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MEMPHIS COLLEGE of ART


UNDERGR 2


RADUATE

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WELCOME

62 Foundations 76 Animation

07 MCA Quick Facts

86 Comics

09 Mission

98 Digital Cinema

10 Message from the President

112 Digital Media

13 Memphis Quick Facts

126 Graphic Design

18 The Campus

150 Illustration

25 Your College Experience

170 Painting/Drawing

29 Easy to Fit In

192 Photography

34 Student Housing

218 Printmaking

39 Everything You Need to Make Your Art

238 Sculpture

CAREERS

GENERAL INFORMATION

44 Make Connections 47 Give Back Program

268 About MCA

48 Internships

271 Admissions

49 Alumni

274 Admissions Policies

ACADEMICS

276 Tuition/Financial Aid

52 BFA Programs

282 Academic Policies

52 Accreditation

292 Resources & Info

53 Majors List

293 Board of Trustees/Administration

56 Liberal Arts

294 Faculty

279 Scholarships/Grants

1930 Poplar Avenue, Overton Park Memphis, Tennessee 38104 901-272-5151 or 800-727-1088 mca.edu info@mca.edu

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17 Average class size is

10 to1 student to faculty ratio

FOUR DEGREES:

BFA MFA MAT MAARTED

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07

foreign countries represented

400+ 1 OF ONLY 4 students

independent, regionally and nationally accredited art colleges in the south and the only one to offer graduate programs

4 HOUSING BUILDINGS/OVER 150 BEDS YEARS

10 concentrations

70 % 30 from the mid-south

%

of students are from outside the mid-south

342

within

77

+

5 UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS

AC R E O V E RTO N PA R K

22 FULL-TIME FACULTY 35 PART-TIME

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states represented

477 SOUTH MAIN

MCA’S FINE ARTS BOUTIQUE

003507 MCA’S FEDERAL SCHOOL CODE


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MISSION To provide a professional art and design education in an intimate setting.

Core values to support the mission > Emphasize realistic training in the professional practices of artists and designers. > Use the liberal arts to humanize and better prepare students to be positive forces within their communities. > Foster critical appraisal of facts and ideas. > Prepare students for immediate and lifelong success.

VISION All graduates will have the skills, knowledge, creative acumen, experiences, and spirit to ensure lifelong professional success in art and design.


DR. RON JONES

Message F R O M T H E I would like to introduce you, and welcome you, to Memphis College of Art. Certainly you will sense in these pages the quality of our facilities, the flexibility of our programs, the look and feel of artwork created by our students, and the career opportunities that abound for those pursuing a professional art and design education. As the new President, I immediately recognized some special attributes that distinguish and differentiate MCA. They are the qualities and strengths that set MCA apart, and feature the most important points to consider in the development of your career as an artist: MCA is solely dedicated to educating art professionals, who impart knowledge through visual art, by preparing students to think creatively, critically, and to solve problems. Here, the emphasis isn’t on artmaking alone, it’s equally on the development of ideas in a unique program

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PRESIDENT from which talented and successful artists emerge. MCA recognizes that living fully means living artfully, and that nurturing the artful spirit is a means to developing a complete person. Our small faculty to student ratio fosters an environment where talent flourishes with the development of skills and insights needed to realize creative, artistic, and academic potential. Visit our home, Rust Hall, located in beautiful Overton Park in Midtown Memphis, and our spectacular Nesin Graduate School located in the heart of Memphis’ South Main Historic Arts District, and experience what makes Memphis a unique city that inspires creative expression. Talk with the students who are already here; visit with faculty… come, see for yourself… and I would be delighted to meet with you to talk about this incredible place. MCA is an opportunity you cannot afford to ignore.


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WHEN YOU WERE A KID, WHAT DID YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GREW UP? You may have briefly considered a career as a fireman or a ballerina, but in your heart of hearts, you knew that you wanted to be an artist. You probably didn’t understand what that really means, or have any notion of how to make it happen, but the idea of creating art for the rest of your life was irresistible. Now you’re taking the next step toward fulfilling your dream – choosing a college. At this point in your development as an artist, each choice gets increasingly more important. Don’t freak out, but making the right decision now will not only impact your education but will set the course for the rest of your life.

Memphis College of Art has a plan to turn you from a wide-eyed freshman full of potential into a seasoned senior ready to take on the world. Along the way, you’ll have a lot of fun. After all, isn’t that what college is all about? Getting a great education, making lifelong friends, gaining invaluable life experience, shaping your worldview, growing up and landing a job that you love. Yes, you’ll pack a lot into your four years at MCA, but that’s what it takes to make art work.


Welcome to

MEMPHIS

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13

TH

largest city in the United States

MEMPHIS NICKNAME:

Official City Tree: Dogwood

VOLUNTEER STATE

THE BLUFF CITY

OLD MAN RIVER The Mississippi River is the second longest river in the United States

HOME OF THE BLUES

62°

AVERAGE ANNUAL TEMPERATURE

Birthplace of Rock ‘n’ Roll OFFICIAL CITY FLOWER CREPE MYRTLE

GRACELAND The home of Elvis ranks behind only the White House in terms of visitors per year.

