TO THE VR TRIBE When a single training centre can generate its own revenues, it should become self-sustainable, so we can scale it to other cities and countries. This model is unrestricted by the limitations of donor money, but driven by demand. And so far, we experience, that demand from rural youth in Kenya is endless.

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RESULTS 2015 2015 was the year where Vijana Reloaded (VR) really came to live. In January 2015, the first batch of VR students started, where the VR team was about 4 weeks ahead of the trainees in developing the detailed curriculum. This allowed the VR team to be very agile in the adapting the level of depth and speed of the curriculum to the feedback and progress of the students. The first batch graduated in August. During their graduation, the group of (10) students created sales leads of 20k euro value! It showed that they were really ready for doing business, beyond just pitching a business plan. The VR team evaluated the curriculum with batch 1 and batch 2 who started in Q2 already, and used that to develop the 2.0 version of the curriculum. In Q3, the third batch started. During Q3 and Q4, the VR team developed the business plan for scale which is used to attract financiers and new partners like Agrics and OLX in Q4.    

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In total, 4 batches of students were trained. The batch consisted of about 8 trainees, that took an average of 26 weeks of training; 6 hours per week. In addition to training the youth and local capacity building of our team, the VR team laid linkages with local government bodies in 2015. Especially the government of Kakamega county has expressed great interest to scale up Vijana Reloaded within her county. But also other county governments have shown interest. In our strategy, we also anticipate to offer a service to the many technical vocational education and training centres (TVETs) to access and embed the VR curriculum in their portfolio. Also we have been engaging with the MMUST university in Kakamega who want to have an in-house VR traineeship dedicated to its MMUST students.


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TEAM Besides governmental and educational linkages, we have established linkages with local companies, especially via the Kakamega Lions Club. They have expressed their willingness and interest to mobilise local companies for the VR graduation events. VR is shifting her focus on government bodies to the private sector, since the private sector can create a far better kick-start for the VR entrepreneurs to get into business. For instance, we have been engaging with OLX, the leading e-marketplace platform in Kenya, with whom we aim to develop a specific curriculum dedicated to create job opportunities as e-merchants for selling produce of farmer groups to online buyers on OLX.

ICS is currently implementing multiple youth empowerment projects in Africa and Asia and has been working in Western Kenya since 2006. Nailab is a business incubator in Nairobi, that contributes to the curriculum and offers growth opportunities to VR graduates.

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Jaramogi Oginga Odinga University has the mandate to certify the Vijana Reloaded curriculum in Kenya. ProPortion has been leading in developing the curriculum.


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OUR PROJECTS

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CHALLENGE In Bangladesh over 22 million people drink highly toxic arsenic contaminated water every day. Deaths caused from consumption of contaminated water amounts to approximately 20.000 a year. Rural communities in Bangladesh are drinking water that is not only contaminated with Arsenic but also has dangerous levels of Iron contamination & Fecal Coliform bacteria. Sadly, most of the rural households in Bangladesh are not aware of the contamination levels in their water source.

MISSION

APPROACH

ProPortion Foundation, together with NGO Forum, are nurturing 'Sujol': an ambitious social enterprise that offers water quality testing services to the rural households in Bangladesh. In case the drinking water of any household is tested to be contaminated, Sujol helps them to identify appropriate water treatment solutions and guides them through the process of owning and using an affordable water treatment solution to purify their drinking water.

Together with NGO Forum, ProPortion conducted Rapid Market Analysis in three Upazilas (municipalities). The team interviewed and observed several stakeholders like rural households, WASH entrepreneurs, Tube well installers and mechanics, local Government bodies, local NGOs, MFIs and Self Help Groups, existing social businesses and other rural entrepreneurs. This provided us with rich insights on water quality, water sources, income, market value chain, business culture, willingness to pay for water quality test services, local availability of safe water solutions, etc. The insights from the Rapid Market Assessment, resulted in the design of a minimal viable product; a multi-parameter water quality test service, which we will start offering to households and other water well owners in the upcoming pilot.

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RESULTS 2015 The year 2015 was meant to invent the idea, do the necessary preparations, form a team, selecting and test the test-procedure and select the entrepreneurs in order to have a smooth take off in 2016.

TEAM 1.NGO Forum

2. ProPortion has been leading in the design of the marketing propositions and the initial ideas for self-sustainable business models. When revenues can cover the income of the micro-entrepreneurs and the back office operations, Sujol will be a scalable and sustainable intervention. The challenge is big. So, it is key that we prove a viable social business model designed for creating impact at scale. Teammembers from UDAY ProPortion Foundation Bangladesh and partners from the water quality testing lab from NGO Forum form Public Health, Awami League President and the Basil Union Parishad.

