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Mengyao —Han— 21-01-1990

EDUCATION Master Apr.2016-Oct.2013 Politecnico di Milano Master Degree of Architecture Achieved by evaluation :110 Lode/100 (distinction)

Bachelor Jun.2013-Sep.2008 Sichuan University,China Bachelor Degree of Architecture Engineer SKILLS Language Chinese: Mother tongue English: Excellent (IETLS 7.5,2013)

CONTACTS syrinxhan@gmail.com

www.facebook.com/syrinxhan

Belgrad 8, Plovdiv, Bulgaria Postal :4000

it.pinterest.com/mengyaoh/

+359 885145994

Instagram ID: syrinxhan


Contents Art Factory

——Berlin Contemporary Art Museum

- Project Development

------------------------------------6

- Research

------------------------------------8

- Composition Study

-----------------------------------14

- Visualizations

-----------------------------------16

- Interview with Koozarch

-----------------------------------23

- Technical Drawings

-----------------------------------28

“Rehub”

——Milan Building Reuse + Sport Park Design

- Masterplan Development

------------------------------------38

- Architectural Development

------------------------------------47

- Function and Circulations

------------------------------------49

- Internal Programs

------------------------------------50

- Physical Model

------------------------------------54

“The Cross”

——Milan Farming Laboratory Complex

- Overall Masterplan

------------------------------------58

- Project Description

------------------------------------60

- Structural Concept

------------------------------------64

- Plans

------------------------------------70

- Details

------------------------------------72

2


- Building Sustainability

------------------------------------86

- Energy Performance Index

------------------------------------89

“The City Does Not Exist” ——Examining spatial transformations through an urban biopsy - Abstract

------------------------------------94

- Part 1: Research

------------------------------------96

1.Morphological Transformation ----------------------------------97 2.Social Complexity

----------------------------------107

3.Conclusions

----------------------------------114

- Part 2: Procedure

----------------------------------116

Introduction

----------------------------------116

Mapping

----------------------------------123

Meta-Projects

----------------------------------126

Procedure Examples

----------------------------------132

------Rooftops

----------------------------------133

------ Abandoned Buildings

----------------------------------144

------ Empty Lots

----------------------------------156

- Part 3: Spatial Transformation ----------------------------------167 Virus

----------------------------------------------------------167

“Fragments”

——Personal Illustrations ---------180

3


Art Factory Berlin

Art Factory Berlin Contemporary Art Museum Jun.2015 Studio Project Team: Mengyao Han, Giulia Chiatante, Luka Milovanovic


Project Development: Approaching the context of Berlin, we identified one specific characteristic of the city: monumentality. As the pattern has been scattered and deformed by scars of the city’s history, the skyline has grown consistently extending as an open hand, it’s long shadows over the green voids of the German capita. In this continuous escalation of power, Berlin has been defined as the city in perpetual becoming, but never be. This feeling is tangibly perceivable on the edges of the central area, where bad operations from the past merge with the new and the dynamic, with just one rule in common: rigidity.

6


7


Research: In the research for the origin of this pattern and it’s function, we tried to compare three different maps, not to make an historical research, but more for typological and formal study. -Maps:1940 is essential to study the situation before the destruction of war, to identify the original design of the city, the main lines that faded and had been forgotten.Referring to our site we can see how it was more homogenous and consistent with the surrounding, answering to the main pulse. -Map 1953: after bombing great part of the city is destroyed, loosing continuity. -Map 2010: The reconstruction didn’t follow the former configuration, lowering the density of the interventions in serveral areas, thus creating a major presence of green spaces.

8


1940

1950

2010

9


Today the area of intervention is almost a backside of the previous master plan, disconnecting in different elements, mostly industryrelated, that created a poorly planned waterfront on the river, an actual focal point, where different “lines�, some of which we identified as main axis in the red board, meet, creating an indistinct tension.

10


Axes on the Spree

City distribution

11


A perfect grid seems to be what the city is going towards with a wheezy run, and never reaching, looking as its destiny is to be a collage of intentions that will never reach accordance. The area, formerly intent to the industrial production, with its chimneys which rise from the horizon as skeletons between the underbrush of oaks, is now moving to a different production: Art.

12


“Hidden Grids”

Landscape Programs and the Strategy Map

13


Composition Study between the volums: In one of these areas, formerly engraved by strong lines, emerges from the water a monolithic stone. Tangled and shaped by the surrounding, the building looks over the river, sacred fluxes of lines, and is watched by the city, entering with all rights, of heights, in the skyline. As the monolith rises, it goes defining the necessity of a treshold, a ring to define it`s edge and towards which it can relate, contructing a base and enriching its volumes. In the end, with the ‘ring’ following the city grid and the ‘cube’ parallel to the river bank, a strong typology contrast between the two typologies becomes the unique art museum.

14


15

Axonometry


Visualizations: For the image presentation, we chose to combine fine art with the actual space of our project, mostly using David Hockney’s art pieces as the main resource. We focus to creat the atmosphere in order to reveal the poetic point of the space without sacrificing the practical usefulness.

16


17

“Pavilion”


18


“Riverfront” 19


20


Masterplan

21


“Landscape Path”

22


Interview with Koozarch: Why were Hockney’s characters appropriated and what is the effect of this juxtaposition of time and space on your proposal? Hockney depicts a sort of colorfoul, still life of the American’s periphery, where his figurers fit in a flat and abstracted architectural environment.In this sense,keeping the level of simplicity of the image, but enriching details and personality, they create a story. The pure exemplification in his works, the plane surfaces and neat layout, well suited our idea of the project as a composition of simple volumes. The distant gazing in the eyes of the characters brings a poetic feeling that might add another dimension to the space we created. All these devices create a richer atmosphere of time and space, still, they maintain a level of abstraction as a whole. Due to this abstraction, the picture results as simplified representation of the architecture, not aiming to be a carbon copy of reality.