JERRY LEE LEWIS, JOHNNY CASH, ELVIS PRESLEY, CARL PERKINS, ROY ORBISON, BOOKER T. & THE M.G.’S, OTIS REDDING, ISAAC HAYES, SHAWN LANE, SAM & DAVE, AND B.B. KING ALL GOT THEIR START IN MEMPHIS


“MEMPHIS” IS SUNG IN OVER 1,000 SONG LYRICS AND TITLES, ACCORDING TO BILLBOARD MAGAZINE - MORE THAN ANY OTHER NAME OF A CITY IN THE WORLD.

MEMPHIS HAS ONE OF THE TOP URBAN PARK SYSTEMS IN THE NATION, COVERING 7,000 ACRES.

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CYCLISTS CAN NOW ENJOY 60+ MILES OF CITY STREETS FOR ON-ROAD, SHARED ROADWAY BIKE ROUTE TOURS. THERE ARE FIVE “NEIGHBORHOOD” ROUTE TOURS AND ONE

LONGER “MEMPHIS” ROUTE TOUR. THESE ROUTES ARE INTENDED FOR RECREATION AS WELL AS COMMUTER USE AND LINK NEIGHBORHOODS, COMMERCIAL AREAS, AND

MANY CITY ATTRACTIONS. DESTINATIONS INCLUDE DOWNTOWN, MEMPHIS RIVERFRONT, CITY PARKS, MUSEUMS, GARDENS, NATURE CENTER, AND THE MEMPHIS ZOO.


24 OF THE 97 STARS FEATURED IN THE ROCK AND ROLL HALL OF FAME ARE FROM WITHIN A 100-MILE RADIUS OF MEMPHIS.

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SHELBY FARMS PARK LIES IN THE HEART OF SHELBY COUNTY IN MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE ON 4,500 ACRES OF GREEN SPACE. IT’S A COMMUNITY TREASURE, UNRIVALED IN SIZE AND POTENTIAL ANYWHERE ELSE IN THE UNITED STATES.

EVERY YEAR, THE LEVITT SHELL PRESENTS MORE THAN 50 FREE CONCERTS IN THE HEART OF MIDTOWN, MEMPHIS.


A campus MADE

FOR

ARTISTS Imagine waking up and heading to the park every day for class. As a student at Memphis College of Art, that will be your reality. Nestled right in the middle of a sprawling, tree-laden, 342-acre urban oasis is the architectural marvel known as Rust Hall, the main campus building at MCA. Every classroom, every window, every open walkway was created to inspire and unleash the artist within you. It’s the type of setting you really have to see to fully appreciate. Here you’ll meet for class, eat lunch in the cafeteria, work in the labs or in your studio, hit the library, tour the galleries, and just hang out. It is small but spacious, friendly yet formal and it will serve as creativity central for your college career. Just a short walk away, or an even shorter bike or shuttle ride, you’ll find the dorms. Although the term “dormitory” doesn’t really do justice to MCA’s campus housing. You’ll have your pick from contemporary residence towers with spacious, top floor studio spaces (Metz and Fogelman Halls) or apartment complex living or even smaller, single structure housing. All have fully furnished kitchens, private bedrooms and a sense of community that you’ll treasure. Around the corner is the administrative building, Gibson Hall, with staff offices, admissions, financial aid, the business office, and student affairs. MCA’s newest facility, the Nesin Graduate School, can be found downtown in the South Main arts district along with the Hyde Gallery and 477 store – MCA’s fine art boutique.

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OVERTON PARK SLEAZE AND SLIME

THE SHOP

G. PILLOW LEWIS MEMORIAL LIBRARY

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RAINBOW LAKE, OVERTON PARK

GIBSON HALL

RAINBOW LAKE, OVERTON PARK


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ICON, TED RUST SCULPTURE IN FRONT OF RUST HALL


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BRITTANY SANTOS/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS


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Make the most

of Your

EXPERIENCE Beginning with Orientation, we host a three-day seminar designed to help you fully understand what’s expected of you as a student at MCA. We cover drawing classes and critique sessions, library research and writing lab experience, career education, study skills, and a thorough immersion into the things important to your success in art school. All freshman students are assigned a peer mentor to serve as their “go-to” person in that first semester while learning the ropes. Later in the semester, you can join the crowd at community dinners, movie nights, and bowling—great chances to meet and hang out with other students. Some of our traditional events include the annual Talent(less) Show and our fall canoe trip. The End-of-the-Year Party is a last blast held as classes end in May. Get involved in the Student Alliance and have a say in how things are done on campus. The Student Alliance serves as an advisory council to the administration on student matters and helps provide cohesiveness to student life by sponsoring a number of social events each year, such as the annual Halloween Party featuring the most outlandish costumes this side of Carnival. We begin the fall semester with the Welcome Fair, an opportunity to get to know the clubs and organizations that you might

