Learning and Teaching: Subjects Guide 2023

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LEARNING GUIDE AND TEACHING 2023 SUBJECTS

COMMERCE / ENGLISH / HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION / HUMANITIES / LANGUAGES / MATHEMATICS PERFORMING ARTS / SCIENCE / TECHNOLOGIES / VISUAL ARTS / VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR)


Due to some ongoing limitations around the COVID-19 regulations pertaining to schools, our School will endeavour to provide as many subject and cocurricular offerings outlined in this document, as is possible. In the event that our School may need to limit some offerings into the future, we will ensure that our parent community is well advised and that our staff will be available to assist with alternative subject selections or to detail any changes to any of our off-campus learning experiences. At the time of publication, all subjects listed are available at each year level. We thank you for your patience and understanding as we continue to evaluate and update how we can continue to provide a rich learning environment for all. JAMES WALTON DIRECTOR OF LEARNING AND TEACHING

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CONTENTS MENTONE GRAMMAR OVERVIEW

SUBJECTS 2023 YEARS 7-12

Welcome to Mentone Grammar

04

Learning and Teaching Strategic Vision 2020-2023

06

Lenses for Learning

07

Learning Enhancement

08

Wellbeing

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CAMPUS LENSES

Commerce Subject Flowchart

38 45

English Subject Flowchart

46 57

Health and Physical Education Subject Flowchart

58 63

Humanities Subject Flowchart

64 71

Languages Subject Flowchart

72 77

Mathematics Subject Flowchart

78 83

Performing Arts Subject Flowchart

84 93

Science Subject Flowchart

94 103

Technologies Subject Flowchart

104 117

Visual Arts Subject Flowchart

118 125

VCE-VM (Vocational Major)

126

ELC & Eblana Campus Introduction

12

Eblana Campus Overview

14

Riviera Campus Introduction

18

Riviera Years 5 & 6 Overview

20

Bayview Campus Introduction

24

Bayview Years 7 & 8 Overview

26

Greenways Campus Introduction

28

Greenways Campus Overview

30

Greenways Electives

31

Elective Subject Selection

136

Frogmore Campus Introduction

34

Need to Know More?

142

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WELCOME TO MENTONE GRAMMAR At Mentone Grammar we believe in developing happy, healthy and high achieving young people. Our goal is to develop successful learners, confident and creative individuals and active, informed citizens. Living in a rapidly changing world, our teaching aims to be learner-centred, flexible and a balance between disciplinary knowledge and skills, alongside the development of important dispositions and habits of mind. By focusing on the development of well-rounded young people, students enter the world fully prepared to embrace the challenges that lay before them and are equipped with the tools to thrive in whatever they pursue. We believe strongly that learning is enhanced when a student’s emotional intelligence is maximised. Students with high emotional intelligence are able to recognise and name emotions in themselves and others, they are able to link emotion to cause and consequence and are able to harness their emotion to enhance thinking and deepen understanding. Our differentiated learning and teaching programs utilise the latest research to ensure students develop this capability. The teachers at Mentone Grammar are outstanding. They recognise the importance of building strong relationships with their students and their families. We provide contemporary, supportive and engaging learning environments and allow opportunities for collaborative and individual learning. There is a culture of high expectation, mutual respect, trust and responsibility. Our teachers are learners too, constantly seeking ways to improve and refine their practices. WE ALL LOOK FORWARD TO SHARING THIS JOURNEY WITH YOU. BEST WISHES JAMES WALTON DIRECTOR OF LEARNING AND TEACHING

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LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGIC VISION 2020-2023

We believe children learn most powerfully and deeply when they connect with their teacher and they see relevance in what they are learning.

We believe that the fundamental aspect of a modern education is learning how to learn. We develop our learning and teaching approaches to ensure students have processes in place to know what to do when they don’t know what to do.

We define learning as a transformative process that changes what we know and builds on what we do. We believe that education should be underpinned by deep disciplinary and transdisciplinary knowledge, include a wide range of skills, key literacies and experiential learning opportunities.

We believe that the development of character and disposition are vital aspects of a modern education. We believe that our curriculum should include classical, modern and contemporary elements and include a wide variety of student choice.

We believe that the best way of catering for the diverse needs of all learners is through the development of a common set of teaching practices that includes learning directly from others, a model of humancentred inquiry, real world projects and ensuring clarity of intent in everything we do.

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LENSES FOR LEARNING

THINKING

LEADING

BECOMING

People learn most powerfully and deeply when they focus on the ‘how’ and ‘why’ as well as the ‘what’. Developing an ability to think deeply and clearly, excites, engages and inspires the learner as they grow intellectually and emotionally. Students are encouraged to reflect and unpack their thinking throughout the day. By learning how to question and understand the important role that thinking has on their understanding, students grow as learners and a broad culture of thinking is developed, allowing students to critically and creatively apply their understanding.

Leadership of self and others requires an investment of time, firstly in ourselves, to understand how we function and how we lead, then an investment in those we support to determine their needs, how they can be supported and then our response to it. A range of contexts will exist within this community of leadership.

Our identities, understandings, skills and relationships are shaped by our experiences. As we learn and grow, we change.

As a school we are now moving beyond thinking routines to the type of thinking we want to make routine. We are developing a culture of thinking through a focus on: ■ critical thinking within and across disciplines ■ understanding phenomena from a systems level ■ seeing things from the perspectives of others ■ asking good questions ■ having routines and structures readily available to support deep and deliberate thinking and metacognition.

At the forefront we need to draw on the wisdom of our School values:

Respect, Discipline, Care, Resilience, Endeavour, Integrity and Service. These should be drivers of our approach to leading. Opportunities to reflect and collaborate are also required as we work together for the greater good as life-long learners and thoughtful global citizens. Through a range of opportunities for our staff and students, our local and global leadership involves a significant investment in: ■ personal development ■ service to others ■ working in teams ■ coaching ■ mentoring.

At Mentone Grammar we aim to develop well-rounded young people who are happy, healthy and high achieving through a focus on: ■ Having a sense of belonging that has a powerful effect on their social, emotional, academic, spiritual and physical wellbeing. ■ Understanding notions of Identity – Who am I, how am I developing and what does it mean to be human? ■ Having a sense of agency so that students see themselves as the designers, creators and makers of the world of tomorrow. ■ Humility – not thinking less of yourself but thinking of yourself less. ■ Empathy and responsiveness to the needs of others. ■ Resilience - students develop strategies to cope and thrive in school and in their lives. ■ Emotional Intelligence and Agility – being able to tolerate high levels of stress and to endure setbacks, while remaining open, engaged and receptive. Facing emotion with curiosity, self-compassion and acceptance.

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LEARNING ENHANCEMENT All students deserve to feel socially connected and academically challenged at school.

ABOUT The Learning Enhancement Department at Mentone Grammar strives to achieve best outcomes for all students. Our highly qualified, expert staff analyse the academic data of all of our students using the Robert Allwell assessment tool, and a range of other assessments, both psychometric and academic, according to suitability. From these assessment results, which are regularly updated, students may qualify for additional support or for enrichment programs to further enhance their learning.

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ENRICHMENT Students, who are highly able and meet the program criteria, are presented with a range of academic challenges through Dare 2 Dream! This program focuses on general extension for students in Literacy, Science, Mathematics, Technology, Public Speaking and Philosophical Thinking. Weekly classes are run for highly able students in Years 1 to 10, with specialised Mathematics Extension for students at Years 2 to 9.

COMPETITIONS Competitions are a very important part of the Dare 2 Dream! program with inquiry-based competition projects completed by students across the School for Science (Term 1), Mathematics (Term 2), Technology (Term 3) and Writing (Term 4). Students can choose to be involved in all of the inquiry-based competitions, or just one or two. Where students choose to be involved, they will generally be supported by a teacher Mentor who will work with individual students each week focusing on goal setting, progress checking and discussion around the project’s presentation. These mentoring sessions provide a process model for students, regarding how to approach investigative research from the initial idea, to asking the right research questions, to project completion. In time, students learn the process and many choose to initiate their future project plans and structures and complete their competition projects autonomously.

LEARNING SUPPORT Team competitions include options such as Tournament of Minds, Da Vinci Decathlon, Aurecon Bridge Building and GATEways Challenge.

CHALLENGE Additionally, highly able Mathematics students are encouraged to be involved in Mathematics competitions including the: Australian Mathematics Competition (AMC), University of New South Wales (UNSW) Mathematics Challenge, Maths Talent Quest (MTQ), and Maths Olympiad. At Year 12, our highly able students work with a teacher Mentor, meeting individually with their Mentor on a regular basis. The focus for these sessions might be goal setting and progress checking, troubleshooting an issue, building social and emotional strength and resilience, reviewing student data, or working to develop a skill that might not be progressing as planned. The aim is to support all students enabling them to reach their full academic potential, whilst further developing personal character.

Supporting students with diverse learning needs to reach their full potential. The Learning Enhancement Department at Mentone Grammar School has a diverse role providing support to both the teachers and students. Our highly qualified Learning Enhancement teachers analyse a range of assessment data and specialist reports and make recommendations regarding specific strategies and adjustments to improve learning in the classroom. Student selection for our programs is based on comprehensive data collection and internal assessments. Students qualify for small group evidence-based learning interventions or additional academic assistance to further enhance their learning within an inclusive environment. In addition to teaching specialised classes, Learning Enhancement teachers case manage year levels which includes liaising with all stakeholders such as parents, subject teachers and external providers to meet the individual needs of students.

In Eblana our focus is on the identification of students who require early intervention in Literacy and/or Numeracy and the provision of programs recognised as best practice. In Riviera the predominate focus is targeted intervention in Literacy and Numeracy to advance their skills prior to secondary schooling. In Bayview the focus is to continue developing independent learning allowing students to progress with more academic demands in all areas of the curriculum. This may entail the coaching of students to utilise assistive technology to improve outcomes. In Greenways, as the academic content increases in complexity, the breadth of learning support also increases, directly aligning with course content. A strong focus is on the development of executive functioning skills and self-advocacy. In Frogmore we extend the curriculum support for Learning Enhancement students to best manage the academic rigour of VCE, the VCE Vocational Major (VM) or the Victorian Pathways Certificate (VPC). This includes preparing students for potential special provision entitlements and developing higher level study skills.

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WELLBEING Our student Wellbeing Centre is located on the Frogmore Campus and is available for all students from ELC to Year 12. The Wellbeing team comprises:

PSYCHOLOGISTS Our School Psychologists provide confidential counselling for students from ELC to Year 12. The Psychologists work in partnership with School staff to address the general wellbeing of students. They provide individual and group counselling, intervention, case management, specialised sessions, assessments, and referral to outside agencies, as appropriate. The Psychologists also provide guidance and consultation in relation to the development of Wellbeing Programs across the School.

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CAREERS COUNSELLORS The School’s Careers Counsellors provide senior students from Years 9 to 12 with a broad range of information, resources and activities that assist them to develop skills to make informed decisions about future career possibilities. Tertiary selection preparation, subject selection, job seeking skills and counselling support are also provided.

NURSES AND CHAPLAINS NURSES Our School Nurses are available to attend to student illness, emergencies, and accidents every day during the term. They also provide: health promotion and primary prevention education focusing on health related information, individual student health counselling, advice and referrals to assist young people in making healthy lifestyle choices.

CHAPLAINS The School Chaplains provide private and confidential opportunities for spiritual guidance, support, discussion and reflection. They also oversee the School’s Social Service Program. The Chaplains deliver regular religious education to classes and chapel services.


WELLBEING PROGRAM

MENTOR PROGRAM

The Wellbeing Program at Mentone Grammar helps to create an environment where every student in the School Community is known and cared for. The Program aims to create an atmosphere where every student can achieve his or her best academically, socially and emotionally.

Mentoring is an entrenched part of the culture at Mentone Grammar; students and teachers build strong, mutually respectful relationships which enhance the learning environment. Student-student mentoring and staff-student mentoring are also encouraged and embraced.

Mentone Grammar embraces the teaching of the RULER program to students in Eblana, Riviera, Bayview and Greenways. RULER is an emotional intelligence program designed to support a positive and safe school environment. Through tools such as the Class Charter, The Mood Meter, Meta Moments and the Blue Print, students build their ability to recognise emotions in themselves and others, understand the causes and consequences of their emotions and build tools to regulate their emotions. The framework was developed at Yale University. Our senior students explore the Rights, Resilience and Respectful Relationships framework and the Resilience Project encompassing empathy, mindfulness and gratitude. The main focus of the program is to build connections, provide support, encourage self-care and build a mental health toolbox.

ELC AND EBLANA Junior School students in ELC and Foundation to Year 4 have a dedicated classroom teacher who is primarily responsible for the students’ social, emotional and academic progress.

RIVIERA AND BAYVIEW Middle School students in Years 5-8 have a Mentor who they meet with each morning for roll call. The Mentor will typically teach the student for one or more of their subjects, and will work with the class during allocated Mentor sessions.

FROGMORE For Years 10-12, a Mentor is allocated to each student from within the House system. Each Mentor group has a small number of students from Years 10, 11 and 12. Mentors meet with students daily at roll call and during allocated Mentor sessions. These are the staff who will monitor students’ wellbeing and are the key point of contact between School and home. House Coordinators oversee each House and lead, develop and nurture positive student wellbeing in a safe and supportive environment. They are responsible for fostering successful learning outcomes, addressing individual needs and maintaining support for academic rigour, sporting and cocurricular involvement.

GREENWAYS Year 9 students have a Mentor who they meet with each morning for roll call and for timetabled Mentor classes through the week.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS

ELC & EBLANA MARY JONES EARLY LEARNING CENTRE At the Mary Jones Early Learning Centre, children feel happy and secure in their environment. They have the opportunity to contribute to the development of their program and build upon personal experiences while making connections. Children develop a sense of ownership towards their learning within indoor and outdoor play spaces. All staff in the ELC are professional, dedicated, passionate and inspired educators who nurture, encourage, engage, and challenge children to reach their full potential. At the Mary Jones Early Learning Centre we believe that family is an integral part of our service and a strong, supportive and joint partnership with the Centre can achieve the best results for every child. Mentone Grammar values and supports a sense of community.

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Our program facilitates equal opportunities for both boys and girls. The environment at the Mary Jones Early Learning Centre provides countless opportunities for adventure, discovery, and interactive play so children can begin to develop and acquire preliminary tools and skills for life-long learning. Experiences both inside and outside the classroom foster curiosity, creativity, imagination, reflection and resilience. This is supported by the RULER program within the classrooms. These are integral to maximising and enhancing student learning at Mentone Grammar.

THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT We believe that three interrelated components combine to form our context for learning. 1. OUR ENVIRONMENT Encompasses all areas of the community that we, our families and children have access to influence and are influenced by. The environment is diverse, safe and engaging. We believe that social interaction with and between peers, families and educators is the foundation for learning these interactions. This opens doors to new ideas and experiences. 2. VALUES Our Community strongly supports the School’s values. Framework documents and our Philosophy provide a foundation for our practice and reflect our aspirations and the broader Australian education context. School is a happy place where families have a sense of ownership and belonging. We feel a deep commitment to our Reconciliation Action Plan. We are committed to environmentally sustainable practices throughout the Early Learning Centre. 3. THE CURRICULUM Combines a blend of intentional teaching moments, child initiated explorations, collaborative inquiry and individualised learning experiences. Our play-based curriculum is strongly influenced by the children’s interests. It is subject to ongoing evaluation and modification as we assess and scaffold children’s learning and skill development.

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EBLANA FOUNDATION TO YEAR 4 In Eblana, we celebrate the uniqueness of each child, believing they have amazing capacities and potential to learn. We view each student as a person of strength, curiosity, creativity and intelligence. Eblana is a place where children discover who they are; learn to express their opinion and listen to others; learn about the world around them, strive to be their personal best and fulfil their need to know more.

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With a focus on developing positive, personal attributes of good citizenship and responsibility, students take their place as valued members of the Community fulfilling the promise of the School’s motto: Labore et Honore - ‘by work and with honour’.

We believe that children are entitled to develop strong positive relationships with themselves and others. We nurture caring, resilient students, who appreciate the differences in each other in an environment that cultivates relationships. Through the RULER program, we foster an environment where students develop emotional intelligence, self-regulation and the skills to thrive and contribute to society through service to others.

By focusing on both the mind and the heart, we cater for students’ intellectual, social, emotional, physical and spiritual development. The program is underpinned by the Mentone Grammar core values of Endeavour, Caring, Resilience, Integrity, Respect, Discipline and Service.

We recognise that children are naturally curious and eager to experiment and explore in order to make meaning of the world around them. Based on current educational research, learning is facilitated through a combination of inquiry learning and explicit teaching. Our program is not textbook driven, but rather, it is respectful of the individual needs of our students, where our expert teachers take full advantage of the interests and passions of learners to drive inquiries.

With a focus on developing core foundational skills in Literacy, Mathematics, Science, Humanities, and Technology, including ICT, students acquire conceptual understanding and knowledge. Integrating disciplinary areas provides opportunities for students to apply skills across the subjects and enables them to delve more deeply into the concepts and topics they are investigating.

The combination of flexible indoor and outdoor learning environments in Eblana is designed to enhance student learning and connection to nature. Eblana’s ‘Discovery Garden’, ‘Magic Garden’ and play areas allow for different types of learning through play while promoting discovery, appropriate risk-taking and challenge. Contemporary indoor learning spaces can be transformed according to the learning experience. The walls are sources of learning too. Through documentation and curated displays of inquiry processes in each year level, learning is made visible in the space contributing to students’ abilities to reflect and learn from each other.

Personal achievement is central to the Eblana philosophy. Student learning is measured using Victorian curriculum outcomes that indicate what a student should know and be able to do. Ongoing assessment informs differentiated instruction, so that students are catered for according to their needs and next steps in learning. Effective differentiation in classrooms includes teachers partnering with students to set goals, and students knowledgeably participating in the process because they understand themselves as learners.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: EBLANA Continued

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LITERACY

LANGUAGES

NUMERACY

SCIENCE

Language skills, concepts and processes are taught in relevant, authentic and meaningful contexts across the curriculum. Through a variety of instructional strategies, our students are empowered to learn language, learn about language and learn through language. Learning occurs in a language-rich environment in which a strong focus on oral language is maintained. Children are invited to speak, listen, read, write and view. They reflect on multimodal texts with accuracy, fluency and purpose. They develop an appreciation of literature, and gain a sense of the power of language to stir emotions, convey information, form ideas, entertain, persuade and argue.

Students from Foundation learn Chinese Mandarin through listening, speaking, reading and writing; broadening their comprehension as they progressively move through each year level. Cultural, geographic and historical aspects other than language are also studied to give our students appreciation of others in our world.

In today's increasingly technology-based society, knowledge and understanding of mathematics is becoming ever more important in everyday life. Learning and teaching of mathematics in Eblana aims to develop enjoyment and fascination, as well as confidence and skills, so that they see the value and importance of numeracy. At each year level, the study of mathematics equips students with understanding, knowledge, skills and practices in the main strands: number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. Understanding fluency, problem-solving and reasoning are integral as students progressively develop their abilities to think critically, solve problems of various kinds, and communicate their thinking effectively.

During Science, students observe, investigate and respond to such topics as their senses, lifecycles, the needs of living things and changes in substances, taking in biological, chemical and Earth and space scientific investigation.

Children are encouraged to participate in language activities to develop their individual interest and talents.

Science in Eblana is designed to develop a student’s interest and appreciation of exploring, discovering and understanding the changing world in which they live. It provides a basic understanding of scientific inquiry methods. In addition, students develop the ability to communicate scientific understanding and use evidence to solve problems and make decisions through a hands-on approach. Science in Eblana is organised in the three interrelated strands of Science Understanding, Science Inquiry Skills and Science as a Human Endeavour.


HUMANITIES

THE ARTS

During Humanities, students view their importance, place and participation in the family, the neighbourhood and the broader community as well as studying Australia’s people and their unique environment. Through History Studies students develop their capacity and willingness to be active and informed citizens. In Eblana, key inquiry questions provide a framework for developing a student’s historical knowledge, understanding and skills.

Education through the Arts touches the mind, body and spirit and is a powerful force in our lives. It can help us develop an appreciation and understanding of ourselves and of cultures of the world. Through listening, performing and creating, opportunities are created for students to gain a deeper understanding of the Arts as a medium of communication and to express themselves. Furthermore, discussion, analysis and reflection help students become educated consumers of art forms.

An opportunity is provided to focus on key concepts such as continuity and change, significance and perspectives; organised in two interrelated strands, Historical Knowledge and Understanding, and Historical Skills. There is an emphasis on Australian History so that students better understand Australian experiences including the past and present experiences of indigenous Australians, their identity and the continuing value of their culture.

In Music, the classroom program is Orff and Kodaly based with the curriculum focusing on developing aural skills and musical appreciation through the aid of percussion instruments, music and movement. Orchestral strings classes are a compulsory part of the curriculum in Years 2 and 3, and offered in Year 4 for those students wishing to continue. Eblana, students are also encouraged to learn musical instruments on an individual basis through private tuition. Expert tuition from music tutors is available for: piano, strings, woodwind, brass, voice, guitar and percussion. The Performing Arts program is both exciting and comprehensive and offers a broad range of engaging performance experiences.

TECHNOLOGIES The Visual Arts program aims to foster a love of creativity, self-expression and learning. Visual Arts helps to engage students in critical and creative thinking so they can understand themselves and the world. The purpose of the program is to engage and challenge students in a way that encourages them to take risks and have a go, apply their vision and to make artwork that is unique and individual.

Students learn how to use technologies (digital and product based) to design and create innovative solutions that meet current and future needs. Students enjoy practical opportunities to be users, designers and producers of new technologies as they engage in design thinking and project based inquiries.

Visual Arts allows students to create and critically explore visual culture and artworks that involve the fusion of traditional forms with digital media. Engagement in the Visual Arts allows students to communicate their perceptions, observations and understanding of structures, functions and concepts drawn from other areas of the curriculum. Learning in the Visual Arts is sequential, and students have continuous experience in exploring the principles and elements. The Arts programs in Eblana reflect the cultural diversity of students and communities though exploring music and visual art from different cultures, including the traditions of Indigenous Australians. The annual Christmas performances and the Wakakirri experience combine the elements of Visual Arts, Dance, Drama and Music to provide spectacular opportunities for all students to perform. Please note: In accordance with COVID-19 regulations, some Eblana events may be modified during 2023.

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RIVIERA Riviera introduces our Together-Apart-Together model where students across Years 5-9 learn in gender-based environments.

Riviera meets students where they are in their learning journey and empowers them to become self-navigating life-long learners. Students engage with a curriculum developed in response to their specific learning needs. Learning in Riviera is lifeworthy and spectacular. Students become problem finders and solvers through projects that exercise their thinking skills. Students graduate from Riviera with an understanding of the world not as something that unfolds separate and apart from them but as a field of action that they can potentially direct and influence.

Other highlights of the students' experience across these levels include core subjects in a range of specialist subjects including Science, Music, Art & Drama, Entrepreneurship, Design Thinking and a special program called Global Changemakers at Year 6.

Students also engage in experiential learning opportunities travelling to Shoreham, Canberra and Sovereign Hill, placing their curriculum in context and sharing experiences that encourage personal development and cultural immersion as part of our Learning Journeys program.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: RIVIERA Continued

RIVIERA YEARS 5&6

In Years 5 and 6, the program challenges and encourages students to make practical connections between their studies and the real world. Our programs aim to build in students the capacity to respond to challenges in innovative, informed ways, personally and as a collective. Our inquiry based learning approach ensures communication, research, organisation and thinking skills are embedded across the curriculum, thus enabling students to develop skills needed to respond and thrive in our interconnected, culturally diverse and rapidly changing world.

In the spacious purpose-built Keith Jones Centre, our Together-ApartTogether model is lived out with separate classes for girls and boys where they are catered for according to their learning styles and individual needs. The learning space is flexible. Breakout areas of various sizes are available for small group, individual and partner work. The central auditorium, a film studio, green room, and study booths enhance learning through the use of technologies. Classroom culture emphasises effort, cooperation, thinking and collaboration.

Our program prioritises the development of self-awareness and personal and social skills. Learners must feel secure and supported in order to reach their potential. Growth in self-awareness about how interactions influence relationships is embedded in our program. Positive, kind and cooperative attributes are valued. When students feel truly valued by the adults who are leading them and their peers, they develop confidence to be effective and committed agents for the change needed to shape a better world.