23


The exterior views seem to have a very contrasting atmosphere compared to the interior perspectives, how does this influence the way people perceive and use the space? While defining the volumes and facades, we intended to interact more with the city of Berlin and its character, introducing a public space coherent with the intervention. At the same time the interior spaces are designed to relate more to the functions and brief, with a higher degree of flexibility. This off scale space that we created, is articulated in different relations between confining spaces, defining an overall complexity that follows the whole building. In this way the space can host different types of contemporary art, fulfilling its main function. Both the interior and exterior show a minimalistic approach that we tried to maintain constant during the development of the project.

24


“Stage”

“Hall” 25


You mention Berlin as having heavily influenced the character of the proposal, however you neglect to feature it within the images, why so? The analysis of Berlin has been a fundamental step that influenced all the main decisions we took. It was very interesting for us to understand the processes that created the actual urban situation of the city and its fragmented composition. From our understanding, the city architecture is characterized by monumentality and rigidity that we somehow wanted to feature in the building. This was meant to contrast the chaos of lines of the urban context converging in the site. Combining these two aspects the building would become both a response to the environment and the result of our intentions, being able to work in the relation of the site and as a new image for it. The project then assumed a certain freedom from the context, yet still remaining its product.

26


“Meditation waterway”

27


1. Lobby and Cloakroom

7. Studios

2. Exhibition Space 3. Auditorium 4. Bookshop 5. Cafe 6. Administration Offices

8. Restaurant / Dining Room 9. Residence 10. Library 11. Storage

-1 Floor Plan 28


一漀爀琀栀  䔀氀攀瘀愀琀椀漀渀 

䔀愀猀琀 䔀氀攀瘀愀琀椀漀渀 

圀攀猀琀 䔀氀攀瘀愀琀椀漀渀 

29


1. Lobby and Cloakroom

7. Studios

2. Exhibition Space 3. Auditorium 4. Bookshop 5. Cafe 6. Administration Offices

8. Restaurant / Dining Room 9. Residence 10. Library 11. Storage

Ground Floor Plan 30


匀攀挀琀椀漀渀 䄀ⴀ䄀  

匀攀挀琀椀漀渀 䈀ⴀ䈀  

31


1. Lobby and Cloakroom

7. Studios

2. Exhibition Space 3. Auditorium 4. Bookshop 5. Cafe 6. Administration Offices

8. Restaurant / Dining Room 9. Residence 10. Library 11. Storage

1st Floor Plan 32


“The Cube”’s Exhibition Section 33


“The Cube”’ and “Cortyard”

34


Exhibition Corridor

35


“Rehub” Milan BuildingReuse & Sport Park Jun.2014 Studio Project Team: Mengyao Han, Yu Wang, Svetlana Normantovich


Site

Greenary and Waterways

City Official Bikepaths

GPS uploads by users

38


Masterplan Development: Our Site locates near Porta Genova, with several abandoned buildings and a public park in the center. Towards the north lies the canal, on the sides of the canal locates Milan’s famous antique market, grocery market and lots of galleries which hold Milan’s Design week yearly. All the elements around give a young identity and energetic character to the neighbourhood. Our approach is to consider the site in a larger scale aiming to develop a system highly related to sport. As we start our project creating two vertical bike paths coming from south, the bike path itself become an “urban necklace”, connecting all the urban elements in an open circle, while the inner circle of the necklace became the urban hub itself.

39


We organized all the underused buildings into three groups: Northern part as “hostel”, western as “Commercial” and southern part as “Sport facilities”. The northern and southern areas stay in the position face to face, as if having a dialogue, where the landscape in between becomes their language. We also enhanced the function of landscape: Digging down the soil in the park between the bike paths into huge sport fields, then divide it into 6 rectangular fields and filled them with 6 types of sporte textures, responding to the yougn personality of the neighbourhood while providing high quality common ground for the public. So the hub becomes a small exhibition of sport itself.

40


41 Masterplan


Site Model 1:1500

42


Accessibility

Inner Roads 43


Bike Circulations

Greenary and Water 44


Sport System

Urban Elements 45


46


Architectural Development: Architecturally, we extend Porta Ticinese 83 horizontally by repeating the building’s most identifying arms. All the arms in plan are developed into a transportation system which makes the whole hub bike-free. So the extension became a “Station” for bikers. The second floor are pedestrians, even with all the roof free of walking. The whole project Re-hub would be the rehab of sport-addicted people to let them fully set free of mind, while at the same time serves the daily/artistic use for the city.

47


Reuse Strategy:

Function Distribution Hostel Gallery Hostel Services Commercial Pavilions Exhibition Hall Sport Shops Educational Center Sport Services Administrations

Existing/New Structures Existing New Structure

Bike Path

Internal External

48


Function and Circulations 49


50


Internal Programs

51


52


Internal Views

53


Model 1:100 54


55


“The Cross” Milan Farming Laboratory Complex Jan.2015 Building Technology Studio Team: Mengyao Han, David Diaz, Jorge Herrera


Overall Masterplan

58


Overall Masterplan: The site given is a “spine” like abandoned area which served as railways in Milan in the 70th. Since around its location there is grocery market everyday and a second-hand market every week, we tried to manage this site as a “provider” for the markets while being a farming researching center itself. 3 groups are sharing this masterplan and each group takes one building to develop the construction. Our group takes the “cross” which is a research center plus residence in the west.

59


Project Description: Based on the Masterplan, our “Cross� is a group of bars locatedin the west of the site, working as a complex for doing nursery plants research. The largest branch is residential, which serves both the reserchers and the research, working as a experimental field of greenhouses. Our idea is to use the greenhouse as a tool, letting it blendwith the residence, taking into account the interaction between both parts provides us with guidelines for a structural and energetical workframe. For the Structural design, having the greenhouse lets us design a double facade system so the inner residence units are free to be arranged without affecting the outer image of the building. For the energy part, the greenhouse helps us create public and semi-public interstitial spaces, they serve as air and temperature pockets that intermediate heat and cold transmission between inside and outside, thus reducing directly our heat and cooling energetic demands.

