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August 2-8, 2009

F R E E

Crossway takes Vacation Bible School outdoors Pg. 2 Educator of the month Pg. 5 Mom reveals her top super hero: Chemo Man! Pg. 7

Pint-size authors With grandma’s help, boys tell tale of Mojo the Cat, pg. 6


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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

AUGUST 2-8, 2009

EXTRA!EXTRA!

‘Valley Treasures’ presentation at Bakersfield Museum of Art COURTESY OF BAKERSFIELD MUSEUM OF ART

F

irst Wednesdays at the Bakersfield Museum of Art, 930 R. St., will feature Paula Castadio, president and CEO of Valley Public Television, who will speak on Valley Treasures, an update of Valley Public Television and a preview of the upcoming series, The National Parks:

America’s Best Idea. Come and enjoy this talk on Wednesday, Aug. 5 from 9:30 to 11 a.m. Free to members, $4 non-member seniors, $5 adults. Sponsored by Valley Public Television, San Joaquin Community Hospital, and Adventist Health. Call 323-7219 or on the Internet visit: www.bmoa.org for more information.

VBS at Deer Peak Park in Seven Oaks COURTESY OF CROSSWAY BAPTIST CHURCH

P

lease join us Tuesday, Aug. 4 through Thursday, Aug. 6 from 6:30 to 8 p.m. as Crossway Baptist Church presents Vacation Bible School in the Seven Oaks community at Deer Peak Park, Deer Peak Drive and Beckenham Road. Any and all children, 4 years old through the sixth

grade, are welcome to attend and participate. It will be three evenings filled with competitive games, Bible memory, a Bible challenge, snacks and prizes. Parents are welcome to drop off their children for this fun-filled, supervised event, or stay and watch the program. For questions or to arrange pick-up, please call 9002578 or e-mail: info@crosswaybaptist.org.

Staff EDITORIAL Olivia Garcia Vice President /Content ogarcia@bakersfield.com Gene Garaygordobil Managing Editor ggaraygordobil@bakersfield.com 716-8642 Teresa Adamo Associate Editor tadamo@bakersfield.com Sandra Molen Writer/Copy Editor smolen@bakersfield.com

ART Timothy Heinrichs Designer theinrichs@bakersfield.com

ADVERTISING Jaime De Los Santos Sales Manager jdelossantos@bakersfield.com 716-8632

YOURCELEBRATIONS Happy 10th Birthday, Kylee! Happy 10th Birthday, Kylee! Hope you have a wonderful birthday Snoots!

Central Cal Intensity wins championship BY CCI 14U MANAGER Community contributor

Central Cal Intensity 14u won Championship at the Summer Sizzle NSA Tournament (Division A) in Hanford July 19. The winning team was: Jessica Velasquez, Cheyenne Rodriguez, Sissy Gonzales, Gabby Spaillero, Brooke Charles, Maddie Arambula, Vanessa Moralez, Bianca Duran, Katie Clifton, Victoria Johnson, Andrea Negrete and Sarah Gonzales. Coaches were John Fitz-Patrick, Brian Graham and Ray Carrasquillo with Serena Rodriguez as manager.

Gustavo Carrillo Sales Executive Mark Wells Sales Executive Bill Guerro Sales Executive Tony Menchaca Sales Executive

OFFICE Marisol Sorto Office Administrator msorto@bakersfield.com 716-8640

The Bakersfield Voice P.O. Box 2344 Bakersfield, CA 93303 The Bakersfield Voice is published by Mercado Nuevo, an independent subsidiary of The Bakersfield Californian. To learn more or to contribute news and pictures, visit us online at: www.bakersfieldvoice.com


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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

AUGUST 2-8, 2009

FROM THE BLOGS

Contents

Piedras Blancas Light Station

4 4 7

Curious collections

Two longtime friends take beloved collections to the library.

