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AFRICA MICRO Airlines, TunisAir and Air Mauritius are government owned (Air Mauritius has a minority stake held by private investors and Egyptair is autonomous). ComAir, ArikAir, and Kenya Airways are private companies with Kenya Airways having a minority interest held by the government. Air links are generally good with London and Paris, but they are less so with the US where direct or US carrier flights are limited to a few major cities such as Johannesburg, Cairo, Dakar, Casablanca, Accra, Lagos and Nairobi. The only airports that have links to Asia are Cairo, Addis Ababa Luanda, Nairobi and Johannesburg. Flying within Africa can be problematic because many airports just service their geographical region. There are no flights for instance between Maputo, Mozambique and West and North Africa, no flights between Accra, Ghana and East Africa, no flights from Kigali, Rwanda to West Africa and at the Gaborone airport in Botswana there are only flights to Harare, Nairobi, Lusaka and Johannesburg. As a result, passengers have to fly to hubs such as Johannesburg, Cairo, London or Paris to make connecting flights. Most of Africa’s airports were notorious for poor service, flight delays, and inadequate infrastructure conditions. However, in recent years, many governments have undertaken major programs to reJoab’s Technologies and Research.te, upgrade, expand and modernize their international airports in order to accommodate increased passenger traffic resulting from rising business and tourist arrivals. Among the airports that have undergone expansion and modernization are Luanda, Monrovia, Cairo, Lagos, Maputo, Addis Ababa, and Entebbe. New international airports are being constructed in Luanda, Kigali, Dakar, N’Djamena, Khartoum, Bamako, Freetown and Ougadougou, with China taking the lead involvement in the expansion and construction of airports. It is for example building new airports in Bamako, Luanda, N’Djamena, Freetown, and Khartoum in addition to expanding, modernizing, and reJoab’s Technologies and Research.ting the airports at Nairobi, Mauritius and Zanzibar. Ports The busiest port in Africa is Port Said in Egypt. In 2009, it was st the 31 busiest container port in the world handling 3,300,000 TEUs (twenty foot equivalent units). This is up from 860,000 in 2004. The port is located on the Mediterranean Sea on the northern terminus of the Suez Canal. It is operated by the Port Said Port Authority which is a government agency. Work is under way to double the terminal by 2012 which will make it the largest container terminal in the Mediterranean Sea. Durban, South Africa is the second largest container port and one of the largest container terminals in the Southern Hemisphere. In 2009, it handled 2,395,000 TEUs, up 39.5% from the levels of 2004. It has 59 berths excluding those used Joab’s Technologies and Research, Natu Court Flat B.

KEY SECTOR TRENDS AND OUTLOOK

by fishing vessels and for ship repair and has undergone an expansion in recent years to create more container handling facilities. In the fiscal year ending in March 2009, the port handled 4,554 ships. It accounted for 38% of all ships that were serviced in South African ports. Cargo handled during the FY 08/09 was 74,683,597 tons (including oil, petroleum products and containers). The car terminal is the largest import and export facility for the automobile sector. In FY 08/09, it handled 372,557 cars of which 84,511 were imports, 182,091 exports and 5,955 were transshipments. The port is owned and operated by Transnet, a public company that operates the railway, the ports and pipelines. The Port at Richards Bay in South Africa is the third busiest port. It was built in 1976 to handle coal exports and is the largest coal export terminal in the world. In 2010, it handled 84.937 million tons of cargo. During FY 09/10, the port serviced 1,871 ships. Mombassa in Kenya is the largest port in East Africa and the fourth largest port in Africa. It serves landlocked Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of Congo. It struggles with inadequate capacity, deteriorating equipment, corruption and high costs. The transportation of a container of goods between Mombasa and Kampala can take twice the time and expense as transporting the same container between London and Mombasa. The productivity of the port is very poor with off-loadings of only 6.5 containers per hour per ship, which is well below the target of 25 per hour set by the Kenya Ports Authority, a government entity that operates the port. In 2010, the port handled 696,000 TEUs, up 12.4% from the previous year’s level. Cargo tonnage of 19 million was similar to that of 2009 and is very close to the 20 million capacity. The ship turnaround time increased from 3.6 days to 4 days as a result of rehabilitation work on 3 berths. The port is expected to be the main port for the newly independent country of South Sudan. Dar es Salaam is the fifth largest port. The container terminal has three deep water berths that can handle over 5.5 million tons a year. The port has recently benefited from the problems at Mombassa with shipping agents diverting ships to Dar es Salaam because of delays allocating berths and a shortage of loaders at Mombassa. It is the main export point for agricultural and mineral exports. It also serves as a port for the landlocked countries of Zambia, Malawi, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, and the eastern part of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The port is operated by the Tanzania Ports Authority, a government entity that was created in 2005 “to coordinate the country's system of harbors, provide harbor facilities and services, construct new harbors, operate and maintain

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Equity Research in Africa, Like an Electric Train Africa is picking up, a True Emerging Market  

Economic analysis of Africa as a whole, as well as of particular countries and sectors, with special regard to their potential as investment...

Equity Research in Africa, Like an Electric Train Africa is picking up, a True Emerging Market  

Economic analysis of Africa as a whole, as well as of particular countries and sectors, with special regard to their potential as investment...

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