60


Masterplan of the “Cross” 61


62


Exterior view (Northwest facade)

63


Structural Concept: In our residencial branch, we developt an“In between� way to locate the residence units.Units are independent structures after which we used a second facade made of wooden frames to creat a semipublic greenhouse, framing the shell of the building . Our construction goal, is to create a light and flexible system. Steel structure is supporting the entire building. Inside the common areas, we purposely eliminate several beams and collumns to avoid spatial fragmentation, instead using alternative cables to support cantilevered slabs. Structurally, the second facade is independent from the steel structure.

64


Ground Floor

First Floor

65

Facades


66


Interior view (Residential +Greenhouse)

67


Static Elements Hierarchy:

4.

1.

2.

5.

3.

6.

1. Foundation + Columns 2. Main Beams 3. Secondary Beams 4. Floor Decking 5. Roof Decking 6. Enclosure 7. Second Facade

7.

68


Node 3

Node 5

Node 2

Node 4

Node 6 .16

.86

.16

1.33

Node 1

4.50

3.00

.13

4.50

1.33 .16

Node 3 Node 3

.86

.17

Node 6

2.69

1.33 .16

Node 4

.16

Node 3

Node 2

Node 1

Node 1

.50 .15

.15

.15

4.50

4.50

3.00

1

.50

0

69

.15

.50

Node 1

.15

.50

3.33

3.83

3.33

3.33

6.09

Node 2

.27

Node 2

.27

.27

.27

2.69

3.45

3.71

Node 6

Node 5

2


Architectural Plan:

Module 1 Double Rooms

Module 2

Single Rooms

Module 3

Apartments

5

0

0

5

10

10

Ground Floor

First Floor 4.50

3.00 4.50

5

3.00

10

6.00

6.00

0

6.00

4.50

6.00

4.50

4.50

3.00

00

4.50

00

00

00

70


4.50 3.00 3.00

6.00

IPE 160

0

IPE 160

4.50

IPE 160

IPE 160

5

3.00

0

10

4.50

5

4.50

10

Main Beam Secondary Beam Calcium silicate panel decking Glass decking

4.50 4.50 3.00

4.50

0

4.50 4.50

4.50

5

4.50 3.00 3.00

71

3.00

4.50

5

4.50

4.50 3.00

IPE 270

IPE 270

10

3.00

6.00

10

4.50 4.50

3.00 4.50

Slab Plan

IPE 270 Main Beam Secondary Beam IPE 270 Column Heb 160 Corrugted steel sheet decking 3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00 4.50

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50 4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.006.00

3.00

6.006.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

4.50 3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50 3.00 3.00

3.00

0

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

4.50

10 3.00

3.00

IPE 160

6.00

6.00

6.006.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50 4.50

6.00

6.00

6.006.00

3.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00 4.50

6.00

4.50

3.00

5 6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.00 6.00

4.50 4.50 3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.00 6.00

6.00

3.00 6.00

3.00

6.00

3.00

4.50

6.00

4.50 3.00 3.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

3.00

3.00

6.00 6.00

3.00

3.00

3.00

IPE 160

IPE 160

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50 3.00

6.00

Roof Plan

0

6.00

IPE 160

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.00

3.00 3.00

3.00 4.50

6.00

3.00 4.50

3.00

4.50 4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.00

3.00

6.00 6.006.00

4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00 6.006.00

3.00

3.00

4.50 4.50

3.00

4.50 3.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

6.00

6.00

4.50 3.00

3.00

3.00

6.00

6.00

4.50

6.00

3.00

3.00

4.50 3.00 3.00

6.00

6.00

Structural Plan:

4.50 3.00

4.50 3.00

4.50

3.00

IPE 270

IPE 270

4.50


Detailed Section Module 1

Double Room

Double Room

72

Detail 1


Detail 2

Hall

Hall

Garden

0

1

2


Detail 5

Detailed Section Module 2

Detail 3

Single Room

Hall

Detail 4

Canteen

74


Bathroom

Hall

Garden

0

1

2


Module 3

Detail 7

Coridor

Detail 6

Garden

76

Kitchen


Master Room

Study Room

Bedroom

Detail 8

Living room

Exterior Hall

0

1

2


PERFORATED BRICK 12cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 15cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm WOODEN SKIRTING BOARD LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm CEMENT CONTAINING RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM 8cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 20cm RIGID FIBERGLASS INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER: LAYER OF BITUMINOSE SHEET CASTED CONCRETE 8cm IGLÙ SYSTEM H20 20cm POOR CONCRETE MIX 8cm IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE: POLIETILENE SHEET 8cm

FOUNDATIONS PROJECTION

NATURAL GROUND

0

1

WOODEN FRAME | 0,40 x 0,10 m ALUMINUM SKYLIGHT OPENABLE MECHANICALLY WATERPROOFING LACQUER C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm

IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE: POLIETILENE SHEET

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 10cm PLYWOOD PANELS 2cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 160 C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 15cm PERFORATED BRICK 12cm TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm WOODEN FRAME | 0,40 x 0,10 m TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW

0

1

78


WATERPROOFING LACQUER CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE PLYWOOD PANELS 2cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 10cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm ALUMINUM SKYLIGHT OPERATED MECHANICALLY

PLYWOOD PANELS 2cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 160 CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm ALUMINUM SKYLIGHT OPENABLE MECHANICALLY

WOODEN FRAME | 0,40 x 0,10 m C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE

16cm

SPIRAL STRAND ROPE CABLE. DIAMETER 14mm STEEL COLUMN | HEB 160

0

1

WATERPROOFING LACQUER CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE: POLIETILENE SHEET

STEEL BEAM | IPE 160 EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE

10cm

PLYWOOD PANELS 2cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 16cm VAPOR BARRIER: LAYER OF BITUMINOSE SHEET C BEAMS SUPPORTING BOARDPANELS 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL

