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Christina Strohm

Magdalena GarcĂ­a

Suzanne van der Heide

Can Guneyli

Minh Vu

Samira Charrib

Nils Roskamp

Marit Meelis

Whitney Waldschmit

Saskia van der Kaaij

Geeske Sibrijns

Nisha Marapin

Guilliano S. P. Payne

Thalita Lingers

Xin Dan Xen

TTommy Sevens


Tracy Kleef

Kirsten Verdeen

Martina van der Smissen

Donald de Groen

Monica Dinca

Noelia Caro

Shantal Gopal

Katharina Tjart

Danique Dellevoet

Anne Geerken

Nique Brinkman

Ahalya Ganesh

sta

Renato Castillo

Students of European Studies & Communication Management


TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 5 7 9 111

Going abroad Which country to choose?? ? Etiquette all over the world

Exchanging information A brief story of Communication and techology Back to the roots Past and present of exchange Top 5 Destinations How to survive?

Want to know more about what is going on in The Hague University? Check Link Online for the latest events, news, opinion polls, blogs and lots more. Go to the student portal and click on the links in the right-hand box. Stay connected, use Link!


WELCOME ON BOARD OF ThE ExChANgE ExpERiENCE AND gET READy FOR A LiFE-ChANgiNg ExpERiENCE iN yOuR jOuRNEy TO BECOME A CiTizEN OF ThE WORLD. WhiCh COuNTRiES REpRESENT ThE TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS FOR ESCM STuDENTS; FiND OuT WhAT OThER hOT DESTiNATiONS OuR gLOBETROTTERS RECOMMEND. gOiNg FOR A TRip DOWN MEMORy LANE, yOu WiLL DiSCOvER WhAT EARLy ExChANgE pROgRAMMES ACTuALLy MEANT AND LEARN hOW pEOpLE SuRvivED iN ThE pRE-FACEBOOk ERA. AND pLEASE TAkE NOTE OF OuR iNTERCuLTuRAL TipS ON EATiNg, gREETiNg AND kiSSiNg SO yOu CAN BECOME A SuCCESSFuL WORLD CiTizEN. hAppy TRAvELS!


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gOiNg ABROAD. WhEThER iT iS gOiNg ON ExChANgE OR gOiNg ON AN iNTERNShip. iT iS SOMEThiNg WE ARE ALL LOOkiNg FORWARD TO. FOR SOME EvEN ThE REASON TO ChOOSE EuROpEAN STuDiES. ThE STuDENTS OF ThiS COuRSE ALL hAvE ThE DREAM TO gO ABROAD, MEET NEW pEOpLE, NEW CuLTuRES, LEARN ABOuT OThER pEOpLE’S CuSTOMS AND WAyS OF LiFE. BuT ThERE ARE SO MANy ThiNgS TO ThiNk ABOuT WhEN yOu WANT TO gO ABROAD. SO MANy BEAuTiFuL COuNTRiES TO gO TO. WhiCh COuNTRy TO ChOOSE AND WhAT DO yOu REALLy hAvE TO kNOW ABOuT ThAT COuNTRy? OR EvEN A pARTiCuLAR CiTy? OuR REpORTERS ShARE ThEiR OWN ExpERiENCES WiTh SOME COuNTRiES. Written by Samira Charrib, Geeske Sibrijns, Guillianso S. F. Payne, Ahalya Ganesh & Katharina Tjart

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gOiNg ABROAD

Morocco A country growing under the eye of the United Arab Emirates with all their investments. A country growing under the eye of the relatively young king. Morocco is on the rise. A perfect moment to visit that beautiful country, rich of culture and good foods. Approaching the people in the right way, showing them a lot of respect, the Moroccan people are very welcoming. But there is also a lot to see in the country. Most of the cities are placed on or in between two mountains. Seeing the sun go down, or come up is a beautiful experience. But Morocco is also a rising knowledge economy. More people are getting the chance to go to the University and women are more represented both on the work floor and in all the universities. Girlpower spreads through the country. Nice people, good food, and a beautiful nature. Studying is not so much fun, but we can make it fun by going to this beautiful place. And if you are going on the study exchange, it is only possible for students who choose pr vate to go to Morocco.

North-America America is a very well-known country to go to on an exchange. America offers a lot of opportunities to widen your knowledge, see more of the world and let you have the time of your life. The Hague University of Applied Sciences has several connections with other universities in theUnited States of America. Exchange opportunities are offered for students who choose for the private sector, but also for the public sector. Almost all the universities mentioned on the exchange website of the ESCM academy are both for the private and public specialisation students. Exchanges are offered in Georgia, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Texas and Mississippi. America is a fun country to explore. Every state is different and you’ll always be able to find something fun to do. In California there are the famous Hollywood walk of fame, Yosemite National Park and of course the beautiful beaches. In Texas there’s a city called ‘Nederland’. A festival is held there every year and there’s a Dutch Windmill Museum. In Georgia there are many state parks to visit and there are also a lot of festivals to go to. For an exchange you will need a visa. This website: http://www.usastudentvisa.org/ offers a lot of useful information on what the requirements are and on how to apply for a visa.

