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still awed by

images Today Mike Bohl RT, MHA, FRBMA manages Radiology Group, PC, SC, as well as their imaging center and billing company. He was recently elected president of the Radiology Business Management Association, and he’s proud to be one its inaugural group of fellows.

B

ut Bohl still remembers the first day he showed up for class in Mercy’s School of Radiologic Technology program in 1978. He was wearing a crisp new uniform, but recalls knowing little of what was ahead of him. Bohl had been working in a warehouse, but he wanted something more. He thought x-ray technology was cool. Mercy had an opening, Bohl was accepted, and he began the rest of his life. “The science, the physics, the detailed nature of positioning and angles…it was really a great match for me,” he says. After graduation in 1980, Bohl’s first job—as an x-ray technologist at Mercy Medical Center—led to subsequent stints in CT and MRI. But as much as he enjoyed the work, Bohl again wanted something more. He and his wife Julia moved to North Carolina so Bohl could finish an undergraduate and then a master’s degree in health administration. “I still remember walking on campus between courses, marveling at the opportunity to be where I was,” he says. “There I was, in my 30s, just enjoying every aspect of where I was and what I was doing.”

Bohl returned to Iowa to manage the Radiology Group, 21 years after entering Mercy as a student. Along with his education, Bohl credits two activities with his success in group practice management. Joining the RBMA pays dividends, he says. “You meet people, and then you learn from the people you meet.” He also recommends that those who are management-bound build up strong spread-sheet and database management skills. “Physicians are scientists. They’re highly data-driven,” he says. “I can honestly say that in my position, one of the best things I know how to do is to leverage data.” Bohl wears a suit now, not a uniform, but he continues to love radiologic technology. “To this day, I’m still awed by the images we produce,” he says. “They’re just beautiful; they’re works of art.” And he predicts an ever-increasing need for people in the field. “When you think how medicine is actually practiced, imaging is at the center of so much of it,” he says. Toward that end, Bohl funds the Bohl Radiologic Technology Scholarship at Mercy College, awarded each year to a fulltime RT student. “I feel the same way about my time at Mercy as I did about my years in North Carolina,” he says. “I’ve not found a better program anywhere in my travels. The scholarship is a way for me to give back.”

Next step in his career: business manager of a 6-physician radiology group with a small imaging center and billing office in Casper, Wyoming—a smaller version of what he does today. There he enhanced his graduate school education with a practical one: developing an understanding of the nuts and bolts of managing a radiology practice.

www.mchs.edu/vitalpeople | www.mchs.edu/vitalpeople |

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Vital People 2011  

Mercy College of Health Sciences Magazine

Vital People 2011  

Mercy College of Health Sciences Magazine

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