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February 1- 7, 2009

w w w . b a k e r s f i e l d v o i c e . c o m

On their honor Boy Scouts deliver food to needy, pg. 4

Exciting new read by local author Pg. 6 Hip twist on square dancing Pg. 9 5 tips to read food labels right Pg. 10 Blog: Anatomy of a girls' night Pg. 12


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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

EXTRA!EXTRA!

Discover treasures at BYSO Yard Sale fundraiser Feb. 7 concert tour to Bucheon, South Korea. All proceeds from the yard sale will go toward this exciting international opportunity. ou know that old saying about “one man’s There are sure to be plenty of books, furniture, trash being another man’s treasure?” household goods, bikes, toys, sporting equipment and Well, when it comes to yard sales, that’s so decorative items for sale. In fact, your donations of true! such items (sorry, no clothing, please) are also appreIf you want to go ciated. Call Charlotte Heion a successful “treasure drick at 201-5409 to arrange hunt,” be sure to check out for a drop-off time and day. the giant, multi-family BakWhether you’d like to be a ersfield Youth Symphony yard sale shopper or yard sale Orchestra (BYSO) Yard Sale, donor — or both! — we hope 7 a.m. to noon, Saturday, Feb. to see you on Feb. 7 for this 7 at 2308 Haggin Oaks Blvd. worthy fundraiser that beneThis is a fundraiser for the fits the talented musicians in BYSO’s upcoming, weeklong the BYSO!

BY TERESA ADAMO TBV Staff

Y

Staff EDITORIAL Olivia Garcia Publisher ogarcia@bakersfield.com 395-7487 Natalie Erlendson Managing Editor nerlendson@bakersfield.com Teresa Adamo Associate Editor tadamo@bakersfield.com

ART Timothy Heinrichs Designer theinrichs@bakersfield.com

MEETTHE BLOGGER

ADVERTISING

Allow us to introduce ...

J

amie deQuillettes is the type of person that will laugh over spilt milk — not cry — and her blog will have you laughing right along with her. deQuillettes is better known on bakersfieldvoice.com as TilTues — a sentimental name she chose because of a friend’s assertion that she looked like Aimee Mann from the ‘80s new wave band, ‘Til Tuesday. Her blog brings a sense of much needed sarcasm and deadpan humor to the woes of her everyday life such as longing for the sun to shine like she longs for her “high school figure,” or picking up half-chewed Qtips that her “Darn Dog” scavenged from the bathroom trash can. deQuillettes’ blog is so enjoyable — even if the subject matter isn’t — because her life is pretty darn similar to the rest of ours, just told through what she says “can be a twisted view.” Like many people today, she’s unemployed: “Before becoming a stay-athome mom again, I was a mortgage loan offiBakersfieldvoice.com blogger cer. We all know the

JAMIE deQUILLETTES

ending to that story, yada yada yada, I am now unemployed.” She’s a procrastinator: “[I’m] still doing everything possible to avoid studying for the GMAT test. I have even resorted to using the excuse ‘I can’t possibly study now, I have to dust the leaves on the house plants...’” And deQuillettes wants her kids — who she occasionally blogs about — to think she’s cool: “I would like for my kids to look back and think that Mom could have fun and be a bit quirky at times.” She also has an attitude of resilience that we could all adapt during these tough times. An attitude that the description of her blog, titled “Look before you leap,” sums up quite well: “Look before you leap is a reoccurring theme in my life. I could save myself many moments of regret if I simply think my actions through ... but then life wouldn’t be nearly this much fun if I did.” deQuillettes is certainly having fun — and you can too! Read one of her first bakersfieldvoice.com blog entries on “The anatomy of a girls’ night” on page 12, then give the husband and kids some quarters for the nearest arcade and call your best girlfriends over to have a good laugh at that crazy thing called life ... — Read deQuillettes’ blog at: bakersfieldvoice.com, search keyword TILLTUES. While you’re there, register for a free profile, so you can post your own blogs, stories, photos and more!