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gOiNg ABROAD

Thailand

Paris

Why going on exchange to Thailand? Thailand, a paradise for everyone. White beaches, sunny, full moon parties, Thai food, beautiful cultures and the best places to shop. That is the reason why this is the perfect country to go on exchange.

Paris is a city that moves you. You can call it cliché but it is true. Whether you are into the architecture, food, shops and of course the atmosphere. You can visit Paris in two different ways. Of course it also depends on if it is your first time there or not and how much time you have.

Crowded Bangkok vs. relaxed beaches The crowded but impressive capital Bangkok has a lot of must-sees. The most popular place to go is Wat Phra Kaew, this is the most important Buddhist temple of Thailand. But there are a lot more must-sees, like the JJ market. This is the biggest market of the whole world. All these markets have an imposing atmosphere, and here you can really see the culture of Thai people. Also at night, Bangkok is a great place. If you want to learn how to party, you definitely have to visit one of Bangkok’s clubs. If you have had enough of the crowded Bangkok, there are many places where you can relax. The coast is the most popular place for tourists. In the cities Pattaya and Phuket, you can find beautiful resorts, with all the luxury you need. These are the best places for full moon parties.

You have the tourist and you have the “I’ll just walk and see what happen” tourist. When you are the first one, you probably start at the Eiffel tower and you can choose to “climb” it. The most famous cathedral is “Notre Dame” (where Napoleon was crowned for emperor). This is also something that’s on the list “must see”. Just as you can choose to visit the Louvre to see the famous Venus de Milo and the Mona Lisa. If you haven’t been there yet; don’t expect that much, because it is a real small painting. The most famous (shopping) street/boulevard is Champs-Élysées. Here you can find the best macaroons shop in the world! At the end of the boulevard you see the Arc de Triomph. It is 50 meters high and every achievements en conquests are showed on it. In front of it is the grave of a unknown soldier (since 1920). Also it is a real recommendation to do the boat trip along the Seine where you can see the beautiful bridges etc. You can take these near the Eiffel. The best time to do this is in the evening. Don’t forget to eat Nutella crepes, they are absolutely delicious! If you have time left you can choose to visit the district Montmartre. Here’s another famous cathedral (Sacré Coeur). If you don’t like walking up al lot of stairs, you should think twice. Also here is the place du tertre where all the painters are working. It is a really small square. One thing I still haven’t visited here is the Moulin Rouge. You can visit it from 175 Euros. This is already a lot but there are much much more things to see. A little outside Paris you have Versailles where Marie Antoinette lived. Père-lachaise, the famous cemetery where you can find Edith Piaf, Oscar Wilde, Jim Morrison and many others. So those are the “big” must-see things. If you want to be the second sort of tourist, you should just walk randomly. The streets and the atmosphere are already that beautiful, that all the big sight-seeing stuff don’t really care anymore. Just imagine it is the late twenties, and it’s raining. For, me that’s the perfect scene.

What do you need if you want to visit Thailand? Like for many other countries, visitors need a visa. But if you want to visit Thailand, it is also recommend to take some vaccinations. The vaccine for yellow fewer is obligatory, but the vaccines for Hep A/B, DTP, typhoid fever and rabies are only recommended. At the moment, it is not necessary to take medicines against malaria, because there is no danger for it.

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etiquette all over the world kiSS AND gREATby Noelia Caro Martinez It is universally known that in most Western countries kissing to greet is common practice. In France or The Netherlands giving three kisses is the norm, while in Spain two will do. In the UK, however, shaking hands is still more appropriate, following the norm of most English speaking countries like Canada or the United States. But, where and when did the ´kiss to greet´ tradition start? It is believed that it all started in ancient Rome. It was common mostly among men and only professed among the high classes (like patricians) to kiss each other on the cheek to greet. Such tradition started, according to historians, during the time of Emperor Au gustus, so three decades before the birth of Jesus Christ. Nowadays, kissing on the cheek is a widespread form of greeting someone. However, there are differences between countries and kissing can not be always used to greet someone. In Southern Europe, for instance, kissing on the cheek is very normal between friends and family, but it is not acceptable in professional settings. Depending of the country or even the region, kissing as a form of greeting will vary. Women kiss women, and women kiss men to greet, but most men will not kiss other men on

the cheek to greet unless they are very close or relatives. In countries like France where people greet each other kissing three times, some men use the saying ‘Chez nous, c'est quatre’ (At home, we give four), in order to ´steal´ an extra kiss of a girl they fancy. In former Yugoslavia, as in the southern countries, it is not rare to see some men kissing each other if they are close enough, especially in Serbia and Montenegro. In Latin American countries, due to the Spanish influence, it is not uncommon to see men greeting other men kissing each other on the cheek, especially in Argentina and Uruguay, although shaking hands or a big hug also applies to the Latin culture of greeting. In many Latin American countries one kiss is the most common greeting, and is also used when introduced for the first time to someone (woman-woman or woman-man). So, once again we come to the conclusion that we might look like we are very different, but in reality, when it comes to the simple things, we are all alike. And as the Latin saying goes: ‘Da mihi basilia mille’ – (Kiss me with a thousand kisses). No matter how!