want to join such as the Photography Club, Japanese Culture Club, the Knitting Club, and “Swiftness,” the running club. Sometimes things don’t seem so promising and aren’t quite as much fun. We know that the stress of school and other responsibilities can be challenging. If you feel the need for personal counseling, Student Affairs staff can help and/or make referrals. We also have medical services for healthcare referrals for students with and without health insurance. For those who try to nourish their spiritual self, help is offered through our finals stress-relievers event, such as a makeyour-own sundae midnight snack, and a FREE membership to the neighboring French Riviera workout club with weights, exercise equipment, and all kinds of workout classes—did we mention its free? If you own a car, you don’t have to obtain a Tennessee driver’s license or auto license tag unless you choose to become a permanent Tennessee resident. This and other important information such as where you can open a checking account, or where you can get your computer fixed is listed in a very handy publication that we call Living in Memphis. You’ll receive one before you come to campus and it is available online at www.mca.edu.


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WE MAKE IT EASY TO FIT IN While open space abounds here at MCA, you’ll never be in danger of getting lost. With a very low faculty-to-student ratio and a student body that is an intimate community of artists, you’ll not only feel included, you’ll actually be connected—to your professors, to your fellow classmates, and most importantly, to your art. You’ll also be connected to our neighborhood, Overton Park. On one side sits the world-famous Memphis Zoo – one of the most popular zoos in the nation with modern exhibits and rare animals in abundance. On the other side is the always-topical Memphis Brooks Museum of Art. Behind us sits Levitt Shell, with free outdoor concerts, film series, and other entertainment you’ll love. And just past our front door you’ll find acres of open fields and trails perfect for a little playtime. Only a couple of blocks away you’ll find the restaurants, theatres, and hang-outs of Overton Square, while surrounding the campus in all directions are great places to see bands, intriguing galleries, quaint cafes, and everything else an ideal art college community should supply.


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FOGELMAN AND METZ HALLS


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Make

Yourself at

HOME

Let’s talk about where you’ll stay. MCA-owned student residences are just a short walk from campus and provide housing for over 160 students. Freshmen students that live outside a 30-mile radius are required to live on-campus for their first year unless they plan to live with family members in the area. All campus housing is wired for high-speed Internet and cable access, and provides phones, and utilities. The Toxic Lounge sits amid the residences for hanging out, watching TV, playing some ping-pong, or even doing your laundry. Live-in Resident Assistants supervise students in all housing buildings. Newly constructed Metz and Fogelman Halls feature several stories of spacious, suite-style apartment dorms and top floors of expansive, wide-open space that overlooks Midtown Memphis. Within each apartment are four private bedrooms, two shared bathrooms, a kitchen, a living room, and laundry facility. Metz and Fogelman Halls are gated communities with studio and community space provided for residents. The newly remodeled Parkside Residence with apartments shared by two students and single efficiency units for upper level students, is a

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great choice for those who love old style charm. Each apartment has a full service kitchen, a shared bathroom, bedroom, and living room area along with hardwood floors. A beautiful courtyard and fenced parking area are all part of the package. Just across the street is At the Park, which holds 16 students within eight apartments. Each shared two-person apartment is 750 square feet with hardwood floors and French doors that open to balconies. Residents share a kitchen, bedroom, bathroom, and living room area. Common coinoperated laundry facilities for At the Park are available. You might be the type that prefers creating your own space—you are an art student, after all. You’ll find tons of other housing options within walking distance of the college. If you want to live off-campus, and need help finding a roommate or roommates, complete a housing questionnaire so that we might match you with someone with compatible tastes in music, study habits, and budget. We can provide lists of rental properties, even take you to visit some places—we’ll be as involved as you want us to be in your search!


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METZ HALL PARKSIDE


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mca.edu 37 37


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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE YOUR ART While we at MCA pride ourselves on being a small establishment in size, there’s nothing small about the technology resources or facilities available to our students. Whether your passion steers you toward a fine art or design art degree, you’ll never be left wanting for resources or space to explore your art. MCA’s computer labs feature dozens of large screen LCD flat-panel computers, color printers, and high-end multimedia peripherals. All stations have the latest design, video, and multimedia software. A large-format color printing lab allows for printing on a large scale. What’s more, the computer labs are open 24/7. To enhance your digital or graphic arts projects, digital cameras, both still and video, are also available to students for checkout from the faculty.

Photographers and digital imaging students will be hard-pressed to find anything lacking from MCA’s photo lab facilities. Ten work stations feature Omega large-format enlargers and 12 are equipped with Beseler medium-format enlargers. A digital imaging work station has digital cameras, slide and transparency scanners, flatbed scanners, and a high-resolution film printer. A lighting studio houses electronic strobe equipment, backgrounds, and medium- and large-format cameras. Facilities for non-silver alternative photo processes are also available, along with access to light tables and a large-format printer. Sound and animation studios provide workspace and equipment for digital cinema and animation majors.


EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE YOUR ART Illustration and Sequential Narrative (Comics) students have a spacious mixed-use studio shared by these concentrators with other departments, particularly graphic designers for collaboration between these areas. Work space is available for in-class and outside of class projects. A computer lab with all necessary equipment is just next door for digital assignments and several computer stations are available for digital work within the Illustration studio. Individual work carrels provide studio space for the upper level illustration concentrators. Are the fine arts more your scene? MCA’s 4,400 square foot shop is equipped with machines for woodworking, metalworking, mat cutting, glass cutting, shrink wrapping, and stretcher and frame construction. A full-time shop supervisor is available to help with use of equipment and to oversee safety. Large studios for both metals and clay boast great spaces for pursuing 3-D work. MCA has separate foundry and welding areas for casting and large metal work, while small metals artists enjoy private welding and soldering stations, and a casting room. The clay studio features kick wheels and six electric wheels, a second space exclusively for handbuilding and glazing, and a semi-enclosed firing room. Convenience and technology reign in the printmaking, papermaking, and book arts studios, which are arranged to provide easy interaction between

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these related media. Printmaking has facilities for lithography, etching, screen printing, relief printing, and other print processes. Two exposure units are on hand for photo processes for screen print, lithography, and polymer plates. Book arts includes three letterpresses and a bindery. The wet room is equipped with beaters, a hydraulic press, a hydraulic pulper, and vacuum table for large-format paper pieces for papermaking. We also emphasize academics. The MCA library has 19,000+ books, videos, and exhibition catalogs, along with 120+ artspecific periodicals. The The library provides online resources including full-text (JSTOR, Art Full Text), bibliographic (Art Bibliographies Modern, Design & Applied Arts Index, and image (ARTstor, Bridgeman Education) databases which are available both on campus and remotely 24 hours a day. Additionally, audiovisual equipment and computers are available for student use. Upper level students have studio space to call their own in almost every discipline. There is never waiting for computers or a line to get time in the darkroom. Our students’ opportunities to explore ideas and develop their creative processes are made that much bigger by our selective size. It’s just one more thing that makes MCA truly a great place to learn, do, and be.


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EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE

YOUR ART

Just off the courtyard that we call Granny’s Garden, you will find the Achievement Center, a spacious lounge area where students can find a quiet place to study, meet, or seek help from our Achievement Support Staff or Career Services Director. A great space for relaxing before or after class, or meeting up with the knitting club. Our Wow Wall highlights employer and internship partnerships that provide our students with opportunities while in school and after.


MAKE YOUR PASSION

At first it may seem a little scary choosing a visual art field as a profession. At Memphis College of Art, we think it’s even scarier to do something for a living that doesn’t make you happy, rather than what you love to do—make art. That’s why Career Services is committed to making sure that you follow both your head and your heart. And we know how to help you do just that—in fact 87% of our alumni work in art-related fields. They range from curators and art therapists to college professors and principal designers at their own design firms. They’re medical illustrators, photographers, sculptors, web designers, painters, potters, and character artists. They work for Google, PGA Tour Entertainment, International Paper, FedEx, Gagosian Gallery, and the Superdome. They’re doing fine financially. And most importantly, they’re doing what they love. Of course, we believe that the numerous and diverse programs offered through Career Services have something to do with the success of our alumni’s placement rate. On-campus interviewing, internships, career counseling, and our Professional Practices course curriculum are just a sampling of the services and opportunities available to our students throughout the year. 44

YOUR

At MCA we like to say “We Make Art Work!” Throughout our curriculum from freshman orientation through senior BFA Exhibitions, students learn the knowledge and skills, and have the experiences to support their transition to the working world. Classes will teach resumé and artist statement writing, applying for juried exhibitions, networking skills and methods, entrepreneurial basics and more. Internships are an excellent way for juniors and seniors to get on-the-job experience and earn credit to boot! The Give Back Program is a community service, work-study employment opportunity designed to build resumé-worthy work experience and the soft skills that employers seek. Additional support from the Career Services office is offered through workshops for portfolio preparation, interviewing skills, and applying for graduate school, should that be your direction. Our annual Career Fair brings companies and organizations to campus each year to recruit for employment and internship opportunities. This provides you the experience of presenting your work and yourself to prospective employers as they review your work and talk about what they’re looking for in an employee as they search for their next artist–wunderkind.


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PROFESSION A final capstone class required for all graduating students will offer guidance in a “life after art school” plan. You will learn portfolio presentation, copyrighting, finding gallery representation, pricing artwork, selfpromotion, calls for entry, writing an artist statement, and much, much more. By the time you’ve finished your studies, you’ll be ready to take MoMA by storm!

At Memphis College of Art we are distinguishing ourselves as the art college where we measure our success as a college by the success of our graduates. What defines success at MCA is not what we do, but rather the results of what we do. While there are all kinds of ways to measure our effectiveness, the three most important are that MCA Graduates have 1. The skills, understandings, and creativity to assure a lifetime of success; 2. An income that is increasingly sufficient to enjoy life; and

MCA’s Professional Practices program (P2 is what we call it), is embedded in every level of every academic discipline. In today’s environment, every college is expected to demonstrate that it is relevant and that it provides value-added educational experiences for its students.

3. A continued positive assessment of the education they received at MCA. These measures are attained through a curriculum that embeds essential business and life skills (i.e. the ability to communicate, collaborate, create and compute) in every class to complement the core goals of the College, maximizing each student’s artistic growth.