At Mentone Grammar, we believe that everyone can be creative. Through human centred projects such as Global ChangeMakers and the Community Service Project, our Years 5 and 6 students are provided with the space to nurture their creative confidence and potential. They see themselves as stewards of possibility - searching for outcomes and diving deep into the unexpected and unknown. Students develop empathy, agility as problem solvers and thinkers; they learn skills to collaborate and develop an action mindset and a bias towards doing and making things happen.

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The Learning and Teaching program in Years 5 & 6 is based on the following core values: INQUIRY INTO SIGNIFICANT AND RELEVANT TOPICS AND WORLD ISSUES. A TEACHING APPROACH THAT PROMOTES AGENCY AND OWNERSHIP. ATTENTION TO THE LEARNING ASPIRATIONS AND NEEDS OF STUDENTS. ACADEMIC RIGOUR THAT MEETS THE INDIVIDUAL NEEDS OF STUDENTS. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PHILOSOPHICAL AND CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS. HANDS ON, INTERACTIVE AND EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING. WELLBEING AT THE CENTRE OF LEARNING.


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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: RIVIERA Continued

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ACADEMIC STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM Literacy and Numeracy knowledge, skills and understanding are at the core of our students’ education. Teachers are guided by the Mentone Grammar written curriculum, aligned to the national curriculum to ensure students’ education has breadth and depth. The academic curriculum has been developed with a clear understanding of the transitional needs of our students. Mentor teachers oversee their pastoral care and are also responsible for teaching core subjects such as English, Mathematics and Humanities. Science, Art and Music are taught by specialist teachers. Our Mathematics program provides students with essential mathematical skills and knowledge in number and algebra, measurement and geometry, and statistics and probability. Through mathematical inquiry, students develop the capabilities needed to solve authentic, real world problems. We aim to instil in students an appreciation of the elegance and power of mathematical reasoning and the value and beauty of mathematics that is all around them. The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of language, literature and literacy. Together, the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in reading and viewing, speaking and listening, and writing. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier years, and

teachers will revisit and strengthen these as needed. A love of reading and an appreciation of how language connects us are central to language learning. Our Humanities program includes students being immersed in the areas of: History, Geography, Economics & Business and Civics & Citizenship. Curiosity about how the world works is harnessed in our Science program where scientific generalisations and principles are explored. We aim to expand students’ willingness to ask questions and speculate on the changing world in which they live. Understanding the work of scientists as well as the scientific discoveries made in the past enables students to develop the empathy needed to drive them to take their learning beyond the classroom to solve problems in the world. Our Health and Physical Education program has an important role to play in developing the health and wellbeing of our students. At the core of our program is the goal of inspiring lifelong participation in active pursuits with competence and confidence. Through games and sports, students work as a team, and learn fundamental movement skills. Our approach to teaching Physical Education is strengths based. Rather than focusing on limitations, teachers provide safe, inclusive learning environments where students gain confidence to take appropriate risks and

develop the knowledge, understanding and skills they require to make informed choices that will enhance their own and others’ health and wellbeing, at home, at school and in the community. Our Chinese language program offers students opportunities to expand their experience and communication skills both in Chinese and English. Engagement with Chinese language is primarily through speaking and listening. Students begin to read, write and communicate in Chinese. In Technologies students develop innovative solutions that meet current and future needs using design, computational and systems thinking. Students learn to make decisions about the development and use of technologies, considering the impacts of technological change and how technologies may contribute to a sustainable future. Students learn to apply a design thinking process to identify needs, uncover opportunities, explore possible solutions and reflect on their progress. Through practical learning, students develop a sensitivity to the designed dimension of objects and systems, along with the inclination and capacity to shape one’s world through building, tinkering, and making.

In the Performing Arts, students learn a wind, brass or percussion instrument so that they can participate in a School band program, while in Drama they explore ideas of confidence building and interpersonal skills through play and exploration of expressive skills, Melodrama, Mime and Kabuki. In Visual Arts, students explore, develop and refine skills using a variety of materials and techniques. The process is recorded and annotated in their visual diary to evaluate these qualities in their final artworks. We encourage all students to experiment with the creative process to enhance learning and increase confidence. Students will have the opportunity to showcase their work during our annual Art and Design Exhibition.

Please note: In accordance with COVID-19 regulations, some Riviera events may be modified during 2023. 23


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BAYVIEW In Bayview, growing independence moves to centre stage. Our students learn to manage multiple demands on their time and attention and make important life choices with increasing ownership and agency.

For the young people of Bayview, change and growth become significant forces. Their capacity to find balance, exercise reasonable judgement and manage a busy schedule is fostered with great care and finesse through their Bayview years. Whether making choices about which clubs, sports and artistic endeavours they will pursue, or managing the pressures of social networks (online and in real life) our Bayview students are supported along their journey to independence.

Bayview students learn to approach the world with a Growth Mindset, a belief that through effort and by applying the feedback provided, they can achieve personal success. They will further develop their organisational and time-management skills. By the end of their time in Bayview, they will understand the nature of wise choices and apply this as they face the challenges of adolescence.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: BAYVIEW Continued

BAYVIEW YEARS 7&8

A focus on: ■

Independence -

in learning

-

beyond School

-

whole-self management.

A growth mindset.

Organisational skills.

Managing

-

intrapersonal

-

interpersonal

-

social change

-

online, social media.

Navigating competing pressures -

academics, clubs, sports, performing arts groups, etc.

Making positive life choices.

Ownership and agency over all aspects of learning and life.

Success through wise choices.

ACADEMIC STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM The academic curriculum is underpinned by the student’s relationship with their Mentor, a teacher who oversees their wellbeing. This teacher will often teach the class a core subject such as English, Mathematics, Science or Humanities, and this arrangement is designed to smooth the transition into the senior years, creating a situation where each student’s academic progress can be monitored more closely and communicated more readily to parents. Students also have a number of specialist teachers who provide them with specialised classes. The subjects studied are English, Mathematics, Science, Humanities, Languages (German/Chinese), Visual and Performing Arts (Art, Music, Dance, Drama), Product Design and Technology, Digital Technology and Food Studies, Physical Education and Health and Religious Education. In Years 7 and 8, students begin to spend more time on the Frogmore Campus using the purpose-built facilities of senior students including sports, sciences and the arts.

Please note: In accordance with COVID-19 regulations, some Bayview programs and events may be modified during 2023. 26


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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS

GREENWAYS Greenways is our Year 9 Campus. Students learn about leadership through service, personal development, a student-led Café program, learning journeys, and a range of classical and contemporary core subjects and electives. It is in Greenways where students are placed in mixed gender elective classes, as preparation for their transition into the senior years of Frogmore.

Our strong academic program includes a broad offering of academic subjects. Students are well supported in their academic program through attendance at supervised study sessions each week.

Through the Café program, Greenways students effectively manage a business, learning valuable skills in hospitality, financial literacy, marketing and business management and students all complete an accredited barista certificate and food handling qualification.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: GREENWAYS Continued

GREENWAYS YEAR 9 The Greenways Learning Program invites students to explore personal interests and develop skills, knowledge and understanding in increasingly sophisticated ways.

CORE SUBJECTS

GREENWAYS ELECTIVES

In Year 9, all students study core subjects offered in the learning areas of English, Health, Humanities, Mathematics, Physical Education and Science.

In Year 9, students will have the opportunity to study a number of elective subjects, in addition to the core subjects. Students have an opportunity to submit their preferences for the elective subjects that they wish to undertake.

LEARNING JOURNEYS The Greenways Learning Journeys are experiential learning initiatives aimed at taking students out of the classroom and expanding their comfort zones by immersing them in a range of environments that are fun, challenging and stimulating. Our vision is to provide students with skills that can be transferred to all aspects of their lives whilst still keeping in touch with the school curriculum. Each Year 9 class undertakes experiential activities including: Shoreham Experience, City Experience, Outdoor Challenge Experiences and the Greenways Café.

At Year 9, students must select a total of four units of elective studies. The unit value of a subject depends on the length of the subject: ■ If a subject runs for one semester, it counts for one unit. ■ If a subject runs for two semesters, it counts for two units. Students are able to select any combination of semester/year-long subjects, provided the total value of their elective selections is four units. Students must also select two reserve elective subjects.

Please note: In accordance with COVID-19 regulations, some Greenways programs may be modified during 2023. 30


ELECTIVE STUDIES MUSIC

DRAMA

VSL LANGUAGES DISTANCE ED

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

This course provides foundational skills and knowledge to students interested in improving musical performance and/or a pathway towards VCE Music. It is designed as an introduction to the key knowledge and skills required for VCE Solo Performance. It will also focus on the practical skills for music making. During the course, students will study 4 units over a single year comprising: performance preparation and playing techniques, musicianship, composition/arrangement/music technology and contemporary music styles.

The Year 9 Drama course allows students to explore ideas and develop skills, knowledge and understanding related to their personal interest in this area of specialisation. Drama provides opportunities for students to continue sequential development of learning that they have undertaken in previous Drama programs or begin their learning in this discipline. Students will apply decision making skills to find the most effective way to implement ideas, design, create and produce works that demonstrate development of personal and creative style and communicate their interpretations by effectively combining and manipulating dramatic conventions.

This course allows students to study a language outside of our mainstream offerings (Chinese and German). Through the Victorian School of Languages, students are able to study French, Italian, Spanish, Indonesian, Japanese, Greek or Latin. Learning is via Distance Education mode, with students regularly submitting work to a teacher at the VSL, and undertaking regular conversational lessons via Skype or phone. Students may take these subjects at either a regular Year 9 level, as a beginner or via an accelerated program.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS: GREENWAYS Continued

ELECTIVE STUDIES

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CHINESE (CONTINUING)

GERMAN (CONTINUING)

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

This course is offered to students who studied Chinese in Year 8. The focus of Year 9 Chinese (continuing) is to reinforce skills previously introduced in Year 8 and extend the understanding and use of them. Cartoons are still used to springboard language concepts, with unit topics being selected for their interest and relevance to teenagers. Topics are drawn from the wider world of students’ experiences and interests, and include family and friends, entertainment, food and sport.

This course is offered to students who studied German in Year 8. The focus of Year 9 German (continuing) is to reinforce skills previously introduced in Year 8 and extend the understanding and use of them. Cartoons are still used to springboard language concepts, with unit topics being selected for their interest and relevance to teenagers. Topics are drawn from the wider world of students’ experiences and interests, and include family and friends, entertainment, food and sport.

VISUAL ARTS

FOOD STUDIES

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

In Visual Arts, students develop specialised skills in a range of art forms. Imagination and creativity are promoted through a process of teacher-initiated explorations, including painting, drawing, printmaking, textiles, sculpture, digital photography, mixed media and design. In Visual Arts we aim to assist students to enjoy the experience of creating, to develop their individual skills and to experiment with a wide range of techniques. We also aim to stretch and develop their imagination at an age where pressure from their peers and fear of criticism tend to make them seek approval by playing it safe. We aim to teach students to appreciate and to react with sensitivity and knowledge when viewing works of art. In Year 9 students move in and out of class as they take part in Learning Journeys and running of the Greenways Café. We aim to make the course flexible with a range of activities and a combination of teacher directed and collaborative projects. Students are encouraged to provide feedback about the type of materials, techniques and processes they want to investigate. This subject helps prepare students for Art, Photography or Visual Communication Design in Year 10.

Students in Food Studies develop and enhance their practical skills in creative production classes. Students explore challenges and opportunities feeding the world, adapting to climate change, managing the environment and maintaining biodiversity within the food system. Students express their creativity by designing and producing a 3D edible product. Multiple Masterchef style classes are held over the semester allowing student to gain skills needed to cater for the lack of time and convenience in today's society. Students create nutritious, healthy food based on food in season, reduction of waste and consideration of sustainability. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating underpins the Year 9 course, focusing on nutrition and improving performance in both sport and study.


DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAMMING

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY DATA ANIMATION

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY CAD/CAM

DESIGN TECHNOLOGY MATERIALS

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

In Year 9 Digital Technology - Programming students investigate the creative and logical processes of problem solving through programming. They develop algorithms to describe logical processes they encounter in everyday life and learn how computer simulations help solve complex problems. Students discover how data is represented in computer systems and ways in which it can be manipulated to ensure efficient and secure transmission and storage. Students explore a range of different programming contexts such as robots, web pages and networked components.

Students will develop an understanding of how data is collected, manipulated and presented through a variety of formats, for specific audiences. They learn how privacy concerns can be managed while still collecting important data about the world around them. Students explore a range of techniques to analyse their findings and tell a story to their audience through static and dynamic data visualisation tools such as infographics, spreadsheets, websites and animations.

Students explore a variety of skills and techniques related to 3D design. They make use of CAD and 3D printing to solve pre-set problems. Students investigate, understand and design within constraints that flow from living in a community. They invoke a range of solutions to architectural feature designs and demonstrate design thinking to solve issues.

In Design Technology, students follow the design process throughout the course in order to resolve a concept for production. Students brainstorm ideas using mind mapping, following this they undertake research to develop and refine their idea. With ideas becoming refined students undertake concept sketching before completing resolved 3D drawings. Once concepts are fully resolved, students prepare material supply lists to enable them to move into the production phase. Production in an exciting hands-on experience, where safety is paramount. Reflection and evaluation are important phases that deepen student understanding of all processes and final solutions.

Students start the semester creating a 3D model and render of a simple gear system in CAD software. They then use CAD to create a Beach Box that is 3D printed.

Students are introduced to basic power tools and are instructed on their safe and correct use. Students are encouraged to investigate and implement the best finishing techniques available to complete their designs.

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LOOKING THROUGH THE LENS

FROGMORE Our Frogmore Campus is a vibrant hub that provides an immersive and well-rounded learning environment where students are invited to customise their learning experience and find their own personal definition of excellence.

Throughout the Frogmore journey, students are closely supported by a community of passionate teachers and wellbeing staff who are highly regarded for the positive relationships they build with students, based on mutual respect and genuine care.

Year 10 is where life in Frogmore begins, offering a range of elective subject pathways which allow students to explore personal interests and develop skills, knowledge, and understanding in preparation for senior years.

Continuing into Years 11 and 12, our VCE program delivers a comprehensive range of subjects – including selected vocational education offerings and an alternate vocational pathway – to empower students to achieve their academic, career, and personal goals.

We encourage our students to get involved in a wide range of cocurricular activities that complement their academic program and cultivate talents beyond their textbooks. Through this program, students are able to develop a broad range of experiences and skills through a variety of activities such as Sports, the Arts, Cadets, Social Service, Public Speaking, and Debating.

Our unique after-school Tutors Program, staffed with high-achieving former students, offers expertise across all subject specialties and invaluable advice based on current university experiences.

Our outstanding VCE results are testament to the dedication and commitment of students and teachers, and are just one measure of the many successes of our students.

At the end of the Frogmore journey, we farewell our students as well-rounded, independent, and skilful young people ready to take their place in the world, no matter what path they choose.

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COMMERCE ENGLISH

SUBJECTS 2023 YEARS 7-12

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION HUMANITIES LANGUAGES MATHEMATICS PERFORMING ARTS SCIENCE TECHNOLOGIES VISUAL ARTS VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR)

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COMMERCE Year 10 • MONEY AND MARKETS SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW A semester-based course where students study a combination of Accounting, Financial literacy and Economics.

ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL LITERACY

ECONOMICS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The effect that consumer and financial decisions of individuals have on themselves, their family, their broader community and the natural, economic and business environment.

■ The basic economic problem of relative scarcity.

■ Financial and organisational goals including budgeting strategies. ■ Managing financial risks and rewards in Australia and the global landscape. ■ Personal financial literacy skills and the role of savings and investment. ■ Cash accounting for businesses and analysing how to improve the bank balance.

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■ The need for economic decision-making. ■ The concept of opportunity cost. ■ The laws of demand and supply – factors that can influence consumers and supplier. ■ Effects of changes in demand and supply on equilibrium prices and quantities. ■ Apply economic theory to make economic predictions. ■ Gather and interpret relevant data and information about the economic markets. ■ Research current economic issues facing Australia and their impact on society.


Year 10 • BUSINESS & THE LAW SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW Another semester based course where students study both Business and the Law as separate units. BUSINESS Key Concepts covered ■ What is a business? ■ Types of Business Structures ■ Management Skills ■ The concept of Business Change ■ Corporate Social Responsibility LAW Key Concepts covered ■ Legal and Non Legal Rules ■ Characteristics of an Effective Law ■ Key Principles of Criminal Law ■ Police Powers and Individual Rights ■ Court Hierarchy ■ Factors in Sentencing ■ Criminal Case Study

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COMMERCE ACCOUNTING • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW VCE Accounting explores the financial recording, reporting, analysis and decisionmaking processes of a sole trader. Students study both theoretical and practical aspects of accounting and collect, record, report and analyse financial data and report, classify, verify and interpret accounting information, using both manual methods and ICT. Students will also apply critical thinking skills to a range of business situations to model alternative outcomes and provide accounting advice to business owners, taking into account the range of ethical considerations faced by business owners when making decisions.

UNIT 1 ROLE OF ACCOUNTING IN BUSINESS Key Concepts covered ■ Establishment of a business and the role of accounting in the determination of business success of failure. ■ Types of business ownership, sources of business finance and ethical considerations. ■ The role of accounting. ■ Recording financial data and reporting accounting information for a service business. UNIT 2 ACCOUNTING & DECISION MAKING FOR TRADING BUSINESS Key Concepts covered ■ Accounting process for sole traders operating a trading business. ■ Analyse, evaluate the performance of the business and suggest strategies for improvement. ■ Accounting for Inventory. ■ Accounting for and managing accounts receivable and accounts payable. ■ Accounting for and managing non-current assets.

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UNIT 3 FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING FOR A TRADING BUSINESS

UNIT 4 RECORDING, REPORTING, BUDGETING AND DECISION-MAKING

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Accounting and financial issues of a small trading business, operating as a sole proprietor.

■ Developing accounting information for management.

■ Recording and analysing financial data using a double entry accrual basis of accounting.

■ Extension of recording and reporting processes with the inclusion of balance day adjustments and alternative depreciation methods.

■ Preparing and interpreting accounting reports, taking into account relevant ethical considerations to evaluate the performance of the business.

■ Budgeting and decision-making—modelling and discussing the effects of alternative strategies on the performance of a business.


BUSINESS MANAGEMENT • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW In studying VCE Business Management, students develop knowledge and skills that enhance their confidence and ability to participate effectively as ethical and socially responsible members of society, managers and leaders of the business community, and as informed citizens, consumers and investors. The study of VCE Business Management leads to opportunities across all facets of the business and management field such as small business owner, project manager, human resource manager, operations manager or executive manager. Further study can lead to specialisation in areas such as marketing, public relations and event management.

UNIT 1 PLANNING A BUSINESS

UNIT 2 ESTABLISHING A BUSINESS

UNIT 4 TRANSFORMING A BUSINESS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Explore the ability of entrepreneurs to establish a business and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing.

■ Examine the legal requirements that must be met to establish a business.

■ The importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future.

■ Investigate how to take business idea and plan how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. ■ Explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, as well as the effect of these on planning a business. ■ Students also consider the importance of the business sector to the national economy and social wellbeing.

■ Investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. ■ Analyse management practices by applying key knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years.

■ Evaluate a theoretical model to undertake change and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance.

UNIT 3 MANAGING A BUSINESS

■ Analyse the importance of effective management and leadership in change management.

Key Concepts covered ■ Examine different types of businesses and their respective objectives and stakeholders.

■ Investigate contemporary business case studies from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

■ Investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives, and develop an understanding of the complexity and challenges managing businesses. ■ Compare theoretical perspectives with current practice through the use of contemporary Australian and global business case studies from the past four years.

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COMMERCE

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ECONOMICS • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Economics is the study of how resources are allocated to meet the needs and wants of society. It considers how and why individuals behave the way they do and the consequences of their decisions. Studying Economics enables students to explain and debate the world in which they live. UNIT 1 THE BEHAVIOUR OF CONSUMERS AND BUSINESSES Key Concepts covered ■ The basic economic problem of relative scarcity and the need for economic decision-making. ■ The purpose of economic activity and the influence on material and non-material living standards.

UNIT 2 CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES

UNIT 3 AUSTRALIA’S ECONOMIC PROSPERITY

UNIT 4 MANAGING THE ECONOMY

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The benefits of economic growth and the trade-off between economic growth and environmental sustainability.

■ The relationship between relative prices, resource allocation and living standards.

■ The role of budgetary policy and monetary policy in influencing the level of aggregate demand in the economy.

■ The trade-off between equity in the distribution of income and the efficiency of resource allocation. ■ The effect of poverty and income inequality on individuals and the wider economy. ■ Investigation of a contemporary global economic issue.

■ Reasons for market failure and the effect of government intervention on market outcomes.

■ Analysis of the last two Federal Budgets and their likely effect on the economy.

■ The Australian Government’s domestic macroeconomic goals of low inflation, strong and sustainable economic growth and full employment.

■ Analysis of how changes in interest rates are likely to affect inflation, the rate of unemployment and the rate of economic growth.

■ The influence of Australia’s international transactions on the current account balance, the domestic macroeconomic goals and living standards in Australia.

■ The nature and operation of government policies to influence the level of aggregate supply in the economy.

■ Economic factors that influence decisions made by consumers and businesses. ■ The role of markets in determining prices and the allocation of resources.

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COMMERCE LEGAL STUDIES • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Legal Studies, while quite demanding, relates extremely well to life. It offers great insight into our parliamentary and legal system, as well as the opportunity to visit the County and Supreme Court. UNIT 1 GUILT AND LIABILITY Key Concepts covered ■ Legal Foundations. ■ The Presumption of Innocence. ■ Civil Liability. ■ Sources of law and the existence of a court hierarchy in Victoria. ■ Criminal law and civil law and apply these to actual and/or hypothetical scenarios to determine whether an accused may be found guilty of a crime, or liable in a civil dispute.

UNIT 2 SANCTIONS, REMEDIES AND RIGHTS

UNIT 4 PEOPLE AND THE LAW

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The enforcement of criminal law and civil law.

■ How the Australian Constitution establishes the law-making powers of the Commonwealth and state parliaments, and protects the Australian people.

■ The methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute. ■ The purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness. UNIT 3 RIGHTS AND JUSTICE Key Concepts covered ■ The methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes. ■ The Victorian court hierarchy, as well as other Victorian legal institutions and bodies available to assist with cases. ■ The rights available to an accused and to victims in the criminal justice system. ■ The roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties. ■ The ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve their purposes. ■ The extent to which the principles of justice are upheld in the justice system.

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■ The significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. ■ The relationship between Parliament and the courts in law-making, and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform bodies in changing the law. ■ Application of legal reasoning and information to actual scenarios.


Year 9 Year 9 Humanities

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 10 Humanities

Units 1 & 2 Business Management

Units 3 & 4 Business Management

Year 10 Business and The Law

Units 3 & 4 Business Management

Year 10 Money and Markets

Units 1 & 2 Legal Studies

Units 3 & 4 Legal Studies

Units 1 & 2 Accounting

Units 3 & 4 Accounting

Units 1 & 2 Economics

Units 3 & 4 Economics

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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ENGLISH

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Year 7 • ENGLISH

Year 8 • ENGLISH

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

With a focus on learning about who we are as readers and writers, students in Year 7 English engage with a wide range of texts across various genres, including narrative, persuasive and poetry. By using a range of reading strategies, students immerse themselves in reading while enhancing their understanding of the text. In the Reader’s Notebook, there is a focus on noticing the important details of a text and the choices made by the author to create meaning. While in the Writer’s Notebook, students are encouraged to experiment creatively with these strategies in their own writing. Through participation in Literature Circles, students are encouraged to discuss their thinking while learning from their peers.

In Year 8 English, students continue to discover their own interests and passions across a range of texts from various genres, including film, narrative and persuasive. Across the year, there is a focus on noticing themes and analysing the intended impact of choices made by the author while also implementing this into their own writing with an increased awareness of target audience and purpose. Students are encouraged to experiment in creating and crafting their own short films, stories, and opinion pieces. Students continue to work with their Reader’s and Writer’s Notebooks to organise their thinking.


Year 9 • ENGLISH

Year 10 • ENGLISH

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

WRITING

Year 9 English continues the journey of uncovering your own voice as a reader and a writer. Over the year, students build on their work with the Reader’s and Writer’s Notebooks as they respond analytically to persuasive, informative and creative texts, with increasing focus on the author’s craft and text composition. Students also increase the sophistication of their own writing, showing greater awareness of audience and purpose in the selection of their ideas and language.