A TASTE OF EATiNg ETiquETTE iN ASiA by Xin Dan Chen The first chopsticks were used by people more than 5000 years ago in China. The earliest Asians took out their food from the fire with a stick or branch. As the population was growing and resources became more scarce, people started to cut the food in smaller pieces. This meant using less fuel, as the food was done faster, and they did not need knives anymore. And so, chopsticks ( or ‘kuai-zi’ in Chinese, you sort of pronounce it as ‘quite’) became the only tools people needed. With the expansion of Confucianism eating chopsticks were confirmed as the right way of eating. Confucius associated the knife with violence. Instruments used for killing should be banned from the dining table, chopsticks, however, reflected gentleness and benevolence. By the year 500 chopsticks also conquered Japan, Vietnam, Korea and further areas. Perhaps you’re wondering what this has to do with exchange? As I kind of mentioned in the introduction, having food together also has an element of exchanging thoughts, stories and manners. And when you go on an exchange, it is good to know some eating etiquette. Now, here is a taste of modern eating etiquette in Asia, mostly revolving around chopsticks. globetrotter / 5

Never stick your chopsticks straight up in your food, this reminds people of incense sticks that they traditionally put in sand at (Buddhist) funerals. Lay down your chopsticks every once in a while, when you’re drinking or talking. Another thing about chopsticks, don’t point or gesture at people with them or use them to push bowls or plates around. It’s meant for eating. In Asian culture, second or even third helpings are a must, no matter how full you are. This is to show the host that you like the dishes a lot and appreciate his/her efforts. Slurping soup is pretty common, it is known that if you slurp, you cool the soup. Burping happens after the meal, probably just once. It means you enjoyed the meal (except in Japan). It is customary, if there is a pot of tea at your table, for younger members at a dinner table to serve the older members. Also, we let older people reach for the food first as a sign of respect. Finally, always bring something for your host(s). Doesn't matter what they say, you must bring a gift. Obviously, these guidelines are basic and don't apply to every single Asian culture. For example, in Korea they eat rice with a spoon, eating rice with chopsticks is considered as having bad manners.


giFT giviNg iN EgypT by Danique Dellevoet There is an astounding number of antiquities to catch a glimpse of in Egypt. If you have a fair interest in history, Egypt has a lot to offer you. Besides the rich history, there is also a lot of etiquette. Hierarchy is important and since the Egyptians are generally very religious, many of their customs are religion based. If you plan to study, work, live, or spend your holidays in Egypt, it is important to gain some knowledge on Egyptian etiquette. For now, the emphasis will be placed on gift giving in Egypt. This is not something new and has existed throughout history. Pyramids were built to house the pharaohs and filled with treasures. In the medieval age, gifts were given to kings in order to gain personal favour or to gain loyalty in war. The ancient Egypt royalty were very fond of gold jewellery and paid a lot of attention to the clothes they were wearing. Therefore, typical gifts were gold, silver and jewels. Nowadays, the tradition of gift giving is still present in Egypt. To exemplify, if you stayed with an Egyptian family, it is customary to purchase an expensive item for them that is representative of your country and that is hard to acquire in Egypt as a form of thank you to the host.

In business settings, gifts are accepted as a thank you gesture in business relationships. Usually farewell gifts are given right after a last meeting and only to the person highest in rank as hierarchy is very important. Gifts are always given with the right hand or both if a gift is heavy, but never with the left hand. A number of Egyptian holidays involve the exchange of gifts, especially religious holidays where the value of generosity and the importance of giving are highlighted. For example, during Coptic Christmas - Egyptian Christians (Copts) celebrate Christmas on 7 January - children traditionally receive toys and clothes. Somewhat older children are given some money. Muslim children are all given the same gift at the beginning of Ramadan, namely a lantern. During Ramadan, adults give gifts of money, clothes and food to the underprivileged people. Although the gift giving etiquette in Egypt may differ from other countries, gifts are, like in many other countries, exchanged for a number of reasons. Tradition is one of them. Other reasons are to affirm one’s personal bonds and simply to bring pleasure to another. Even though this article is about gift giving in Egypt, remember that this is just a small part of a very, very interesting country with lots to discover!