Jaime De Los Santos Sales Manager jdelossantos@bakersfield.com 716-8632 David Alanis Sales Executive Gustavo Carrillo Sales Executive Samantha Vilchis Sales Executive Mark Wells Sales Executive

OFFICE Marisol Sorto Office Administrator msorto@bakersfield.com 716-8640

The Bakersfield Voice 1522 18th St. Suite 310 Bakersfield, CA 93301 The Bakersfield Voice is published by Mercado Nuevo, an independent subsidiary of The Bakersfield Californian To learn more or to contribute news and pictures, visit us online at: www.bakersfieldvoice.com


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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

Share your

voice today! ■ Submitting your stories for The Bakersfield Voice is simple and FREE! Just go to: www.bakersfieldvoice.com and create a profile. ■ Choose what you’d like to contribute (an article, letter, picture or community event listing) and post it yourself for our online readership to see. You can even add video to the site!

■ We also include as many community contributions as possible in the print edition of The Bakersfield Voice, published Sundays. ■ Still need help getting your contributions onto our Web site? E-mail: Natalie Erlendson at: nerlendson@bakersfield.com or Teresa Adamo at: tadamo@bakersfield.com

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Scouting for food

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Dancing inside the box

Clean out your pantries and help local Boy Scouts feed the needy.

Your Creative Corner

Local author releases new book on government gone bad.

Square dance for a little exercise and a lot of excitement.

9

Jazzin’ up the Elks Club

10

What’s in your food?

12

No men allowed!

First Sunday each month, you can hear the Southside Chicago Seven.

How to know if what’s in the package is what you want in your body.

Bakersfieldvoice.com blogger gives you the ‘anatomy’ of a girls’ night. .

About the cover Cover photo courtesy of the Southern Sierra Council, BSA. Donate to the Scouting for Food project. Non-perishable food donations can be dropped off at Wal-Mart, 8400 Rosedale Hwy., on Saturday, Feb. 7 from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Your photo could be on our next cover! Photos and stories for the Feb. 22 issue must be posted by Wednesday, Feb. 11 at 5 p.m.


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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

MEETTHE CLUB

Boy Scouts do their ‘good turn’ port is greater than ever. “In 2008, the food bank was overwhelmed by people, a 90 percent increase, in need of food… many people that have never needed help before,” partnership food bank manager, Gary Romriell stated. “This need for food will continue to increase in this coming year.” In Scouting for Food, Scouts deliver empty shopping bags to homes in their neighborhoods. Residents then fill those bags with non-perishable foods to be picked up by the Scouts and delivered to the drop-off location. This year, the Southern Sierra Council began their Scouting for Food efforts delivering shopping bags to homes on Saturday, Jan. 31., returning the following Saturday to pick up the food and deliver it to a drop-off location. If you did not receive a bag at your home, you can still participate in the food drive. All city and county fire stations are accepting food donations now through Saturday, Feb. 7 or bring your canned goods to the Wal-Mart parking lot, 8400 Rosedale Hwy., on Feb. 7 between 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m.

Courtesy of Southern Sierra Council, BSA

S

ince 1910, the ideals of Scouting have guided young men to perform “service to others and to the community.” Responding to the plight of America’s poor and hungry is a traditional Scouting “good turn.” During World War I, Boy Scouts planted vegetable gardens to provide food for the hungry. President Roosevelt called on Scouts to collect food for the needy during the Great Depression, and planting Victory Gardens were the Scouting “good turns” organized during World War II. Today, Boy Scouts continue their “good turn” efforts in community stewardship through Scouting for Food. “We definitely see the need to feed the hungry in our own communities as evidenced by comments we get from local food banks of markedly increased demands on their resources,” said John Wagner, District Director of the Southern Sierra Council, Boy Scouts of America. “We in Scouting are proud to do our part to help feed those in need through our part- Scouting for Food is the single largest donation they — For information on Scouting in your area, please nership with these agencies,” Wagner notes. receive each year, and the community is a key part of contact the Southern Sierra Council, Boy Scouts of Many local food pantries are proud to note that the success. This year the need for community sup- America at 325-9036.