English is a core subject in Year 10 that continues to build on the skills, knowledge and thinking developed in the middle years. It introduces students to the expectations of VCE English study and is a taste of the assessments and learning to come.

Students continue to hone their writing skills using both analytical and creative techniques. We believe the ability to communicate through the written word is crucial regardless of age, interests or goals.

We understand the importance of student choice and so offer students the opportunity to select their text from a recommended text list, prior to the subject selection closing date. READING Students are required to read texts prior to studying them in class. Familiarity with the texts will determine the level of success achieved. Students may choose one of the texts themselves.

SPEAKING One oral presentation is required in Year 10. This experience is nerve-wracking for some (many!), but the sense of achievement after tackling a challenging experience is exhilarating. We can’t wait to hear students persuade their audience through words and persona.

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ENGLISH Year 10 • ENGLISH LANGUAGE ELECTIVE SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

AREA OF STUDY 1: LANGUAGE BOTH UNITES AND DIVIDES US

AREA OF STUDY 2: MORPHOLOGY AND LEXICOLOGY

AREA OF STUDY 3: SYNTAX

OVERVIEW

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Through this course, you will develop a technical understanding of how English works as a language, as well as explore the social attitudes and identities reflected in our language use. We will build a bank of metalanguage terms which are applied to real-world contexts, and students are encouraged to bring examples from their observations, social media and their own experiences to our discussions. This supports students to view language as not only a tool for communication, but also reflective of identities, culture and attitudes.

The aim of this topic is to explore the subtleties of human communication. It allows students to think about the subconscious decisions we make when we communicate with one another.

In this topic students will study the first of two linguistic subsystems: morphology and lexicology. This focuses on the how words are made up of stems and affixes (morphology) and how every word performs an important function in a sentence (lexicology).

In this topic students will study another linguistic subsystem: syntax. This focusses on the how words work together to form clauses which in turn form sentences.

Year 10 English Language is an opportunity to sample the subject before choosing it at a VCE level. It is not compulsory to take this elective in order to select Year 11 English Language, but it is highly recommended due to the technical skills required. Note that students who do not complete the elective, then subsequently choose to complete VCE English Language, will have their progress closely monitored in Unit 1 of the study and may be recommended to return to a VCE English pathway.

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Within this topic we explore the following: ■ The Bouba-Kiki effect and the Sapir Whorf Hypothesis which highlight the idea that words have meaning beyond their denotations and that each of us bring our own culture and life experience to our language. ■ How language changes over time and the fact that the meaning a word has today may not be what it meant in the past nor what it could mean tomorrow. ■ The concept of constructed languages including the pros and cons of creating new languages. We zoom in on languages like Esperanto, Klingon and Valyrian. ■ The International Phonetic Alphabet and how this helps people who do not speak English to know how to pronounce words.

Within this topic we explore the following: ■ Derivational and inflexional morphemes. ■ The eight word classes: nouns, adjectives, verbs, adverbs, determiners, pronouns, prepositions and conjunctions. ■ The linguistic decisions speakers and writers make when creating a text. These include how our language is determined by the context, audience, register and purposes of the text.

Within this topic we explore the following: ■ Different sentence structures and their effect. ■ Different sentence types and their effect. ■ Different clause structures and their effect. ■ How when we change the order of our words, we change their impact.


Year 10 • LITERATURE ELECTIVE SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

AREA OF STUDY 1: CLOSE ANALYSIS

OVERVIEW

Key Concepts covered

If you are interested in reading and discussing ideas, then Literature is the elective for you. The study of Literature at Year 10 is designed to enable students to: develop an enjoyment of literature; read widely and independently; gain an understanding of the variety of human experience as it is represented in literature; extend their understanding of the different ways in which literary texts are constructed; read closely and critically; use interpretive skills by hypothesising, questioning, and drawing inferences from texts; develop the capacity to present analytical, critical, and creative responses to texts orally and in writing.

■ Discuss and analyse the construction and features of a text. ■ Explore the connections between features of a text and the conventions appropriate to presenting an interpretation. ■ Explore and analyse the views and values suggested in a text.

AREA OF STUDY 2: LITERATURE – SEEKING AND SHAPING CHANGE

AREA OF STUDY 3: MEET THE BARD - A STUDY OF SHAKESPEARE’S MACBETH

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Explore the ways in which Literature has been an agent for social and political change.

■ Explore the ways in which Literature has been an agent for social and political change.

■ Explore the active role that words, language and ideas have as a force for change.

■ Explore the active role that words, language and ideas have as a force for change.

■ Study and analyse the range of literary content and form that have facilitated change and reform.

■ Study and analyse the range of literary content and form that have facilitated change and reform.

Year 10 Literature is an opportunity to try out the subject before choosing it at a VCE level. It is not compulsory to take this elective in order to select Year 11 Literature, but it is highly recommended due to the skills required. Note that students who do not complete the elective, then subsequently choose to complete VCE Literature, will have their progress closely monitored in Unit 1 of the study and may be recommended to return to a VCE English pathway.

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ENGLISH ENGLISH • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNIT 1

UNIT 2

UNIT 3

VCE English focuses on how language is used to create meaning across a range of contexts, purposes and for different audiences. Different selected texts and mentor texts are used to encourage students to think both critically and creatively throughout Units 1-4. These range from poetry to plays to fiction and include texts from both acclaimed contemporary and classic writers.

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND EXPLORING TEXTS

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND EXPLORING TEXTS

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND CREATING TEXTS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Explore the ways in which Literature has been an agent for social and political change.

■ Students develop their inferential reading and viewing skills through the exploration of a different selected text.

■ Students discuss and analyse how features of a text create meaning and influence their interpretation.

■ Explore the active role that words, language and ideas have as a force for change.

■ Students identify and analyse how features of the text work together to create meaning.

■ Students identify and analyse both implicit and explicit views and values in each text.

All students must study four units to complete VCE.

■ Study and analyse the range of literary content and form that have facilitated change and reform.

■ Students respond analytically to discuss ideas and values conveyed by the author using evidence and appropriate metalanguage to support their interpretation.

■ Students respond both analytically and creatively to selected texts.

Most students choose to study English as it is the most familiar of the English subjects and students are well-prepared for these units of study. No matter which English you choose, it will be included in your top four subjects which counts towards your ATAR. Therefore, it is important that this subject is given a lot of attention. If you choose to do more than one English (for example, English and English Language) the best score is included in your ATAR and the second score is only counted if it is in your top subjects. For further advice on which English to choose, students are encouraged to speak to their English teacher or the Head of English.

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AREA OF STUDY 2: CRAFTING TEXTS Key Concepts covered ■ Students develop an understanding of effective and cohesive creative writing through their engagement with a range of mentor texts. ■ Students craft and create their own written pieces with an increased understanding of context, purpose and audience. ■ Experiment and employ a range of vocabulary, text structures and language features for effect.

AREA OF STUDY 2: EXPLORING ARGUMENT Key Concepts covered

AREA OF STUDY 2: ANALYSING ARGUMENT Key Concepts covered ■ Students analyse and compare the writer’s use of argument and language in texts that debate current issues.

■ Students consider how arguments are developed and conveyed across a range of forms in the media.

■ Students read and view a range of media texts to hone their argument analysis skills.

■ Students explore and develop analysis skills to examine how argument, language and visuals might impact an audience.

AREA OF STUDY 3: LISTENING TO TEXTS

■ One oral presentation is required in Year 11. Students employ their understanding of argument and language to present their own point of view in response to an issue of interest.

■ Students listen to a range of spoken texts and use active listening strategies to understand information, ideas and opinions presented in texts.

Key Concepts covered


UNIT 4 AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND COMPARING TEXTS Key Concepts covered ■ Students explore meaningful connections between two selected texts and consider how ideas, issues and themes which reflect the world and human experiences are conveyed in both texts. ■ Students respond in the form of a comparative analysis to discuss similarities and differences across these texts. AREA OF STUDY 2: PRESENTING ARGUMENT Key Concepts covered ■ One oral presentation is required in Year 12. Students can choose an issue that interests them from an array of topics in the media to present a reasoned point of view in response to this issue.

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ENGLISH ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL) • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNIT 1

EAL students need to meet the VCAA criteria for enrolment in VCE EAL. To qualify for VCE EAL, students must have received less than seven years of schooling with English as a major language of instruction.

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND EXPLORING TEXTS

AREA OF STUDY 2: CRAFTING TEXTS

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND EXPLORING TEXTS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Students read and discuss a selected text with a focus on making personal connections to the story and identifying vocabulary, language features, text structures and ideas in a text.

■ Students develop an understanding of effective and cohesive creative writing through their engagement with a range of mentor texts.

■ Students develop their inferential reading and viewing skills through the exploration of a different selected text.

All eligible students must study four units of EAL to complete VCE. EAL will be included in a student's top four subjects which counts towards the ATAR. Therefore, it is important that this subject is given a lot of attention. The study of English as an Additional Language contributes to the development of literate individuals capable of critical and creative thinking. This study also develops students’ ability to create and analyse texts, moving from interpretation to reflection and critical analysis.

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■ Students develop analytical skills to discuss the ideas and values conveyed by the author through the analysis of characters, setting, plot and voice.

UNIT 2

■ Students craft and create their own written pieces with an increased understanding of context, purpose and audience. ■ Experiment and employ a range of vocabulary, text structures and language features for effect.

■ Students identify and analyse how features of the text work together to create meaning. ■ Students respond analytically to discuss ideas and values conveyed by the author using evidence and appropriate metalanguage to support their interpretation.


UNIT 3

UNIT 4

AREA OF STUDY 2: EXPLORING ARGUMENT

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND CREATING TEXTS

AREA OF STUDY 2: ANALYSING ARGUMENT

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING AND COMPARING TEXTS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Students consider how arguments are developed and conveyed across a range of forms in the media.

■ Students discuss and analyse how features of a text create meaning and influence their interpretation.

■ Students analyse and compare the writer’s use of argument and language in texts that debate current issues.

■ Students explore and develop analysis skills to examine how argument, language and visuals might impact an audience.

■ Students identify and analyse both implicit and explicit views and values in each text.

■ Students read and view a range of media texts to hone their argument analysis skills.

■ Students explore meaningful connections between two selected texts and consider how ideas, issues and themes which reflect the world and human experiences are conveyed in both texts.

■ One oral presentation is required in Year 11. Students employ their understanding of argument and language to present their own point of view in response to an issue of interest.

■ Students respond both analytically and creatively to selected texts.

AREA OF STUDY 3: LISTENING TO TEXTS Key Concepts covered ■ Students listen to a range of spoken texts and use active listening strategies to understand information, ideas and opinions presented in texts.

■ Students respond in the form of a comparative analysis to discuss similarities and differences across these texts. AREA OF STUDY 2: PRESENTING ARGUMENT Key Concepts covered ■ One oral presentation is required in Year 12. Students can choose an issue that interests them from an array of topics in the media to present a reasoned point of view in response to this issue.

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ENGLISH ENGLISH LITERATURE • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNIT 1

UNIT 2

UNIT 3

The study of VCE Literature fosters students’ enjoyment and appreciation of the artistic and aesthetic merits of stories and storytelling and enables students to participate more fully in the cultural conversations that take place around them. By reading and exploring a diverse range of established and emerging literary works, students become increasingly empowered to discuss texts. As both readers and writers, students extend their creativity and high order thinking to express and develop their critical and creative voices. Students expand their frameworks for exploring literature by considering literary forms and features, engaging with language, and refining their insight into authorial choices. Students immerse themselves in challenging fiction and non-fiction texts, discovering and experimenting with a variety of interpretations to develop their own responses.

AREA OF STUDY 1: READING PRACTICES

AREA OF STUDY 1: VOICES OF COUNTRY

AREA OF STUDY 1: ADAPTATIONS AND TRANSFORMATIONS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The consideration of how language, structure and stylistic choices are used in different literary forms and types of text.

■ An exploration the voices, perspectives and knowledge of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander authors and creators.

■ An exploration of how the form of a text contributes to its meaning.

■ Exploration of the degree to which points of view, experiences and contexts shape their own and others’ interpretations of text.

■ A consideration of the interconnectedness of place, culture and identity through the experiences, texts, and voices of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, including connections to Country, the impact of colonisation and its ongoing consequences and issues of reconciliation and reclamation.

■ Close examination of the literary forms, features and language of texts. AREA OF STUDY 2: EXPLORATION OF LITERARY MOVEMENTS AND GENRES Key Concepts covered ■ Exploration of the concerns, ideas, style, and conventions common to a distinctive type of literature seen in literary movements or genres, such as modernism, epic, tragedy, and magic realism, as well as more popular, or mainstream, genres, and subgenres such as crime, romance and science fiction. ■ Exploration of the ideas and concerns shared by the texts through language, settings, narrative structures and characterisation.

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■ Consideration of the extent to which adapting the text to a different form, and often in a new or reimagined context, affects its meaning, comparing the original with the adaptation. ■ Exploration of how creators of adaptations may emphasise or minimise viewpoints, assumptions and ideas present in the original text.

AREA OF STUDY 2: THE TEXT IN ITS CONTEXT

AREA OF STUDY 2: DEVELOPING INTERPRETATIONS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ An exploration of the text and its historical, social and cultural context.

■ An exploration of the different ways we can read and understand a text by developing, considering and comparing interpretations of a set text.

■ A consideration of the representations of a specific time period and/or culture within a text. ■ Exploration of the text to understand its point of view and that on which it reflects or comments. ■ One Oral Presentation is required in Year 11 Literature.

■ Consideration and exploration of the ways a supplementary reading that can enrich, challenge and/or contest the ideas and the views, values, and assumptions of the set text to further enhance the students’ understanding.


UNIT 4 AREA OF STUDY 1: CREATIVE RESPONSES TO TEXTS Key Concepts covered ■ Exploration and development of the imaginative techniques used for creating and recreating a literary work. ■ Critical reflection on the literary form, features and language of a text, and discuss their own responses as they relate to the text, including the purpose and context of their creations. AREA OF STUDY 2: CLOSE ANALYSIS OF TEXTS Key Concepts covered ■ An exploration and a detailed scrutiny of the language, style, concerns and construction of texts. ■ Close consideration to and of textual details to examine the ways specific passages in a text contribute to their overall understanding of the whole text. ■ Consideration of literary forms, features and language, and the views and values of the text. ■ One Oral Presentation is required in Year 12 Literature

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ENGLISH ENGLISH LANGUAGE • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNIT 2

UNIT 3

UNIT 4

If you wish to learn about how English works within the world and study the grammar, history and evolution of English language, this subject is for you. In English Language we explore how we carefully choose our language to support our social purposes and discuss why our language is changing and how, by adapting our language, we can change the world.

LANGUAGE CHANGE AND ENGLISHES IN CONTACT

LANGUAGE VARIATION AND SOCIAL PURPOSE – INFORMAL AND FORMAL LANGUAGE

LANGUAGE VARIATION AND IDENTITY

Key Concepts covered

■ Explore the range of language varieties which exist in contemporary Australian society.

All students must complete four units of English to complete the VCE. UNIT 1 LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION Key Concepts covered ■ Explore how situational and cultural contexts influence language choices. ■ Study the five subsystems (phonology, morphology/lexicology, syntax, discourse and semantics). ■ Study the theory of child language acquisition. ■ Explore the impact that our environment has on language learning. ■ Discuss the impact of multilingualism on language acquisition.

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Key Concepts covered ■ Examine how English has developed over time. ■ Study the factors that cause language to change over time. ■ Predict how our language might continue to change in the future. ■ Consider the effects of the global spread of English. ■ Discuss the development and decline of languages as a result of English contact. ■ Examine the development of Creoles, the impact of multilingualism on society. ■ Predict how societal changes will influence the progress of English in the future.

■ Consider the way in which speakers and writers choose their language to suit their context, purposes and audience in a formal or informal setting. ■ Study how adapting their language can positively or negatively impact the effectiveness of their communication. ■ Critically evaluate other people’s texts to ascertain what makes these texts effective.

Key Concepts covered

■ Discuss how these construct our shared national identity. ■ Explore how societal change has influenced our language. ■ Discuss the changing prestige associated with different varieties. ■ Discuss the role of language in reflecting and constructing individual and group identities.


Eblana & Riviera Literacy

Year 7 Year 7 English

Year 8 Year 8 English

Year 9 Year 9 English

Year 11

Year 12

Units 1 & 2 English Units 1 & 2

Units 3 & 4 English Units 3 & 4

Year 10 English

Units 1 & 2 English as an Additional Language 1/2

Units 3 & 4 English as an Additional Language 3/4

Year 10 English Literature

Units 1 & 2 Literature 1/2

Units 3 & 4 Literature 3/4

Year 10 English Language

Units 1 & 2 English Language 1/2

Units 3 & 4 English Language 3/4

Year 10

Students must choose two semesters of English

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION Year 7 • HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Year 8 • HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Year 9 • HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

HEALTH

HEALTH

HEALTH

Students will complete a unit of work on Respectful Relationships, Nutrition and the benefits of Physical Activity. Students explore how positive choices in these areas will impact their health and wellbeing.

Students complete a unit of work on Respectful Relationships, and explore the physical, social and emotional changes they will experience during adolescence. They also explore the topic of Mental Health with a specific focus on stress. Students then investigate strategies to improve personal care to minimise the effects of stress on their daily lives.

Students complete a unit of work on personal identity, sexuality and respectful relationships. They examine the impact of changes and transitions in relationships and how to make healthy and safe personal choices. Students investigate risk taking behaviours and explore the impacts such choices have on individual health and develop strategies for harm minimisation. Students explore nutrition, in particular the role and influence sugar has on the body and evaluate various sources of nutritional information.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Year 7 students will begin their PE journey at Mentone Grammar with a Design a Game unit where they will work collaboratively to come up with a fun and energetic game within small groups. Throughout the year they will be exposed to such topics as Indigenous Games, Footy Codes, Fitness, Invasion Games and Athletics. Year 7 Physical Education will allow students to improve their overall fitness levels with a major focus on skill improvement and enjoyment.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Physical Education provides the opportunity for students to explore a range of different sports under the Game Sense approach to learning and teaching. This model encourages students to develop their strategic and tactical decision making, as well as developing their fine and gross motor skills, across various sporting codes.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION Course content in Physical Education at Year 9 involves a Game Sense approach to all units of work. This teaching/learning method emphasises the development of tactics and decision-making. It encourages participants to think strategically and solve problems that arise in small sided/ modified structured games.

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Year 10 • SPORTS SCIENCE SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO OVERVIEW This course focuses on the physiological capabilities of the human body with a specific focus on the body's skeletal, muscular, respiratory, cardiovascular and energy systems. During these units they will learn structure and function of these systems and how they relate to sporting performance.

Year 10 • HEALTH OF A NATION Key Concepts covered ■ Students will then focus on the different training methods of developing these systems in order to achieve positive sporting outcomes. They will design and undertake their own training to determine the effectiveness of the program they have written. ■ Whist this is predominantly a classroom based subject, once a cycle, students will have an opportunity to trial what they have learnt in the ‘field’ in order to reinforce their learning. ■ Students will undertake an excursion to the Richmond Football Club where they will have the chance to view how an elite training facility operates and they will explore possible career opportunities in the field of Sports Science. ■ The Course is closely aligned with VCE Physical Education and Year 10s who excel in Sports Science will have the opportunity to go straight into Units 3/4 Physical Education. Others will have the opportunity to undertake Units 1/2 Physical Education which will better prepare them for Units 3/4 Physical Education.

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO OVERVIEW This course focuses on equipping students with awareness and knowledge about the health of Australians from an individual and community perspective. Students explore the sociocultural factors that impact on individual health outcomes, with an in-depth focus on obesity and road traffic safety. Key Concepts covered ■ Students will acquire specific knowledge about key nutrients and their role within a healthy and well-balanced diet and the influences that packaging and advertising can have on food choices. ■ Not all Australians experience the same levels of health and wellbeing or health status, therefore students will investigate aspects of Indigenous history and culture and how these have led to a range of factors that contribute to health inequality.

■ With non-communicable or lifestyle conditions increasingly impacting on the health status of Australians, Year 10 students will further their understanding of the role health promotion plays in combatting common causes of ill-health. This then leads to the development and implementation of their own health promotion campaign within the School Community. ■ Finally, the students will explore the Australian health care system and how they can interact with this system in their community, raising their awareness of health resources available to them now and in the future. ■ The course is closely aligned with VCE Health and Human Development (HHD) and those Year 10s who excel in Health of a Nation will have the opportunity to go straight into Units 3/4 HHD. Others will have the opportunity to undertake Units 1/2 HHD, which will better prepare them for Units 3/4 HHD.

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HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION VCE HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW UNIT 1 UNDERSTANDING HEALTH AND WELLBEING This unit looks at health and wellbeing as a concept with varied and evolving perspectives and definitions. It takes the view that health and wellbeing are subject to a wide range of contexts and interpretations, with different meanings for different people. As a foundation to the understanding of health, students investigate the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) definition and also explore other interpretations. Wellbeing is a complex combination of all dimensions of health, characterised by an equilibrium in which the individual feels happy, healthy, capable and engaged. For the purposes of this study, students should consider wellbeing to be an implicit element of health.

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Key Concepts covered ■ Identify personal perspectives and priorities relating to health and wellbeing, and enquire into factors that influence health attitudes, beliefs and practices, including amongst Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. ■ Multiple dimensions of health and wellbeing, the complex interplay of influences on health and wellbeing and the indicators used to measure and evaluate health status. ■ With a focus on youth, students consider their own health as individuals and as a cohort. They build health literacy through interpreting and using data, through investigating the role of food, and through extended inquiry into one youth health focus area.

UNIT 2 MANAGING HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT This unit investigates transitions in health and wellbeing, and development, from lifespan and societal perspectives. Key Concepts covered

UNIT 3 AUSTRALIA'S HEALTH IN A GLOBALISED WORLD This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts.

■ Students look at changes and expectations that are part of the progression from youth to adulthood.

Key Concepts covered

■ Application of health literacy skills through an examination of adulthood as a time of increasing independence and responsibility, involving the establishment of long-term relationships, possible considerations of parenthood and management of health-related milestones and changes.

■ Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organisation (WHO). They use this knowledge as background to their analysis and evaluation of variations in the health status of Australians.

■ Students enquire into the Australian healthcare system and extend their capacity to access and analyse health information. They investigate the challenges and opportunities presented by digital media and health technologies, and consider issues surrounding the use of health data and access to quality health care.

■ Health promotion and improvements in population health over time.

■ Health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry.

■ Students look at various public health approaches and the interdependence of different models as they research health improvements and evaluate successful programs. While the emphasis is on the Australian health system, the progression of change in public health approaches should be seen within a global context.


UNIT 4 HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT This unit examines health and wellbeing, and human development in a global context. Key Concepts covered ■ Investigate health status and burden of disease in different countries, exploring factors that contribute to health inequalities between and within countries, including the physical, social and economic conditions in which people live. ■ Health in a global context through examining changes in burden of disease over time and studying the key concepts of sustainability and human development. ■ Consider the health implications of increased globalisation and worldwide trends relating to climate change, digital technologies, world trade and the mass movement of people. ■ Global action to improve health and wellbeing and human development, focusing on the United Nations’ (UN’s) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and the work of the World Health Organisation (WHO). ■ Students also investigate the role of non-government organisations and Australia’s overseas aid program. Students evaluate the effectiveness of health initiatives and programs in a global context and reflect on their capacity to take action. 61


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION VCE PHYSICAL EDUCATION • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW UNIT 1 THE HUMAN BODY IN MOTION In this unit students explore how the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems work together to produce movement. Through practical activities, students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt and adjust to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main structures in each system and how they respond to physical activity, sport and exercise. They explore how the capacity and functioning of each system acts as an enabler or barrier to movement and participation in physical activity. Using a contemporary approach, students evaluate the social, cultural and environmental influences on movement. They consider the implications of the use of legal and illegal practices to improve the performance of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems, evaluating perceived benefits and describing potential harms.

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UNIT 2 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, SPORT AND SOCIETY This unit develops students’ understanding of physical activity, sport and society from a participatory perspective. Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity and sedentary behaviour plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different population groups. Through a series of practical activities, students experience and explore different types of physical activity promoted in their own and different population groups. They gain an appreciation of the level of physical activity required for health benefits. Students investigate how participation in physical activity varies across the lifespan. They explore a range of factors that influence and facilitate participation in regular physical activity.