REDiSCOvERiNg EThiCS (iN ThE NEW WORLD) by Donald de Groen As many rules of behaviour and etiquette the European aristocracy had in the 1700’s, as little few did the early colonists bring with them to the New World. Most of the Europeans first to arrive in what is now the United States of America, were no gentlemen at all. These “Yankees” were merchants, farmers but most of all poor people who sought a new start in a new country. Surprisingly, the first person who picked up a pen to bring some manners to the continent was the sixteen- year- old George Washington. The young man who would later become one of the founding fathers apparently struggled with all kinds of little annoyances. In 1747 he wrote ‘Rules of Civility & Decent Behaviour on Company and Conversation’. In this book he stated that drumming with your hands or feet in the presence of others was absolutely not done. Doesn’t that sound familiar? Later in the south where plantations began to thrive, the need for etiquette based on hierarchy increased.

Slaves had to address their masters in specific ways and despite of massive losses in wealth or status, a gentleman would always remain a gentleman. Luckily for them. As the Americans started expanding to the West, the need for a new form of conduct arose along with new experiences. Famous unwritten rules like; don’t shoot a man in the back or; the ten-steps shootout came to be. A more European like, Victorian style of etiquette became popular amongst the wealthy after the Civil-war. Decency in general was at a high level for more than a century. It was in the late 20th century when the use of etiquette took a dramatic turn downwards. Think of having diner in front of the TV or the billions of dollars that are lost due to reckless driving. Etiquette or not, the American culture radiates throughout the world and we can only sit and watch to see where it will take us next.

MEET, gREETS AND BuSiNESS ETiquETTE OF NORWAy by Minh Vu A country in Northern Europe, bordering Finland, Sweden and Russia, Norway was mostly famous for its history of the Vikings, the painting named “The Scream” by Edvard Munch, Oslo and many other intriguing geographical and cultural heritages. However, instead of looking into the history of the Vikings or Oslo, we will be exploring the subject of etiquette; more specifically, the meet & greeats and business etiquette of this beautiful country. The Norwegians greet each other in a casual way: a firm handshake, direct eye contact and a smile to brighten the atmosphere. What is interesting is that they often introduce themselves by their first name only! However, if you are not accustomed to this, you can just start with the last name and move to the first name although people will just start with the first name. Handshakes are usually used to greets and say goodbye. If you ever find yourself doing business with a Norwegian, it is a good idea to remember some of these tips. Norwegians are transactional and do not need longstanding personal relationships to conduct a business.

However, they also would prefer to do business with those that they trust; therefore, before conducting a business, you should provide self-information before a meeting. The basic business style is usually informal as the Norwegians are relatively informal in their meets and greets. The Norwegians are excellent at timing and are very direct when it comes to communicating. Like the Dutch, they have no difficulty letting their colleagues know about their disapproval but maybe not as frank. They often rely on facts. Often than not, they are not emotive speakers and tend to show little body language. When it comes to business, they are not so much into small talks and prefer to make business discussion quickly and succinctly. These are just some of the very basic you-must-know tips about the etiquette of the Norwegian. There are so many more interesting facts about this country and it would be a great idea to come and explore Norway yourself and experience firsthand what this country, these people are all about! globetrotter /6


ExChANgE OF iNFORMATiON hAS ChANgED OvER ThE yEARS. iT’S iMpOSSiBLE TO iMAgiNE A WORLD WiThOuT ONLiNE COMMuNiCATiONS, TExT MESSAgES ETC. BuT WhAT DiD pEOpLE DO TO ExChANgE iNFORMATiON BEFORE ThESE iNvENTiONS WhERE MADE? hOW WhERE ThESE iNvENTiONS MADE, AND WhEN?

On the Radio

The life and times of the telephone

For more than a hundred years, radio has been one of the most frequently used media to exchange messages. Although Guglielmo Marconi patented the radio in Great Britain in 1896, there had been many developments throughout the 19th century that eventually made it possible for Marconi to find investors to manufacture radio sets, or “Marconi sets” as they were called. These radio sets were able to transmit and receive messages in Morse code with the help of wireless telegraphy. This came in very handy for ships at sea that, at this point, could only communicate with other ships via signal flags and lights. The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom acquired three warships in 1899, which were equipped with Marconi sets to send wireless messages from one ship to another. Transmitting messages at sea was not a problem, but Marconi wanted the radio waves to reach even further. In 1901, he managed to send the first transatlantic message in Morse code from Cornwall, UK, to Signal Hill in St. John’s, Canada. One of the most memorable uses of radio in the early days was during the sinking of the Titanic in 1912. Operators and nearby ships communicated with each other, which made it possible to rescue passengers from the ship. In the years after that, wireless telegraphy quickly spread to other countries in Europe and the rest of North America. During the 1920s, more and more people bought a radio set and made it their primary home entertainment medium. This continued until the mid-1950s, when television began to replace the radio. During these thirty years, radio was not only a source for news and music, but it also served for hours of entertainment broadcasts such as plays, comedies, children’s story book hour, soap operas and variety shows. Radio broadcasting was one of the new industries that were created thanks to the invention of radio. And while these days radio is not the people’s primary source for the latest news and music and other entertainment anymore, radio is still an important communication source that keeps people up-to-date, providing not only music, but also talk radio, 24hour news radio, and sports radio. By Martine van der Smissen