FROM HYESTYLESHOTS BLOG

W

Words to live by

Don’t let the summer drift by without picking up a good book!

e spent the day at the Piedras Blancas Light Station in San Simeon. The tour was a field trip organized by Jen of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes (OLLI) program at Cal State University Bakersfield. We all had a great time. It was an awesome trip! A bus took us there and back. We all packed a lunch and enjoyed some cool weather. Wow, that was a relief! What is the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute? The OLLI at CSU Bakersfield’s Extended University is a membership organization for all Kern County residents aged 50 and older who want to participate in a community of fellow learners. Exams and grades are not part of the program. The only requirement is the desire to learn for the joy of learning. Extended University’s OLLI program is part of a network of Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes funded in part by the Bernard Osher Foundation. As an OLLI member, you help shape, manage, and lead. You can take classes, teach classes, plan and coordinate activities, organize volunteer projects, and volunteer for other things. If anyone is interested in the OLLI Program, here is the Web site: http://www.csub.edu/eud/olli.html

And the winner is ...

Check out our top athlete for July! Then enter your Star Athlete, too!

About the cover Scenes from a beautiful day at the Piedras Blancas Light Station in San Simeon on the Central Coast. PHOTOS BY TERESA HARIGIAN

Thinking About a New Career?

Do Something About It!

Helen Venosdel's grandsons, Brett and JD, have been busy this summer. They adopted Mojo, a rescue cat — and, with their grandmother acting as editor, the duo wrote and illustrated a book about the family's newest feline member. Your photo could be on our next cover! Photos and stories for the Aug. 16 issue must be posted by Wednesday, Aug. 5 at 5 p.m.

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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

AUGUST 2-8, 2009

YOURVOICE

Friends share ‘curious’ collection with library BY MARILYN ADAMS GEORGE Community contributor

K

athleen Stewart and Marilyn Adams George found out 50 years ago that they had a lot in common as two young wives and mothers. The two young women both loved shopping for Lanz Dresses from the Vogue Dress Shop at 19th Street and Chester Avenue (now a men’s store) and they both loved eating chicken salad sandwiches in Brock’s Mezzanine Café. With those two activities as a start, the two, who both attended East Bakersfield High School, continued a friendship that found both making several moves to towns around northern California. But they always stayed in touch visiting one another no matter where they lived. Once both families decided to move back to Bakersfield, their hometown, to retire, they found they had developed other interests that were similar, like collecting fun things such as 1920 to 1950s kitchen and household items. Both women have an old can of unopened Bab-O, old kitchen cooking utensils and other nostalgia things that were their grandmothers’ and mothers’ from more than 50 years ago — back to 1910. Most surprising was how they both developed a love for all things “Curious George.” Marilyn Adams George collected vintage style Curious George items for her George children and George grandchildren. Kathleen Stewart collected them for her grandchildren’s Bakersfield guest room. The two collectors began a joint venture in collecting, finding items for one another and comparing collections. In addition to these collections, George and her grandson Austin George Walker have collected almost all

of the Chevron eye-balled cars since they first came out, having the very first one in the original cardboard box. In 2001, when George bought the special 60th Anniversary Edition book called, “The Complete Adventures of Curious George,” which told the history of Margret and H.A. Rey and the George phenomenon, the two women decided to go public with their collection. The Curious George enthusiasts placed their joint collection into two glass cases at the Beale Memorial Library in downtown Bakersfield. On top of the 6-foot tall case, they sat a 3-foot tall stuffed toy Curious George looking down on the children’s section of the library. In the case was the new book, other collectible books, a huge birthday card for George on his 60th birthday and tons of George toys. The Beale librarians said they had more favorable comments on that display than many others they have had there over the years. This prompted Stewart and George to go on the road with the Curious George display, offering it to all county libraries. They recently had it at the Beale Library for the second time in eight years, then last month at the Wasco Library; and then the Chevron cars were at Beale Library having just left Southwest and on their way to Wasco. The old kitchen “junk” collection focused on cookies just left the Southwest Library and will then move to Beale. “We were sad to be told by several libraries that they no longer have display cases in all the libraries,” said George. She and Stewart have other collections they can place and loan the libraries. When visiting your library, the women encourage you to stop and view the displays.

PHOTO BY MARILYN ADAMS GEORGE

Kathleen Stewart in front of the Curious George display case.