UNIT 3 MOVEMENT SKILLS AND ENERGY FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY They collect data to determine perceived enablers of and barriers to physical activity and the ways in which opportunities for participation in physical activity can be extended in various communities, social, cultural and environmental contexts. Students investigate individual and population-based consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. They then create and participate in an activity plan that meets the physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines relevant to the particular population group being studied.

This unit introduces students to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse human movement skills and energy production from a physiological perspective. Students use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse movement skills and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine movement in physical activity, sport and exercise. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport.

Students apply various methods to assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour levels at the individual and population level, and analyse the data in relation to physical activity and sedentary behaviour guidelines.

Students investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems to performance in physical activity, sport and exercise. In particular, they investigate the characteristics of each system and the interplay of the systems during physical activity. Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery.


UNIT 4 TRAINING TO IMPROVE PERFORMANCE In this unit students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance within physical activity at an individual, club and elite level. Improvements in performance, in particular fitness components, depend on the ability of the individual and/ or coach to gain, apply and evaluate knowledge and understanding of training. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patterns, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program. Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual, and evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective.

Eblana & Riviera Physical Education

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 7 Physical Education

Year 8 Physical Education

Year 9 Physical Education

Year 7 Health Education

Year 8 Health Education

Year 9 Health Education

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 10 Physical Education

Units 1 & 2 Physical Education

Units 3 & 4 Physical Education

Year 10 Sport Science

Units 3 & 4 Physical Education

Year 10 Health of a Nation

Units 1 & 2 Health and Human Development

Units 3 & 4 Health and Human Development

Units 3 & 4 Health and Human Development

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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HUMANITIES Year 7 • HUMANITIES OVERVIEW In the Year 7 Humanities course, students study a term each of Geography, History, Economics and Civics and Citizenship. Beginning in Term 1, and in anticipation of their Learning Journeys to Central Australia in Term 2, students explore Australian Indigenous culture and history. An understanding of the lineage, history and unique culture is developed throughout the term, with the key skills of historical writing underpinning their studies. In Term 2, students will begin to unpack the notion of financial literacy and what it means to be economically independent in an age of increasing debt. Exploring notions like wages, taxes, interest and budgeting, students will be tasked with keeping their group ‘in the black’.

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Through their studies of Geography in Term 3, Year 7 will investigate where water ‘actually’ comes from. Beginning with an analysis of their household usage, individuals will calculate their daily and weekly use and evaluate strategies to minimise their impact. This concept will then be applied to Melbourne as a whole, with broader concepts like grey water and desalination being evaluated as possible solutions. In Term 4, students will investigate what it means to be a Citizen of Australia. By developing an understanding of how laws are made and government is conducted, Year 7 Humanities will delve deeper in to the culture of contemporary Australia.

Year 8 • HUMANITIES

Year 9 • HUMANITIES

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

In the Year 8 Humanities course, students will again get the opportunity to explore a range of Humanities subjects, spanning from Geography and History to Economics, and Civics and Citizenship. Beginning in Semester 1, students will start to explore the formation of Medieval Europe and how the collapse of the Roman Empire gave rise to the foundations of prevailing social conditions such as law and order and political representation. In this semester, students will also extend on understandings developed in Year 7 surrounding entrepreneurship and the formation of a viable enterprise.

In Year 9 Humanities, students study the four key learning areas of Economics, Geography, History, and Sociology. To this end, they are taken through the key skills of developing a business, designing a business model, and unpacking the global and local implications of operating a business that spans across continents. Through this unit of work, students are encouraged to design their own product and source materials within a global supply chain, identifying the moral, financial, and ethical implications of their choices.

Through their studies of Geography in Semester 2, Year 8 will investigate the world around them and why certain locations are structured in certain ways and what influences the formation of both social and geographical spaces. Rounding out the semester, students will unpack the Australian identity and the ways in which it has changed, and continues to change, over time. In such exploration, the role of laws, government, and the individual will all be investigated in order to understand the evolving nature of Australian culture.

In Geography, this element of globalisation is equally investigated and extended upon, whereby we seek to understand the biomes around the world and the role they play in influencing a wide range of factors such as food production, weather patterns, and human living conditions. In History, students specifically focus their studies on World War One and the impact it had on the global world order. In this, we inquire about both the causes and ongoing effects of the conflict. Finally, in our studies surrounding Sociology, students seek to understand the world around us and the role that the group psychology inherent in patterns of people plays in influencing our lives.


Year 10 • HUMANITIES OVERVIEW In Year 10 Humanities, students explore four key learning areas surrounding History, Geography, Sociology, and Philosophy. These learning areas allow students to foster their creative and critical thinking, as well as their understanding of the physical and social world around them. In History, students unpack World War Two and, most specifically, the causes and lasting impact of the conflict. In this learning, classes unpack primary sources and seek to understand what the motivations of those on all sides of the war were. In Geography, students explore the natural world around them and begin to utilise data to analyse cause and effect of certain events. To this end, both the creation and manipulation of data become the central skill of the learning. Through their studies of Sociology, students unpack why humans and societies act as they do and what motivates the masses to act in patterns. Through their exploration of Sociology, classes will utilise case studies and specific examples to anchor their theories. Finally, in Philosophy, groups will be given the big questions of life and be tasked with unpacking how and why they have reached their conclusions. In this, students will explore what they know and think to be true and test for validity why this is or isn’t provable.

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HUMANITIES GEOGRAPHY • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Where? Why? How much? What with? These are some of the questions to which geographers want to find the answers. Geography is the study of places on the earth, the people who live there and the environments that support them. UNIT 1 HAZARDS AND DISASTERS Key Concepts covered ■ Undertake an overview of hazards before investigating two contrasting types of hazards and the responses to them by people. ■ Describe and explain the nature of hazards. ■ Impacts of hazard events at a range of scales. ■ Explore the nature and effectiveness of specific measures such as prediction and warning programs, community preparedness and land use planning, as well as actions taken after hazards become harmful and destructive disasters.

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UNIT 2 TOURISM

UNIT 3 CHANGING THE LAND

UNIT 4 HUMAN POPULATION TRENDS AND ISSUES

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The characteristics of tourism, with particular emphasis on where it has developed, its various forms, how it has changed and continues to change and its impacts on people, places and environments.

■ Investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water. Students also explore the interconnections with human activity.

■ The geography of human populations.

■ Describe the changing sources and destinations of different types of tourism. ■ Describe and explain the different types of tourism and tourist locations and destinations. ■ Explain the usefulness of spatial technologies for the tourism industry.

■ The patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the world.

■ Identify and describe the change in land use in the selected area at spatial and temporal scales.

■ The distribution of world population characteristics including birth rate, death rate, infant mortality rate, fertility rate and life expectancy.

■ Explain the processes of change, the reasons for change and the resulting land use change in the selected area.

■ The five stage Demographic Transition Model and its use in interpreting population structures and other characteristics.

■ Describe and explain the processes and causes of deforestation, desertification and melting glaciers and ice sheets.

■ Analyse maps, data and other geographic information to develop descriptions and explanations.


Year 10 • GLOBAL POLITICS SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SEMESTER TOPICS

KEY SKILLS

ASSESSMENTS

Key Concepts covered

■ Case Study Analysis.

OVERVIEW

■ What is politics and why should we study it?

■ Develop a critical understanding of the current global political arena and the political, social, cultural, and economic forces that shape our rapidly changing world. ■ Cultivate an awareness of our roles and obligations as active citizens within a democracy.

PATHWAYS

What events led to the environment where ISIS came into being? How did Trump get elected? Why should we care? This subject gives students an understanding of the global political arena and exposure to different perspectives which enables them to draw reasoned conclusions about the world in which they live; tools which will be useful in their study of other disciplines and for their life-long learning. Students will examine case studies of interstate war and terrorist groups from the last 50 years in order to gain a deeper understanding of the economic, political, and social impacts these have on local, regional, and international communities.

■ The global political arena What role do I play as an individual in the global political arena? ■ The most important global actor and why they have such an influence. ■ How can ‘war’ be defined? What are the different types of war? Why does war occur?

■ Recognise and analyse the major debates in global issues, such as the roles of states, international organisations and other actors in resolving these issues such as terrorism.

■ How can ‘terrorism' be defined and the reasons why people become terrorists. What are their goals?

■ Work independently as well as part of a team to find answers and solutions to complex problems and issues.

■ Research Essay. ■ Ongoing IT task- posts and reflections by students.

This subject will give students a good background in multiple disciplines and will be beneficial to those wishing to study: ■ VCE Global Politics Units 1 & 2 ■ VCE History Units 1 & 2

■ The structure and composition of the global politics today. ■ How 9/11 and ISIS changed the global political arena.

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HUMANITIES AUSTRALIAN AND GLOBAL POLITICS • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Australian and Global Politics offers students the opportunity to engage with key political, social and economic issues, and to become informed citizens and participants in their local, national and international communities. Australian Politics increases awareness of the nature of power and allows students to become informed observers of, and active participants in, their political system. Global Politics provides students with an insight into the political, social, cultural and economic forces that shape our rapidly changing world. Students develop a critical understanding of the world in which they live and of contemporary global issues.

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UNIT 1 IDEAS, ACTORS AND POWER

UNIT 2 GLOBAL CONNECTIONS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ What is politics? What is meant by power and how can it be exercised?

■ How peoples’ lives have been affected by globalisation - politically, socially and economically.

■ How power is distributed in the Australian political system. ■ The roles and functions of political parties, interest groups, and the media in Australia’s democracy - What impact do they have on the political system?

■ Do citizens and states have global responsibilities? Can the global community meet the challenges of the 21st Century or will the interests of individual global actors compromise the needs of this global community? ■ Challenges key global actors such as the United Nations and NGOs face in resolving issues such as climate change, conflict, people movement and terrorism.


UNIT 3 GLOBAL ACTORS

UNIT 4 GLOBAL CHALLENGES

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The key global actors in contemporary global politics and the power they have.

■ Ethical issues and debates – Human Rights and People Movement.

■ What impact do these global actors have on the global political arena and on global issues?

■ The international laws regarding these global issues.

■ The challenges the global actors face in achieving their aims. ■ To what extent has Australia used various types of power to achieve its national interests of national security, economic prosperity, maintaining regional relationships and a positive international standing?

■ What are the ethical debates that surround these global issues and how have global actors responded to these issues? ■ Crises and Responses – Terrorism and Climate Change. ■ The key characteristics and causes of each global crisis. ■ The challenges in effectively resolving these crises.

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HUMANITIES HISTORY • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW The study of VCE History assists students to understand themselves, others and their world and broadens their perspective by examining people, groups, events, ideas and movements. Through studying VCE History, students develop social, political, economic and cultural understanding. It also fosters the ability to ask searching questions, to engage in independent research, and to construct arguments about the past based on evidence.

UNIT 1 20TH CENTURY HISTORY

UNIT 2 20TH CENTURY HISTORY

UNIT 3 REVOLUTIONS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ In Area Study One students explore the events, ideologies and movements of the period after World War One; the emergence of conflict; and the causes of World War Two.

■ After World War II the United States emerged with the Soviet Union as the global superpowers.

■ The events and conditions that contributed to the outbreak of the Chinese Revolution

■ Investigate the impact of the Treaty of Versailles, the political events between the wars in Germany, and the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party. ■ The second Area of Study focuses on social life and cultural expression and how it reflected the technological, political and economic changes of the period. Students explore particular art movements such as paintings, architecture, film and music. ■ Explore how the Nazi Party viewed race and changed the social and living conditions of Jewish people and other minority groups in Germany.

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■ Causes and consequences of the Cold War; the competing ideologies that underpinned events, the effects on people, groups and nations, and the reasons for the end of this sustained period of ideological conflict between capitalism and communism. ■ The impact of groups challenging established political orders. Students will examine the civil rights campaigns in the USA, and investigate campaigns by terrorist groups such as Hezbollah and Al Qaeda.

■ The ideas that played a significant role in challenging the existing order, including Sun Yixian’s (Sun Yat-sen’s) Three Principles of the People, the New Culture Movement and Mao Zedong Thought (Maoism) ■ The role of individuals in challenging or maintaining the power of the existing order ■ The challenges the new Communist Regime faced in consolidating its power including the Korean War and first Five Year Plan ■ The causes and consequences of the new regime’s cultural, social, and political ideas; including the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution ■ The diverse experiences of different groups within China, such as women, peasants, Red Guards, and so on.


UNIT 4 REVOLUTIONS

Eblana & Riviera

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Key Concepts covered ■ Popular movements such as Communism contributing to trigger a revolution. ■ The actions of particular individuals such as Lenin and Trotsky contributing to the revolution. ■ How did the consequences of revolution shape the new order? ■ How the revolution affected the experiences of peasants, women, the aristocracy, and workers.

Year 6 Global Changemakers

Year 7 History

Year 8 History

Year 9 History

Year 10 Humanities

Year 5 Design Thinking

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship

Geography

Geography

Geography

Sociology

Civics & Citizenship

Civics & Citizenship

■ To what extent was society changed and revolutionary ideas achieved?

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Year 10 Global Politics

Units 1 & 2 20th Century History

Units 3 & 4 History: Revolutions

Units 1 & 2 Geography

Units 3 & 4 Geography

Units 1 & 2 Australian & Global Politics

Units 3 & 4 Global Politics

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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LANGUAGES

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Year 7 • LANGUAGES

Year 8 • LANGUAGES

Year 9 • LANGUAGES

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

Students in Year 7 have the option to choose either Chinese or German as their language other than English. Our Year 7 German program is a beginners’ course, allowing all students to take part without having studied German previously. Our Chinese classes in Bayview are streamed, in order to cater for the Advanced group (those who have studied Chinese in junior school, or who have a Chinese-speaking family background) and the Standard group (for example, those starting as beginners in Year 7).

Students in Year 8 continue their language from Year 7 (either German or Chinese). Chinese is streamed into Standard and Advanced classes, but both groups will learn the foundational knowledge required to continue to Chinese in Year 9 and onwards if they choose to do so.

CHINESE (CONTINUING) SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO This course is offered to students who studied Chinese in Year 8. The focus of Year 9 Chinese (continuing) is to reinforce skills previously introduced in Year 8 and extend the understanding and use of them. Cartoons are still used to springboard language concepts, with unit topics being selected for their interest and relevance to teenagers. Topics are drawn from the wider world of students’ experiences and interests, and include family and friends, entertainment, food, and sport.


GERMAN (CONTINUING) SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

VSL LANGUAGES – DISTANCE ED SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

This course is offered to students who studied German in Year 8. The focus of Year 9 German (continuing) is to reinforce skills previously introduced in Year 8 and extend the understanding and use of them. Cartoons are still used to springboard language concepts, with unit topics being selected for their interest and relevance to teenagers. Topics are drawn from the wider world of students’ experiences and interests, and include family and friends, entertainment, food, and sport.

This course allows students to study a language outside of our mainstream offerings (Chinese and German). Through the Victorian School of Languages, students are able to study French, Italian, Spanish, Indonesian, Japanese, Greek or Latin. Learning is via Distance Education mode, with students regularly submitting work to a teacher at the VSL, and undertaking regular conversational lessons via Skype or phone. Students may take these subjects as either a beginner or via an accelerated program but it is essential that the student is a confident, independent learner due to the nature of the study. As a guideline, Learning Behaviours should be high (mostly ‘Consistently’ and no lower than ‘Usually’) in all areas.

VSL Distance Education Languages are also available for Year 9 students.

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LANGUAGES Year 10 • LANGUAGES

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GERMAN, CHINESE (SECOND LANGUAGE) SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

VSL LANGUAGES – DISTANCE ED SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

The Year 10 German and Chinese courses aim to develop and refine each student’s use of receptive, productive and interactive language, and to further develop self-awareness and a sense of personal and cultural identity. Topics include: family and hometown; occupations; school activities and cultural events. By the end of each Language Unit students should be able to: listen to and understand short dialogues; participate in simple conversations and oral presentations; read and understand authentic material; and complete simple written tasks.

This course allows students to study a language outside of our mainstream offerings (Chinese and German). Through the Victorian School of Languages, students are able to study French, Italian, Spanish, Indonesian, Japanese, Greek or Latin. Learning is via Distance Education mode, with students regularly submitting work to a teacher at the VSL, and undertaking regular conversational lessons via Skype or phone. Students may take these subjects as either a beginner or via an accelerated program but it is essential that the student is a confident, independent learner due to the nature of the study. As a guideline, Learning Behaviours should be high (mostly ‘Consistently’ and no lower than ‘Usually’) in all areas.


VCE GERMAN, CHINESE SECOND LANGUAGE AND SECOND LANGUAGE ADVANCED • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Includes German, Chinese and other languages via Distance Education with the Victorian School of Languages (VSL). All VCE Second Language subjects cover the skill areas of speaking and writing in the language, as well as reading written texts in the language, listening to conversations and spoken texts and viewing texts such as films or TV shows in the language.

In Units 1 & 2, students complete three communication-based outcomes per semester. In Units 3 & 4, the students complete SACs covering the communication skill areas. SACs contribute 50 per cent to the overall study score, with the remaining 50 per cent being the final written and external oral examinations. The exams focus on the language being used, and as such there is not a grammar section on the exam per se, although is it assessed in the context of the written and oral tasks. SPEAKING Students complete oral assessment tasks covering language skills such as: sharing information, discussing a resolution to an issue, and giving class presentations on a topic related to the culture or history of the language speaker community.

LISTENING Listening comprehension includes extracting meaning, both explicit and implied, from texts such as announcements, ads and news reports, as well as conversations. READING Reading skills cover a range of formal and informal texts, including newspaper and magazine articles, short stories, diary entries and book extracts. WRITING Students learn a range of styles of writing, including both formal and informal contexts. These might include writing children’s stories, writing a business letter, writing a report for a magazine, or even writing an evaluative article on a current news topic.

VIEWING Students will view various authentic audiovisual materials in the language, which then connect to tasks such as writing a review or discussing cultural aspects of the text.

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LANGUAGES CHINESE LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND SOCIETY • Units 1 to 4

VCE CHINESE FIRST LANGUAGE • Units 1 to 4

OVERVIEW

CHINESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY

OVERVIEW

THEMES AND SUB-TOPICS

Chinese Language, Culture and Society is a new subject created to give Australian students a more achievable avenue for Chinese study in VCE. The level of language required is more manageable than regular Chinese Second Language. Additionally, there is a social studies component included, which is taught and assessed in English.

Students read and respond to texts in English about aspects such as Chinese family culture, education in China, traditional myths and legends, and modern societal values and issues. For Units 3 & 4, there will be a prescribed text in English published by VCAA.

Chinese First Language is designed for students who speak Chinese as a first language, and have completed a significant amount of their schooling in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong or Macau, typically having moved to Australia during their secondary schooling.

Students study topics within the areas of Self and Others, Tradition and Change in Chinesespeaking community and Global Issues.

LANGUAGE SKILLS

In Units 1 & 2, students complete communication-based outcomes, which are assessed internally.

In Units 1 & 2, student are assessed internally by their teacher at School. In Units 3 & 4, students complete SACs in class which contribute 50 per cent to the study score. There is also a written and external oral exam, which contribute the other 50 per cent. The written exam will include listening and reading comprehension questions, a written task in Chinese, but also a response in English to the prescribed culture and society text in English.

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Students will learn to read, write, speak and understand spoken Chinese on topics including family and school life, travel and geography, leisure and lifestyle, youth issues, and the world of work. VCAA publishes a list of characters and grammar that students need to know by the end of Year 12, this is available in the Study Design from the VCAA website.

In Units 3 & 4, the students complete SACs covering the communication skill areas. SACs contribute 50 per cent to the overall study score, with the remaining 50 per cent being the final written and external oral examinations (10 per cent oral, 40 per cent written).

SKILLS ASSESSED ■ Students will express themselves in a broad range of topics in Chinese, including written and spoken language across a broad range of formal and informal usages. ■ Texts and responses in this subject are to all be in Chinese. ■ The Unit 4 external oral examination will include a detailed study topic from the area of Language and Culture through Literature and the Arts.

ELIGIBILITY Students may not enrol in this subject if they have spent more than two years in a Chinesespeaking country (China, Taiwan, Hong Kong or Macau), or if they have previously studied for six months or more at a school where Chinese is the language of instruction (e.g. in the Chinese-medium schools in countries such as Malaysia or Brunei). Students also may not enrol in this subject if they are also completing another Chinese subject such as Chinese First Language or Chinese Second Language.

It is recommended that students speak to the Head of Languages to discuss eligibility for the different Chinese pathways.


Eblana & Riviera Chinese

Year 7 German or Chinese

Year 8 German or Chinese

Year 9

Year 11

Year 12

Year 9 German

Year 10 German

Units 1 & 2 German

Units 3 & 4 German

Year 9 Chinese

Year 10 Chinese: Second Language

Units 1 & 2 Chinese: Second Language

Units 3 & 4 Chinese: Second Language

Units 1 & 2 Chinese Language, Culture and Society

Units 3 & 4 Chinese Language, Culture and Society

Year 10 Chinese: First Language

Units 1 & 2 Chinese: First Language

Units 3 & 4 Chinese: First Language

Year 10 VSL Languages

Year 11 VSL Languages

Year 12 VSL Languages

Year 9 VSL Languages

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Year 10

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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MATHEMATICS Year 7 • MATHEMATICS

Year 8 • MATHEMATICS

Year 9 • MATHEMATICS

Year 10 • MATHEMATICS

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

The Year 7 Mathematics curriculum is common to all students. The areas developed throughout the course are directly linked to the content listed in the Victorian Curriculum documentation. Students develop and extend their knowledge through three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

The Year 8 Mathematics curriculum is common to all students. The areas developed throughout the course are directly linked to the content listed in the Victorian Curriculum documentation. Students develop and extend their knowledge through three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

All students study a common Mathematics course in Year 9. The Year 9 curriculum follows and covers the content outlined in the Victorian Curriculum documentation. There are three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry, and Statistics and Probability.

At Year 10, there are four options available for study:

Students use technology to help analyse and display data, begin their exploration of algebra, extend their knowledge of number and investigate a variety of rules to measure perimeter and area. Students are assessed on the detail provided in answering questions, the summaries they develop for each topic and the accuracy provided in recalling past knowledge and skills. Students have access to a text resource that helps them consolidate and explore learning in an independent setting.

Students further develop their skills in using technology to help analyse and display data, extend their study of algebra including its use in linear relationships and their associated graphs, develop knowledge of rates and ratios and broaden their rules of measurement to include surface area and circle applications. Students are assessed on the detail provided in answering questions, the summaries they develop for each topic and the accuracy provided in recalling past knowledge and skills. Students have access to a text resource that helps them consolidate and explore learning in an independent setting.

Students will develop their algebraic skills, graphing skills and mental manipulation skills. They also learn to effectively use CAS technology to assist in solving problems and consolidate their understanding of new concepts using the online software program that comes with their textbook. Students also have the opportunity to learn to collect and analyse data while on their Learning Journeys, as part of the Statistics strand.

It is recommended that students consult their Year 9 Mathematics teacher and the Head of Mathematics when making this decision.

Students are also encouraged to enter The Australian Mathematics Competition held during Term 3.

Students are also encouraged to enter The Australian Mathematics Competition held during Term 3.

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Students are also encouraged to enter The Australian Mathematics Competition held during Term 3.

■ Year 10 Mathematics (Foundation); ■ Year 10 Mathematics (General); ■ Year 10 Mathematics (Methods); ■ VCE Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2.


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MATHEMATICS

YEAR 10 MATHEMATICS GENERAL

YEAR 10 MATHEMATICS METHODS

YEAR 10 MATHEMATICS FOUNDATION

This area of Mathematics covers recursive relationships and their link to Financial Mathematics including simple interest, depreciation, compound interest and loans; problem solving techniques, including applications to linear equations and inequalities; algebraic and graphical representations of relations; measurement rules that find the surface area and volume of composite solids; the relationships between parallel and perpendicular lines; applications of reasoning to congruence and similar triangles; numerical exercises involving plane shapes; comparison of data sets including summaries and shapes; the description of bivariate data and the statistical relationships that exist between two continuous variables using regression analysis; statistical reports.