Watson, come here; I want you!” were the first words ever to be uttered through a telephone on March 18, 1876. The first telephone looked nothing like the slender touch screen minicomputer we carry around nowadays. This particular piece of technology has travelled a long road from just a voice carrier. It all started out as a machine invented by Alexander Graham Bell in New York, with the goal of speaking with others over larger distances. In that very same city his biggest competitor, Elisha Grey, reached the same invention around the same time. Since Bell beat him by two hours to the same patent office he was never credited for inventing the phone. The telephone then went on to expand into the answering machine. A machine that was mostly popular with Jews on Sabbath. By then the telephone already started looking more and more like what we know today as the famous camera phone. In 1956 the so-called “Picturephone” appeared on the market, with a test run allowing people to place hone calls between Disneyland and New York. Only it was dissatisfying people since the screen was too small and it was not very practical. So really the first step towards a camera phone was already made before cell phones had even been thought of. A little under thirty years later the mobile finally did appear, in 1983. Now we had definitely outgrown the messenger boys and operating girls. The first cell phone was the beginning of a new era of mobility. This phone was the beginning of singularity for Mr Bell and his colleagues, who would not recognize their own machinery anymore as it had completely evolved past its initial use. From the Nokia we all played the game ‘snake’ passed the color phones and onto the touch screen phone. It is now a small computer, doing exactly what you want when you want it. An easier way of life. Yes, it has made life so much easier and maybe in a way it still is Bell’s invention from 1876. It was once intended to simplify communication by making it more direct, and that is what the smart phone does in numerous ways. The time where a phone was not more than what was needed of it has gone. We have surpassed the point where it was a device made to carry your voice over electronic transmitters. That point in time is a distant spot on the map of evolving technology. A machine that is not only useful but has everything one could want from it, ranging from games to internet straight to Skype and back to free texting. A lifeline most of us cannot and will not life without. By Madalenna García

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A BRiEF STORy By Nils Roskamp

Exchanging information goes back to the prehistoric ages. In order to communicate over long distances, the first human like organisms used smoke signals and fire beacons. By burning dry plants on a fire, a lot of smoke was created, and by using a piece of cloth over the fire, specific types of signals could be formed. It was a standard way of communication back then, but

nobody would think of using it these days. Why would we? We have technology! Let’s take a leap in time, going to the year 1869. In this year the first official ‘Heliograph’ was made, a somewhat unknown way of communication. What is a heliograph? A heliograph is a wireless solar telegraph that can produce signals through flashes of sunlight. These flashes are produ-

ced by moving a small mirror attached to the device or by interrupting the solar beams with a shutter. The heliograph was often used by armies or forest protectors to signal allies nearby or over long distances. The heliograph uses the same system as Morse code. After this brief history lesson we will focus on more recent technologies. Read on!

@

www The Internet; an unrecognized treasure Nowadays, it is quite common to use the internet. In fact, the internet has become a part of our daily routines. I, for example, am addicted to my iPhone and its apps, which was a phenomenon that would not exist without the internet. Students cannot imagine doing their homework, writing a report, or preparing a presentation without Google. We take the internet for granted and we seem to forget how it is introduced to us in the first place. It was back in 1983 when the internet was born, which was because of a switch from ARPANET to TCP/IP. The internet was like an oil spot, it was spreading from government organisations to universities. From the United States to Canada, Europe and Japan. Not long after this process, the World Wide Web was founded. The internet was more than a Google search page. It was one of the most important findings of the 20th Century, it was an easier method to communicate; people from all over the world could share their lives with each other with just one click on the computer. Imagine families living thousands of miles from each other and still being able to share their lives. So, before you unlock your phone to open up an internet page to watch some videos on YouTube,. Take one moment to think about the process we’ve been through the past two decades when it comes to exchanging information through the years. And most importantly, be thankful that you don’t live in an era where you had to actually read every book in the library to get some information. By Shantal Gopal

Email One of the best known, and also a very old way of exchanging information is mail. Basically everyone has sent or received a postcard or letter in their life, and therefore has been exchanging information through mail. The concept of mail has been quite the same throughout the centuries it exists: A system for transporting: letters, postcards, documents etc. which can be delivered all around the world. Of course, the way of transporting mail from one place to another has changed quite a lot over the years. Where in the beginning people would just give their document personally to another person who would deliver the document, modern mail is organized by national and privatized businesses. Mail can be sent anywhere in the world, relatively fast and cheap. In most countries there is a system of codes has been created in order to make the deliverance of mail easier. Those codes are called zip codes (USA) postcodes (UK & Australia) or postal codes (in most other countries). Through these codes it is easier to deliver a letter, and if you just put the number, postal code and country on the envelope, the letter can be delivered. How much you have to pay for your mail to get delivered also depends on where you want to send your mail to, the weight and where you send it from. The most common way to pay for your mail to get delivered are, of course, post stamps. Post stamps are also used all over the world and are also popular for collecting. Unfortunately mail isn’t as popular anymore as it used to be. Especially with the development of internet, with its e-mail, normal mail has decreased. By Suzanne van der Heide.