PROJECT GREENFORK AND URBAN ART COMMISSION

MEMPHIS EMPTY BOWLS PROJECT PROJECT GREENFORK AND URBAN ART COMMISSION

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MCA STUDENTS WORKING ON INDIE BIKES PILOT PROGRAM DURING THE INDIE MEMPHIS FILM FESTIVAL.

SNOWDEN SCHOOL


Use

YOUR ART

to

GIVE BACK A college student’s education as an artist

newfound connections are often so strong

will not be complete without a certain

that many students continue to volunteer

amount of experiential knowledge that can

long after their official project is completed.

only be gained in environments beyond the classroom. And while each of the numerous

As part of the program, students apply to

internships MCA has coordinated with

participate for this paid experience. The

local, national, and international art- and

popularity of the program is such that many

design-focused organizations provides

other students request participation in Give

great opportunities, we also hope to nurture

Back projects, even without pay, for the

our students’ desire to serve more diverse

growth opportunity it provides.

causes and assist area non-profits. The Give Back Program is a paid service-learning

Since the program’s inception, MCA

project that does just that!

students have given art lessons to specialneeds and at-risk students; created murals at

Initiated in 2008, the program allows

multiple locations in the city, including the

students to earn work-study scholarship

National Civil Rights Museum; developed

funds while using their time and talents

art for the walls of a children’s hospital;

to support area non-profits. Through their

designed promotional materials for several

service, students develop new interpersonal

non-profit organizations; and designed a

skills, gain a greater sense of his or her

new library card for the Memphis Public

role in the community, and begin lasting

Library system.

relationships with participants and staff from non-profit community organizations. These

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KAITLYN GARRETT BFA 2014, PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY Kaitlyn interned at Gagosian Gallery in New York, New York, the summer before her senior year with financial assistance from the Ferris Summer Internship Scholarship.

Internships

& ALUMNI

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Internships are an excellent way for juniors

script.) As if that isn’t enough, MCA-approved

and seniors to get that real world experience

internship sites are top notch: Anthropologie;

(and the ol’ foot in the door) by working with

Creative Time, NY, NY; Dieu Donne Papermill,

professional artists in the Memphis area and

NY, NY; Gagosian Gallery, NY, NY; Crew Train-

beyond. You can earn up to three hours of

ing International; Connect USA; LLC Africa;

academic credit per internship and possibly

Medtronic; National Ornamental Metal

get paid, too. (Or you can do an internship

Museum; National Civil Rights Museum; and

without credit for the resume-building experi-

20X24 Polaroid, NY, NY are just a sample of

ence that will be listed on your course tran-

the 100+ listed opportunities available.


BFA 2009, DIGITAL MEDIA Originally from Nigeria, Kenneth makes his home in San Diego, CA via Bellview, WA where he is a Character Artist for Sony Online Entertainment. His current projects are the new extreme sports game, Tony Hawk Ride 2, and a new political thriller comic project that takes place in Texas and Niger Delta.

JILL EXLEY (FRONT AND CENTER)

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KENNETH SHOFELA COKER

KENNETH SHOFELA COKER

JILL EXLEY BFA 2011, DIGITAL MEDIA/ART HISTORY Jill moved to New York following graduation and now works at PGA TOUR Entertainment in their Media Asset Management department where she updates and performs color correction on archived tour footage as well as new satellite feeds.

BFA 2011, DIGITAL MEDIA Kim worked as a freelance video editor and motion graphic animator in New Orleans and Baton Rouge after graduation until landing a position as head video editor and animator at letsdeveloptv.com in Metairie, Louisiana. There she creates digital content for broadcasts, websites, and large-scale presentations. She also continues to develop character animation on a freelance basis.

KIMBERLY BROADBRIDGE

KIMBERLY BROADBRIDGE


ANGELIQUE GONZALEZ BFA 2012, DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA

ANGELIQUE GONZALEZ

Angelique’s years at MCA made her well prepared for her position as Photography Assistant/Stylist at Whitmor – a home furnishing manufacturer and distributor. Not only does she assist with all product photography, but she typically helps construct and style the sets, retouches imagery and prepares photos for use in the company’s branded product packaging.

NICOLE PHILLIPPE BFA 2006, DIGITAL MEDIA Nicole’s experience at Memphis College of Art provided the opportunity to work as an illustrator, designer, and writer for a children’s magazine, led her to become an elementary visual arts instructor in the Memphis city school district, and ultimately open Allie Cat Arts, a funky eclectic art gallery and gift shop located in the historic Cooper-Young neighborhood. Her mission is to support and promote local artists while providing quality, affordable art to the community.

MFA 2012, STUDIO ART BFA 2005, PRINTMAKING Jay is originally from New Orleans, LA but has lived in Memphis for nearly a decade. After completing his degree in printmaking he has since been navigating the line where art and design meet. In 2007, he co-founded TaroPop, a small design team producing T-shirt designs and limited-edition art prints. Since then it has grown to include stationary and web design.  He has exhibited work in Rome, Barcelona and, of course, in his new hometown of Memphis. 50

JAY CRUM

NICOLE PHILLIPPE

JAY CRUM


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ANDREW LEBOWITZ BFA 2011, DIGITAL ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA ANDREW LEBOWITZ

Andrew has been very busy since graduation, going from freelance designer to founding his own business to landing a position with Oden, a brand strategy and marketing communications firm in Memphis.