This subject covers the Year 10 Mathematics outlined in the Victorian Curriculum documentation and includes some enrichment that helps prepare students for the subsequent study of various implementations of General Mathematics Units 1 & 2 and/or Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 in Year 11. Topics include linear functions, matrices, surds, indices, quadratics, statistics and exponential functions.

Students are selected into the subject by invitation only. The Mathematics covered is of a very practical nature and encourages the pursuit and exploration of ideas aligned with a student's career pathway. I does provide preparatory work for VCE Foundation Mathematics Units 1-4.

Students must have a minimum grade of B+ in Year 9 Mathematics to study this course.

VCE MATHEMATICAL METHODS UNITS 1 & 2 FOR YEAR 10 STUDENTS The opportunity for students to study VCE Mathematical Methods in Year 10 is limited to a select number and is designed for students who are planning to study the highest levels of Mathematics at School and who seek some flexibility in their choice of subjects at Year 11. It is not open to students who want to finish their study of Mathematics at the end of Year 11.

VCE MATHEMATICAL METHODS UNITS 1 & 2 FOR CURRENT YEAR 9 STUDENTS Current Year 9 students can apply for entry to VCE Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 in Year 10, provided they meet the following requirements: ■ Overall and Semester examination grades of A++ (both semesters). ■ At least three Learning Behaviour ratings of ‘Consistently’ in Year 9 Mathematics at year's end. ■ Furthermore, in order to be suitably prepared for Mathematical Methods it is recommended that Year 9 students achieve: - A++ for all Maths topics studied throughout the year. - Minimum semester grade average of A for all core subjects (English, Maths, Science, Humanities). - Effort rating of ‘Consistently’ in all core subjects (English, Maths, Science, Humanities).

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MATHEMATICS VCE MATHEMATICS • Units 1 to 4 FOUNDATION MATHEMATICS UNITS 1 TO 4

GENERAL MATHEMATICS UNITS 3 & 4

MATHEMATICAL METHODS UNITS 1 TO 4

SPECIALIST MATHEMATICS UNITS 1 TO 4

This study emphasises mathematics in contexts that are specifically related to the life and work of a student. In Units 1 & 2, contexts should be familiar and include the local community and environment while Units 3 & 4 should include federal and global contexts. Assessments in Units 1 to 4 will centre around mathematical investigations which ideally will be 1-2 weeks in duration.

This study is intended to be widely accessible. It provides general preparation for employment or further study where data analysis, financial modelling, organisation, structure and networking is important. The assumed knowledge and skills for General Mathematics Units 3 & 4 are drawn from General Mathematics Units 1 & 2. Students who have studied only Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 will have already acquired the assumed knowledge and skills to undertake General Mathematics Units 3 & 4.

Units 1 & 2 have a closely sequenced development of material, intended as preparation for Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4. Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4 may be taken alone or in conjunction with either Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 or General Mathematics Units 3 & 4, and provide an appropriate background for further study in, for example, science, engineering, humanities, economics or medicine.

Knowledge and content from Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2 are a prerequisite for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4. The Units 3 & 4 sequence is normally studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4, and the areas of study extend and develop material from these particular units. Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 are intended for students with strong interests in mathematics and who wish to undertake further study in mathematics and related disciplines such as engineering, aerospace and the sciences.

There are restrictions on student entry into Foundation Mathematics Unit 1 to 4.

There are some restrictions on student entry into General Mathematics Units 1 & 2.

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Eblana & Riviera Numeracy

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 7 Mathematics

Year 8 Mathematics

Year 9 Mathematics

Year 10 Mathematics (Foundation)

Units 1 & 2 Foundation Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Foundation Mathematics

Year 10 Mathematics (General)

Units 1 & 2 General Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Foundation Mathematics

Number & Algebra

Number & Algebra

Number & Algebra

Measurement & Geometry

Measurement & Geometry

Measurement & Geometry

Statistics & Probability

Statistics & Probability

Statistics & Probability

Units 3 & 4 General Mathematics

Subject to the approval of the Head of Mathematics

Year 10 Mathematics (Methods)

Subject to the approval of the Head of Mathematics

Units 1 & 2 Mathematical Methods

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

AND/OR

Units 1 & 2 Mathematical Methods

Units 3 & 4 General Mathematics AND/OR

Units 3 & 4 Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 Mathematical Methods

Units 3 & 4 Mathematical Methods

AND/OR

AND/OR

Units 1 & 2 Specialist Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Specialist Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Mathematical Methods

Units 3 & 4 Specialist Mathematics

AND/OR

AND/OR

Units 1 & 2 Specialist Mathematics

Higher Education Study Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 General Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Mathematical Methods

AND/OR

AND/OR

Units 1 & 2 Specialist Mathematics

Units 3 & 4 Specialist Mathematics

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

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PERFORMING ARTS Year 7 • PERFORMING ARTS

Year 8 • PERFORMING ARTS

OVERVIEW DRAMA

MUSIC

DRAMA

Year 7 music is a semester length classroom course, incorporating composition, improvisation, listening, theory and performance. Students will have the opportunity to develop their musical knowledge and experience through a series of activities and assessments focused on key foundational musical skills, with an emphasis on:

Year 7 students will undertake a number of character design elements over one semester. Students learn to develop their dramatic skills by imagining and creating roles and relationships that convey characters consistent with performance styles and situations. Students learn improvisation techniques, thinking about physical codes and conventions of character, unpack ideas around The Hero’s Journey and understand how to communicate meaning and status through movement. Improvisation is the Skill Based Assessment while the Superhero Design & Performance Unit is the Weighted Assessment.

Year 8 Music is a semester length classroom course, incorporating composition, improvisation, listening, theory and performance. Students have the opportunity to develop their musical knowledge and experience through a series of activities and assessments focused on key foundation musical skills, with an emphasis on guitar performance.

Over the course of the semester, Year 8 students continue to develop their dramatic skills by imagining and creating roles and relationships that convey characters consistent with Performance Styles and situations. Students will learn improvisation techniques, thinking about physical codes and conventions of character and will experience the Performance Style of Commedia Dell'arte and investigate stereotypes. Students will undertake two units of work over the semester. Unit 1 explores Stereotypes and is a Weighted Assessment, Unit 2 explores Comedy Performance and is a Skill Based Assessment.

■ body percussion and rhythm ■ musicianship musical hearing and comprehension ■ rhythm and melody transcription ■ introduction to body percussion, featuring performances ■ introduction to guitar ■ composition and group work ■ listening assignments based on the elements of song forms.

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OVERVIEW

MUSIC

■ musicianship musical hearing and comprehension ■ rhythm and melody transcription ■ continuation of basic guitar course, featuring performances ■ guitar composition, a composition task featuring notated music ■ melody, improvised solos and chordal accompaniment ■ listening assignments based on six elements of music.


Year 9 • PERFORMING ARTS

Year 10 • PERFORMING ARTS

MUSIC SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

DRAMA SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

This course provides foundation skills and knowledge to students interested in improving musical performance and/or a pathway towards VCE Music. It is designed as an introduction to the key knowledge and skills required for VCE Solo Performance. It also focuses on the practical skills for music making. During the course, students will study four units over a single year comprising: performance preparation and playing techniques, musicianship, composition/ arrangement/music technology and contemporary music styles.

The Year 9 course focuses on the techniques and practises of Jerzy Grotowski’s Poor Theatre, which suggests if that the theatre cannot be richer than mass entertainment, then let it be poorer. Students explore both the imaginative world and the human condition through the world of Theatre, devising an exaggerated performance based on a moment of emotional resonance from their life. The world of Drama has no boundaries and therefore students must allow themselves to take risks with thinking and expression. Students start to create a concrete understanding of how play-making skills are used, with particular focus on Improvisation. Students learn to reflect critically on the way they use their expressive skills of voice, movement, gesture and facial expression in developing characters. Students work in partnerships creating their own individual Life Monologues, with each student helping the other in the partnership with their own performance. We explore how Performance Styles create work that moves away from naturalistic and realistic expression.

MUSIC STYLES SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO OVERVIEW We call it an Eclectic Performance Style. Students develop critical analytical skills through giving and receiving feedback. They learn to use the language and terminology of drama to enhance their own working practices. Students also design their own set and build a shadowbox while exploring how application of symbol can be represented in production areas and create a greater, deeper meaning within performance. This course also develops a student’s confidence, public speaking and interpersonal skills and encourages emotional intelligence and problem solving. There are three summative assessments: Assessment One is based on Improvisation Skills, Assessment Two is a devised monologue performance and Assessment Three is a set design task.

This course is intended to provide skills and knowledge to students interested in a pathway towards VCE Music. It is designed as an introduction to the key knowledge and skills required for VCE Solo Performance and VCE Styles. During the course, students will study six units over a single year comprising: performance preparation and playing techniques, the history, literature and context of selected works, theory and analysis and composition.

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PERFORMING ARTS Year 10 • DRAMA SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO OVERVIEW Drama is an art form, which is directly concerned with living and the way in which we lead our lives. Through Drama we explore the way human beings think, feel and communicate, learning to understand others and us more fully. Each time we engage in the imaginative world of drama, we enhance our own self and our understanding of the nature of humanity. The course covers varied techniques and practices and explores both the imaginative world and the human condition. The world of drama has no boundaries and, therefore, students are encouraged to take risks with thinking and expression. Drama is about creating meaning from everyday occurrences through the use of various performance styles, theatrical conventions and dramatic elements. Expressive use of voice, facial expression movement and gesture are important in developing characters, which explore this meaning. The performance skills of focus, timing, energy and the actor-audience

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relationship will help to develop an ability to portray or realise characters. Students will work with text (scripts) and with stimulus (art, films, poetry, concepts and themes) to create their own text. Students will work in groups (ensemble performance) and on a solo performance. Also included is how Performance Styles create work that moves away from naturalistic and realistic expression. We call it an Eclectic Performance Style. This is a foundation course for VCE Drama Units 1 - 4 and VCE Theatre Studies Units 3 & 4.


DRAMA • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

PERFORMANCE

UNITS 1 & 2

Key Concepts covered

In this unit students study three or more performance styles from a range of historical, social and cultural contexts. They examine drama traditions of ritual and storytelling to devise performances that go beyond re-creation and or representations of real life as it is lived. Students focus on creating, presenting and analysing a devised ensemble and solo performance based on stimulus material that reflects personal, cultural and community experiences. Students will also analyse their own work and the work of professional drama performers. Students apply play-making techniques to shape and give meaning to their performance. They manipulate expressive and performance skills in the creation and presentation of characters through a range of performance styles. They document the processes they use through a folio and experiment with production areas, dramatic elements, conventions and performance styles.

Students will develop skills and knowledge in:

Unit 1 Introducing Performance Styles (includes four Study Outcomes) Unit 2 Australian Identity (includes four Study Outcomes)

■ Ways of creating, sustaining and developing a role. ■ Ways stimulus material can be given shape and meaning. ■ The processes in character development through improvisation, script work, the methods of Anton Artaud & Theatre of Cruelty, Expressionism, Absurdism and Commedia Dell'Arte and how we collaborate to create performance. ■ The use of expressive skills – voice, movement, gesture, facial expression. ■ The use of performance skills – focus, energy, timing and actor-audience relationship. ■ Application of symbol, transformation of character, time and place. ■ Application of dramatic elements. ■ Production areas appropriate to performance style.

■ Describe and analyse the use of dramatic elements, conventions, styles, and production areas in the presentation of performances. ■ Using stimulus material to create a range of ideas. ■ All of this is explored through the exploration of rituals and rites of passage, status and social roles, from a range of cultural contexts. ANALYSIS Key Concepts covered ■ Analyse the application of conventions, elements and style in performance. ■ Analyse the actor-audience relationship in performance. ■ Evaluate the expressive and performance skills used to communicate character to an audience.

■ Conventions used in performance styles and how they relate to the relationship between actor and audience. ■

Approaches to recording and documenting play-making techniques.

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PERFORMING ARTS DRAMA • Units 1 to 4 UNITS 3 & 4

PERFORMANCE

In these units students explore the work of drama practitioners and draw on contemporary practice as they devise ensemble and solo performance work. Students explore contemporary performance styles, practice and associated conventions from a diverse range of contemporary and/or traditional contexts. Students document, analyse and evaluate the stages involved in the creation, development and presentation of their solo and ensemble performances. They will also analyse and evaluate a professional drama performance as well as their own work and the work of their peers.

Key Concepts covered

Unit 3 Devised Ensemble Performance (includes three Study Outcomes) Unit 4 Devised Solo Performance (includes three Study Outcomes)

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Students develop skills and knowledge in: ■ Ways of creating, sustaining and developing a role. ■ Play-making techniques and the processes in character development through improvisation, script work, the methods of Bertolt Brecht and Epic Theatre, Jerzy Grotowski and Poor Theatre, biomechanics and how we collaborate to create performance.

■ Approaches to recording and documenting playmaking techniques. ■ Describing and analysing the use of dramatic elements. ■ Using stimulus material to create a range of solo and ensemble performances. ■ Collaborating on the construction and presentation of an ensemble performance to an audience.

■ The use of expressive skills – voice, movement, gesture, facial expression.

■ Devising a solo performance in response to a given stimulus.

■ The use of performance skills – focus, energy, timing and actor-audience relationship.

ANALYSIS Key Concepts covered

■ Application of symbol, transformation of character, time and place.

■ Analyse the application and use of production areas, conventions, elements and style in performance.

■ Production areas appropriate to performance style.

■ Analyse the actor-audience relationship in performance.

■ Conventions used in performance styles and how they relate to the relationship between actor and audience.

■ Evaluate the expressive and performance skills used to communicate character to an audience.


THEATRE STUDIES • Units 3 & 4 UNIT 3: PRODUCING THEATRE In this unit students develop an interpretation of a script through the three stages of the theatre production process: planning, development and presentation. Students specialise in two production roles, working collaboratively, creatively and imaginatively to realise the production of a script. UNIT 4: PRESENTING AN INTERPRETATION In this unit students study a scene and an associated monologue. They initially develop an interpretation of the prescribed scene. This work includes exploring theatrical possibilities and using dramaturgy across the three stages of the production process. Students then develop a creative and imaginative interpretation, they work in production roles as an actor and director, or as a designer.

INTERPRETING A MONOLOGUE In this area of study students focus on an interpretation of a monologue from a scene contained within a script selected from the VCAAVCE Theatre Studies Monologue Examination. Students select a monologue, and study the text of the monologue, the prescribed scene in which it is embedded and the complete script from which the scene is derived. Students apply selected production roles and develop an interpretation of the monologue that is informed by a study of the prescribed scene and the complete script and dramaturgy, including contexts of the play. Students make decisions about how the contexts, theatrical possibilities, elements of theatre composition and theatre styles will inform their interpretation of the monologue. Students work in the selected production roles to realise and present their interpretation of the monologue. They consider the interrelationships between acting, direction and design. Please note: Unit 3 & 4 Theatre Studies will run in 2023 and each alternative year, thereafter.

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PERFORMING ARTS VCE VET MUSIC • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNITS 1 & 2

CUA30915 Certificate III in Music Industry (Sound Production) is offered to students under the auspices of the College of Sound and Music Production (RTO #41549).

Key Concepts Covered

This qualification is for students who have an interest in music and sound production and are keen to develop skills in a range of areas such as recording, mixing and sound editing. Sound Production Specialisation provides students with the practical skills and knowledge to record, mix and edit sound sources, and operate sound reinforcement equipment for live music events. The program includes core units such as implementing copyright arrangements, performing basic sound editing and developing music industry knowledge. Elective units provide students with the opportunity to learn the essentials of audio engineering and electronic music production. Students gain competencies that will enhance their employment opportunities within the music industry, and a recognised qualification that will assist them in making a more informed choice when considering vocational and career pathways.

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■ contribute to health and safety of self and others ■ implement copyright arrangements ■ work effectively in the music industry ■ apply knowledge of style and genre to music industry practice ■ repair and maintain audio equipment ■ operate basic lighting. UNITS 3 & 4 Key Concepts Covered ■ operate sound reinforcement systems ■ record and mix a basic music demo ■ install and disassemble audio equipment ■ mix music in a studio environment ■ manage audio input sources.


VCE MUSIC SOLO PERFORMANCE • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW

UNITS 1 & 2

UNITS 3 & 4

Music Performance develops the students’ skills in the following areas as a musician and performer. Students learn written theory and create compositions to extend their musical literacy. They also improve their musicianship skills through aural training exercises using singing and listening activities. Students will also extend their ability to listen to music performances (both recorded and live) and give critical responses using musically sophisticated language. The primary objective is to improve as a solo performer on a chosen instrument. To this end, students prepare solo performance programs which explore a variety of music styles and develop skills in rehearsing, refining and executing performances. Students will be required to have learned an instrument prior to taking on VCE Music Performance and will be expected to have weekly hour long lessons with a suitable VCE skilled instrumental teacher in addition to their regular classes. The concepts explored through Units 1-4 are the same with a rising level of skill required throughout the process.

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Musicianship and aural – musical hearing and comprehension using singing as a tool to explore and develop understanding.

■ Musicianship and aural – musical hearing and comprehension using singing as a tool to explore and develop understanding.

■ Performance – playing in performance as a soloist, exploring various genres and techniques idiomatic to their instrument.

■ Performance – playing in performance as a soloist, exploring various genres and techniques idiomatic to their instrument.

■ Theory – exploration and development of musical literacy.

■ Theory – exploration and development of musical literacy.

■ Composition – exploration and comprehension of the elements of music using a musical notation program.

■ Responding and listening – listening and responding to music performances, exploring and developing musically sophisticated terminology.

■ Responding and listening – listening and responding to music performances, exploring and developing musically sophisticated terminology.

■ Singing – exploration and mastery of aural skills through singing practice.

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PERFORMING ARTS VCE VET • MUSIC CUA30915 CERTIFICATE III IN MUSIC INDUSTRY (SOUND PRODUCTION) This qualification is for students who have an interest in music and sound production and are keen to develop skills in a range of areas such as recording, mixing and sound editing. Sound Production Specialisation provides students with the practical skills and knowledge to record, mix and edit sound sources, and operate sound reinforcement equipment for live music events. The program includes core units such as implementing copyright arrangements, performing basic sound editing and developing music industry knowledge. Elective units provide students with the opportunity to learn the essentials of audio engineering and electronic music production. Students will gain competencies that will enhance their employment opportunities within the music industry, and a recognised qualification that will assist them in making a more informed choice when considering vocational and career pathways.

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CONTRIBUTION TO VCE/VCAL (VIC SCHOOLS ONLY) VCE Students who complete Certificate III in Music Industry will be eligible for up to five Units of credit towards their VCE: up to three at the Units 1 & 2 level and a Units 3 & 4 sequence. VM (VCAL) This program contributes to the Industry Specific Skills Strand and may also contribute to the Work-Related Skills Strand of VCAL. ATAR Students wishing to receive an ATAR.


Eblana & Riviera Classroom Music Private Tuition Drama (Riviera)

Year 7 Year 7 Music

Year 7 Drama

Year 8 Year 8 Music

Year 8 Drama

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 9 Music Styles

Year 10 Music Styles

Units 1 & 2 Music Solo Performance

Units 3 & 4 Music Solo Performance

Units 1 & 2 VET Music Industry

Units 3 & 4 VET Music Industry

Units 1 & 2 Drama

Units 3 & 4 Drama

Year 9 Drama

Year 10 Drama

Units 3 & 4 Theatre Studies

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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SCIENCE Year 7 • SCIENCE

Year 8 • SCIENCE

Year 9 • SCIENCE

Year 10 • SCIENCE-CORE

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

Year 7 often represents the first time many students get to experience Science taught in a laboratory on a consistent basis. Therefore, the Year 7 course reflects this new shift in focus by spending time learning about their new environment and working as scientists would work. Divisions within the domain of Science become more clearly defined as topics completed take on a more physical, chemical and biological specialisation. The principles of the scientific method are taught, practised and reported on in greater detail than they have been in the past. Foundations, theories, rules and laws in science are explored through experimentation. A large emphasis is placed on inquiry-based learning, evidence gathering and conclusion formulation throughout the year.

Students begin to explore each of the scientific domains of Biology, Chemistry and Physics in greater depth and detail. Concepts begin to become a little less tangible, so the use of scientific models to explain natural phenomena becomes very important for students to make sense of things that are frequently unable to be detected by the five senses of the human body. Students begin to analyse these models for their features and their flaws in order to explore and interpret the world around them.

Science provides an empirical way of answering interesting and important questions about the biological, physical and technological world. Science is a dynamic, collaborative and creative human endeavour, arising from our desire to make sense of our world through exploring the unknown, investigating universal mysteries, making predictions and solving problems.

In Year 10 Science students undertake practical investigations and test key scientific questions to provide empirical evidence about the biological, physical and technological world. Students study the subjects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics, which provide a pathway to VCE study. Students can also choose to undertake further study in Science through the electives of Year 10 Psychology or Investigating Biology, which both link to VCE Pathways.

A typical student in Year 7 can expect to experience time working as a scientist, become familiar with the properties of substances, classify living things and where they live, experience the forces that drive the natural world and machines that exploit these forces and separate mixtures.

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A typical Year 8 Student will explore energy and its applications and transformations, delve into the biological world of cells and then look outwards into the systems of the body to keep it functioning successfully. They will explore chemical reactions and chemical substances and their application on a local and global stage as well as in relation to energy and systems within the body.

Students study the core subjects of Biology, Chemistry and Physics, which provide a pathway to VCE study. Topics include: The Atom; Body Coordination; Radiation; Disease; Reaction Types; and Electrical Energy.


Year 10 • INVESTIGATING BIOLOGY

Year 10 • PSYCHOLOGY

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

SEMESTER 1 INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY

OVERVIEW

Key Concepts covered

Psychology is a broad discipline that incorporates both the scientific study of human behaviour through biological, psychological and social perspectives and the systematic application of this knowledge to personal and social circumstances in everyday life.

■ Introduction to Psychology, including nature/nurture debate.

The study researches human behaviours from biological, cognitive, philosophical and social perspectives.

■ Research Methods: how to conduct psychological investigations.

Underpinning all studies in Psychology is the Scientific Method. Students are expected to investigate scientific psychological phenomena and write up practical reports. Students are expected to analyse their results using statistics and draw conclusions.

SEMESTER 2 PERSONALITY AND FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY

OVERVIEW This elective is for students wishing to further enhance their scientific skills and is expected to act as a precursor for accessing Units 3 & 4 Biology in Year 11. It will build on the content offered in the Science-Core course with a particular emphasis on practical investigation and hands on learning of scientific principles related to VCE Biology. It is suitable for students who are interested in Science and Biology and is good preparation for studying VCE Sciences. TOPIC 1 PROTEINS, GENOMICS AND PROTEOMICS Key Concepts covered

TOPIC 2 FORENSICS, DNA FINGERPRINTING AND GENE EDITING Key Concepts covered ■ Understanding the nature of the genetic code. ■ Identification of individuals (forensic and medical applications of gene sequencing). ■ Changing organisms by gene editing. TOPIC 3 FROM BACTERIA TO HUMAN, 3.6B YEARS OF ADAPTATIONS Key Concepts covered ■ Investigation Adaptations. ■ Bacterial resistance and viral antigenic drift as a model of natural selection.

■ Aggression: why it occurs and how to minimise it. ■ Myself and others: how to make friends and influence people.

Key Concepts covered ■ Memories and eyewitness testimony. ■ Personality, including psychodynamic theory, trait theory and humanistic theories.

■ Basics of nucleic acids and their role in protein synthesis.

TOPIC 4 FOCUS ON SCIENTIFIC SKILLS

■ Origami organelles – modelling gene expression.

Key Concepts covered

ASSESSMENTS

■ Critical analysis of scientific media articles.

■ Proteomics and Genomics – new frontiers in diagnosis of disease.

■ Practical Report Write Ups

■ Literature review techniques and scientific writing skill development.

■ Tests

■ Scientific methodology, organising, analysing and evaluating primary and secondary data.

■ Research Methods: development of key skills.

■ Scientific Posters ■ Practical Folios ■ Presentations.

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SCIENCE BIOLOGY • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW The study of Biology explores the diversity of life as it has evolved and changed over time and considers how living organisms function and interact. It explores the processes of life, from the molecular world of the cell to that of the whole organism and examines how life forms maintain and ensure their continuity. The sequence of learning begins with a focus on whole organisms and biological systems that maintain and continue life; the complexity increases with a greater molecular biology focus in Units 3 & 4 where students delve into the mechanisms that sustain life.