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BACk TO ThE ROOTS ThESE ARTiCLES ARE ABOuT ThE pAST AND ThE pRESENT. WE hAvE LOOkED BACk ON hOW ExChANgE WAS WAy BACk WhEN, hOW iT iS NOW AND hOW pEOpLE hAvE ExpERiENCED ThE ExChANgE

AuSTRALiA by Saskia van der Kaaij

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eople have participated in exchange to all over the world for quite some time now. The first big exchange happened back in the 4th century and even before that people travelled around. Now let’s go forward to the eighteen century. To a country called Great Britain. A country that was becoming too small for their population, or at least too small for all the prisoners. Because of the Industrial revolution it was getting more and more difficult to earn your money in an honest way so a lot of people chose a life of crime to stay alive. So the prisons were overflowing and the cities were crowded, Great Britain had to come up with a solution. And they did, a solution called Australia, their newly made colony. Why Australia you might think? There were a couple reasons for that. They couldn’t ship them to America because it just became independent, plus there were a lot of raw materials in Australia that would be very useful to use in the Industrial revolution. Material such as wool and gold. Another important reason of the Britain’s was that they just couldn’t let the France have Australia or any part of the South Pacific for that matter. It was a terrible boat trip for the prisoners, they were on old boats for weeks, very unhealthy and again overcrowded. Great Britain only claimed the South of Australia and named it New

DuTCh EAST ASiA COMpANy

A

By Kirsten Vreede

s said earlier, there are different kinds of exchanges. Let us take a look at the exchange that arose during the colonisation and the decolonisation, especially from the Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies. What happened and what exactly was exchan-

ged? During the 19th and 20th century, the Netherlands expanded its territory from East to West. One of the most resourceful countries they had conquered was the Dutch East Indies. In the year 1800, it became Dutch territory. From then on, lots of Dutch commercial men moved to the East, followed by their families. They brought their staff as well. These people were also joined by whole families. Of course, their white children were not allowed to grow up between the indigenous people, so special Dutch schools were build.t This way, a whole new (Dutch) population arose in the Dutch East Indies. The Dutch didn’t share their wealth nor their knowledge with the Indians, just repressed them. In 1942, Japan started the dismantling of the Dutch East Indies. The Japanese promised the Indian population to free them from

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South Wales with its capital Melbourne. After the prisoners were dropped there, other people also made the trip to this new adventures land. It had a good climate, job prospects and enough gold to eventually make Melbourne one of the richest cities in the world. Small problem, Australia already belonged to someone else,the native people, the aboriginals. So how did the British colonists deal with that? At first the Aboriginals tried to avoid the weird white men as much as possible. But after a while it became clear that the British settlers were using more and more land and contact became unavoidable. The British had hoped to assimilate the Aboriginal people into the British culture and make them work for them but it didn’t work that way. The Aboriginal peoples saw that the British settlers were clearing the land, putting up fences, restricting access and introducing different animals; so they started to retaliate against the invasion. A lot of aboriginal people died because of the retaliations, the loss of hunting grounds, watering holes, a loss of their way of life. The British also brought with diseases for which the aboriginals had no resistance. Many exchanges of people ended up this way, the foreign invader exploiting the natives. Right now we have completely different motives to go on an exchange. None of use wants to rule the country were we go. ( I hope)

the Dutch repressors, which turned out to be one big joke. A few Dutch, who had seen this coming, were able to make the long journey back to the Netherlands. But most of the Dutch were captured by the Japanese and forced to work in working camps or prostitution. After the end of World War II, most of the Dutch rushed back to Holland. They were followed by the less coloured Indians (and thus the Moluccans, who were less tanned than the average Indian) who had worked closely with the Dutch. For the people in the Netherlands this was a big shock: they had never seen people with such a dark skin before. On the other hand, some Dutch returned to their homes or to the jungle in what was later called Indonesia, because they felt more connected to the people there than to their motherland. Today, there are still a bunch of Indians who speak Dutch, but the younger generation of course misses this knowledge. On the other hand, not many Dutch had really made the effort to learn the Indian language, so they who had come back after World War II, didn´t bring with them any linguistic knowledge. However, they had really learned their lesson.