SIPHNE SYLVE BFA 2010, ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY Siphne manages the Urban Art Commission’s mural program and provides in-house design expertise to the Urban Art team and for various community-based projects. A native of New Orleans, Siphne was featured in the Memphis Flyer’s 20<30 edition, which highlighted 20 young Memphians who are shaping the city’s future. She’s also one-half of the talented indie and renaissance music group, Artistik Approach, whose sound ranges from hip-hop to doo-wop. SIPHNE SYLVE

JUSTIN NUNEZ

JUSTIN NUNEZ BFA 2012, SCULPTURE Justin came to MCA by way of Houston, TX and while here he discovered a passion for furniture. He has since turned that passion into a profession as Director of Design at Woodland Tree Products, where he designs and builds custom furniture modeled from reclaimed or repurposed urban hardwood.


ACADEMICS BFA

PROGRAMS

As a professional school of art and design, MCA offers BFA degrees in visual arts at the undergraduate level. Within these degrees, students choose from an array of majors and concentrations that provide a variety of avenues to suit individual interests and needs. At the heart of the curriculum is a vigorous Foundations and Core program of studio practice and intellectual rigor engined by the Liberal Arts program.

ACCREDITATION Memphis College of Art is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate and masters degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, GA 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Memphis College of Art. Memphis College of Art is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Colleges of Art and Design (NASAD). The Art Education and Teachers Education Programs of Memphis College of Art have been approved by the Tennessee Board of Education. 52


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majors

LIST ANIMATION COMICS DIGITAL CINEMA DIGITAL MEDIA

GRAPHIC DESIGN ILLUSTRATION PAINTING/DRAWING PHOTOGRAPHY PRINTMAKING SCULPTURE


PROGR 54


RAMS

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Liberal

ARTS

The Liberal Arts Division, comprised of Art History, Humanities, Mathematics/Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences, teaches all MCA students at every level. Our classes help each student to develop as a whole person by teaching the skills of critical thinking, problem solving, research, effective writing, and clear communication. Faculty encourage students to learn big themes from human history and experience, and foster a spirit of inquiry and imagination in preparation for a life of continuous learning. MCA requires 33 credits in Liberal Arts and an additional 12 specifically in Art History, totaling 45. An Art History minor requires 6 additional credits and a grade of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;? or above in each course.

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ELLEN DAUGHTERY Associate Professor | Art History

I love teaching at MCA because I know so many students personally. And on graduation day, I feel enormous pride as I watch so many students that I have taught or advised cross the stage and receive their degrees.


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MARIA BIBBS

Assistant Professor | Liberal Arts The talented, committed faculty and students at MCA provide a consistently stimulating environment where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re challenged to grow, mature, and develop your own voice.


Jackie O’Neil

This is IT! This is the information that touches everything else you will do for the rest of your life as a visual artist. These are the “rules” you have to know in order to break them. What you will learn in these classes is always present and always crucial. This is not something to survive, “get through,” or tolerate. This is knowledge to embrace and revel in.

The seven Foundations courses occupy students for most of their first three semesters at MCA. These courses supply the basic knowledge and skills of artmaking that are critical to success in all studio concentrations and majors. Some people think basic means boring and obvious. Wrong! This is the hull and rudder to your artmaking boat, the chassis of your art Rolls Royce. No matter which way you turn, it underpins your every move. You can rock it and roll it, but unless you ignore it, you won’t sink, or crash and burn. The better you know it, the more control you will have, the farther out you can get, and the greater your ability to challenge the status quo. 

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mca.edu 61 61


FOUNDA 62


ATIONS

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64 CARA DISTEFANO/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE


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CRISTIAN ANZURES/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS/ART HISTORY


66 LINDA LANGLEY OSBORN/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


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REBECCA GARRETT/PHOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


REMY MILLER

Dean and Vice President for Academic Affairs | Drawing I love the sense of tradition at MCA, but tradition isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just something that happened in the past. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the legacy we create today by building on our strengths and constantly improving.

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Student Name


GRACE SHORE/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS

70


FOUNDATIONS REQUIRED COURSES:SES: DRAWING 1 FD100

Seeing/drawing skills are developed and sensitivity toward the aesthetics of form and space including linear perspective, mark making, value, line and line quality is explored. Students work in black and white media on a variety of papers from still-life, landscape, and self-portrait.

DRAWING 2 FD110

FD100 is continued with continued emphasis on mark making, full value studies, point-of-view selection, basic compositional ideas, and space. Prerequisite: FD100

2-D DESIGN FD120

The vocabulary, premises, and methods of visual events on the flat plane are explored through a series of lectures, experimental exercises, and applied problems.