SPOTLIGHT ON: Haylee Nutter

Haylee Nutter is a 15-year-old sophomore at Centennial High School. She loves taking pictures of the world around her and has captured it from unique vantage points as can be seen in the images here.

You can see more photos from Haylee and other local photography enthusiasts in our PHOTO GALLERY. Go to: www.bakersfieldvoice.com and click PHOTOS, then SEE USER GALLERIES. Feel free to post your own shots, too!


FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

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LIFE’S TOUGH. PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD DOESN’T HAVE TO BE. The Bakersfield Californian’s self-serve advertising system is a fast, convenient way to place Classified ads. If only everything in life were this easy.

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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

CREATIVECORNER

Local author’s book a tale of government gone bad BY PEGGY SUE YARBER Community contributor

S

mall-town America takes on Big Government and an uncontrollable virus. Peggy Sue Yarber writes a compelling novel of what happens when government becomes involved in a small town in California. Something has gone terribly wrong in the small California town. An infectious virus has been discovered in the soil and threatens the country’s grain production. The United States government takes over — military operations quarantine the town and its residents are held in captivity until someone can determine the cause and resolve the problem. But who is responsible and who can be trusted? A soldier abandons his post and takes

his family on a pilgrimage, traveling to The Rocketship Café, a sanctuary for those who are able to escape the tragedy that’s befallen the town. There he attempts to find the answers and take back what the government has stolen from him — his life, his home and his family. As the soldier digs deeper and uncovers the horrible truth, he learns that those in power may have had a role in a world that has suddenly and inexplicably gone wrong. A cover-up of enormous proportions is behind it all and the soldier questions everything he’s held dear. “Tare” is full of intricate twists and turns. This compelling novel is about right and wrong, good and evil and the choices individuals and communities make that oftentimes have devastating repercussions.

Peggy Sue Yarber is a writer, dancer, and high school teacher and administrator. Yarber lives with her husband, daughters and two dogs in Bakersfield. This is her first published novel.


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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

THE VOICE CALENDAR Sunday 2/1 Southside Chicago Seven will perform during the monthly meeting of the golden Empire Hot Jazz Society, 2 to 5 p.m., Elks Club Banquet Hall, 1616 30th St. $10 for non-members. Celebrate Oildale’s 100th anniversary and outstanding Oildalians. Gerald and Janice ( Petticord) Haslam will be honored. As part of the event, the Haslams will proctor a historical presentation and reading to celebrate Oildale's 100th anniversary. 2 p.m. Christ of the King Catholic Church, 1800 Bedford Way, Oildale. 391-4640.

Monday 2/2 VPR broadcast, Richard Southwick’s composition: “Sonata for Violin and Piano,” performed by Darius Johnson, violinist, and Patrick Bender, pianist, on Valley Public Radio, FM 89, 10 a.m., a New Directions Concert. Diesel Rhodes Community Fundraiser all day, BJ's Restaurant & Brewhouse, 10750 Stockdale Hwy., www.dieselrhodes.com.

Tuesday 2/3 Open Forum Travel Series Don and Fran Van Polen, “Sea to Sea in a Model T,” 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.,

Bakersfield High School, Harvey Auditorium, 1241 G St. Free. 871-0146. Sierra Club Conditioning Hikes 3 to 5 miles, 7 p.m., meet at corner of Highways 178 and 184. 872-2432 or 873-8107.

Wednesday 2/4 Car Nights 8:30 p.m., in front of Bakersfield Billiards, 2916 Niles St. 549-6276. Condors vs. Idaho Steelheads 7 p.m., Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $7 to $23. bakersfieldcondors.com or 324-7825. Fair Trade Store Jewelry, baskets, gift items from Third World countries,10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sundays, First Congregational Church, 5 Real Road. 327-1609. Senior Wednesday Special events and refreshments, 9:30 to 11 a.m., Bakersfield Museum of Art, 1930 R St. $4 non members. 323-7219. Education Recruitment Fair will focus on future employment opportunities as well as teacher retention and quality, 3 to 6 p.m., CSUB Student Union, 9001 Stockdale Hwy., 654-3033.