B

ack in the old days studying abroad for an entire degree, one year, or even just a semester seemed like one of the biggest adventures you could possibly imagine. Students had to leave their homes, families and friends to move to a different country where most customs were unfamiliar to them. Their biggest motivator? Experiencing different cultures meet new people and receive an excellent education. Much of these motives are still the same today, but studying abroad has become a completely different experience. Globalization has had a great influence on the world, especially over the last decades. Whereas travelling to a different country used to be a long and often exhausting experience, people can now fly to the other side of the world in only hours, while sitting in a comfy chair and watching a movie. It is not just the transportation ,however ,that has changed the experience, the development of the internet and social media have had an especially big impact. Staying In touch with your loved ones back home is no longer a case of writing letters and making the exceptional phone call. We now have skype, email, facebook and tons of different ways to contact pretty much anyone, anywhere. Anyone with a decent in-

BRiTA, 48 gERMANy By Christina Strohm

T

here is nothing like the thrill of to start to look further than your own limits. Discovering and exploring foreign countries and meeting other people and cultures, are the benefits of going on exchange. A European Studies student shared her view on how she experienced her exchange. Lia is from Bulgaria. She is here in the Hague for one semester. The general reflection on how she feels about her exchange is positive. Lia says: ‘Studying here in the Hague is a great adventure. It is amazing to meet with people from totally different countries only in one room. The multicultural environment teaches me different cultures and traditions. Tolera-

ternet connection that is. It would be pretty fair to say that as long as you stay in the developed world you can reach everyone and in case of an emergency you will be home in days, or even hours. All of these changes have created a whole new mind-set when it comes to studying abroad. Now that there is a lot less stress about having to miss home, the amount of students that choose to go abroad has grown rapidly. Studying abroad for a period of time has become a normal and common thing, and often universities make it a compulsory part of their curriculum. Most importantly however, is that the whole attitude towards exchange has changed. The choice of a specific country or city exceeds the choice of a university and making new social contacts is now the biggest priority. This raises the question if exchanges are still a relevant part of the curriculum, or if students just use it as an opportunity to party? On the contrary, exchanges today are still very rewarding experiences. Although studying the course catalogue has become less important, not having to worry so much about the home front gives students a change to fully experience the other culture with much less stress. Their new social focus will help the students to really learn about the culture of their host country directly from the peo-

I

was never abroad for a six months. Sure, during Highschool I have been taken part in students exchanges, that was in the late 1970s. I was in Bournemouth, UK and in Mont Lucont, France. I spent only two weeks there, but nevertheless these were great experiences. In France I lived at the family’s house and went to school with my exchange partner Claire. She was lovely! One night, I even dreamed in French and I said “le chat ronronne”- The cat purrs. In my opinion, a lot of things have changed. For us, it was just not common to go abroad for such a long time. None of my friends at that time did that at all. Also, we used to learn and study for one job, applied for one company and stayed in

NEW WORLD, NEW ExChANgE By Nique Brinkman

one city at one and the same place. There was no need and no time to see something else. In these days, though, every CV should state experience abroad. Either travelling, studying or living in another country. This almost seems like a requirement, because people are facing a disadvantage if they cannot prove a stay in a foreign country and speak at least 3 different languages fluently. Competition on the job market has changed dramatically. I see my children growing up and adapting naturally to the situation. My daughter Marina will finish school next year and wants to study in Italy. My other daughter studies in the Netherlands. This kind of thinking, trying and daring was just not common when I was young.

ting and respecting various understanding can open a lot of opportunities.’ The Hague plays a key-role in today’s international politics, because of the establishments among other: Eurojust, the ICC and the ICJ. This is the main reason why she chose to come here: ‘the Hague is the political centre in Europe for me, and thus it is a important part of my study.’ Thus far, she has no regrets about choosing the Hague. But, if she could do the exchange again than she would choose for Brussels. ‘It could be good for me to meet with political issues in closer aspect and maybe to put it into practice in a more advanced level.’

ExChANgE - AT ThiS TiME, iN ThiS MOMENT By Nisha Marapin

globetrotter / 10


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS WhEN gOiNg ON ExChANgE, STuDENTS NOWADAyS EvEN gET ThE LuxuRy OF ChOOSiNg TO WhiCh COuNTRy hE OR ShE WANTS TO gO TO. ThERE ARE ExChANgE pLACES ALL OvER ThE WORLD AND NATuRALLy STuDENTS pREFER ONE COuNTRy MORE ThAN ThE OThER, BuT DO yOu kNOW WhAT CERTAiN ThiNgS iN ONE COuNTRy CAN BE SEEN NOT ACCEpTABLE WhiLE iTS COMpLETELy NORMAL FROM yOuR BACkgROuND? ThAT’S Why WE DECiDED TO ADviCE yOu iN ‘’hOW TO SuRvivE’’ iN ThE TOp 5 MOST pOpuLAR COuNTRiES ThiS SChOOL yEAR. By Can Guneyli, Thalita Lingers, Monica Dinca, Marit Meelis, Whitney Waldschmit and Renato Castillo

globetrotter / 11


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS

1 Canada What can you expect from Canada? Besides the snow, the icy roads and the artic fauna, Canadian cities are best known for their cleanliness, lots of skyscrapers and the beautiful CN tower. Its downtown areas are usually crowded but vibrant and attractive, its historical districts and of course well-organized transportation systems. Most Canadians consider that all people deserve the same rights and respect no matter their religion age race

or cultural background. When they greet each other, Canadians generally hug when greeting a friend, but a normal hand shake for both men and women when introduced to someone new is also common. Canadians doesn’t like‌ People who lurk Having too much snow Having to little snow Being mistaken for American globetrotter / 12