2.5cm

TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW WATERPROOFING LACQUER CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm

C BEAMS SUPPORTING WINDOW 10cm IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE: POLIETILENE SHEET

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 8cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 160

0

1

79


CEMENT CONTAINING RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM

8cm

PERFORATED BRICK 12cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL

2.5cm

LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm WOODEN SKIRTING BOARD EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 2.5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm CONCRETE SLAB ON SHEET DECKING EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm

5cm

HANG C BEAMS BEARING BOARDPANELS 5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm C BEAMS SUPPORTING WINDOW 10cm C BEAMS SUPPORTING WINDOW 10cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 270 TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW

0

1

PERFORATED BRICK 12cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 15cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm WOODEN SKIRTING BOARD EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 2.5cm LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm CEMENT CONTAINING RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM 8cm

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm CONCRETE SLAB ON CORRUGATED STEEL DECKING 5cm

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 17cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 270 C BEAMS SUPPORTING WINDOW 5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm HANG C BEAMS BEARING BOARDPANELS 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW

0

1

80


TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW WOODEN FRAME | 0,40 x 0,10 m NATURAL GRASS GRAVEL EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 2.5cm LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm CONCRETE SLAB 8cm C BEAMS SUPPORTING WINDOW 10cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 20cm CASTED CONCRETE 8cm IGLÙ SYSTEM H20 20cm CONCRETE CLOSING BEAM| 0,30 x 0,50 m POOR CONCRETE MIX 8cm IMPERMEABILIZING MEMBRANE: POLIETILENE SHEET

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm NATURAL GROUND

0

1

LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm CEMENT CONTAINING RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM 8cm

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 2.5cm LAMINATED WOODEN FLOOR 2cm CEMENT CONTAINING RADIANT HEATING SYSTEM 8cm

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm CONCRETE SLAB ON CORRUGATED STEEL DECKING 5cm

EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 10cm PERFORATED BRICK 12cm STEEL BEAM | IPE 270 HANG C BEAMS BEARING BOARDPANELS 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 15cm TRIPLE GLAZED ALUMINUM WINDOW EXTRUDED POLIESTIRENE 5cm CALCIUM SILICATE BOARD PANEL 2.5cm

0

1

81


Hall

Garden

Detailed Plan Ground Floor

Hall

82

Kitchen


Dining Room

Living Room

Exterior Hall

Storage

Common Kitchen

Garden Canteen

0

1

0

83

2


Bedroom

Detailed Plan First Floor

Single Room

Single Room

Single Room 84


Master Room

Study Room

Hall

Hall

0

1

0

85

2


Building Sustainability Roof: 0.085 W/m²K

SW Facade: 0.07 W/m²K

NE Facade: 0.07 W/m²K

Enclosure Walls:

SW Facade:

0.147 W/m²K

0.07 W/m²K

NW Facade: 0.07 W/m²K

Ground Slab: 0.07 W/m²K

Passive House: U-values all building parts of large-volume structures ≤ 0.15 W/m²K Building U Value = 0.12 W/m²K <0.15 W/m²K 86


Sustainability Concepts

1.

2.

3.

-

4. +

5.

1. Insulated Residential Modules 2. Greenhouse Layer 3. In cold months, it serves as second insulation layer, slowing down heat loss and reducing heat energy demand. 87

4. Greenhouse + Residence 5. The second layer opens completely in hot months to allow air in and provides shading to inner spaces.


Envelope Details: Greenhouse Layer Triple Glazed 0.07 W/m²K Mechanical Aperture

Triple Glazed 0.07 W/m²K

Triple Glazed 0.07 W/m²K Mechanical Aperture

Triple Glazed 0.07 W/m²K Mechanical Aperture

88


ENERGY PERFOMANCE INDEX

Total transmision losses

----12736 (kWh/a)

Total ventilation losses

----23716 (kWh/a)

Total usable solar gains

----16027 (kWh/a)

Total usable internal gains

----6891 (kWh/a)

Total heat energy demand

----13533 (kWh/a) 14.8 (kWh/m2 a) < 15 (kWh/m2 a)

Total cooling energy demand

----3624 (kWh/a) 4.2 (kWh/m2 a)

Household energy demand

----1172.05 (kWh/a) 1.64 (kWh/m2 a)

Lighting energy demand

----370 (kWh/a) 0.52 (kWh/m2 a)

End energy demand

----18700 (kWh/a) 20.16 (kWh/m2 a) < 42 (kWh/m2 a)

Total primary energy consumption

----41.46 (kWh/m2 a)< 120 (kWh/m2a)

* PASSIVHAUS : U-values of all building parts of large-volume structures ≤ 0.15 W/m²K BUILDING U VALUE: 0.12

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90


Interior view (Corridor+Semi-public) 91


â&#x20AC;&#x153;The City Does Not Existâ&#x20AC;? Examining spatial transformations through an urban biopsy

Apr.2016 Master Graduation Thesis 110/100 e lode in Politecnico di Milano Team: Mengyao Han; Jacopo Abbate; Martina Mitrovic Tutor: Stefano Boeri


Abstract: The research investigates the possibilities of transformation given by the contemporary urban environment. After decades of international debate to figure out how the city should be, still today it is almost impossible to define a unique shared model of transformation. In the last century the western city went through all kind of events, from world wars to economic boom, from village-like towns to metropolis, from the traditional middle-class family to the a onemember family, from mechanical to high technological production, from a centralized structure to infinite networks of informal connections, from close system to open source, from homogeneity to complex heterogeneity. This research first aims to analyze a small sample of the city of Milan in order to certify and understand the main urban conditions that define the contemporary panorama. We worked as scientists considering the fragment we chose as the test to prove our hypothesis. A scientific analysis on a sample of urban fabric clearly reveals the conditions of the environment. A multitude of human â&#x20AC;&#x153;speciesâ&#x20AC;?, different one to the other for colours, beliefs and traditions, inhabits simultaneously the same piece of town that in the last 30 years slightly changed. The environment is characterised by a progressively entropic drift: growth of complexity (social complexity), drop of evident physical changings. The energy of the system has deeply modified in the last decades: if urban transformations used to be visible and explicit, due to a centralised system, today they are fragmented and weak, provoked by a multitude of individuals.