UNIT 1 HOW ORGANISMS REGULATE THEIR FUNCTIONS

UNIT 2 INHERITANCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON DIVERSITY

UNIT 4 HOW LIFE CHANGES AND RESPONDS TO CHALLENGES

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

In this unit students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single celled to the multicellular organism, including the requirements for sustaining cellular processes. There is a focus on cell growth, replacement and death and the role of stem cells in differentiation, specialisation and renewal of cells. As well as how systems function through cell specialisation in vascular plants and animals and consider the role homeostatic mechanisms play in maintaining an animal’s internal environment.

Students describe the production of gametes in sexual reproduction through the key events in meiosis; they explore the nature of chromosomes and the use of genetic language to read and interpret patterns of inheritance. Students learn how a characteristic can be influenced by a gene, many genes, genes interacting with external environmental or epigenetic factors and how reproduction impacts biodiversity. Students also develop their analytical skills though exploration of a range of bioethical issues.

In this unit students consider the continual change and challenges of life on Earth beginning by understanding the human immune system followed by an exploration of the evidence in evolutionary biology. Students examine the molecular and structural evidence for relatedness between species and change in life forms over time.

UNIT 3 HOW DO CELLS MAINTAIN LIFE? Key Concepts covered Students explore the relationship between nucleic acids and proteins as key molecules in cellular processes. Students explore regulation of gene expression as well as techniques for modifying an organism’s genome. The unit explores regulation of biochemical pathways with a focus on photosynthesis and cellular respiration as well as inefficiencies of both that could be overcome using biotechnology tools such as CRISPR Cas-9.

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Scientific investigation skills A student-designed scientific investigation involving the generation of primary data related to cellular processes and/or how life changes and responds to challenges is undertaken to hone their experimental and reporting skills in line with scientific convention.


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SCIENCE CHEMISTRY • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW VCE Chemistry enables students to examine a range of chemical, biochemical and geophysical phenomena through the exploration of the nature of chemicals and chemical processes. In undertaking this study, students apply chemical principles to explain and quantify the behaviour of matter, as well as undertake practical activities that involve the analysis and synthesis of a variety of materials. UNIT 1 HOW CAN THE DIVERSITY OF MATERIALS BE EXPLAINED? Key Concepts covered ■ Investigate the chemical properties of a range of materials from metals and salts to polymers and nanomaterials. ■ Explore and explain the relationships between properties, structure and bonding forces within and between. ■ Introduction to quantitative concepts in chemistry, including the mole concept.

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UNIT 2 HOW DO CHEMICAL REACTIONS SHAPE THE NATURAL WORLD?

UNIT 4 HOW ARE ORGANIC COMPOUND CATEGORISED, ANALYSED AND USED?

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ Explore the physical and chemical properties of water and gases.

■ Investigate the structural features, bonding, typical reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds including those found in food.

■ Investigate solubility, concentration, pH and reactions in water including precipitation, acid-base and redox. ■ Introduction to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques. UNIT 3 HOW CAN CHEMICAL PROCESSES BE DESIGNED TO OPTIMISE EFFICIENCY? Key Concepts covered ■ Evaluate different chemical energy resources, including fossil fuels, biofuels, galvanic cells, electrolytic cells and fuel cells. ■ Investigate the combustion of fuels and the use of stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products. ■ Investigate and apply equilibrium law and predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical processes.

■ Process data from instrumental analyses of organic compounds to confirm or deduce organic structures and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic chemicals in mixtures. ■ Use calorimetry as an investigative tool to determine the energy released in the combustion of foods.


ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary, investigative science that explores the interactions and interconnectedness between humans and their environments and analyses the functions of both living and non-living elements that sustain Earth systems. Students explore: ■ How the relationships between earth systems produce natural environmental change over a variety of time scales and how these systems respond to change and disruption.

■ The strengths and the limitations of science, respect evidence-based conclusions and gain an awareness of the ethical contexts of scientific endeavours, including sociocultural, economic, political and legal factors. ■ The role of innovation and science in addressing contemporary environmental challenges. UNIT 1 HOW ARE EARTH’S DYNAMIC SYSTEMS INTERCONNECTED TO SUPPORT LIFE?

■ The extent to which humans modify their environments and the consequences of these changes in local and global contexts with a focus on biodiversity, pollution, food and water security, climate change and energy use.

Key Concepts covered

■ The challenges and opportunities presented by selected environmental issues and case studies, and consider how different value systems, priorities, knowledge and regulatory frameworks affect environmental decision-making and planning for a sustainable future.

■ Managing environmental challenges.

■ Investigation of local ecosystems ■ Earth systems thinking ■ Earth’s dynamic systems ■ Data and modelling

UNIT 2 WHAT AFFECTS EARTH’S CAPACITY TO SUSTAIN LIFE? Key Concepts covered ■ Pollution effects on Earth’s systems ■ Managing pollution ■ Sustainable food systems

UNIT 3 HOW CAN BIODIVERSITY AND DEVELOPMENT BE SUSTAINED? Key Concepts covered ■ Importance of biodiversity ■ Biodiversity changes over time ■ Assessing changes in species diversity ■ Threats to biodiversity ■ Protection and restoration of biodiversity ■ Case study ■ Sustainability principles ■ Environmental decision-making and management. UNIT 4 HOW CAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE IMPACTS OF HUMAN ENERGY BE MANAGED? Key Concepts covered ■ Major factors that effect the Earth’s climate ■ Understanding climate change ■ Managing climate change ■ Comparison of different energy sources ■ Managing the impacts of human energy use.

■ Maintaining food and water security.

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SCIENCE PHYSICS • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW VCE Physics provides students with opportunities to explore questions related to the natural and constructed world. The study provides a contextual approach to exploring selected areas within the discipline including atomic physics, electricity, fields, mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum physics and waves. Students examine classical and contemporary research, models and theories to understand how knowledge in physics has evolved and continues to evolve in response to new evidence and discoveries.

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UNIT 1 HOW IS ENERGY USEFUL TO SOCIETY?

UNIT 2 HOW DOES PHYSICS HELP US TO UNDERSTAND THE WORLD?

UNIT 3 HOW DO FIELDS EXPLAIN MOTION AND ELECTRICITY?

UNIT 4 HOW CAN TWO CONTRADICTORY MODELS EXPLAIN LIGHT AND MATTER?

■ Electromagnetic Radiation, Thermal Energy, Interaction of Thermal Energy and Electromagnetic Radiation.

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ How can motion be described and explained?

■ How do things move without contact?

■ How can waves explain the behaviour of light?

■ Radiation from the Nucleus, Nuclear Energy.

■ Exploring Contemporary issues and applications in society through Physics.

Key Concepts covered

■ How are fields used to move electrical energy?

■ How are light and matter similar?

■ How fast can things go?

■ Concepts to Model Electricity, Circuit Electricity, Using Electricity, Electrical Safety in the home.

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SCIENCE PSYCHOLOGY • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW Psychology is a broad discipline that incorporates both the scientific study of human behaviour through biological, psychological and social perspectives and the systematic application of this knowledge to personal and social circumstances in everyday life. VCE Psychology enables students to explore how people think, feel and behave through the use of a biopsychosocial approach.

UNIT 1 HOW ARE BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES SHAPED?

UNIT 3 HOW DOES EXPERIENCE AFFECT BEHAVIOUR AND MENTAL PROCESSES?

UNIT 4 HOW IS WELLBEING DEVELOPED AND MAINTAINED?

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

■ The structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system.

■ Macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system to explain how the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the world around them.

■ The nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour.

■ Brain plasticity and the influence that brain damage may have on a person’s psychological functioning. ■ The development of different psychological models and theories used to predict and explain the development of thoughts, feelings and behaviours. UNIT 2 HOW DO EXTERNAL FACTORS INFLUENCE BEHAVIOURS AND MENTAL PROCESSES? Key Concepts covered ■ A person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours are influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. ■ How perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted. ■ Examine the contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of human perception and why individuals and groups behave in specific ways.

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■ How stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress. ■ Investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed behaviours. ■ The contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system, and to the understanding of biological, psychological and social factors that influence learning and memory.

■ The mental health continuum and application of a biopsychosocial approach, as a scientific model, to analyse mental health and disorder. They use specific phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors. ■ The contribution that classical and contemporary research has made to the understanding of consciousness, including sleep, and the development of an individual’s mental functioning and wellbeing.


Eblana & Riviera

Science Inquiry

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 7 Science

Year 8 Science

Year 9 Science

Year 10 Science

Units 1 & 2 Biology

Science Investigation

Science Investigation

Science Investigation

Year 10 Investigating Biology

Units 3 & 4 Biology

Biology

Biology

Biology

Units 1 & 2 Environmental Science

Units 3 & 4 Environmental Science

Chemistry

Chemistry

Chemistry

Units 1 & 2 Chemistry

Units 3 & 4 Chemistry

Physics

Physics

Physics

Units 1 & 2 Physics

Units 3 & 4 Physics

Units 1 & 2 Psychology

Units 3 & 4 Psychology

Year 10 Psychology

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Units 3 & 4 Biology

Units 3 & 4 Psychology

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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TECHNOLOGIES Year 7 • TECHNOLOGIES

Year 8 • TECHNOLOGIES

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY

FOOD STUDIES

This is an introductory design-based curriculum that focusses on critical and creative thinking through the lens of product design. At the core of this unit of study, students implement the design process to develop a viable solution to a specified need or problem. Students are encouraged to undertake focused research, generate a range of design concepts before producing their solution. A reflective evaluation is used to conclude the process. In this unit of study students also employ a range of traditional and digital techniques to produce their final products. Students are introduced to the safe use of basic hand tools and simple plant machinery.

Students are introduced to the impact of cyber security and information privacy, learning the importance of keeping our information safe.

Students investigate how people communicate using digital systems. They explore how different technologies allow for efficient transferring of ideas and how different systems connect together. Students evaluate how different systems are secured against cyber threats. Students create a digital solution to a real-world problem using a range of technologies.

Food and You provides a framework for students to understand and value the importance of good nutrition for health and wellbeing.

Students explore the systems in a functioning robot. They write block-based code to control the robots, learning how to respond to inputs from sensors. Students understand and employ a range of coding concepts such as variables, loops, binary selection and functions. They use robotic systems to solve simple problems and understand the impact that robotic systems are having on society. Students present their findings in a website format they design, incorporating images, text and video.

Students study food as an essential need for the function of the human body and its relationship with good health, focusing on the role of fruit and vegetables, a range of nutrients and the importance of breakfast in the diet. Students also learn about the importance of safety and hygiene in the kitchen environment and preparing food for social occasions. Students develop their practical cooking skills to make functional and healthy food products that can be recreated at home. They will also consider constraints, hygiene, specification and sustainability issues that inform decisions about preparing and cooking healthy meals. They will work through designing, making and presenting a dish using seasonal vegetables. During the unit, they will also make a range of other recipes that further develop their cooking skills and knowledge and use of ingredients. ASSESSMENT Assessment and reporting are based on a variety of tasks including research assignments, analysis and application, food preparation skills.

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Year 9 • TECHNOLOGIES FOOD STUDIES SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW FOOD AND WELLBEING Food Studies provides students with a broad knowledge and understanding of food properties, processing, preparation and their interrelationships, nutritional considerations and consumption patterns. It addresses the importance of hygiene and safe working practices. It also provides students with a context through which to explore the richness, pleasure and variety food adds to life. There are increasing concerns about food issues, including the nutritional quality of food and the environmental impact of food processes. Students understand the importance of a variety of foods, sound nutrition principles and food preparation skills when making food decisions to help better prepare them for their future lives. Students progressively develop knowledge and understanding about the nature of food and food safety, and how to make informed and appropriate food preparation choices when experimenting with and preparing food in a sustainable manner. Students understand the challenges for world food and fibre production include an increasing world population, an uncertain climate and competition for resources such as land and

water. Students engage in these challenges by understanding the processes of food and fibre production and by investigating innovative and sustainable ways of supplying agriculturally produced raw materials. ASSESSMENT Assessment and reporting are based on a variety of tasks including research assignments, analysis and application, food preparation skills. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY – PROGRAMMING SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW In Year 9 Digital Technology - Programming students investigate the creative and logical processes of problem solving through programming. They develop algorithms to describe logical processes they encounter in everyday life and learn how computer simulations help solve complex problems. Students discover how data is represented in computer systems and ways in which can be manipulated to ensure efficient and secure transmission and storage. Students explore a range of different programming contexts such as robots, web pages and networked components.

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TECHNOLOGIES Year 9 • TECHNOLOGIES DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY – ANIMATION & DIGITAL MEDIA SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW Students will develop an understanding of how data is collected, manipulated and presented through a variety of formats, for specific audiences. They learn how privacy concerns can be managed while still collecting important data about the world around them. Students explore a range of techniques to analyse their findings and tell a story to their audience through static and dynamic data visualisation tools such as infographics, spreadsheets, websites and animations. PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY – MATERIALS SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW This is a design-based curriculum that focuses on critical and creative thinking through the lens of product design. At the core of this unit of study, students implement the design process to develop a viable solution to a specified ‘real-world’ need

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Year 10 • DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY or problem. Students are encouraged to undertake focused research, generate a range of design concepts before fabricating their own solution. A reflective evaluation is used to conclude the process. In this unit of study students also employ a range of traditional and digital techniques to produce their final products. Students are further introduced to the safe use of hand tools and plant machinery. DESIGN TECHNOLOGY – CAD/CAM SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE OVERVIEW This unit of study is directed in developing a range of highly practical contemporary design and production skills that give students insight into the rapidly changing manufactured world we live in today. Though a design process students research to develop creative yet targeted design concepts that are finally refined and modelled through Computer Aided Design (CAD) in preparation for manufacture. As a continuation, Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) techniques such as Laser Cutting and 3D Printing are then employed to bring the student’s final design to fruition. An analysis of the final product and process is used to evaluate the final design.

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO OVERVIEW In Year 10, learning in Digital Technologies focuses on further developing understanding and skills in computational thinking, such as precisely and accurately describing problems; and the use of modular approaches to solutions. ■ Students have opportunities to analyse problems and design, implement and evaluate a range of solutions, such as websites and simulations. ■ Students consider how human interaction with networked systems introduces complexities surrounding access to, and the security and privacy of, data of various types. ■ When defining problems, students consider the functional and non-functional requirements of a solution through creative and critical thinking. ■ They consolidate their algorithmic design skills to incorporate testing and review, and further develop their understanding of the user experience to incorporate a wider variety of user needs.

■ Students progressively become more skilled at identifying the steps involved in planning solutions and developing detailed plans that are mindful of risks and sustainability requirements. ■ When creating solutions, both individually and collaboratively, and sharing them online, students comply with legal obligations, particularly with respect to the ownership of information. SEMESTER 1 TOPICS ■ Data Analysis ■ Web Design ■ Java Script. SEMESTER 2 TOPICS ■ Project Management ■ Game Design and Development ■ Networks and Data Security.


Year 10 • FOOD STUDIES

Year 10 • ROBOTICS

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

CHOICE, HEALTH AND WELLBEING

What influences the food we eat?

OVERVIEW

Students focus on patterns of eating in Australia and the influences on the food we eat.

Year 10 Food Choice, Health and Wellbeing assists students in making healthy food and lifestyle choices. In this study, 60 per cent of the time is allocated to practical skills and the remaining 40 per cent to theory. The theory component of the subject is supported by practical production sessions, where students have the opportunity to take part in a variety of meal design activities. These tasks reinforce and challenge their health knowledge and food preparation skills. The study of Food Choice, Health and Wellbeing provides an excellent foundation for future studies in Units 1 to 4 of Food Studies or Health and Human Development. POSSIBLE CAREER PATHWAYS ■ Medicine ■ Nutritionist ■ Dietitian ■ Soil Scientist ■ Sports Science.

Students will consider environmental and ethical issues relating to the selected debate and apply their responses in practical ways.

Students look at relationships between social factors and food access and choice, as well as the social and emotional roles of food in shaping and expressing identity, including body image and connectedness.

This course provides for the development of relevant and meaningful learning experiences, inclusive of life experiences, values, learning styles and individual student characteristics.

What is the role of media, technology, and advertising as influences on the formation of food habits and beliefs?

Assessment and reporting are based on a variety of tasks including research assignments, analysis and application, food preparation skills, and an end of semester examination.

Students investigate the principles of encouraging healthy food patterns by undertaking practical lessons, developing a repertoire of healthy meals suitable for children and families. Students address debates concerning Australian and global food systems, relating to issues on the environment, ethics, technologies, food access, food safety, and the use of agricultural resources. They research one selected debate in depth, seeking clarity on disparate points of view, considering proposed solutions and analysing work undertaken to solve problems and support sustainable futures.

ASSESSMENT

OVERVIEW Robotics and AI are fast beginning to impact on our daily lives. An understanding of robotics is therefore key to flourishing in a technologically impacted world. In this course, students begin to explore some of the key systems that are needed in order to make a robot perform a real-world function. As the course progresses, students will begin to manufacture their very own peripheral devices in order to enable the robot to have greater capacities. CORE UNDERSTANDING 1: MECHANICAL SYSTEMS CORE UNDERSTANDING 2: ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

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TECHNOLOGIES Year 10 • PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY

n tio a u al Ev

SUBJECT LENGTH: SEMESTER UNIT VALUE: ONE

■ Identify and present a design option. ■ Develop working drawings for manufacturing. Planning and Production ■ Devise a scheduled production plan.

■ An interest in understanding the designer’s role in industry.

■ Conduct risk assessments.

■ Enjoy developing new and creative ideas.

Evaluation

■ Be able to plan and organise themselves for extended projects.

■ Evaluate the final product against the evaluation criteria.

■ Enjoy concept generation with both manual and digital methods.

■ Identify areas for improvement and how they might be improved.

■ Produce the final product.

Development of criteria to evaluate how well the

including pattern drafting may be made throughout production

8. Scheduled

production plan

Sequenced plan and timeline, listing tools, equipment and machines with risk assessment and a materials list

Any step can be revisited throughout the product design process

■ Develop concepts.

d production ing an n n Pla

Design and Development

3. Evaluation criteria

Product and production record.

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■ Gather research materials.

9. Production

7. Working drawings

Drawings including technical drawings, showing product construction methods) needed for production planning

■ Have a passion for problem solving and innovation.

■ Develop a design brief with design parameters.

Outline of the context, constraints and considerations

Students should:

Investigating and Defining

2. Design brief

➜ ➜

SEMESTER BASED ENTRY AND SKILLS REQUIRED

THE PRODUCT DESIGN PROCESS

■ Set evaluation criteria.

1. Identify end-user/s, need, problem or opportunity

Evaluation of product quality using evaluation criteria and end-user/s feedback. Recommend improvements

This is an industry focused curriculum that is designed to develop a range of traditional and contemporary design and manufacturing techniques leading to VCE Product Design & Technology Units 1-4. Delivered through a design process, students are directed to creatively respond to a design brief and to develop a viable product that considers both aesthetic and functional qualities. Much like within the designer/client relationship an analysis of the design process and the final product, throughout its development, concludes the design folio.

10. Product evaluation

■ Be interested in developing skills with a variety of materials, tools and plant machinery.

ning de nd ga tin ga sti ve

OVERVIEW

In

6. Design options

(presentation drawings), selection

the design brief

4. Research

Research into factors related to the design brief: materials and process investigations

5. Visualisations

Concept sketches and drawings, mock-ups and 3D modelling of whole or part of potential ideas to meet the requirements of the design brief

preferred option

A series of potential solutions evaluated to determine which best suits the requirements of the design brief

De n) sig tio a n an s i d dev ual elopment (concept


APPLIED COMPUTING UNITS • Unit 1 OVERVIEW VCE Applied Computing focuses on the strategies and techniques for creating digital solutions to meet specific needs and to manage the threats to data, information and software security.

UNIT 1 AREA OF STUDY 1: DATA ANALYSIS Key Concepts covered Students use software tools such as spreadsheets and data bases to collect, interpret and manipulate data, draw conclusions and create data visualisations that represent their findings. Data visualisations may include charts, graphs, histograms, maps, network diagrams and spatial relationships diagrams. Students examine the features of different design tools to represent the functionality and appearance of software solutions.

APPLIED COMPUTING UNITS • Unit 2 OVERVIEW VCE Applied Computing focuses on the strategies and techniques for creating digital solutions to meet specific needs and to manage the threats to data, information and software security.

UNIT 2 AREA OF STUDY 1: INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS Key Concepts covered Students work collaboratively to develop an innovative solution to an identified need or opportunity. They apply all stages of the problem-solving methodology to investigate the use of digital devices and emerging technologies and their applications. Students choose from a selection of topics to explore in greater detail including AI, assistive and wearable technologies, robotic devices, games development or another innovative digital solution.

AREA OF STUDY 2: PROGRAMMING

AREA OF STUDY 2: NETWORK SECURITY

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

Students use a programming language (Web-based PHP) and apply computational and design thinking skills when preparing solution designs and transforming them into a working solution. A project plan is prepared to support an organised approach to problem solving. Students record and monitor the progress of their working solution throughout the stages of the problem-solving methodology.

Students investigate how networks enable data and information to be exchanged locally and globally. They examine the hardware and software components and procedures required to connect and maintain wired, wireless and mobile communications technology. They apply this knowledge to design a Local Area Network (LAN), describe its components and explain the transmission of data and information in this network. Students develop an understanding of cybersecurity issues. This subject leads into both Software Development and Data Analytics in Units 3 & 4.

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TECHNOLOGIES VCE VET CREATIVE AND DIGITAL MEDIA (CDM) • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW If you have an interest in Vocational Education Training (VET) combined with VCE assessment, then VCE VET Creative and Digital Media (CDM) may be a choice for you. Students develop skills in industry standard Adobe software applications, to produce their creative solutions to given briefs. This subject examines the ways in which people at various levels within a design organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives. Entry and skills required This is a two-year course of study whereby students who complete both years will be eligible to receive a VET qualification (issued by the RTO) and are also eligible for VCE accreditation of, two units at Units 1 & 2 and two units at Units 3 & 4 levels. Students who are assessed as competent for all the modules (Units 1-4) will have successfully completed the Certificate III.

The VCE VET Creative and Digital Media program aims to:

CERTIFICATE III UNITS 1 & 2

■ Provide participants with the knowledge prospects in digital media related industries. and skills to achieve competencies that will enhance their employment.

At a Units 1 & 2 level, students undertake six learning modules including:

■ Enable participants to gain a recognised credential and to make a more informed choice of vocation or career paths.

■ CUADIG201 Maintain interactive content.

Students should ■ Have a passion for creative expression.

■ CUAWHS312 Apply work health and safety practices.

■ Enjoy developing new ideas and exploring a range of creative solutions.

■ CUAACD201 Develop drawing skills to communicate ideas.

■ Be able to plan and organise themselves for detailed projects. ■ Develop concepts on paper using the design process. ■ Be interested in electronic media. ■ Be interested in developing an understanding in a variety of industry related areas. ■ Develop skills in electronic image and text development, manipulation, and animation, using a variety of computer applications. ■ Be interested in developing an understanding in a variety of industry related areas.

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■ BSBCRT311 Apply critical thinking skills in a team environment. ■ CUAIND311 Work effectively in the creative arts industry.

■ CUASOU304 Prepare audio assets.

ASSESSMENT The teaching staff at Mentone Grammar assesses the requirements for Units 1 & 2. Work is assessed through initial developmental exercises and culminating in final 'work based' projects to achieve a competency grade for each of the learning modules. Students must also complete semester examinations (worth 20 per cent of the overall year grade) demonstrating their ability to apply their developed knowledge within a structured tight timeframe. Student work is shared with a Registered Training Organisation (RTO) who issue a formal certificate (for units covered) to successful students.


CERTIFICATE III UNITS 3 & 4 OVERVIEW This subject continues to examine the ways in which people at various levels within a design organisation manage resources to achieve the objectives of the organisation. Students further develop the skills covered in Units 1 & 2 and apply them to successfully undertake and complete work relating to 5 learning modules including: ■ CUAANM301 Create 2D Digital Animations. ■ CUADES302 Explore and apply the creative design process to 2D forms. ■ CUADIG312 Author interactive sequences. ■ CUADIG304 Create Visual Design Components. ■ CUAWRT301 Write Content for a Range of Media. ASSESSMENT The modules are paired to create 3 major SAT’s that make up 66% of the overall grade. Students also undertake a final computer-based examination that makes up the remaining 34% of their grade. Their examination is also used in conjunction with the GAT to moderate the internal SAT’s.