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OUR PROJECTS

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CHALLENGE Colombia has the highest victim rate of land mines in the world. It causes, together with diabetes and traffic accidents, many amputees. Making a prosthesis is time-consuming, expensive and requires a lot of knowledge. In Colombia, the experienced and certified prosthetic centres are mainly located in big cities, therefore rural amputees need to travel for hours to reach to a centre. They often stay a couple of weeks and need to come back afterwards for adaptations. During this time, they cannot take of their families, nor work, creating all sorts of social, financial and mental problems. Since the prosthesis are expensive, and insurance companies often delay payment, a part of the low-income amputees do not get a prosthesis at all. For some it takes up to two years.

MISSION

2015 WAS ABOUT:

LegBank was initiated in June 2014 by social business developers from ProPortion, in order to increase access to affordable, qualitative prostheses to low-income amputees in upcoming economies, starting in Colombia. Worldwide there are 30 million people that have limited access to orthopedic care, after Colombia we would love to roll out LegBank to other countries in order to reach out to other low-income amputees.

ProPortion’s strategy for LegBank was in a phased way, meaning that different parts of the project were planned to be implemented in different subsequent time slots. We would use 2015 especially for internal team- and idea building among Reggs, Strathclyde and ProPortion. Also it was a year of relation building in Colombia, and a year in which we really tried to understand the problems in the orthopedic industry in Colombia. At the same time, it was a year of success; people believed in our ideas and so we found two investments and won three Awards. Please read more in detail below.

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APPROACH In order to fully understand the problems in the Colombian othopedic industry, ProPortion started exploring the stakeholders; potential customer segments, potential partners, government bodies, peers, etc in Colombia. By further exploring their stakes, desires and needs, we got a better sense of the context and the problem behind the problem. During four months, ProPortion studied the orthopedic market and health system in Colombia with help of many Colombian stakeholders and six amazing TU Delft engineers. We organized creative sessions at universities, visited and interviewed specialists at orthopedic clinics, the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs, several NGOs, health care companies, etc. Also we spoke to several amputees; about the quality of their prostheses, the barriers they faced to obtain them. We got to know about cases when amputees had to wait up to 2 years before they got a prosthesis. Some even didn’t get theirs at all. This helped us to better to identify opportunities for improvement.

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uring our research we learned that the prosthetic socket was the only handcrafted element, most time-consuming to produce and most risk-involving part of a prosthesis. The socket is the component that connects a person’s residual limb with the rest of the prosthesis and is therefore crucial for walking comfortably. So we started to look for techniques that could make the production of sockets better and more efficient. We came across Arjan Buis, dr. at the University of Strathclyde and together with Reggs and engineers from TU Delft, created the first prototype of the Majicast; a casting device for use by orthopaedic specialists to capture the shape and volume of lower residual limbs. This prototype was brought to Colombia, where our first tests and demonstrations to our potential customer segment took place; i.e professional CPOs. We better understood the value we could deliver and how to distribute this product & services to potential customers. However, it was still a rudimentary prototype. Therefore we needed investors to believe in our potential. Another challenge was that if we would start selling the Majicast to urban centra’s, we would especially reach out to urban amputees and not to people in rural areas. We had to come up with a strategy in order to reach out to rural amputees as well. uring a positive mould for a prosthetic socket in Colombia.

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RESULTS 1. We invented a strategy We had learned the need for prosthetic care was high, especially in rural areas. However, this was harder to organize, since there hardly are orthopaedic clinics in rural areas. Our concept therefore leaned on two ideas; one urban model, based on Majicast sales and one rural model, based on service provision.

URBAN MODEL

In order to reach urban amputees, we first target as prospective purchasers those organizations and professionals already working within the field of orthopedics. They are in business and have the capital to invest. This way we create the highest chances of revenue generation and short term profitability, enabling us to ramp-up the creation of orthopedic centers in the rural areas and decentralize prosthetic care.

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RURAL MODEL In order to reach rural amputees, we came up with the idea to provide practical training and seed capital to young people from the National Prosthetics educational program, looking for self-employed job opportunities. We would empower them to work in the prosthetic business, reduce the current shortage of technicians and enable prosthetic provision in rural areas. We will support them in several ways, such like legal support for contracting with EPSs (Colombian healthcare insurance companies), entrepreneurial and technical skills through practical experience to setup their own businesses and a certification attesting their knowledge and skills in the Majicast technique.