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Thus, the city cannot be defined anymore as unique and compact body transformed by shared common ideals. At the same time, it is not even completely uncontrolled and left to the randomness of events. A clear clue about this comes from the latest technological innovations: peer-to-peer, sharing economy, open-source are proves of how individuals are getting self-organized in order build tools to produce common benefits escaping from the main profitoriented ideology. If the Global made us uniformed consumers and the Individual made us unhappy selfish users, probably the answer should be found in the middle. Exactly as new social networks and application do, the scale of intervention becomes big enough to be sustainable and small enough to be governable. Human groups became always more fragmented but always more connected. The possibility of connections and interaction between actors - involved in the process of transformation of the city - is in our opinion the key point to develop a procedure to trigger a collective collaboration and produce a direct impact on the city we are living in. Symbiotic relationships â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when both actors give something to have something in return â&#x20AC;&#x201C; can open up infinite possibilities in the private and in the public space. If the society is today a net of multiple links, then intersections and knots are the epicentres where transformation can begin. A transformation that grows from the specific point to affect the whole system. Planning tools changed because the city changed. The architectural city has been overtaken. It does not exist anymore. This is the reason why the tools need to be updated to the new conditions of reality to produce a transformation suitable to the context we are living in.

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Part 1

Research 0.Phylosophy: The approach chosen for the first part of the research is to select a little piece of the city as a sample where to test our hypothesis and eventually make some general considerations. The area selected is called Gorla and belong to the peripheral ring of Milan. A place that went through all the different phases of the metropolis and still shows some traces of the past years. A generic place far from any kind of exception that would make our conclusions partial and extra-ordinary. Indeed the aim is to diagnose some issues that can be found in many other area similar to this one which is a very common example of peripheral urban fragment of the western cities. The analysis is divided in different topics, each of them analyzed through the whole 20th century.

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1.Morphological Transformation

Our biopsy starts with the definition of the physical features. Going through the historical maps of the neighborhood from 1900 till today there are some clear considerations to be done once considered the quantity of buildings built in the different time periods. The area which used to be a former independent municipality grew exponentially for 60 years, with a huge increase around the 1950s, when Italy and Europe lived a historical moment of economic boom. Gradually the growth slowed down until today when relevant physical transformations are not present anymore. The neighborhood stopped growing in the last thirty years.

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Historical map of Gorla in the 1930s Existing Buildings from the 1900s Newly built buildings from 1900-1930s

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Historical map of Gorla in the 1960s Existing Buildings from the 1930s Newly built buildings from 1930-1960s

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Historical map of Gorla in the 1930s Existing Buildings from the 1960s Newly built buildings from 1960-2014

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“For the first time in human history the world’s population has reached seven billions; this number is due to increase exponentially. This seven billions of individuals are all claiming their owns sacred identity, unicity and originality as bearers of an unrepeatable history, love and genome they do not want to sacrifice. Complexity, contradictions and hybridizations have thus become the reference categories fro those working in politics and planning, once instrument of order and organization, now forced to confront with “problems without a solution”. This new multi-ethnic society is not that joyful round dance as we expect, born from a mutual acceptance and allowing every ethnic group to keep its own roots and its ancient identities. In the multi-ethnic metropolis a global hybridization among the four hundreds still existing minorities is being produced. Regardless of our welcoming capacity, this precious melting pot is constantly suffering from an environmental pressure that consumes its unicity. Equally subjected to the invasive owes of international goods and mass information, to the coexistence with new habits, fashions, music, food and religion, it dissolves itself and produces a massive general hybridization. In the last century we deceived ourselves with the idea that we could find a solution for every problem, but multi-ethnic metropolis represents a problem that cannot be solved, but can only be handled with caution.” A. Branzi

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2.Social Complexity

The second layer of analysis concerns the â&#x20AC;&#x153;organismsâ&#x20AC;? that inhabit the sample. Each change of the city was provoked by and for a different kind of society. In order to describe the evolution through the years two main features were taken into consideration: nationalities of citizens and families structure. These two elements can give us a lot of clues to understand the society structure not only formally speaking but also considering a cultural factor. A homogeneous group that shares the same values and traditions can easily agree on the different aspects of life and decision-making, while a heterogeneous group becomes a complex subject.

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Immigration & Local Population of Milan

38 108


39 109


Synthesis

56 110


57 111


Social Structure Even though the society became always more complex and apparently hard to control, human groups responded becoming apparently more connected. The hierarchic structure belonging to the first half of the century collapsed, the strong systems that kept us together failed. Modernity tried to produce the last ultimate truth, which turned out to be unsuitable for the reality. In the last decade society re-organized itself using the existing connections provided by the new technological and digital revolution. The net is apparently the most suitable structure for the society of today. Small and multiple interactions, virtual and real, gave shape to a new environment which is no more controlled and guided by strong political, economical or cultural system, but it is more like a puzzle of heterogeneous and different pieces stitched up together to be a solid whole.