YOUREDUCATION

Cool off ... with a good book

M PEGGY DEWANE-POPE Education columnist

y best advice to anyone on the hunt for a book is to hit a local library and enjoy the cool temperatures. I like young adult literature. When I’m hungry for a book, I know that if I pick up a Newbery Award or Honor winner, I’m going to read a good one. I can’t stand to waste my time with a crummy book and no child should either — no matter how highly recommended. Elementary, junior high and high school students will enjoy Newbery books and libraries and bookstores are loaded with them. This summer I read, among oth-

ers, some great historical fiction including “The Road From Home,” by David Kherdian, about the Armenian genocide in Turkey in the early 1920s. We study about the Holocaust and I expose students to modern genocide in Rwanda and Darfur, but I knew only what an Armenian student told me about her family’s plight until I picked up the book. I loved the way the story unfolded but the content blew me away. Why does history repeat itself? “Fever 1793,” by Laurie Halse Anderson, tells of the yellow-fever epidemic in that year in what was then our nation’s capital, Philadel-

phia. Both stories are from a teen’s perspective. There are plenty of great books that aren’t Newbery winners and I just finished the final book of the “Percy Jackson & the Olympians” series by Rick Riordan, which came highly recommended by several eighth-grade boys — although it’s popular with young and old, girls and boys. “April Morning,” by Howard Fast, views a day in the American Revolution through a boy’s eyes and I’m still crazy about the “Twilight” books, by Stephenie Meyer, “Harry Potter” books, by J.K. Rowling, and “A Series of Please see BOOKS , page 5


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W W W. B A K E R S F I E L D V O I C E . C O M

AUGUST 2-8, 2009

YOURPETS

Paw Print City: Magazines unleash love of pets

W

hen I’m not busy skulking about on the Internet, one can frequently find me nose-deep in a magazine, that being another of my favorite addictions in life. There’s something about the printed word that draws me — like a moth to a flame. Naturally, some of my very favorite reads are magazines dealing with pets and pet issues, so I thought I’d share a few of my favorites. Hands-down, my No. 1 pick for critter mags is The Bark. I nearly leapt for joy when this magazine arrived on the scene. The Bark accomplished something many magazine publishers didn’t think could be done — they created a dogspecific magazine without accepting any ads from breeders, and in doing so developed a loyal audience of people involved in rescue and Pet columnist adoption. The

VICKY THRASHER

What makes this product unique is that the publishers accept no advertising. While this makes the subscription costs a wee bit higher than some are used to seeing, it also means readers can be confident that the reviews they provide on food and toys are honest reviews, not tainted by financial relationships. Granted, some of the articles embrace complimentary health practices such as chiropractic, acupuncture and flower essences, and may not be for everyone, but this is a solid publication that has the best interests of dogs and their owners at heart. The magazine Web site is: www.whole-dogjournal.com. For cats, the pickings are a little slimmer, especially for someone like me who tries to avoid magazines that offer breeder ads. One magazine of note is Catnip, published by the Tufts University School of Veterinary Medicine. Much like Whole Dog Journal, Catnip does not accept advertising. It’s a great Bark is full of fun features, health general-interest publication for cat news, travel ideas and fiction, and I owners, even if it’s a wee bit short on dare anyone to look at their ‘Smiling Dogs’ features and not crack a smile. It’s just not possible. Online at: www.thebark.com Another favorite, for entirely different reasons, is The Whole Dog Journal.

Educator of the Month

Community contributor

J

oin Christian Home Educators of the County of Kern for the our annual Home School Forum & Newcomers Social on Thursday, Aug. 6, from 7 to 8:30 pm., at Riverlakes Community Church, 4301 Calloway Drive. We will have a panel to answer the questions: 1. Why would a family consider home

education? 2. What are the legal requirements to home educate? 3. How does one begin the process? 4. What support, and from whom, can one expect to receive? 5. What styles of homeschooling and curricula options exist and where are they obtained? For further information, contact Kathy Gildez at 872-3766, Susan Lemons at 827-0540 or e-mail: info@checkca.org.