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2. We created a strong network

Over the whole year we worked on building and reinforcing our network, and getting insights in all the several stakeholders, all having their own role in the Colombian health system, and we learned:

a.

d.

National & Local Government: All organizations and institutions that regulate, monitor and guarantee the provision of healthcare at a local, state or national level. It also includes SENA, the National Apprenticeship Service where the National Program for Prosthetics and Orthotics is taught.

Paying customers: For most cases, prosthetic /orthopedic services are covered by the mandatory health plan, to which all Colombian citizens are entitled to. These health plans are administered by insurance companies providing coverage to specific parts of the country. However, there are also private clients (people with disabilities and/or their caretakers) willing to pay for prosthetic /orthopedic services themselves. This is not the customer segment LegBank is targeting at, but still can be considered as a complementary source of income for this business model.

b.

Civil Society: All local and international (non-profit) organizations that support and advocate for their rights of people with disabilities and other vulnerable populations in Colombia, also active in rural areas.

c.

Beneficiaries: Though amputees are shown as the focus of this map, there are other groups of individuals who could directly or indirectly benefit from the provision of prosthetic/orthopedic services from rural areas, including: other people with physical disabilities and their caretakers; also disability associations and their affiliates.

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e.

Healthcare providers: This group consists of public and private organizations in the health sector and the specialists required for the provision of a complete prosthetic treatment, including a physiatrist and/or orthopaedist, a physiotherapist and a prosthetist/ orthotist (CPO).


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3.We found financiers

We started to look for investors and found them. On the one hand, Orthopedic Centre de Hoogstraat (Netherlands) was interested in financing the first fully functional prototype of the Majicast. Design agency REGGS in close collaboration with dr. Arjan Buis from Strathclyde University, assisted by Jessica Mills from the University of Technology Delft, started to build a new optimized version of the Majicast, a process would take over a year. The results will be discussed in the financial report 2016. Also we found the Rijksdienst Voor Ondernemend Nederland (RVO) a program by the Dutch Government interested in financing a demonstration project in Colombia. This demonstration took place in may 2016.

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TEAM ABOUT REGGS, AMSTERDAM REGGS (1968) is an interdisciplinary design studio that develops innovative total solutions that lead to positive changes in the way people live, learn, work and play. REGGS has a team of 25 professionals who are specialized in user interface design, engineering, brand and product design, also on different kind of (medical) products. Such as a patient table for a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound medical device for Philips and an anesthesia machine for Heinen & Lรถwenstein. REGGS expertise on the product development is essential, they adapt the Majicast technically to the Colombian context.

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ABOUT DE HOOGSTRAAT ORTHOPEDIETECHNIEK, UTRECHT

ABOUT STRATHCLYDE UNIVERSITY, GLASGOW The National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics (NCPO) and the Biomedical Engineering Department of the Strathclyde University in Glasgow (UK) are internationally recognized centres of excellence for education and research at the interface between engineering and life sciences. The departments have developed a rich research environment contributing to innovative research programmes and collaborations which are supported through its established clinical and industrial multidisciplinary networks. The expertise of the Strathclyde consists of train CPO's in Colombia (and in the future other countries) that will work with the innovation. Their involvement guarantees scientific justification for the working principle of the Majicast and will gain trust among clients and distributors.

With 67 years of experience with prostheses making, de Hoogstraat is an expert advising on the needs of amputees in terms of clinical requirements, and mobility solutions such as the type of prosthesis required to maintain a high quality of life. Their knowledge is essential to offer a qualitative prosthesis to low-income amputees. They have collaborated in several research trajectories, for instance with the Strathclyde University, and have played a role in advising and supporting international disability projects. De Hoogstraat’s expertise is important for clinical justification of the product. Also it offers possibilities for piloting; for testing the product with patients in the Netherlands.

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OUR TEAM

ProPortion consists of a diverse, hard-working team based in three different continents that enjoys a working environment where all are encouraged to contribute to new ideas. We are passionate about what we do.

WWW.PROPORTIONFOUNDATION.ORG/TEAM

THOMAS SCHUURMANS DIRECTOR I founded the ProPortion Foundation on July 2nd 2009 based on my passion for creating economic & social impact in developing countries by supporting companies and NGOs in realising social businesses. My passion has come to light while traveling through South-East Asia and Africa during half a year. Since then I was very driven to use my analytical skills developed during my study Applied Physics together with my practical experience in business development at TNO and design agency Reggs and training in Cradle to Cradle design.