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103

101

99

1900

1920

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1960

1940

107

1980

109

2000

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1960

2016


3.Conclusions: The sample analyzed outlined some clear facts about the contemporarycity that are the basis for our proposal. First of all, the morphological aspect: the city did not evidently changed in the last three decades, thus the issue is no more related to a formal matter since the physical variations are almost absent. On the other hand, what came out from the sociological analysis showed an extreme complex environment of extremely heterogeneous organisms. The diversity undermines the possibility of creating a just or unique model of transformation. The society on which architects used to work on does not exist anymore.The energy that fed the city for many years today has totally changed shape. The environment is constituted by small and almost invisible synergies that are points of densification of energy. According to the data coming from our scientific analysis, the sample crystalized thirty years ago and from that moment on it extremely enriched the variety and quality of its organisms. Furthermore we understood that this complexity is not shapeless but is progressively becoming a solid net of connection between the individuals. The language of art and the latest inventions are clear examples of how the matter is always less formal while more related to reinterpreting and reprogramming the existent. The city can no longer be described as architectural. It turned out to be an accumulation of commodities, a liquid display for goods, people and information transit. Goods which become always more, people which become always more different, information which becomes always more accessible (Una generazione esagerata, A. Branzi).

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This is the reason why the city, as we used to consider it, does not exist. What kind of transformation is then possible â&#x20AC;&#x201C;and needed- in such context? What else can be done, besides adding some partial and subjective interventions to complete the urban puzzle? What can keep together such a complex reality?

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Part 2

Procedure: Introduction

The matter is clearly no longer related to formal issues, intended as an endless and psychotic research for originality. Architecture became too important to be left to architects, Giancarlo de Carlo claimed. The material they manipulate is no longer primary. It is no longer a matter of elaborating a form on the basis of a row material but working with objects that already in circulation on the cultural market, which is to say, objects already informed by other objects. Notions of originality (being at the origin of) and even of creation (making something from nothing) are slowly blurred in this new cultural landscape. (Postproduction) Its no longer a matter of starting with a “blank slate” or creating meaning on the basis of virgin material but of finding a means of insertion into the innumerable flows of production. “Things and thoughts advance or grow out from the middle and that’s where you have to get to work, that’s where everything unfolds”G. Deleuze speaking about utopia The processes in question here are not proving the fact that everything has already been done but of inventing protocols of use for all existing modes of representation and all formal structures. (Postproduction) In a universe of products for sale, pre-existing forms, signal already emitted, buildings already constructed path marked out by their predecessors, architectural doctrine is no longer a museum containing works that must be cited or “surpassed” as the modernist ideology of originality would have it but so many storehouses filled with tools that should be used, stockpiles of data to manipulate. (Postproduction) On the basis of this, the architect should not be content with being a mere hardware designer, but should demand an even broader responsibility for creating activity programs and determinehow they could be integrated. (Cedric Price) 116


Social Innovation Social innovation is a new idea of meeting social goals. It can be seen as a process of change, emerging from the creative recombination of existing assets (social capital, historical heritage, traditional craftsmanship, accessible advanced technology) and aiming at achieving socially recognised goals in new ways (Ezio Manzini). A kind of innovation driven by social demands rather than by market and/or autonomous techno-scientific research, and generated more by actors involved than by specialist. The effectiveness and strength of this prospect is the smart involvement of all the actors that constitute the process: each actor plays the given role, not because of a strict rule set or any other imposition, but for a spontaneous and genuine interest in the final outcome. Social innovation does not mean opposition to strong economical and political system. It consists in using the given conditions of reality as assumed starting points. It sounds improbable to overturn the capitalist-consumerist system in a few years or to think of a just world where people are generous, charitable and philanthropist. Re-programming the inner workings of the whole process is the only chance to rearrange the solve some of the contemporary contradictions. Actor Shift One of the main reasons why today we live a commodification of architecture is for sure the strong cut between production and consumption. The process of making buildings, starting from capitalism on, totally divided the producer - the architect or the builders - to the consumer - the tenants. The commitment is not given by the consumer, but from a third profit-oriented figure. The possibility provided by new digital devices is to cut useless bridges in the production chain and get back to a more direct inter117


action to have less standardized and more affordable products. We believe that to have an effective possibility of transformation of the city we have to start re-programing the inners functioning of the more generic system of production. The actor shift is the first and fundamental step to develop a process that can reset the system. Community According to these conditions, it is interesting to imagine a new actor that can govern possible future transformations of the city, being in between the â&#x20AC;&#x153;centralisedâ&#x20AC;? society and the individuals. This actor has to be enough flexible to be suitable for such heterogeneous society. It has to be open to infinite possibilities but, at the same time, clear and direct in what it wants to achieve. A more-or-less wide human aggregation, more-or-less stable that gathers because of a mutual goal. We can call it more-or-less community. Community can be considered as a middle way between the two extremes -the global and the individual- both became unsuitable to define reality.The individual model -which comes from a XIX century romantic subjectivity- was elected by the consumerist system as most adapted to convert men into consumers, row material, fuel of the late-capitalist period. The second model, the society, is based on abstractions able to univocally describe reality and consequently to simplify it. The community can be an opportunity to redefine the sense field. It can be the chance to invert the market system mechanism that unconsciously upgraded us and gave us the tools to be once again able to make the city a collective effort. Community cannot define shapes neither deduce nor abstract them, because with abstraction and utopia we would imagine a world that reality cannot live.

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119 117


Alternative Strategy to centralised public space design We believe that two different interventions are possible in this direction: - private collective space for each unit -improvement of public facilities in the surroundings A collective client (the community) will for sure demand shared and collective spaces to increase the potential social character of the building. These spaces open up possibility for new interaction within the private sphere of the building unit and also towards the outside. Since the whole process is run by a private actor which his main interest is no more profit but quality of the space he will eventually inhabit, there is also the possibility to connect this smaller scale with a wider view of the city which is usually run by political institutions. What if that part of the budget for the construction that is normally addressed to taxes for public urban interventions was used to refurbish the area that surrounds the building itself ? Doing so also public space can be directly controlled and financed by the same future users who have as primary goal the development of the best possible environment where to live. Protocol 1. The potential spaces of transformation 2.The procedure 3. Redefinition of public space design 1. The city stillness of the last decades offers very few and obvious opportunities of intervention. Empty spaces, abandoned buildings, parasite interventions.