Books: Use summer to read CONTINUED FROM 4 Southwest Library with my kids, and

Unfortunate Events” books, by Lemony Snicket. Stop by a library and just browse for an hour or so. I find myself lost in the stacks or among the paperbacks at the

Have a pet-related question or comment? E-mail Vicky at: Vicky@pawprintcity.com or go to: www.pawprintcitytimes.com

we love it! Peggy Dewane-Pope is a teacher at Stonecreek Junior High School in the Panama-Buena Vista Union School District.

Carlee Acevedo Nominated by Cambria Cleveland

No

I’d like to nomina Mr. Rhodes who At the beginnin having learned t for kindergarten as to what a gre girls love Mr. silly songs. He b marvelous with

Educator of the month

Home school forum & social BY SUSAN LEMONS

the warm, fuzzy stories people like to read. Go to: www.tuftscatnip.com to check out more. If you’re looking for something that speaks to people with both dogs and cats, Animal Wellness is a great magazine pick. A mix of stories, informative articles and health news, Animal Wellness is a solid pet care magazine, especially for those owners who want to approach pet care from a more natural and holistic standpoint. Again, some of the more new-age items might be a bit more than most people are looking for, but they definitely provide food for thought. On the Internet at: www.animalwellnessmagazine.com. Well, that’s enough to get you, or any animal-loving friends who are in need of a birthday gift, started. Did I miss one of your favorites? Drop me a line and let me know.

I would like to nominate Carlee Acevedo as Educator of the Month. Ms. Carlee teaches a 3-year-old class at the Richardson Center. We have learned so many things this year, like recognizing letters and numbers, the days of the week, and To submit nominee for Educator of the Month,is the months ofyour the year. My favorite go to: www.northwest music time! voice.com then click on “Post Something!” and contribute a paragraph about why you appreciate and would like to recognize your nominee. Be sure I the love Ms.name, Carlee I will missThe her to include educator’s school, and department and picture. contest is open to when I goin to the Pre-K class. my to: educators the Southwest area. Entries canShe also beis e-mailed dmartin@northwestvoice.com. Each month the winning entry $50 gift certificate, Sunshine! compliments of GW School Supply and The Northwest Voice. Sponsored by

■ If you have a teacher you think is great, nominate them for Educator of the Month by going to: www.bakersfieldvoice.com and posting an article. Nominations should tell us in 50 words or less why your teacher is the best and MUST also include their first and last name, school, department/grade and a photo in a jpeg format. Winners will be featured in the print edition of The Bakersfield Voice for a month and will receive a $50 gift card for school supplies, compliments of GW School Supply and TBV.


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YOURVOICE

Young authors create ‘Mojo, the Rescue Cat’ BY HELEN VENOSDEL Community contributor

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s the time for school fast approaches, an interesting project to engage young children in to improve reading and writing skills is having them create their very own book. My grandsons adopted a shelter cat, and since he soon became the star of the family, we decided to write our first summer book about the daily life of “Mojo, the Rescue Cat.” My two little amateur photographers, Brett, who just turned 5, and JD, 7, used a digital camera to take more than 30 pictures of Mojo — sleeping, chasing toys, hiding behind doors, taking his bath, eating and playing with them. The difficult choice was narrowing the final selection to 10 photos. We visited a local dollar store and purchased a 10-page photo album with lines drawn beneath the picture pockets, a pack of colored Sharpie pens, and a set alphabet stickers. The time had come to write the book! To create the cover, a picture was selected and stickers used to title the story. Each boy picked out five favorite snapshots to describe Mojo’s activities. Next we placed the pictures in the album in chronological order. Using a piece of lined paper, JD wrote his practice sentences with only a little spelling help from me. Brett dictated his sentences. When both authors were satisfied with the story, I used the color pens they had selected and wrote the sentences under each picture. Alphabet

THE WASHINGTON POST

Commercial kits are also available to help children build their own books.

stickers highlighted one word per page. Finally, the boys included an assortment of other stickers to decorate the pages. Original books can showcase not only pets, but also family members, vacations, special occasions, hobbies and things of interest to young authors. This activity provides a special way to review reading and writing skills and produces a book easily read by beginning readers.