Thursday 2/5 Square dancing class with The Joaquin Squares 7:30 p.m., Rasmussen Center, 115 East Roberts Lane. Class is free. 324-1390 or

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Friday 2/6 14th annual Casino Night & Auction Las Vegas style gaming , 6 to 11 p.m., CSUB, Icardo Center, 9001 Stockdale Hwy. $30; $35 at the door. Must be 21 to attend. Proceeds benefit the CSUB Student-Athlete Scholarship Fund. 654-3473. Condors vs. Alaska Aces 7 p.m., Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $7 to $25. bakersfieldcondors.com or 324-7825. Dads 'N Daughters Date Night 6 to 10 p.m., Color Me Mine at The Marketplace, 9000 Ming Ave. $15 for one adult/one child, plus pottery pieces. bakersfield.colormemine.com or 664-7366. FLICS International Cinema Society presents “Lars and the Real Girl,” 7:30 p.m., Bakersfield Fox Theater, 2001 H St. $5. flics.org or call 325-4815. Gabba Gabba Heys A tribute to The Ramones, 8 p.m. Friday, Amestoy's Bar, 2303 River Blvd. $5; 21 & over only. 871-2303. Heroes Doors open at 6:30 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; doors open at 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Stars Dinner Theater, 1931 Chester Ave. $50-$54; show only tickets $25. 325-6100.

Saturday 2/7

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399-3658. Art show Featuring Beverly Carrick, Charlotte White, Richard Geissel, Pattie Doolittle, Mary Lou Slinkard, Shirley Rowles and Les Robison, art on display until March 1, Bakersfield Art Association, Gallery of Art, East Hills Mall, 3000 Mall View Road. Gallery hours 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. 872-2806. Aspiranet Foster & Fost-Adopt Parent Orientation will provide information about becoming a foster or fost-adopt parent. 12 p.m., 2603 G St., Suite #100. 323-1233.

As Se en On

Sierra Club, Buena Vista Group, Breakfast & Program Guest speaker, Uduak Ntuk, a presenter with the non-profit The Alliance for Climate Protection, 10 a.m., Camino Real Restaurant, 3500 Truxtun Ave., optional breakfast $7.50, public welcome. 203-2770. 12th annual Heart & Stroke Expo Free cardiac-related health screenings, cholesterol screening, pulmonary testing, free prizes and

more, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., East Hills Mall, 3000 Mall View Road. Free. 327-1173. 13th annual Super Cruise Poker Run & Car Show in conjunction with the Central Valley Sportsmen and RV Show, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Kern County Fairgrounds, 1142 S. P St. $20; $30 day of event. Open to any vehicle. Benefits the Society for Disabled Children of Kern County. bakersfieldccc.com or 327-1690 ext. 120 or 587-2465. Bakersfield Symphony Orchestra presents “La Traviata,” 8 p.m.; concert preview with Jerome Kleinsasser, CSUB Music Professor, 7 p.m., The theater at Rabobank Convention Center, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $32-$48, full-time students half price. bakersfieldsymphony.org or call 323-7928. Black History Month Celebration “Soaring to Another Level of Community Service,” red carpet walk, social hour, silent auction, dinner, program, book signing, dessert, reception and dance, 6 p.m., DoubleTree Hotel, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court. $75 per ticket; $140 per couple; $725 for a table of ten. 326-1529. Book signing with Earvin “Magic” Johnson of “32 Ways to Be a Champion in Business,” 2 p.m., Borders, 4980 Stockdale Highway. 3289800. Certified Farmer's Market Over 20 vendors with certified and non-certified farmers, 8 a.m. to noon, next to Montgomery World Plaza, 3201 F St. Condors vs. Idaho Steelheads 7 p.m., Rabobank Arena, 1001 Truxtun Ave. $7 to $25. bakersfieldcondors.com or 324-7825. Kern River Valley Hiking Club Coso Pictoglyph, will meet at the Jerky Store in Olancha, 9 a.m. Bakersfield hikers leave 6:30 a.m. from Park'n Ride, Weedpatch Hwy. Bring lunch and quart of water. Dress appropriately. For directions, visit lakeisabella.net/hiking or 778-3453. Mento Buru with The Modern Jazz Trio 9 p.m., Fishlips Bar & Grill, 1517 18th St. $5; 21 & over. 324-2557. No Stinkin' Service Charge Blues Series presents Roy Rogers, doors open at 6:30 p.m., show at 7 p.m., Doubletree Hotel, 3100 Camino Del Rio Court. Reserved tickets $25. 831-3100.