MEREL RUMPING SOCIAL BUSINESS INCUBATOR My ability to arouse enthusiasm among others I consider to be my greatest asset. It is essential in my position of making LegBank a sustainable enterprise, managing the multi-stakeholder team and communicating about ProPortion's activities. My academic and professional experience ranges from Spain, France, Morocco to Colombia where I worked for a Micro Finance Institute. and volunteered with street children & former child soldiers. My time with them encouraged me to always strive for a human centered approach. My international experience has been essential to the development of my English, Spanish, and French language skills.

SUE HERRERA - DESIGN STRATEGIST Working with and for users at the BoP in emerging economies has made me feel that my contribution to LegBank is meaningful, challenging and exciting... all at the same time! This has kept me motivated along the way: from strategic planning through design and validation of our value proposition.

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DIDAS MZIRAI PROPORTION KENYA As a National Youth Leader and Social Entrepreneur whose interest is to influence other people's lives for the better, I find so much pleasure supporting the work of ProPortion through Vijana Reloaded. It's fulfilling to touch the lives of people at the Base-of-Pyramid!

LYDIA MUNIKAH HEAD TRAINER Lydia is a Mandela Washington fellow of YALI (Young African Leadership Initiative), worked as trainer and mentor of the Yes Youth Can! Program, worked at Barclays Bank and Cfc Stanbic, and is former president of Kakamega Country Youth Bunge.


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JORIS KRAMER STRATEGIC DESIGNER

CHETAN KAANADKA DESIGN STRATEGIST

JIP NELISSEN STRATEGIC DESIGNER

Design-thinking is a very powerful methodology. It helps you to deeply understand the desires and constraints of BoP customers, and guides you in designing value propositions and inclusive business models inspired by the local context.

As a product designer I have rendered my services in consumer products, automotive and agriculture sectors, using a ‘design-thinking’ approach in creating sustainable product and service solutions to address the pressing needs of the underserved communities in the developing countries. I currently live in Bangladesh, from where I support ProPortion with a sustainable social enterprise to deliver arsenic free, safe and tasty drinking water to rural communities, called Sujol.

I believe local people know best what is needed to drive markets. I joined ProPortion to make them the starting point of a solution.

My specialties lay in translating insights into business ideas and tangible concepts or programs using creative methods. I have experience with projects in different countries and contexts such as Haiti, India, Sri Lanka, Brazil and the Netherlands. Next to working with Proportion I use my entrepreneurial and strategic skills at Entremedio.

I have a balanced combination of practical and hands-on knowledge, with an analytic skill set in Architecture and Sustainability engineering contexts. I have solid knowledge and working experience in diverse post disaster- and developing-countries, in urban and rural contexts.

JESSICA MILLS - PRODUCT DESIGNER TUDELFT I believe that design skills should be used to create products that significantly improve people's daily lives. The LegBank has this goal in mind. It aims to creates well fitting prosthetic sockets through low-technology, reduce production steps and ultimately reduce costs. This will get more people back on their feet and included in society. It is why I put in my effort into the design of a truly functional and user-friendly 'medical helping hand' that can really make a difference, for my graduation project in Integrated Product Design at the TU Delft.

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OUR PARTNERS

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OTHER PARTNERS

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OUR BOARD WWW.PROPORTIONFOUNDATION.ORG/TEAM

ProPortion Foundaiton is governed by an independent Board of Directors, which is responsible for ensuring that the foundation manages its finances, operations and projects to advance its mission and goals. Our board members have been selected depending on their professional expertise and commitment to ProPortion’s purpose and core activities. The Board meets formally two times each year, as well as between the regular meetings as needed to conduct the Foundation’s activities.

JOOST JAEGER BOARD PROPORTION

TACO HENDRIKS BOARD PROPORTION

MANON SCHUURMANS BOARD PROPORTION

“If we want to have a positive impact on the world we live, we must start being a positive element in creating a better world for our future generations. The ProPortion Foundation is one of these positive elements.” Joost is the managing director of Reggs: A multidisciplinary design agency with the ambition to create meaningful design for people and planet. Reggs is one of the first Cradle-to-Cradle accredited design consultancies and also the founding father of ProPortion Foundation.

“I believe that being a boardmember of the ProPortion Foundation I can actively contribute to the realisation of a new, better world. A dream that many of us share.” Taco works in the financial sector, as a business recovery and interim manager. The passion to create social impact originates from a valuable experience earlier in his career. As a board member of the Ma Vogel Foundation he made sure that the politicians in The Hague will not forget the homeless people.