COLOR FOUNDATIONS FD160 Color Foundations is an introduction to the principles of color mixing and design. We will briefly discuss some of the most significant figures in the history of color theory and their ideas, however it is a studio class based on the actual experience of seeing and working with color. It involves a variety of 2-D assignments based on specific color effects or situations. Recognizing that color is the most relative of art elements, the course is intended to provide knowledge and experience that removes color usage solely from the realm of intuition and puts the student in the position of making informed decisions.

DIGITAL FOUNDATIONS FD170

An introduction to the basics of understanding digital procedures and improving oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s visual skills and concept development through the use of digital production tools. This will include research and fundamental visual design principles connected with a non-traditional way of working via digital methods.

PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES (P2)

3-D DESIGN

TD 300

FD130

The P2 class provides students with information and skills that

Volume, space organization, structure, texture, mass, and

are non-discipline specific and necessary to all professional

tension are explored through a series of short projects using

artists for the transition from college into working life. Guest

simple construction materials and techniques. Equipment

lecturers will address topics such as conducting job searches,

use and safety instruction are included.

personal and professional budgets, networking and marketing, Federal and state taxes, and more.

IDEA, PROCESS, AND CRITICISM FD140

IPC reverses the traditional model of foundation arts education, using content as a starting point for artmaking rather than physical technique. In addition, this course introduces strategies for the research, development, organization, analysis, presentation, documentation, and criticism of individual artistic content.

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CAMERON SPENCER/PHOTOGRAPHY


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AMBER GEORGE/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


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MARY BETH WEBER/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION/ART HISTORY


ANIMA 76


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Our program offers a unique course of study in which students explore a diverse range of techniquesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;both traditional and digital. Students

ATION

are grounded in the history of the medium, encouraged to examine the narrative process, and

pushed to develop original and thought-provok-

ing works.


OUR PROGRAM OFFERS A UNIQUE COURSE OF STUDY IN WHICH STUDENTS EXPLORE A DIVERSE RANGE OF TECHNIQUES—BOTH TRADITIONAL AND DIGITAL. STUDENTS ARE GROUNDED IN THE HISTORY OF THE MEDIUM, ENCOURAGED TO EXAMINE THE NARRATIVE PROCESS, AND PUSHED TO DEVELOP ORIGINAL AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING WORKS. 78


79

ERIC HUBER/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART HISTORY


CAROLINA SALCEDO/DIGITAL MEDIA/ART HISTORY

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Animation BFA IN DIGITAL MEDIA

overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 36 Studio Electives 18 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

First Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 1 Idea, Process, and Criticism Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

REQUIRED COURSES:

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION TECHNIQUES

second Year

DM200

The principles and history of animation are introduced. Working with digital programs as well as pre-cinematic toys, rotoscoping, and live pixilation, students explore “persistence of vision”—the process by which we perceive movement through still images. Students also gain a solid foundation in the history and techniques of animation through screenings and readings.

2-D ANIMATION 1 DM225

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of animation production, including pre-production planning, storyboarding, 2-dimensional character design, and jointing. Classroom assignments will utilize both traditional animation stand techniques and Toon Boom; students will have the option of creating a finished work in either environment.

DYNAMIC IMAGING 1 DM230

This course provides an introduction to narrative story structure and presents strategies for the creation of character driven time-based compositions using a wide variety of media including traditional methods emphasizing drawing. Through lectures, practical assignments, and critiques students gain a technical command of industry standard software as well as the conceptual skills necessary for the production of meaningful and coherent narrative.

DIGITAL CINEMA 1 DM270

This course in an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on screenwriting, directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting, and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using non-linear editing software.

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits) 3-D Design Digital Cinema 1 Intro to Animation Techniques Art History Elective Literature Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) 2-D Animation 1 Dynamic Imaging 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

third Year

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Advanced 2-D Animation Sound Acquisition and Editing Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) 3-D Computer Animation 1 Dynamic Imaging 2 Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year 7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Senior Studio 1 3-D Computer Animation Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Senior Studio 2 Advanced 3-D Computer Animation Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


AMANDA LUCAS/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA

STUDENT WORK

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BLAKE HUDSON/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION

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REQUIRED COURSES: continued:

3-D ANIMATION 1

SENIOR STUDIO 2

This is an introductory course in stop-motion animation, a medium that requires a wide array of technical skills. We consider such techniques as sculpting, two part molds, foam rubber casting, armature configuration, set design, and lighting for small spaces. Through motion and movement tests, students explore the ways in which three-dimensional objects move through space.

This course provides Animation and Digital Cinema majors the opportunity to complete a more in-depth final project.

DM200

3-D COMPUTER ANIMATION DM310

Students gain experience with creating 3-D animation, including geometric modeling, lighting, camera angles, texture formation, skeleton rigging, and motion in a three-dimensional animation package. Students learn underlying principles of 3-D animation, including perspective, transformations, lighting and shadows, and modeling natural phenomena and motion.

ADVANCED 2-D ANIMATION DM325

Open to students who have completed DM225, DM250, or DM300, this course is an intensive workshop in which students create a finished animation in their preferred medium. Special attention is paid to realistic production goals, thorough preproduction and storyboarding, and sound design for animation. There are weekly critiques, and students are expected to spend significant time working outside of class to make the progress necessary to bring an animation project to full fruition.