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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

YOURENTERTAINMENT

Not your granddaddy’s square dancing BY MARILYN AHLEMEYER Community contributor

I

t’s February, the holidays are behind us, the kids are back in school, and the house is quiet. Now is a very good time to introduce a new activity in your life. Yes, it is time to start a square dance class. An activity that provides exercise and social interaction, all accomplished to music. It is the perfect solution to the winter blahs. Just mention the phrase “square dance” and an image of what you did in grade school and junior high school pops into your head. The Joaquin Squares, a local square dance club, would like to dispel this old image and show you that it is definitely not what you did in the school gym. We want to introduce to you the fun of Modern Square Dancing. So what is different about today's square dancing? It is an activity for couples whose kids have gone off to college, married or joined the work force, families and singles who would like an activity to enjoy together. Today’s top tunes and as well as those of yesterday

and, of course, a few country and western tunes thrown in for variety provide the music for the dancing. Square dancing is a great activity as it provides the health benefits of walking, the mental stimulation of a chess game and the fun of moving to music, all rolled into one fun-filled evening. Health experts are touting 30 minutes of walking every day to get and stay in shape. During an evening of dancing, you can cover a couple of miles. The caller for the Joaquin Squares is Michael Kellogg, from Northridge, Calif. During the day, Michael works as a systems analyst for a major manufacturing company in Los Angeles and he drives to Bakersfield each Thursday. Michael has called for square dance weekends throughout the United States as well as square dance events in Europe and Japan. Along with the exercise of dancing, comes the social interaction with others. Everyone is laughing and the tensions of the day slip away as you listen to the music and concentrate on what the caller is telling you to do. Is experience necessary? Absolutely not! A comfortable pair of shoes and

casual attire qualifies you. To introduce this activity to the public, the Joaquin Squares are offering their last of three free classes Thursday, Feb. 5. The classes are at the Rasmussen

Center, 115 East Roberts Lane. No preregistration is necessary. Just show up at 7:30 p.m. and be prepared to have a really good time. If there are any questions, please call 324-1390 or 399-3658.

Hear ‘Hot Jazz’ at Elks Club on first Sundays BY RANDY FENDRICK Community contributor

I

n May 1996, two bowling buddies, John Lines and Bill Wells, who also shared a love for Hot or Dixieland Jazz, got together to form the Golden Empire Hot Jazz Society. The society’s goal was twofold: raise funds to send young people to the Sacramento Jazz Camp and preserve swing and dixieland jazz for the people of Kern County. The first meeting, as the dances were called, was held at the Rodeway Inn in June 1996, but the venue was quickly changed to Golden West Casino where they held forth for some 10 or so years. Now the meetings are held the first Sunday of each month, and are now held at the Elks Club, featuring the band, the Southside Chicago Seven. Southside is co-led by Bob Snyder, trumpet and musical director; and Randy Fendrick, trombonist and busi-