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TECHNOLOGIES FOOD STUDIES • Units 1 to 4 UNIT 1 FOOD ORIGINS

UNIT 2 FOOD MAKERS

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

In this unit students focus on food from historical and cultural perspectives and investigate the origins and roles of food through time and across the world. In Area of Study 1 students explore how humans have historically sourced their food, examining the general progression from hunter-gatherer to rural-based agriculture, to today’s urban living and global trade in food. Students consider the origins and significance of food through inquiry into one particular food-producing region of the world.

In this unit students investigate food systems in contemporary Australia. Area of Study 1 focuses on commercial food production industries, while Area of Study 2 looks at food production in domestic and smallscale settings, as both a comparison and complement to commercial production. Students gain insight into the significance of food industries to the Australian economy and investigate the capacity of industry to provide safe, high-quality food that meets the needs of consumers.

In Area of Study 2 students focus on Australia. They look at Australian indigenous food prior to European settlement and how food patterns have changed since, particularly through the influence of food production, processing and manufacturing industries and immigration. Students investigate cuisines that are part of Australia’s culinary identity today and reflect on the concept of an Australian cuisine.

Students use practical skills and knowledge to produce foods and consider a range of evaluation measures to compare their foods to commercial products. They consider the effective provision and preparation of food in the home and analyse the benefits and challenges of developing and using practical food skills in daily life. In demonstrating their practical skills, students design new food products and adapt recipes to suit particular needs and circumstances. They consider the possible extension of their role as smallscale food producers by exploring potential entrepreneurial opportunities.

Students consider the influence of innovations, technologies and globalisation on food patterns. Throughout this unit they complete topical and contemporary practical activities to enhance, demonstrate and share their learning with others.

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UNIT 3 FOOD IN DAILY LIFE Key Concepts covered In this unit students investigate the many roles and everyday influences of food. Area of Study 1 explores the science of food: our physical need for it and how it nourishes and sometimes harms our bodies. Students investigate the science of food appreciation, the physiology of eating and digestion, and the role of diet on gut health. They analyse the scientific evidence, including nutritional rationale, behind the healthy eating recommendations of the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (see www.eatforhealth.gov.au), and develop their understanding of diverse nutrient requirements. Area of Study 2 focuses on influences on food choices: how communities, families and individuals change their eating patterns over time and how our food values and behaviours develop within social environments. Students inquire into the role of food in shaping and

UNIT 4 FOOD ISSUES, CHALLENGES AND FUTURES expressing identity and connectedness, and the ways in which food information can be filtered and manipulated. They investigate behavioural principles that assist in the establishment of lifelong, healthy dietary patterns.

Key Concepts covered

Practical activities enable students to understand how to plan and prepare food to cater for various dietary needs through the production of everyday food that facilitates the establishment of nutritious and sustainable meal patterns.

In Area of Study 1 students focus on individual responses to food information and misinformation and the development of food knowledge, skills and habits to empower consumers to make discerning food choices. They also consider the relationship between food security, food sovereignty and food citizenship. Students consider how to assess information and draw evidence-based conclusions, and apply this methodology to navigate contemporary food fads, trends and diets. They practise and improve their food selection skills by interpreting food labels and analysing the marketing terms used on food packaging.

In this unit students examine debates about Australia’s food systems as part of the global food systems and describe key issues relating to the challenge of adequately feeding a rising world population.

In Area of Study 2 students focus on issues about the environment, climate, ecology, ethics, farming practices, including the use and management of water and land, the development and application of innovations and technologies, and the challenges of food security, food sovereignty, food safety and food wastage. They research a selected topic, seeking clarity on current situations and points of view, considering solutions and analysing work undertaken to solve problems and support sustainable futures. The focus of this unit is on food issues, challenges and futures in Australia. Practical activities provide students with opportunities to apply their responses to environmental and ethical food issues, reflect on healthy eating recommendations of the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, and consider how food selections and food choices can optimise human and planetary health.

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TECHNOLOGIES VCE PRODUCT DESIGN & TECHNOLOGY • Units 1 to 4 UNIT 1: SUSTAINABLE PRODUCT REDEVELOPMENT

UNIT 2: COLLABORATIVE DESIGN

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

This unit focuses on the analysis, modification and improvement of a product design with consideration of sustainability. It is common for designers in Australia to use products from overseas as inspiration when redeveloping products for the domestic market. Sustainable redevelopment refers to designers and makers ensuring products serve social, economic and environmental needs.

In this unit students work in teams to design and develop an item in a product range or contribute to the design, planning and production of a group product. They focus on factors including end-user needs and wants; function, purpose and context for product design; aesthetics; materials and sustainability; and the impact of these factors on a design solution. Teamwork encourages communication between students and mirrors professional design practice where designers often work within a multi-disciplinary team to develop solutions to design problems.

Generating economic growth for design and manufacturing in Australia can begin with redeveloping existing products so they have positive social and minimal environmental impact. In this unit students examine claims of sustainable practices by designers. Students consider the sustainability of an existing product, such as the impact of sourcing materials, manufacture, distribution, use and likely disposal. They consider how a redeveloped product should attempt to solve a problem related to the original product. Where possible, materials and manufacturing processes used should be carefully selected to improve the overall sustainability of the redeveloped product.

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Students also use digital technologies to facilitate teams to work collaboratively online. In this unit students gain inspiration from a historical or a contemporary design movement or style and its defining factors such as ideological or technological change, philosophy or aesthetics.

UNIT 3: APPLYING THE PRODUCT DESIGN PROCESS

UNIT 4: PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION

Key Concepts covered

Key Concepts covered

In this unit students are engaged in the design and development of a product that addresses a personal, local, or global problem (such as humanitarian issues), or that meets the needs and wants of a potential end-user. The product is developed through a design process and is influenced by a range of factors including the purpose, function and context of the product; user-centred design; innovation and creativity; design elements and principles; sustainability concerns; economic limitations; legal responsibilities; material characteristics and properties; and technology.

In this unit students engage with an end-user to gain feedback throughout the process of production. Students make comparisons between similar products to help evaluate the success of a product in relation to a range of product design factors. The environmental, economic and social impact of products throughout their life cycle can be analysed and evaluated with reference to the product design factors.


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TECHNOLOGIES DATA ANALYTICS • Units 3 & 4 OVERVIEW ■ Find patterns and meaning in data – lots of data! ■ Creatively communicate that meaning to a range of audiences. ■ Develop problem solving and systems thinking skills which can be applied across wide range of fields. UNIT 3 DATA ANALYTICS Review large amounts of data. Develop strategies and skills for finding and extracting the data relevant to a specific audience. Develop skills for storing and manipulating data using relational database software and spreadsheets. Develop skills for displaying data in meaningful ways for specific audiences, including data visualisations. UNIT 4 CYBERSECURITY: DATA AND INFORMATION SECURITY Understand different threats to organisations through the collection and use of data and information, and how organisations can mitigate the risks. Identify why organisations collect and use data and how they manage the collection, storage and communication of data. Develop strategies for solving ethical issues related to data management practices within organisations. Evaluation of disaster recovery plans.

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SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT • Units 3 & 4 SAT INDIVIDUAL MAJOR PROJECT ■ Find your passion – do the research – present the findings! ■ Propose a research question on your topic of interest. Students will collect and analyse data around a topic of their choosing, determine a range of relevant information from primary and secondary sources and design a way to present their findings. They will create an infographic or dynamic data visualisation to inform their target audience, be their own project managers, developing timelines and monitoring progress. ASSESSMENT Students are formatively assessed through ongoing developmental tasks. Mentone Grammar staff provide summative assessments of the requirements for Units 3 & 4. The majority of the work (66 per cent) is assessed through major SATs. The students sit a final VCAA examination (34 per cent) that also moderates their SAT marks.

OVERVIEW ■ Solve real world problems. ■ Create web-based programs to meet a need or opportunity. ■ Developing problem solving and systems thinking skills which can apply across a wide range of fields, not just IT. UNIT 3 PROGRAMMING Develop a solid grounding in programming fundamentals using PHP, a web-based programming language. Explore different data types and stuctures such as arrays and objects. Read and write with permanent storage. Understand the complexities of sorting and searching algorithms. Validate inputs and test code.

UNIT 4 CYBERSECURITY: SOFTWARE SECURITY Understand different threats to organisations through technology systems and how organisations can mitigate the risks. Identify why organisations use and develop software solutions and manage the collection, storage and communication of data. Develop strategies for solving ethical issues related to data management practices within organisations. SAT INDIVIDUAL MAJOR PROJECT ■ Find your passion – write the code! ■ Find a real world client with a need for your best solution, or develop that killer game or app to change the world. Students will plan, design, develop and test their own program, using PHP and other web languages in support, to meet the needs of their users. They will be their own project managers, developing timelines and monitoring progress.


Eblana & Riviera

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Integrated Technologies

Year 7 Technologies

Year 8 Technologies

Year 9 Digital Technology Programming

Product Design & Technology

Digital Technology

Digital Technology

Food Studies

Year 10

Year 11

Year 10 Digital Technology

Units 1 & 2 Applied Computing

Units 3 & 4 Data Analytics

Units 3 & 4 Software Development

Year 10 Robotics

Units 1 & 2 Creative & Digital Media

Year 9 Digital TechnologyAnimation & Digital Media

Year 12

Units 3 & 4 VET Interactive Digital Media

Units 1 & 2 Creative & Digital Media

Units 3 & 4 Creative & Digital Media

Year 9

Year 10

Units 1 & 2

Units 3 & 4

Product Design & Technology Materials

Product Design & Technology Materials

Product Design & Technology Materials

Product Design & Technology Materials

Year 9 Design Technology: Food Studies

Year 10 Design Technology: Food Studies

Units 1 & 2 Food Studies

Units 3 & 4 Food Studies

Year 9 Digital Technology CAD/CAM

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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VISUAL ARTS

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Year 7 • VISUAL ARTS

Year 8 • VISUAL ARTS

Year 9 • VISUAL ARTS

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

In Visual Arts, students explore four units of work: drawing, printmaking, painting, and 3D form. The core skills assessed relate to exploring and expressing ideas, visual art practices, presenting and responding.

In Visual Arts, students explore four units of work: drawing, printmaking, painting, and 3D form. The core skills assessed relate to exploring and expressing ideas, visual art practices, presenting and responding.

SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

There is a focus on students learning to work through the creative process to develop final artworks. They learn to analyse and interpret the way that artists communicate their ideas. They explore, develop, and refine skills using a variety of materials and techniques.

There is a focus on students learning to work through the creative process to develop final artworks. They learn to analyse and interpret the way that artists communicate their ideas. They explore, develop, and refine skills using a variety of materials and techniques.

The process is recorded and annotated in their Visual Diary to evaluate these qualities in their final artworks. We encourage all students to experiment with the creative process to enhance learning and increase confidence. Students will have the opportunity to showcase their work during our annual Art and Design Exhibition.

The process is recorded and annotated in their Visual Diary to evaluate these qualities in their final artworks. We encourage all students to experiment with the creative process to enhance learning and increase confidence. Students will have the opportunity to showcase their work during our annual Art and Design Exhibition.

OVERVIEW In Visual Arts, students develop specialised skills in a range of art forms. Imagination and creativity are promoted through a process of teacher-initiated explorations, including painting, drawing, printmaking, textiles, sculpture, digital photography, mixed media and design. In Visual Arts we aim to assist students to enjoy the experience of creating, to develop their individual skills and to experiment with a wide range of techniques. We also aim to stretch and develop their imagination at an age where pressure from their peers and fear of criticism tend to make them seek approval by playing it safe. We aim to teach students to appreciate and to react with sensitivity and knowledge when viewing works of art. In Year 9 students move in and out of class as they take part in Learning Journeys and running of the Greenways Café. We aim to make the course flexible with a range of activities and a combination of teacher-directed and collaborative projects. Students are encouraged to provide feedback about the type of materials, techniques and processes they want to investigate. This subject helps prepare students for Art, Photography or Visual Communication Design in Year 10.


Year 10 • VISUAL ARTS ART SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

PHOTOGRAPHY SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN SUBJECT LENGTH: YEAR UNIT VALUE: TWO

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

Art aims to promote imagination and creativity through a process of teacher-initiated explorations. Students work on a series of projects that extend their practical skills while being encouraged to explore new materials, methods, and techniques. They are introduced to a range of art forms and challenged to investigate how art pushes the boundaries. Art forms considered may include drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, textiles, sculpture, mixed media, and installation. Students will eventually work independently, investigating and pursuing individual concepts and preferred art forms.

Photography focuses on developing skills, techniques, and knowledge in the use of digital photography. Students learn to use a DSLR camera and work through assignments based around the different modes and functions of the camera. The course then encourages students to investigate sources of inspiration and individual ideas as the basis for developing artworks. Students explore a wide range of materials and techniques as tools for communicating ideas, observations, and experiences through photography. This course utilises industry standard equipment and software to develop fundamental skills in digital image creation and manipulation. The Year 10 Photography course is designed to develop the practical and theoretical skills necessary for future VCE studies in Art Making and Exhibiting (Photography).

Visual Communication Design at Year 10 aims to provide students with an opportunity to improve their freehand drawing, instrumental drawing, digital drawing and creative thinking. Students explore the three design fields: communication design, industrial design, and environmental design. The exploration of these fields can include logo design, product design and architectural design. The study also aims to expose students to a range of differing media, materials, and methods of presentation, as well as developing a greater understanding of the design elements and design principles. The Year 10 Visual Communication Design course fosters the practical and theoretical skills necessary for future VCE studies in Visual Communication Design.

Students expand their knowledge and skills in the use of mediums, surfaces, and applications. They are encouraged to provide feedback about the type of materials, techniques and processes they want to investigate. The Year 10 Art course is designed to develop the practical and theoretical skills necessary for future VCE studies in Art Creative Practice.

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VISUAL ARTS ART CREATIVE PRACTICE (PREVIOUSLY ART) • Units 1 & 2 Students may work in a range of selected art forms including drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, sculpture, textiles, installation.

UNIT 1 INTERPRETING ARTWORKS AND EXPLORING THE CREATIVE PRACTICE

UNIT 2 INTERPRETING ARTWORKS AND DEVELOPING THE CREATIVE PRACTICE

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

Students explore areas of personal interest to develop three artworks. They use a range of materials and artforms and are guided through the Creative Process. Students explore artists who have been inspired by personal identity. They study three artists and one artwork from each of them, using the Structural and Personal lens to interpret the meaning and message.

Discuss three artists from different times and cultures. Students explore social and cultural ideas to create one artwork using a collaborative approach. Students document their use of the Creative Process in their Visual Diary.

Key concepts covered Discuss three artists from different times and cultures. Students produce three artworks using different materials in a selection of set tasks. Students document their use of the Creative Process in their Visual Diary.

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Key concepts covered In this unit, students explore areas of personal interest using any art form they like. They will be expected to create one artwork that will be displayed at the Art and Design Exhibition. Students study four conceptual artists and focus on the way art reflects and communicates the values of contemporary society.


ART CREATIVE PRACTICE (PREVIOUSLY ART) • Units 3 & 4 Students can choose to work in any selected art form including Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Photography, Digital Media, Sculpture, Textiles, Installation.

UNIT 3 INVESTIGATION, IDEAS, ARTWORKS, AND THE CREATIVE PRACTICE OVERVIEW Students select one artist and one artwork as a starting point to develop one finished artwork. After students have researched one artist, they develop one finished artwork using the Creative Practice. The finished artwork will contribute to the Body of Work developed over Units 3 and 4. Key concepts covered Students develop personal ideas using research, that examines one artwork and the practice of one artist, and then produce one finished artwork using the Creative Practice. Students explore an area of personal interest and document the use of the Creative Practice in their Visual Diary including reflective annotations.

UNIT 4 INTERPRETING, RESOLVING, AND PRESENTING ARTWORKS AND THE CREATIVE PRACTICE OVERVIEW Students continue to build upon ideas begun in Unit 3, students begin Unit 4 by presenting a critique to evaluate their use of the Creative practice. The feedback the students receive will inform how they can continue to refine and resolve their Body of Work. Students compare the practices of historical and contemporary artists. Key concepts covered Document the use of the Creative Practice and present a critique to inform the refinement and resolution of the Body of Work. Use the Creative Practice to resolve and present a Body of Work including one artwork. Compare the practices of historical and contemporary artists and use the Interpretive Lenses (Structural, Personal and Cultural) to analyse artworks.

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VISUAL ARTS ART MAKING AND EXHIBITING (PREVIOUSLY STUDIO ARTS) • Units 1 & 2 Art Making and Exhibiting is taught primarily as a Photography-based subject. For students who did not do photography in Year 10 basic camera skills and techniques such as using the shutter and aperture will be taught.

UNIT 1 EXPLORE, EXPAND, AND INVESTIGATE

UNIT 2 UNDERSTAND, DEVELOP AND RESOLVE

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

In this Unit students explore materials, techniques and processes used in Photography. Students also explore the historical development of photography and investigate how characteristics; properties and the use of materials and techniques have changed over time.

In Unit 2 students respond to a set theme and progressively develop their own ideas. They consolidate their ideas to plan and make finished artworks. Students also learn how exhibitions are planned and designed and how spaces are organised for exhibitions.

Key concepts covered

On completion of this Unit students will be able to select a range of photographic artworks from an exhibition and other sources to design their own thematic exhibition. They will also explore and progressively document in a Visual Diary the use of art elements and principles and aesthetic qualities to make experimental photographic works. Students will progressively document their art making to develop and resolve their ideas in at least one finished artwork.

Students document and record their findings from their exploration and experimentation. They use annotations and experimental exercises to record and reflect on their experiences. Students will make at least one finished photographic artwork using skills and techniques they have developed. They will also investigate the artworks of three Australian artists and present information on a proposed exhibition of their artworks.

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Key concepts covered


ART MAKING AND EXHIBITING (PREVIOUSLY STUDIO ARTS) • Units 3 & 4 Art Making and Exhibiting is taught as a Photography-based subject.

UNIT 3 COLLECT, EXTEND, AND CONNECT

UNIT 4 CONSOLIDATE, PRESENT AND CONSERVE

OVERVIEW

OVERVIEW

Students explore contexts, subject matter, and ideas to develop photographic artworks in imaginative and creative ways. Students use their visual arts journal to record their art making. They also document their exploration and experimentation with photographic materials and techniques. Students will also present a critique of their artworks to their peer group for feedback where they then evaluate their work and revise, refine, and resolve their final photographic artworks.

In Unit 4 students make connections to the artworks they have made in Unit 3, consolidating, and extending their ideas and art making to further refine and resolve photographic artworks. The progressive resolution of these photographic works is documented in the student’s visual arts journal, demonstrating their developing technical skills as well as their refinement and resolution of subject matter, ideas, and style. Students also reflect on their selected finished photographic works and evaluate the materials, techniques and processes used to make them. Students will visit a minimum of two exhibitions to provide inspiration and influence for the artworks they make.

Key concepts covered Students will collect information from photographers and photographic works to develop subject matter and ideas in their own photography. Students will research and plan an exhibition of the art or photographic works of three artists.

Key concepts covered Students refine and resolve at least one finished artwork based on the ideas explored in artworks in Unit 3. Students refine and resolve at least one finished photographic work and the techniques and processes used to make them. Students plan and learn how to display at least one finished photographic work and present a critique. Student will also learn about the presentation, conservation and care of artworks including the conservation and care of their own artworks. 123


VISUAL ARTS VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN • Units 1 to 4 OVERVIEW If you wish to learn about the world of design, learn how to think creatively and enjoy drawing this is the subject for you! UNIT 1 INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN Key Concepts covered On completion of this unit, students should be able to create drawings for different purposes using a range of drawing methods, media and materials. Drawing from imagination, observing from real life and presentation drawing will be explored.

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UNIT 2 APPLICATIONS OF VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS WITHIN THE DESIGN FIELDS

UNIT 3 VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN PRACTICES

Key Concepts covered

In this unit, students gain an understanding of the process designers employ to structure their thinking and communicate ideas with clients, target audiences, other designers and specialists. Through practical investigation and analysis of existing visual communications, students gain insight into how the selection of methods, media and materials, and the application of design elements and design principles, can create effective visual communications for specific audiences and purposes. They investigate and experiment with the use of manual and digital methods, media and materials to make informed decisions when selecting suitable approaches for the development of their own design ideas and concepts.

This unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design thinking and drawing methods to create visual communications to meet specific purposes in designated design fields. Students will learn about technical drawing conventions to communicate information and ideas associated with the environmental or industrial fields of design. They also investigate how typography and imagery are used in these fields, as well as the communication field of design. In response to a brief, students develop an understanding of the design process as a means of organising their thinking about approaches to solving design problems and presenting ideas.

Key Concepts covered

UNIT 4 VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN DEVELOPMENT, EVALUATION AND PRESENTATION Key Concepts covered The focus of this unit is on the development of design concepts and two final presentations of visual communications to meet the requirements of the brief. This involves applying the design process twice to meet each of the stated communication needs. Having completed their brief and generated ideas in Unit 3, students continue the design process by developing and refining concepts for each communication need stated in the brief. They utilise a range of digital and manual two- and three-dimensional methods, media and materials. They investigate how the application of design elements and design principles create different communication messages and conveys ideas to the target audience. As students revisit stages to undertake further research or idea generation when developing and presenting their design solutions, they develop an understanding of the design process. Students learn to reflect and evaluate their design solutions against the brief to assist with keeping their endeavours focused.


Eblana & Riviera Mixed Media

Year 7

Year 8

Visual Arts

Visual Arts

Year 9

Year 9 Visual Arts

Solid Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is compulsory

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12

Year 10 Art

Units 1 & 2 Art Creative Practice

Units 3 & 4 Art Creative Practice

Year 10 Photography

Units 1 & 2 Art Making and Exhibiting

Units 3 & 4 Art Making and Exhibiting

Year 10

Units 1 & 2

Units 3 & 4

Visual Communication Design

Visual Communication Design

Visual Communication Design

Dotted Line Indicates: Successful completion of the previous subject is recommended

Elective Subject

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VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR) LITERACY OVERVIEW This course provides foundational skills and VCE Vocational Major Literacy focuses on the development of the knowledge and skills required to be literate in Australia today. Students read, write, speak and listen in different contexts, enabling them to understand the different ways in which knowledge and opinion are represented through print, visual, oral, digital and multimodal representations. Students develop their everyday literacy skills through thinking, listening, speaking, reading, viewing and writing to meet the demands of the workplace, the community, further study and their own life skills, needs and aspirations.

UNIT 1 LITERACY FOR PERSONAL USE AND CREATING DIGITAL TEXTS

UNIT 2 UNDERSTANDING ISSUES AND VOICES AND RESPONDING TO OPINIONS

UNIT 3 INFORMATIONAL, ORGANISATIONAL AND PROCEDURAL TEXTS

Key concepts covered

Key concepts covered

Key concepts covered

■ Explore structures and features of different text types such as narrative, informative, persuasive, instructional, letters, media articles and releases, film, email, digital messaging and workplace reports.

■ Apply the elements of oral communication, including eye contact, tone, body language and intonation.

■ Explore structures and features of different texts such as reports, tax forms and advice, insurance forms, company policies, project proposals and promotional texts.

■ Study and apply the ways in which purpose, context and audience influence the structure and language of different text types. ■ Study and apply the way visual and auditory cues, language and other strategies are used to create meaning. ■ Investigate the structure, purpose and audience of webpages and other digital texts. ■ Critically evaluate the reliability and effectiveness of a range of digital texts. ■ Discuss and apply features and importance of digital security, principles of copyright and safe and respectful practices in the digital world.

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■ Discuss ways in which bias and perspective can influence authors, speakers and audiences, and how different communities engage in debate or discussion. ■ Apply the conventions of discussion and debate, including active listening and questioning. ■ Explore different structures of written, spoken and multimedia persuasive and influential content. ■ Language and visuals that contribute to the effectiveness of an argument.

■ Study the way different organisations, groups and businesses develop their own use of language. ■ Recognise key elements of organisational, informational and procedural texts including table of contents, headings, sub-headings, paragraphs and indexes to locate relevant information. ■ Create informative, procedural and instructional content for a chosen organisation or workplace taking into account the audience and purpose.