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Empty spaces are fragmented and scattered around the urban fabric. They are on sell and they normally have dimension not smaller than 1000smq. According to urban policies, the buildable surface is 35% of the total area. Abandoned buildings are in most cases former factories or offices. Their generic spatial organization opens up interesting possibilities of re-use. According to urban policies, in case of demolitionreconstruction the same volume of the original building can be kept. Parasite interventions are possible thank to specific policies that a low modifications to existing building. The most relevant in terms of residential buildings is related to rooftops. The minimum height is 1.5m while the average weighted height is 2.4m. 2. The procedure describes the mechanism of transformation. It does not give a formal answer or a set of rules to follow. The procedure is nothing but the possibility of a direct connection between users and developers. This modality contrasts with the dominant speculative system and creates a parallel market that does not pr voke any direct conflict. No third part is involved in the construction. The groups or communities are the critical mass to let the whole process start. As already experience with smaller scale projects like BlablaCar or AirBnb, people get together to achieve common goals. This does not happen for philanthropic feeling or charity attitudes. More likely it happens for very practical and materialistic ones: reduction of the price and customise service. The individual members of the community will get a final result that will be a direct mediation between users and architect/developers. As in many other examples of the so called sharing economy, technology offers the best tools in situation of crowd funding: web platforms and mobile applications became the most suitable devices to immediately connect users and share information. The community is not a group of friends, but it can be. It is a group that takes a 121


vantages of a collective body to reach higher quality standards for cheaper prices. Doing so, they Inevitably trigger a transformation following a parallel path to the strong and apparently inevitable stream of individualism and speculation. 3. The connections already present in the society can be extended in order to influence also the public sphere. We considered the po sibility of interaction between the small groups or communities with the public actor, the municipality in this case. This connection can produce a very important shift in city planning. The real users of the space can directly negotiate what the public interventions will be in the neighbourhood scale. Taxes are the source that municipality uses in order to be invested in the future interventions in the city scale. However, where the taxes are destined is a decision taken from the top, according to some documents (like PGT in Milan) that define the areas of intervention. If we think that a community can provide itself a space but also use the money destined to the taxes to improve the quality of that same neighbourhood, it is possible then to rethink city planning as a punctual intervention that can eventually spread and grow all around the city. It is not an anarchic revolutionary anti-governmental movement in opposition to the centralized system, but only a reprogramming of existing conditions considering the possibilities open up by reality. Platform In order to put into effect the multiple connections present in the society we chose to use an online platform as an open and dynamic method in order to achieve a re-organization of the actors involved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One computer every twenty square metersâ&#x20AC;? said A. Branzi to describe the city of today. The digital revolution put people in a constant flow of information and exchanges and made them unconsciously collaborative and supportive. The turning point is to un122


derstand that this conditions of constant â&#x20AC;&#x153;cyber connectionsâ&#x20AC;? are not going to bring us in a future of robots and flying machines (for sure not soon) but are most probably bringing us back to a condition of collectivity. People get together for common benefits, to save money, to meet other people they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know but with whom they share some interest. The self-centered capitalistic aspiration is getting weaker leaving space to a collaborative dimension of smaller groups moving together towards common goals. The means is digital because today digital is accessible, free and diffused. Mapping Mapping consists of the first step needed to start the process. The map is a synthesis of all the transformable areas, selected according to the existing regulations. It is produced by the owner and mediator who are directly interested to sell their land to communities in search of a space. The platform works as both a filter to guarantee the feasibility and also as the open-source channel to select the possibilities.

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Transformable areas and buildings in the whole neighborhood

Actors involved

124


125


Meta-projects Meta-projects are a key point in the procedure. They represent one of the possibilities of transformation within the spots selected. Different architects on the platform upload them in order to show to the users the potentiality of a place.

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The effort of the architect is to interpret local regulations and restriction in order to produce a real concept project of what it can happen. Each meta-project also gives some specific data about surfaces, units available and hints about common and public spaces. Any architect can upload his pr posal for each spot on the platform and users will be the one to decide the winner to start the process of transformation.

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Abandoned Buildings

128


135


Roof Tops


Empty Lots

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Procedure_examples

Rooftops

After mapping phase and meta-projects gathering phase, the Rooftops taller than 1.8mwhich can beallows the users platform is working as an open source reconstructed into buinding one to choose, vote and finally decide which project to join in order to more floor of 2.7m height, settling achieve a certainnew critical mass tounits startwhile the project. residence hav- Here we will ing thea specific possibility comgive for each catalogue casetotohave explain how it works from mon space shared with the existing the beginning to the end. buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community.

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Rooftops Rooftops taller than 1.8m can be reconstructed into buinding one more floor of 2.7m height, settling new residence units while having the possibility to have common space shared with the existing buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community.

Mapping of rooftopswith with their their potential public intervention zones. zones. Mapping of rooftops potential public intervention

133 143


7r

Chosen rooftop

134 144


145 135

Existing Situation


Meta-project phase

2 units 184 mq 92 mq 2700 euros/ mq

Meta-project 1 Architects develops the meta project for this rooftop and uploads the proposal on the platform. Users can choose which meta project they prefer and finally join the project. Meanwhile the platform gathers all users’ information, the meta-project that reaches the Ax1 cristical mass of 33% of 92€248,400 the㎡ total. In this example, Meta-project 1 first reached the critical mass first so it can move Ato the next level of development. B 136


Critical Mass

2units 186 mq 93 mq 2700 euros/ mq

Meta-project 2

137


138


Collaborative Design Phase The newly formed community joins officially the platform paying a first subscirption fee necessary to pay the work done so far. The architect can meet the clients and discuss about the completion of the project. Interiors, common spaces and possible public intervention will be collectively defined according to the preferences of the community. During this first phases the paltform is in charge to freeze the land, talking to the owner that uploaded in the phase of mapping. 139


140


Realisation Phase

If the project reaches the 60% of the units available the construction can start. The members of the community pay 20% of the overall cost to buy the land to allow the process to begin. The architect produces the executive drawings.