ness manager, who plays the music that was popular in the 1930s and 40s. The players are: Mark Meyer, clarinet and saxophone, who studied with Artie Shaw and brings a very swinging style to the band. Mike Montano, guitar and vocals, is a retired fireman, possesses a love for the blues and the music of Louis Jordan in particular. This dimension adds a flavor to the band not heard in many dixie or swing type bands. James Dethlefson, up right bass, adds a subtle vocal flair to many of our tunes, which draws the attention of the crowd. Ernie Cervantes, drummer, is one of three original members of the band and provides a tasty approach to his playing. Our newest member is Micah Nacita and she is a teenage wonder on piano. When one thinks about the music of Louis Armstrong in the ‘40s and ‘50s, then you have the style of Southside. In other words, a style that is loose and swinging at the same time. The band was first organized in about 1987, has played traditional jazz festi-

vals up and down California, and has produced two CD's — one of which is still available from the Hot Jazz Society. They can be heard locally at the monthly meetings of the Golden

Empire Hot Jazz Society the first Sunday of each month at the Elks Club, 1616-30th St., from 2-5 p.m. Admission is $10. Bring your dancing shoes as the Elks have one of the best dance floors.


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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

YO U R H E A LT H

5 tips for reading between the lines on food labels (to add flavor), which is less healthy than the fat. Try olive oil mayonnaise — it has 45 calories versus 100 in regular mayo. Use liquid margarine (I Can’t Believe It’s Not Butter) and natural butter when the Read the label! Fewer ingredients = healthi- liquid isn’t feasible. er foods. With less additives and chemicals, you 4. Be wary of “100 percent natural” claims (black have more food in the product. widow spiders and dust storms are also 100 percent Notice how many carbs are on the package natural), “lightly sweetened” and “good source of” — keep the number in the teens on packaged foods. claims. This generally means the product is highly processed taking out all the original nutrition and 2. Choose whole grain over “multi-grain” and then adding the artificial equivalent — not nutrition“white flour” foods. Some wise person once said: ally the same thing as the original. “The whiter the bread, the faster you’re dead.” Choose brown rice; also whole wheat, spelt or brown 5. When grocery shopping, become aware of and rice pasta. shop from the high and low shelves for healthier, more economical foods. Major brand companies put a 3. Become aware of the labeling on low- or lot of money into packaging and get their products reduced-fat products. Most of them have increased placed at eye level. Nominated by Guadalupe Hernández sugar and sodium to compensate for the reduced fat I’d like to nominate my twin daughters’ kindergarten teacher Mr. Rhodes who teaches at Discovery Elementary School. At the beginning of the year, I was so skeptical after having learned that they were going to have a male teacher for kindergarten. He has superseded all of my expectations as to what a great kindergarten teacher should be. My girls love Mr. Rhodes. He teaches them lots of cute and Cosmetic & General Dentistry silly songs. He builds up their self-esteem. He is just so Yong Eon Park, DDS marvelous with my girls! BY GLORIA GORCE, C.HT. Community contributor

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Educator of the Month

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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

ATTENTION GOVERNMENT BAIL OUT

ATTENCION FONDOS GOVERNAMENTALES

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El Govierno le prestara $7,500 sobre cual quier otro rembolso federal. No Interes, No Costos de Cierre y No Pagos por 2 Años. Pagos de $500 dolares seran cobrados en cada rembolso de impuestos comensando el tercer año por 15 años. Escrow tiene que cerar antes de Julio 1, 2009.

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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

FROMTHE BLOGS

Anatomy of the perfect girls’ night TILLTUES (JAMIE DEQUILLETTES) Bakersfieldvoice.com contributor

E

very Thursday night for the last year, the girls and I have held ‘girls’ night.’ This tradition began because of our love for “Grey’s Anatomy.” So Dirty, RN, Bree, Zeta and I all got together at Dirty’s house to watch our nighttime soap opera together. The premise is simple, meet at Dirty’s place a half hour before the show starts to eat, drink and chat. But what started out so simple, has become an essential part of my week. The pleasure I get out of that hour-anda-half is immeasurable. “Grey’s” is the front to what I believe has turned into a female support group. We talk about children, pets, work, husbands, parents, periods, house cleaning, dieting, decorating, sex, cars — any thing and everything you can think of. We get advice, we give advice, we