UNIT 4 LITERACY FOR ADVOCACY Key concepts covered ■ Explore the structures and features of different influential and advocational texts, including webpages, brochures and social media. ■ Design and create influential or promotional material appropriate for context and audience. ■ Critically evaluate the appeal and effectiveness of influential or promotional material from different individuals or organisations, considering purpose and the social and workplace values associated with them. ■ Apply principles of sequence and structure to oral content that advocates or presents advice to an audience, including use of evidence to support ideas and opinions.

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VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR) NUMERACY OVERVIEW VCE Vocational Major Numeracy focuses on enabling students to develop and enhance their numeracy skills to make sense of their personal, public and vocational lives. Through the applied learning principles Numeracy students understand the mathematical requirements for personal organisation matters involving money, time and travel. They can then apply these skills to their everyday lives to recognise monetary value, understand scheduling and timetabling, direction, planning, monetary risk and reward. The integration of digital technologies in the learning of mathematical processes is essential and is embedded throughout this study for students to then apply to independent living, further study or to work.

UNIT 1 NUMBER, SHAPE, QUANTITIES AND MEASURES, AND RELATIONSHIPS Key concepts covered ■ Apply concepts of number, shape, quantities and relationships to the following numeracies: personal numeracy, civic numeracy, financial numeracy, health numeracy, vocational numeracy, recreational numeracy. ■ Undertake single- and multi-step operations and tasks applied to a range of numbers, including positive and negative numbers, fractions, decimals and percentages and numbers expressed using familiar power notations. ■ Investigate a range of two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional objects. ■ Undertake calculations and determine measurements of distance, perimeter, area, volume and capacity and apply conversions. ■ Discuss relationships between variables and represent these relationships with mathematical expressions, or graphical or tabular representations.

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■ Apply the mathematical problem-solving cycle to investigate and solve a problem where the mathematics is embedded within a real-world context, such as the workplace. ■ Consider personal experience, mathematical and prior knowledge to select appropriate solution strategies to formulate a mathematical plan to solve a real-life problem. ■ Explore contemporary technological, online and digital media, including software and applications based on computers, tablets, calculators and hand-held devices and the relevance, appropriateness of their use and application in solving mathematical problems. ■ Investigate technology to visualise and represent information, such as diagrams, tables, charts, infographics, and graphs that model situations and solve practical problems.


UNIT 2 DIMENSION AND DIRECTION, DATA, UNCERTAINTY, SYSTEMATICS ■ Apply concepts of dimension and direction, to the following numeracies: personal numeracy, civic numeracy, financial numeracy, health numeracy, vocational numeracy, recreational numeracy. ■ Investigate the use of space, direction and location in relation to landmarks and compass directions. ■ Collect, represent and undertake different analyses of data to discover patterns in data, undertake summary statistics, and derive meaning from data. ■ Make decisions based on inferences about sets of accessible, relevant and appropriate data and information. ■ Evaluate risk in relation to relevant and appropriate problems with reference to likelihood of events occurring. ■ Study and apply appropriate technologies such as spreadsheets, software or applications to input or record real-life data and information.

UNITS 3 AND 4 The curriculum draws on the key knowledge and skills developed in Units 1 & 2 with the development of more complex numeracy and mathematical skills and knowledge. Students extend their mathematical skills with consideration of their local, community, national and global environments and contexts, and the use and evaluation of appropriate technologies. Across all four units students will apply the mathematical problem-solving cycle to investigate and solve a problem where the mathematics is embedded within a real-world context.

■ Explore contemporary technological, online and digital media, including software and applications based on computers, tablets, calculators and hand-held devices and the relevance, appropriateness of their use and application in solving mathematical problems. ■ Investigate technology to visualise and represent information, such as to produce diagrams, tables, charts, infographics, and graphs that model situations and solve practical problems.

They will: ■ Identify the mathematics; act on and use the mathematics; evaluate and reflect; communicate and report findings. ■ Consider personal experience, mathematical and prior knowledge to select appropriate solution strategies to formulate a mathematical plan to solve a real-life problem.

■ Use technology to collect, organise and sort relevant data and information and to plan and schedule different actions.

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VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR) PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT SKILLS OVERVIEW VCE Vocational Major Personal Development Skills (PDS) takes an active approach to personal development, self-realisation and citizenship by exploring interrelationships between individuals and communities. PDS focuses on health, wellbeing, community engagement and social sciences, and provides a framework through which students seek to understand and optimise their potential as individuals and as members of their community.

UNIT 1 HEALTHY INDIVIDUALS

UNIT 2 CONNECTING WITH COMMUNITY

UNIT 3 LEADERSHIP AND TEAMWORK

Key concepts covered

Key concepts covered

Key concepts covered

■ Explore personal identity and emotional intelligence within different contexts, such as education, employment, social, family and online.

■ Discuss different groups within the community and the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizens.

■ Examine characteristics of social awareness, such as appreciating diversity, understanding different perspectives, empathy, contribution to society, relationships and consideration of social, cultural and ethical norms that facilitate respectful relationships.

■ Discuss strategies to develop and apply the elements of emotional intelligence in relation to self, such as resilience, effective communication, a strengthsbased approach, problem-solving, conflict resolution and self-management. ■ Discuss strategies to develop and apply metacognitive skills relating to personal identity and emotional intelligence. ■ Investigate factors affecting wellbeing such as emotional, social, physical, cultural, economic, environmental and geographic. ■ Discuss characteristics of inclusive and cohesive communities. ■ Apply communication, critical thinking, problem-solving and metacognitive skills to design and implement an activity that aims to improve health and wellbeing. ■ Investigate the positive and negative impacts of technology on personal identity, health and wellbeing, cultural engagement and social connectedness.

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■ Explore community engagement, including active citizenship, leadership, empathy and connection to culture. ■ Discuss and develop strategies to promote community participation. ■ Discuss and analyse differing perspectives relating to issues and the impact of issues on community cohesion at local, national and global levels. ■ Investigate key features of effective community engagement such as prioritising the needs of the community, building local autonomy, local leadership, capacity building, flexibility, developing partnerships and sharing information.

■ Discuss and apply interpersonal skills to support effective and respectful interactions with others, including verbal and non-verbal communication, collaboration, negotiation, conflict resolution, decision making and leadership. ■ Apply and evaluate strategies relating to social awareness and interpersonal skills when using digital technologies. ■ Discuss characteristics of effective leadership and styles of leadership. ■ Critical and creative thinking relating to leadership, including ethics and democracy. ■ Fostering innovation to address issues, solve problems and achieve goals. ■ Discuss and apply individual attributes when working within a team such as motivation, reliability, persistence and adaptability for the development of collective goals that benefit a community or group.


UNIT 4 COMMUNITY PROJECT Key concepts covered ■ Investigate and analyse an environmental, cultural, economic or social issue of significance to the community and plan a community project to address the chosen area of concern. ■ Apply planning processes to design a community project, including selecting and explaining an area of concern within a local, national or global community; preparing resources and budget; identification of stakeholders; development of strategies. ■ Apply communication, critical thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, planning and metacognitive skills when working independently or collaboratively. ■ Discuss contingency planning and how to apply a contingency plan if required. ■ Apply critical and creative thinking skills to identify strengths, weaknesses and opportunities relating to the overall outcomes of the community project. ■ Document and communicate the evaluation of the community project in an appropriate format.

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VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR) WORK RELATED SKILLS OVERVIEW VCE Vocational Major Work Related Skills (WRS) examines a range of skills, knowledge and capabilities relevant to achieving individual career and educational goals. Students develop a broad understanding of workplace environments and the future of work and education, in order to engage in theoretical and practical planning and decision-making for a successful transition to their desired pathway. Students undertake Structured Workplace Learning one day per week to develop employability skills, technical skills and personal capabilities.

UNIT 1 CAREERS AND LEARNING FOR THE FUTURE Key concepts covered ■ Investigate sources of reliable and credible employment information, such as government websites, careers specialists, industry publications, tertiary institutions and employment agencies. ■ Explore labour market information relating to a range of occupations, including skills shortage areas, geographic location, industry growth areas, emerging industries, green industries, and local, national and global trends. ■ Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pursuing employment in low-growth, medium-growth and high-growth industries. ■ Apply strategies to engage in planning and decision-making relating to employment, such as SWOT analysis, decision-making models as well as consulting with trusted people such as careers specialists, mentors, employers and colleagues. ■ Goal setting for future employment, career possibilities and further education and training.

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UNIT 2 WORKPLACE SKILLS AND CAPABILITIES Key concepts covered ■ Explore the changing nature of work. ■ Develop and apply employability skills including communication, planning and organising, teamwork, problem solving, self-management, initiative and enterprise, technology, and commitment to continuous learning. ■ Develop and apply specialist and technical skills for specific industry groups or occupations. ■ Develop and apply personal capabilities such as growth mindset, work ethic, selfregulation and conflict resolution. ■ Collect evidence and artefacts of personal skills and capabilities with relation to industry groupings. ■ Investigate the relationship between ongoing training and development and increasing the transferability of employability and specialist skills. ■ Explore the recruitment and selection processes, including job design, job advertisements, job applications, shortlisting and interviews.

UNIT 3 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, WORKPLACE ENVIRONMENT AND PRACTICE

UNIT 4 PORTFOLIO PREPARATION AND PRESENTATION

Key concepts covered

Key concepts covered

■ Investigate the role of statutory and national policy bodies including WorkSafe Victoria, the Fair Work Ombudsman, Victorian Equal Opportunity and Human Rights Commission.

■ Explore the methods and mechanisms for communicating with teams and individuals in the workplace, taking individual differences and industries into account.

■ Discuss workplace culture and the characteristics of a supportive, harmonious, safe and healthy workplace.

■ Research, discuss and identify the benefits of developing diverse teams and networks.

■ Explore employer expectations and individual responsibility in a workplace, including work ethic, loyalty, professional behaviour and conduct, and respectful treatment of colleagues. ■ Investigate employee rights in a workplace, including: flexible work arrangements; opportunities for training, development and promotion; a safe workplace; appropriate pay and conditions in exchange for skills, knowledge, labour and experience; and appropriate mechanisms for resolving conflict. ■ Investigate employee advocates, including unions and professional associations.

■ Identify, justify and apply a variety of appropriate open questioning techniques for clarification and problem-solving purposes.

■ Investigate purpose and types of portfolios and their intended audience and uses in different contexts. ■ Discuss characteristics of a high-quality portfolio, including: relevance to target industry, layout, aesthetic, adherence to spelling and grammar conventions, adherence to set criteria and/or entry requirements. ■ Explore and collect types of evidence and artefacts included in a portfolio: cover letter, resume, photographic evidence, written artifacts. ■ Investigate similarities and differences, advantages and disadvantages of digital, physical and hybrid portfolios. ■ Communicate personal skills and knowledge to a target industry panel or target audience panel using a portfolio to enhance and support presentation to the panel. ■ Apply strategies to evaluate the composition and presentation of a portfolio, including selfassessment, feedback from different sources and comparison to selection criteria and/or entry requirements.

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VCE-VM (VOCATIONAL MAJOR)

INDUSTRY SPECIFIC SKILLS

VPC (VICTORIAN PATHWAYS CERTIFICATE)

The VCE Vocational Major must incorporate industry specific units from Vocational Education and Training in Schools (VETiS) programs or VCE VET, which the students undertake externally at TAFE or other training organisation. Students are not required to focus on or complete any single VET certificate, however, a completed certificate across two years will give students a Units 3 & 4 sequence.

The VPC is an inclusive Years 11 and 12 certificate that will meet the needs of students not able or ready to complete a certificate at the VCE level. The VPC is benchmarked at Australian Qualifications Framework Level and not recognised as a senior secondary certificate of education.

THE VCE-VM AND VPC AT MENTONE GRAMMAR ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

Students who complete the VPC at Mentone Grammar will develop a suite of employability and skills and workplace knowledge to take to further studies at TAFE (Cert II, III or IV level) or transition straight into the workforce.

■ strengths and interests

The VCE-VM allows students to try different industries, so they gain a wide range of experience and make informed pathways choices. Students complete an additional Certificate II in Sport Coaching as part of the Year 11 VCE-VM program. Examples of external VET offerings include: Allied Health Assistance, Animal Studies, Applied Fashion, Automotive, Beauty Services, Building and Construction, Community Services, Early Childhood Education, Electrotechnology, Engineering, Equine Studies, Horticulture, Hospitality, Interior Decoration, IT, Laboratory Skills, Salon Assistant, Small Business. Please note: Students undertaking a scored VCE pathway can also include a VET program as one of their subjects. Some are scored and will provide students with a Study Score while others contribute block credit toward a student’s ATAR.

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Core subjects of Literacy, Numeracy, Personal Development Skills and Work Related Skills will cover the same content as in the VCE-VM with greater structure and teacher support.

All students must complete an expression of interest and attend an interview to ensure VCAL is aligned to their desired pathway. The decision to undertake the VCAL should take into account the student’s: ■ vocational goals and envisaged pathways ■ preferred learning style ■ readiness for participation in structured workplace learning or formal vocational education ■ leadership capabilities. Please note, all students should select an appropriate VCE course initially, as entry into the VCE-VM or VPC program. If a student is accepted into the VCE-VM or VPC program, they will be removed from the VCE subjects as appropriate. STRUCTURE Students will attend formal classes at School three days per week, complete their VETiS course either on site or externally one day per week and undertake a day of structured workplace learning one day per week.

FEES VETiS courses will incur additional tuition fees if undertaken off campus and these will be partly subsidised by the School. INTEGRATED CURRICULUM Just as work and life are not compartmentalised into ‘subject areas’ neither is the approach to meeting outcomes in the VCE-VM. Students will apply appropriate literacy, numeracy, personal development and work-related skills to a variety of projects that focus on topics such as moving out of home, the travel and tourism industry, healthy lifestyles, sustainability and future finances. THE MENTONE GRAMMAR DIFFERENCE The greatest value for a student undertaking the VCE-VM or VPC at Mentone Grammar is the opportunity to complete their schooling in a safe and supportive environment and the positive relationships they continue to forge with their peers and teachers.


The benefits of our VCE-VM and VPC programs include: ■ individualised programs with targeted teacher support

■ ongoing career and pathways support that continues beyond school completion

■ strong wellbeing care, primarily through the House system

■ guidance and assistance with securing an appropriate and challenging work placement

■ access to VCE subjects ■ a wide range of real-life learning nominated experiences ■ development of transferable skills applicable to workplaces and future experience

■ engaging community projects that develop confidence, active citizenship and leadership ■ Duke of Edinburgh program.

■ creative, rigorous projects designed to enhance literacy and numeracy skills, planning and organisation, time management, teamwork and communication ■ continued participation in cocurricular activities including Sport, Cadets and the School’s formal occasions

Please note: In the event of COVID-19 restrictions, some VCAL offerings may be postponed, modified or cancelled during 2023. 135


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ELECTIVE SUBJECTS YEARS 9-12

SUBJECT SELECTION Students have the opportunity to study a number of elective subjects, in addition to the core subjects. Early in Term 3, students have an opportunity to submit their preferences for the elective subjects that they wish to undertake in the following year.

Subject selection is emailed to students to digitally enter their preferences. This process is overseen by the Director of Learning and Teaching, the Head of Frogmore, the Head of VCE Performance and the School Timetabler.

Please note that subjects may not run if they are selected by less than 10 students.

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YEAR 9 SUBJECT SELECTION

YEAR 10 SUBJECT SELECTION

LENGTH

UNIT VALUE

Accounting and Economics

Semester

1

Business and the Law

Semester

1

English Language

Semester

1

English Literature

Semester

1

Sports Science

Year

2

Health of a Nation

Year

2

Global Politics

Semester

1

STUDENTS NEED TO SELECT FOUR UNITS OF ELECTIVE SUBJECTS

STUDENTS NEED TO SELECT SIX UNITS OF ELECTIVE SUBJECTS

■ If a subject runs for one Semester: It counts for one Unit.

■ If a subject runs for one Semester: It counts for one Unit.

■ If a subject runs for a full Year: It counts for two Units.

■ If a subject runs for a full Year: It counts for two Units.

Every effort will be made to ensure that students receive their first preferences.

Every effort will be made to ensure that students receive their first preferences.

German

Year

2

Chinese

Year

2

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS SUBJECT SELECTION

VSL

Year

2

Students will not be required to undertake Units 1 & 2 Bridging EAL in Year 11 if they achieve:

Music Styles

Year

2

Drama

Year

2

Investigating Biology

Semester

1

Psychology

Semester

1

Digital Technology

Year

2

Product Design and Technology

Semester

1

Robotics Engineering

Semester

1

Food Studies

Semester

1

Art

Year

2

Photography

Year

2

Visual Communication Design

Year

2

■ A minimum 70%+ average across their Year 10 subjects, excluding Chinese: First Language and Year 10 Bridging EAL. ■ Students should be eligible to undertake Units 3 & 4 Chinese: First Language in Year 11 if they achieve: a minimum of B+ in Year 10 Chinese: First Language; and a 70%+ average across their Year 10 subjects, excluding Chinese: First Language and Year 10 Bridging EAL. Further information is available in the International Students Handbook detailing CIRCOS/VRQA/Visa conditions and regulations relating to modes of study and attendance.

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SUBJECT


YEAR 11 UNITS 3 & 4 SUBJECTS STUDYING

APPLYING

YEAR 11 UNITS 3 & 4 SUBJECTS THAT MAY BE UNDERTAKEN

Making the academic transition from Year 10 to a Units 3 & 4 subject is a big step. Not all students are mature enough, both emotionally and academically, in Year 11 to successfully study Units 3 & 4 concepts and subject matter. Each VCE subject is designed to provide a two-year program.

Students may apply to study one Units 3 & 4 subject in Year 11.

Some Units 3 & 4 subjects are more suited to being studied in Year 11 than others. These include:

Units 1 & 2 are nationally and internationally benchmarked to a Year 11 standard. Similarly, Units 3 & 4 are benchmarked to a Year 12 standard. Students will generally be better prepared to study Units 3 & 4 by first studying Units 1 & 2 in Year 11. Studying a Units 3 & 4 subject in Year 11 may mean that an uneven distribution of time is spent on one subject, resulting in a neglect of all other subjects where the important fundamentals of these subjects are taught and learnt in preparation for Year 12.

Approval for students wishing to study Units 3 & 4 during Year 11 will be the decision of the Head of Frogmore and the Director of Learning and Teaching.

POSSIBLE SUBJECTS

PRECURSOR SUBJECTS

Business Management

Year 10 Business and the Law

In every instance, the decision will be based on the best interests of the student.

Data Analytics (every second year)

Year 10 Digital Technology

Drama

Year 10 Drama

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS

Geography

Year 10 Humanities

Students who apply to study a Units 3 & 4 subject in Year 11 must meet the following minimum requirements by the end of Year 10:

Global Politics

Year 10 Global Politics

Health & Human Development

Year 10 Health of a Nation

■ A minimum grade average of B for all Year 10 subjects;

Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4

Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2*

Physical Education

Year 10 Sport Science

Psychology

Year 10 Psychology

Software Development

Year 10 Digital Technology or Year 10 Robotics

VET: Creative Digital Media

VET: Creative Digital Media

Theatre Studies (every second year)

Year 10 Drama

■ A minimum grade average of B for English; ■ A minimum grade of B+ in the precursor subject. Where the student has not met the minimum requirements, the student will be asked to reconsider their subject choices for the following year.

* Students need a 95%+ average in Mathematical Methods Unit 1 & 2 in Year 10 to be eligible for this option.

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HOW THE VCE WORKS HOW ARE THE VCE AND VCE-VM STRUCTURED?

WHAT DO STUDENTS NEED TO DO TO ACHIEVE THE VCE OR VCE-VM?

■ The VCE course is made up of studies and units, some of which must be studied as a sequence.

■ To achieve the VCE students must successfully complete 16 units including:

■ A study is a subject, for example, English or Biology. It is made up of four units (Units 1, 2, 3 and 4), each of which is a semester in length. ■ For most students, VCE is completed over two years. ■ Students typically study Units 1 and 2 in their first year, and Units 3 and 4 in their second year. ■ Students can study Unit 1 or Unit 2 of a subject as stand-alone units. However, students must enrol in Units 3 and 4 of a study as a sequence. This sequence needs to be completed in the same year if a Study Score is to be calculated. ■ Students usually study from 20 to 24 units (five or six studies) in Years 11 and 12. ■ Students can take longer than two years to finish VCE, if needed. Some students start VCE in Year 10, and some study Units 3 and 4 in Year 11. ■ Students should talk to their teachers or careers counsellor about how to structure their VCE program to best meet their needs.

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■ three units from the English group, two of which must be a Units 3 and 4 sequence ■ at least three additional Units 3 and 4 sequences. ■ Students can refer to the Subject Guide for the differences between the English group studies or find out more about them on the VCAA website. ■ Students can complete the remaining units, including the three sequences at the Units 3 and 4 level, in any study of interest. This could be an additional English group study on top of the units already selected, to meet the minimum English requirement. ■ Class teachers determine if a student has satisfactorily completed a unit based on the work produced and submitted and adherence to VCAA and School rules

HOW TO ACHIEVE MARKS IN THE VCE? ■ Units 1 and 2 are marked by the School; teachers will set a range of assessments to see how students are progressing. The assessments have deadlines, so students need to plan and submit their work on time. Deadlines can only be extended in special circumstances.

■ For Units 1 and 2 students will receive either S (Satisfactory), or N (Non-Satisfactory). The School may give a student a grade for each unit, but only the S counts towards the VCE. ■ For Units 3 and 4 students will have grades calculated from A+ to E, UG (Ungraded), or NA (Not Assessed) for assessment tasks, as well as an S or N. ■ There are three graded assessments for each VCE study at Units 3 and 4 level. All VCE VET programs with scored assessment have two graded assessments. ■ Depending on the study, these may be School-based Assessments and/or external assessments. School-based assessments are set by the teacher and include School-assessed Coursework (SAC) that is completed at School, and School-Assessed Tasks (SAT) that are completed at School and home. These are marked at School. The VCAA checks the marks to make sure that all schools in Victoria are marking to the same standard. Students can read about the rules for marking/assessment on the VCAA website, or ask their teachers. External assessments are set and marked by the VCAA. They are the same for all students taking the same VCE study. Usually this will be an exam – whether written, oral, performance or in an electronic format. External assessments are marked by assessors who are experts in their area of study. All VCE

studies are marked to the same standard and there are multiple checks to make sure that marking is fair. Exams are held each year in October and November. Students will receive plenty of notice about the exact dates of the exams from the School.

WHAT IS A STUDY SCORE? ■ If students obtain at least two graded assessments and achieve an S for both Units 3 and 4 in a study in the same year, they will receive a Study Score. A Study Score is a number between 0 and 50 that indicates a ranking in terms of all students doing that study in that year.

WHAT IS AN ATAR? ■ Tertiary institutions look at the ATAR and the combinations of VCE studies students have completed before offering places. ■ The ATAR is calculated by the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) on the basis of study scores and is presented as a ranking between 0.00 and 99.95. ■ If students want to obtain an ATAR, they need to have at least four study scores, one of which must be from the English group. ■ Students can find out more information about the ATAR, subject combinations and course choices through VTAC. https://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/studentguides/ myvce/Pages/HowVCEWorks.aspx


VCE SUBJECTS THAT MAY BE UNDERTAKEN

SUBJECT

SUBJECT

Commerce

Accounting Business Management Economics Legal Studies

Performing Arts

Drama Music Industry Music Performance Theatre Studies

English

English English as an Additional Language (EAL) English Language English Literature

Health and Physical Education

Health and Human Development Physical Education

Science

Biology Chemistry Environmental Science Physics Psychology

Technology

Applied Computing

Creative Digital Media Data Analytics Food Studies Product Design and Technology Software Development

Humanities

Australian and Global Politics Geography Global Politics History: 20th Century History: Revolutions

Languages

Chinese – First Language Chinese – Second Language German VSL

Mathematics

Foundation Mathematics Further Mathematics General Mathematics Mathematical Methods Specialist Mathematics

Visual Art

Art: Creative Practice (formerly Art)

Art: Making and Exhibiting (formerly Studio) Visual Communication Design

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NEED TO KNOW MORE? For further information on subject offerings please email any questions to: enquiry@mentonegrammar.net

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63 Venice Street, Mentone, Victoria Australia 3194 T: +61 3 9584 4211 E: enrol@mentonegrammar.net www.mentonegrammar.net MENTONE GRAMMAR SCHOOL EST. 1923 ABN 87 616 069 977 CRICOS Code 00323C