“As an experienced Base-of-Pyramid practitioner, I aim to support ProPortion Foundation with my knowledge of (local) markets, networks and pragmatic approach. I strongly believe that we should learn to share, in order to realise growth.” During Manons career her focus always lied on new business development. She is always on the look out for the opportunity above and beyond financial results. This includes business models incorporating social components, in such a way that poor people can benefit. Currently as Business Manager at Teijin Aramid her attention will also be given to the social responsibility of multinationals.

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INGRID HAGEN - BOARD PROPORTION

THEO SPIERINGS - BOARD PROPORTION

As a vice president strategic projects as Frontclear, Ingrid supports economic development globally by catalysing the establishment of more stable and inclusive financial markets in emerging and frontier markets.

Theo Spierings is director of a New Zealand multinational dairy cooperative, Fonterra, owned by around 13,000 New Zealand farmers. The company is responsible for approximately 30% of the world’s dairy exports, and is New Zealand’s largest company.

As a former director strategy and strategic funding at Cordaid, Ingrid & ProPortion closely worked together.

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OUR AWARDS ProPortion’s LegBank won three social entrepreneurial awards; the Cordaid SocialAdVenture Award, (both the audience & jury award) and the ASN Bank World Award. the SocialAdVenture Award | Cordaid At the end of 2015 Cordaid organised the second edition of the Cordaid Social AdVenture, targeting high value social entrepreneurial initiatives. The event took place on December 8 2015 in The Hague, the Netherlands. During the event 3 prizes could be won with value of €2500, €5000 & €7500 respectively. During the event on the 8th of December 2015 11 finalists pitched their ideas. The legbank initiative went home with two awards, one for the first prize and one for the jury prize.

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World Award for Social Entrepreneurship | ASN Bank The ASN Bank believes that innovation is society instigated and therefore it organises the "ASN Bank World Award" since 2009. The aim of this prestigious award is to support projects with a very high potential and considerable global impact. Five theme based awards, sustainable energy, education, fair trade, social cohesion and healthcare and wellbeing, were presented at the end of 2015. On the 19th November of 2015 LegBank was 1 out of 12 finalists left and secured the award for the healthcare and wellbeing theme.

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OUR FINANCE Proportion Foundation Amsterdam

Financieel overzicht 2013 - 2016

in '000 EUR

Netto Omzet - derden Kostprijs van de omzet - overige Brutomarge Personeelskosten Afschrijvingen Overige bedrijfskosten Bedrijfsresultaat Rentebaten/(lasten)

,

Actual 2013

Actual 2014

Actual 2015

Budget 2016

253 111 142

155 76 79

94 79 15

375 307 68

87 0 36

64 0 25

58 0 19

33 0 15

19 -14

,

-10 -8

,

-62 -8

,

20 -8

Resultaat

5

-18

-70

12

Afschrijvingen Operationele kasstroom

0 5

0 -18

0 -70

0 12

Werkkapitaal : Vorderingen - handelsdebiteuren Vorderingen - overige Handelscrediteuren R/C Reggs Kortlopende schulden - overige

103 0 -66 -53 -2

8 32 -13 -43 0

1 2 -43 -10 0

20 0 -25 0 0

Netto werkkapitaal ImmateriĂŤle vaste activa

-18 250

-16 250

-50 250

-5 250

Totaal netto activa

232

234

200

245

Gefinancierd door : Eigen vermogen Lening Reggs Schuld aandeelhouder Bankiers (rekening courant + liquide middelen)

0 250 0 -18

0 250 0 -16

0 250 0 -50

0 250 0 -5

Totaal financiering

232

234

200

245

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CONTACT Name / naam: ProPortion Foundation RSIN number / nummer: 820951833 Contact details / gegevens: ProPortion Foundation Visiting address: Paul van Vlissingenstraat 6a – 1096 BK Amsterdam Postal address: P.O. Box 93124, 1090 BC, Amsterdam – The Netherlands E: info@proportionfoundation.org W: www.proportionfoundation.org T: +31(0)20 66 33 455 F: +31(0)84 21 50 535 Chamber of Commerce nr. 34346615 VAT nr. NL820951833B01 IBAN: NL47TRIO0390288586

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ProPortion Annual Report 2015  

Dear reader, This is the first report of ProPortion Foundation. It will provide you with many insights in what we aim to achieve, what our s...

ProPortion Annual Report 2015  

Dear reader, This is the first report of ProPortion Foundation. It will provide you with many insights in what we aim to achieve, what our s...

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