share, we empathize, we connect. The other ladies may not realize it, but they are my weekly support group for this journey I call womanhood. Every community should have one. I encourage you to start your own, here are a few quick tips: 1. Center it around something the men could care less about, this way they do not feel left out (i.e. “Grey’s Anatomy”). 2. Eliminate children and men from the area. We hold our meetings at Dirty’s place because the only distractions she has there are the four-legged kind. 3. Provide food — doesn’t need to be fancy, just comforting. Cheese, crackers, popcorn, candies and fruit are all acceptable — even served at the same time. Allows for variety, so there is no boredom. 4. Hold the meetings later in the evening. Ours begins about 8:30. This is

convenient for moms to get home from work, feed the children and get them ready for bed before coming over in PJs. 5. Make sure you have a DVR or TiVo. Our conversations can run long in the beginning, so we pause the show and start it late to fast forward through the commercials. 6. Let the conversation flow. The time, place and entertainment have been provided, the women will make use of it in their own way. When the season ends, we simply carry on the tradition through the summer, throwing in field trips to dinner, a paint your own pottery place or shopping. A core group of women is essential, that way no one is left out and you don’t spend half of the time catching someone up on events from the previous weeks. But most importantly, I hope you find as much enjoyment in your own ‘girls’ ‘McDreamy’— the perfect part to the anatomy of a perfect girls’ night. night’ as I have in mine.


FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

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FEBRUARY 1-7, 2009

SPORTSSHORTS

Bits & pieces from BC and beyond

H

ome is where the heart is — true! Ask the Arizona Cardinals, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the men’s varsity basketball team at Liberty High School and they will concur. The Cards valiantly drove 72 yards towards the end of the fourth quarter with momentum from their allegiance of hometown fans in Arizona to score the winning touchdown versus Philadelphia as they captured the NFC title. Consequently the Steelers fought off the rival Baltimore Ravens in Sports columnist the hotbed of

MICHAEL ELLIOTT

Heinz Field to win the AFC championship. Locally, the Liberty High Patriots stunned high-flying Garces behind a rabid support crowd at Liberty to move into an SEYL tie with the Rams, both perched atop the standings with 4-1 records. Home-field/court advantage can never be dismissed at any sporting event. Case in point: Liberty trailed for most of the second half by eight to ten points and with about four minutes left they put together a mini-run which literally ignited the crowd. Garces began to lose composure. Turnovers and fouls near the end of the contest led to their demise as Liberty kept focused, made their foul shots and rode the support of the fan base to victory. Simon & Garfunkel's “Homeward Bound,” Ozzy’s “Momma I'm Comin’ Home,” “Home Alone,” “Mommy, I'm home!” No matter how you spin it, it’s always good to be home. Bits & pieces — The Bakersfield

Star Athlete: Xavier Castellanos Nominated by Kim Smith A third-grader at Endeavour Elementary School, Xavier participates in the NOR afterschool programs of flag football and basketball. Xavier is a team player. He respects his coaches, always gives his best effort, and is a good sport-win, lose, or tie. He encourages his teammates and can be counted on to go to every practice. In soccer Xavier has dribbled the ball past competitors halfway down the field and either kicked the ball in the goal himself, or passed it to a teammate for him to score. Xavier is also quite a slugger in baseball and his favorite position is catcher. Xavier is an all-around, all-star champ! Look for him on the Denver Broncos in 15 years!

■ Do you have a son, daughter, grandkid or buddy who is your pick for MVP? Nominate them for Star Athlete of the Month by going to: www.bakersfield.com and posting an article. Nominations should tell us in 50 words or less what makes this kid a star athlete and should include a photo. All nominees will be featured weekly in the print edition of The Bakersfield Voice and each month one nominee’s name will be drawn to receive a $50 gift card for sporting equipment, compliments of Sports Authority and The Bakersfield Voice.