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142 152


Realisation

153 143


Abandoned buildings Abandoned buildings are the most diffused category suitable for any kind of user. They can be both kept and restored if the general condition of the buildings are sufficient or demolish and rebuild according to the existing urban regulations. In case of restoration the impact on public space can be stronger because the amount of taxes normally required is higher than the one that concerns new constructions. The case we chose for this catalogue has potential to be transformed into residence keeping part of the existing structures while haveing newly built parts for the living units.It is close to two parks which are marked by municipality as future transformation zones of green. So the taxes the new community would pay for the municipality can directely go to the development of one of the parks with negotiations,in this way the taxes are invested in a way that is mutually benificial for all the actors involced.

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Mapping of abandoned buildings with their potential public intervention areas.

18a

Chosen abandoned building and its public intervention.

145


158 146


Existing Situation

159 147


12 units 1242 mq 95-125 mq 2700 euros/ mq

Meta-project 1

A

B

Architects develops the meta project for this rooftop and uploads the proposal on the platform. Users can choose which meta project they prefer and finally join the project. Meanwhile the platform gathers all users’ information, the meta-project that reaches the cristical mass of 33% of the total. In this example, Meta-project 1 first reached the critical mass first so it can move to the 2 3 next level1 of development. Ax 2 124 ㎡ €334,800

Bike parking

Common room

Parking

148

4 Parking

Bx 2 127㎡ €342,900

C

Cx 100 €2


12units 1175 mq 90-120 mq 2700 euros/ mq

C

Cx 3 100 ㎡ €270,000

D

D x1 100㎡ €270,000

E

Meta-project 2

F

F x1 100㎡ €270,000

Ex 2 110㎡ €297,000

149

G

Gx 2 120㎡ €324,000


Collaborative Design Phase The newly formed community joins officially the platform paying a first subscirption fee necessary to pay the work done so far. The architect can meet the clients and discuss about the completion of the project. Interiors, common spaces and possible public intervention will be collectively defined according to the preferences of the community. During this first phases the paltform is in charge to freeze the land, tal ing to the owner that uploaded in the phase of mapping. 162 150


163 151


152


Realisation Phase

-

Within 6 months, all actors will try to gather more people through personal relationships or social media platforms, until it meets 60% capacity of the intervention. At this point,all members pay 20% of their future property to buy the land. Meanwhile the architect will produce the executive drawings for constructing. Once finished, the community will pay the whole cost of their property. Platform will help to sell the rest of the project will be in charge to sell some possible unsold units using social media and personal relationships.

153


154


Realisation

155


Empty lots Empty lots can be transformed in order to host a new building. The community can share common spaces specifically decided during the design phase. Moreover the community can interact with the municipality in order to negotiate the development of public spaces in the surroundings obtained re-investing money normally destined to public taxes.

Mapping of empty lots with their potential public intervention areas. 5e

The case we chose for this catalogue is suitable to build a new residence for a medium community. It is close to a park which will be transformed into a public park by the municipality in the future. So the taxes this residence project will pay can directely go to the investment of the development of part of this park, which can be a huge benifit for the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s future living condition.

Chosen empty lot case with its potential public intervention zone

156


Existing Situation

173 157


9 units 1124 mq 90-120 mq 2700 euros/ mq

Meta-project 1 Architects develops the meta project for this rooftop and uploads the proposal on the platform. Users can choose which meta project they prefer and finally join the project. Meanwhile the platform gathers all usersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; information, the meta-project that reaches the cristical mass of 33% of the total. In this example, Meta-project 1 first reached the critical mass first so it can move to the next level of development. 158

C


14units 1648 mq 90-115 mq 2700 euros/ mq

Meta-project 2

Ax 3 110㎡ €297,000

159

Bx 3 127㎡ €342,900


176 160


Collaborative Design Phase The newly formed community joins officially the platform paying a first subscirption fee necessary to pay the work done so far. The architect can meet the clients and discuss about the completion of the project. Interiors, common spaces and possible public intervention will be collectively defined according to the preferences of the community. During this first phases the paltform is in charge to freeze the land, talking to the owner that uploaded in the phase of mapping. 177 161


162


Realisation Phase

Within 6 months, all actors will try to gather more people through personal relationships or social media platforms, until it meets 60% capacity of the intervention. At this point,all members pay 20% of their future property to buy the land. Meanwhile the architect will produce the executive drawings for constructing. Once finished, the community will pay the whole cost of their property. Platform will help to sell the rest of the project will be in charge to sell some possible unsold units using social media and personal relationships.

163


180 164


Realisation

181 165


Part 3

Spatial Transformation

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Virus Each transformation when considered together with the possible others can produce a change in a larger scale.Each potential spot is a little part of a viral ph nomenon that can grow exponentially and affect the neighborhood scale. The influence on the public space, that each spot has, is a great opportunity for a weak planning of the area. Like new social media and peer-to-peer culture, connections give the possibility to build a dynamic structure in constant expansion that produce a change from the bottom. Unconsciously, the processes of production, of learning and of making things have changed and slowly adapted to fit a new fragmented and connected society. We gave people the tools. This wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t meant to be provocative or important, but if we put spaces of possible transformation and possible actors together and we connected them through a digital device, the boundaries of the procedure can become unlimitedâ&#x20AC;Ś

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A

B

168


C

D

169


A before

170


A after

171


B before

172


B after

173


C before

174


C after

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D before

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D after

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FRAGMENTS “Fragments are what the world is made of. To pick them up is to pick up our own mirror.” Personal Illustration Page: www.facebook.com/syrinxfragments


Past is a story we tell ourselves

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Enjoy the cold air after thunderstorm

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185


Mom and me 1994

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Dad and me 1994

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Pattern design : “You left but spread all around me”

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Thank you.


Mengyao han Portfolio 2016  

Graduated Master from Politecnico di Milano, architecture Portfolio 2016

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