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS

2 United States of Ameérica As you may already know The United States of America is a western country with western norms and values. Therefore most of the things we do in the Netherlands may also apply in the USA, but still there are some things that are not. When on exchange in the United States it is important to take some things into account. What you surely should NOT do is to ‘’cut in line’’ when there’s a queue, because this will be taken as an offense. Also when you meet someone for the first time avoid personal questions about age, income, marriage, health and politics. And usually don’t touch people when talking to them. What highly is expected in the United States is when you go out globetrotter / 13

for a dinner to a restaurant, is that you should ‘‘tip’’ the waiter or waitress with 15-20% of the total amount of the bill. Not doing this is very rude and you should probably not expect good service the next time you will visit the same restaurant. Be aware of dangerous places in the place you are staying. Generally, American campuses and nearby neighborhoods are safe, even at night, but there are exceptions. Check with campus security officials to see if any areas are dangerous. Also, ask an American friend or fellow student to tell you which neighborhoods are unsafe. To be safe, walk with a friend.


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS

3 France When in France: The best thing you can do when going to France is to learn the language, they will appreciate it if you just try, and some even refuse to speak English. Be polite and address people with ‘vous’, even colleagues. Don’t cross hierarchy lines, show respect for co-workers, especially managers. Also, very important in France is the lunch break. Take regular lunch and coffee breaks, working your butt off is not seen as ideal in France, even considered a bit weird. During le déjeuner, between noon and 2 p.m., it is nearly impossible to reach anyone, some offices and banks close at this time. Joining some co-workers for lunch is a good way to get to know each other. If

you are not hungry don’t go to a restaurant, you can’t just order one dish. Don't drink soft drinks or coffee with a good meal, never ask for a doggy bag, don't try to order things you find only at home: ask for what people here eat or drink. It is not very classy to share the bill on the principle of "who had what". If there are three of you, divide the bill by three. To get to know France and the French do socialize, don’t live only among expats, typical discussion subjects are culture, food, vacation, politics, family and office gossip. Even though the French have many unwritten rules, they will help you along the way, as long as you stay respectful of them and their culture. globetrotter / 14


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS

4 United Kingdom In the past decades, the United Kingdom has become one of the most wanted destinations to study around the globe. The standard of excellence provided by most of the universities, the low education costs, the multicultural society with all religions and faiths presented and its openness to new traditions and culture are key aspects that makes the United Kingdom such an appea ling country to study. In general, life in London and the south east of England can cost more but in other areas the prices for goods and services tend to be pretty similar although more expensive than in the north of England. If you plan to study in London, you should expect to pay a little more compared to other cities since it is the capital city. Britain used to be known for its fish and chips;, however globetrotter / 15

with the influence of modern, multinational life, there are various styles of cooking at hand so a variety of food products and international restaurants are widely available in each town. The customary English breakfast of bacon and eggs is still quite trendy although it is now more common for people to have a lighter breakfast. For safety reasons it is advisable to only use licensed taxis with official council plates on the back and be careful crossing the road since the traffic travels on the left in Britain. It is also against the law to buy alcohol if you are younger than 18 years of age. Many supermarkets and off-license chains display ‘Challenge 21’ notices stating that they will not serve persons who look younger than 21 without proper identification.


TOp 5 DESTiNATiONS

5 Spain Spain has proven its popularity and has become number 5 in the list of most popular destinations for an exchange. This made me wonder; why? Typically there are obvious factors that can take a great part such as, the great weather, the food and the way of life, but when I questioned some students and staff members who have been to Spain I got some very interesting stories. One was the story of a staff member who told me that she had become catholic after her trip to Spain, because she was so struck about how passionate people were about their faith. Another answer that I did not expect to hear was ‘for the sexy guys’. I’m not a person that judges others easily, but this sounded a bit odd for my taste.. In addition to these great advantages that Spain offers to its visitors, it also has a rich culture to share with

the world. This, in its turn, can lead to cultural miscommunication and therefore I researched some tips that might come in handy for those who are interested in the culture of Spain or are planning on going there. Firstly people tend to eat late, so don’t be surprised to see people having diner around 9 or 10 p.m. What also might be interesting to know is that excessive drinking isn’t appreciated and getting ‘wasted’ is considered rude and immature. It is also possible that you meet someone you like whilst grabbing this late dinner or consuming an alcoholic beverage within the accepted limits. Therefore it is important to know that when it comes to dating, guys usually ask the girls out. Well, as I stated before Spain has proven its popularity and has lots to offer to its ‘guests’. It is a wonderful place to visit! globetrotter / 16


Globetrotter Issue 1 2012