College Baseball Hot Stove Dinner was once again a rousing success as featured speaker Ned Colletti, L.A. Dodgers general manager, brought with him budding stars Clayton Kershaw and Blake DeWitt — all of whom praised the event for its uniqueness. There is something fishy going on out at Buena Vista’s Lake Evans as innumerable lunker trout are being pulled out of the lake on a regular basis...PLANTED! Wonder how those subscription rates are coming along over at Dish Network after NFL football channels CBS and Fox got the hatchet? Oddly enough Serena Williams loves winning the Australian Open in odd-numbered years (‘03, ‘05, ‘07) and with faux number-one seed Jelena Jankovic making an early exit Serena’s chances look good for ‘09. May as well end this paragraph as it started: How many of you remember The Ned Colletti, the L.A. Dodgers general managDave Clark Five’s pop hit single from er, was the guest speaker at the Bakersfield College Baseball Hot Stove Dinner. the 60s, “Bits And Pieces”?


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YOURPETS

Benefits of being cat-egorized as a ‘cat person’ BY VICKY THRASHER Pets columnist

P

eople often divide themselves into two groups when it comes to pets — cat people and dog people. Even in homes where both species peacefully coexist, lines are frequently drawn, and I have to admit that if I had to choose between one or the other, I’d go with cats. We humans have had a tumultuous relationship with our feline friends. Historically we’ve vacillated between worshipping them as gods and demonizing them as agents of the supernatural. We’ve befriended them as guardians of our grain supplies, eliminators of house vermin and warmers of our laps. We have also vilified them for killing songbirds, scratching furniture and (mistakenly) smothering babies. Those of us who are cat aficionados know the truth lies somewhere in between.

There is something quintessentially unique about cats. I am forever in awe of the fact that a creature who has such a distinct size disadvantage in relation to humans still manages to learn to trust us with their safekeeping, while retaining their prerogative to stand up for themselves if need be. A cat is the closest thing most of us will ever get to possessing a wild creature. There is something

that lies deep within the soul of a cat that shall always remain just out of reach of domestication and all cat lovers accept, if not admire, this aspect of their relationship with their feline friends. Cats simply view the world through their own lens. As much as they appreciate all of the benefits of domestication — the steady food supply, a safe shelter in which to sleep, a warm lap upon

which they may catch a little rest — they will never become a subservient being, waiting to show you how wonderful they believe you to be with every passing moment. Cats remind you that your relationship with them will forever be founded in mutual understanding and respect. A relationship with a cat is kind of like rafting down a river. Some parts of the journey are calm and quiet, some parts wild and a little scary, and although you have an oar to help guide your raft the way you want it to go, the river still has a say in how well the ride turns out. You can help determine the outcome through careful preparation, education and the right equipment, but in the end, some factors are simply beyond your control. For me, that’s the best part of the ride. — Have a pet-related question or comment? E-mail Vicky at: vicky@pawprintcity.com or visit: www.pawprintcitytimes.com.

Pets of the Week

Hi! My name is Emma and I am a spayed female, two month old domestic medium hair Tabby mix. I enjoy taking “cat” naps, playing and being with people. I would do best in a home with older children. Don’t forget to mention my ID number - 751112!

Hi! My name is Jake and I am a male, one year old, chocolate Pit Bull mix. I will be neutered before I can go home. I am very sweet and playful and I love people! I would make a great pet for a family with older children. Don’t forget to mention my ID number 750982!

These pets may be adopted quickly! Please visit the KERN COUNTY ANIMAL SHELTER at 201 S. Mt. Vernon Ave. to see all of our adoptable pets. For more info call 661-868-7144 or visit our website at www.co.kern.ca.us/acd.

Teddy is a 1½-year-old male Border Collie Pit mix. Teddy is housebroken, Playful and minds commands. He could use some training to enhance his already good habits.

Bakersfield SPCA

Torrie is a 2 year old female Torti. She is playful and inquisitive. Torrie would make a great addition to any home.

If you would like to offer Teddy or Torrie a forever home, please call Bakersfield SPCA at 323-8353 today! DONATIONS ARE ALWAYS APPRECIATED!

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The Bakersfield Voice Issue5/2-1-09