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AUGUST 2-8, 2009

YOURVOICE

Chemo Man: A true superhero!

TBV’s July Athlete of the Month: Alec Vaquera

BY ANGELA BLANCO Community contributor

W

Andrew Blanco earned his nickname, “Chemo Man” for his fight against cancer. He inspires his family and friends by playing sports, even when undergoing chemotherapy.

Societies “Light the Night” fundraiser. His team has raised more than $15,000 for the society in the last two years. Meanwhile, Chemo Man will stop his chemotherapy this September and will be monitored closely for the next two years to follow his blood counts. He will continue to fight like a true superhero. Let’s not forget Chemo Man’s sidekicks — his brother and sister are always there to pray for him and make him laugh through it all! Are you ready for Chemo Man’s identity? He is none other than 10-year-old sensation, Andrew Blanco! Stay tuned for more news on this true superhero! QUALITY & PRIDE IN OUR WORK

DOOR AD E RH

OV E

hen cancer came by to destroy, it was no match for him! He is able to gulp a pill in a single bound, take injections in both legs at the same time and still have time to hit home runs! Who is this strong, superhero? His name is none other than Chemo Man! Chemo Man was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia at the tender age of 7. Nonetheless, he continues to live strong and live like a true hero. Since early April 2006, Chemo Man had not been himself. He was extremely fatigued and in and out of doctor’s offices with low blood counts. He was told he had anemia and needed a diet high in iron. In June 2006, he could hardly move and complained of constant leg pain. He also had a lot of abnormal bruising on his body. On June 18, we were told we needed to go to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles immediately. Anthony, (Chemo Man’s dad) and I, (Angela, Chemo Man’s mommy) were terrified of what to expect. It was terrifying for the whole family. It took a couple of days to get an exact diagnosis for him. We were then told it was cancer of the white blood cells. From this horrible diagnosis, Chemo Man was born. His first year was the roughest he endured — multiple injections in his back, his leg muscles and rounds of oral chemotherapy. Chemo Man stood the test of time when he lost all of his hair and had multiple sores from all the chemotherapy. Again, this time was not a match for him. It has been three years exactly since his diagnosis and he has moved forward valiantly with every step. This last year, he completed third-grade with few absences from school. Fatigue seems to be Chemo Man’s biggest challenge, yet it has not slowed him down from participating in sports such as: flag football, soccer, track and baseball. His favorite sport had to be baseball — he played for NOR baseball and was on the Giants team. He made six home runs during his season and still played his scheduled games after he had had a chemo visit to Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. There were times during a game when his joints were hurting, muscles ached and back was throbbing. But he powered through with his super powers. Chemo Man has gone on to inspire his family and friends in so many ways. Since his diagnosis, his friends and family have joined the Leukemia Lymphoma

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The Bakersfield Voice’s Star Athlete of the Month for July is Alec Vaquera. Alec, 8, plays Northwest Baseball. He just finished his third season and has been named an all-star each year. Alec’s name was picked from among the other Star Athlete nominations for July. The Athlete of the Month receives a $50 gift card for sporting equipment, compliments of Sports Authority and TBV.

This week’s Star Athlete: Andrew Blanco Nominated by Angela Blanco Andrew Blanco, aka “Chemo Man,” is a 10-year-old baseball sensation. I would like to nominate him as MVP. He plays baseball for NOR and is on the Giants team. He has been nicknamed Chemo Man since he continues to play baseball while on chemotherapy for his leukemia diagnosis. He is such a brave and strong boy who never complains and gets excited to put on his uniform to play. His season is done, and his family is so proud of all of his efforts. We love you, Chemo Man!

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■ Do you have a son, daughter, grandkid or buddy who is your pick for MVP? Nominate them for Star Athlete of the Week by going to: www.bakersfieldvoice.com and posting an article. Nominations should tell us in 50 words or less what makes this kid a star athlete and should include a photo. All nominees will be featured weekly in the print edition of The Bakersfield Voice,and each month, one nominee’s name will be drawn to receive a $50 gift card for sporting equipment, compliments of Sports Authority and TBV.


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The Bakersfield Voice Aug. 2, 2009