SOUND ACQUISITION AND EDITING DM375

This course is an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using the non-linear editing software Final Cut Pro. The basics of DVD creation using DVD Studio Pro including media capturing, video and audio encoding, interface design and testing are also introduced.

SENIOR STUDIO 1 DM400

This course encompasses the conceptual and technical skills of the senior level student. Personal process, vision, and presentation skills are stressed. The development of works for the professional portfolio, and thesis is expected.

DM405

ADVANCED 3-D COMPUTER ANIMATION DM410 Building on the techniques introduced in Interactive Media 1, this course offers in-depth study of interactive media design. Special emphasis is placed on preparing and producing media for delivery to the “small screen” such as cell phones, iPods, and the web. Students are challenged to examine the aesthetic, cultural, and technological implication of this emerging art field and market.

And a choice of one of the following courses: DYNAMIC IMAGING 2 DM330 The goal of this course is to expand the student’s conceptual and technical understanding of digital motion sequencing as presented in Dynamic Imaging 1. Special emphasis is placed on the post-production processes of stylization, enhancement, and creation of digital effects.

DIGITAL CINEMA 2 DM370

This is an advanced level production course. Students are pushed to further develop the technical processes introduced in DM270. Special instructional emphasis is given to cinematography and lighting.

EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA PRODUCTION DM475 “…the film experience…is not necessarily a projection of light and shadow on a screen at the end of a room…” – Gene Youngblood, Expanded Cinema. This class is designed to assist students in the development of alternative means of production and exhibition of media. Topics include camera experimentation, the position of the viewer, experimental animation techniques, the performative nature of exhibition and the forms and means of disseminating media. Additionally, students will analyze selected works to enlighten their understanding of the history of non-traditional forms in video and film.


COMICS 86


87


WHETHER THEY ARE CALLED COMICS, PICTURE BOOKS, GRAPHIC NOVELS, MANGA, BANDE DESSINテ右, VISUAL ESSAY, OR SEQUENTIAL ART, PEOPLE HAVE BEEN TELLING EACH OTHER STORIES THROUGH DRAWN IMAGERY SINCE WE LIVED IN CAVES. NEARLY EVERY CULTURE IN EVERY PERIOD OF HISTORY HAS SOME FORM OF ILLUSTRATED STORYTELLING, AND YET THIS FIELD OF CREATIVE ENDEAVOR HAS ONLY RECENTLY 88


89

BECOME A SUBJECT FOR SERIOUS STUDY AND CRITIQUE. COMICS (SEQUENTIAL NARRATIVE) IS THE INVESTIGATION OF HOW MEANING IS CREATED BY PUTTING ONE IMAGE NEXT TO ANOTHER. STUDY IN THIS PROGRAM INCLUDES THE MEDIUM’S FORMAL LIMITS, THE DEVELOPMENT OF RICH NARRATIVE CONTENT, AND HOW THE MEDIUM CAN EXPAND INTO THE DIGITAL ENVIRONMENT.


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KAYLA GOLDEN/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY


LANA MCLEAN/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY

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HALEY PALMER/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


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BRITTANY SANTOS/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS


Comics (Sequential Narrative)

BFA in Design Arts overall curricular requirements

Foundations 21 | Concentration Requirements 21 Studio Electives 33 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES:

ILLUSTRATED STORY 1

IL220

This course explores the formal language of storytelling with multiple images, including comics, cartoon strips, and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s picture books. This course is writing and drawing intensive.

ILLUSTRATION 1: DRAWING FOR ILLUSTRATION IL240 This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of representational drawing for the purposes of communication. Images are created in several media, utilizing a variety of visual references, including photography, life, memory, and found sources. Conceptualization, composition, clear rendering, and staging of the figure are emphasized.

ILLUSTRATED STORY 2

IL320

Building on the skills developed in Illustrated Story 1, students develop long-form illustrated stories, and study professional and production requirements of the comics, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s books, and cartooning marketplace.

ILLUSTRATED STORY 3

IL410

Students develop a single long-form story while learning professional comics production techniques, including lettering, inking, coloring, and layout. The class culminates in the production and publication of the story in pamphlet format.

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ILLUSTRATED STORY 4

IL420

TRISTA VERCHER/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS/ART HISTORY

Adapting the traditional production techniques from Illustrated Story 3, the students will take advantage of the Internet as a publication platform, developing a weekly serialized web comic.

DESIGN SYSTEM 1

GD200 This studio introduction to visual communication

explores the unique meanings and principles of design and its supporting elements. As a companion to the first semester, students are instructed on a Macintosh platform utilizing current professional design software.

WEB DESIGN 1 DM260 The conceptual and technical skills for creating art and design for the Internet are stressed. The social implications and development of new media and new social system are discussed and researched. Hand coded HTML and layout programs are used.

First Year

third Year

Drawing 1 3-D Design Color Foundations Writing 1 Art History Survey 1

Illustrated Story 2 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

Illustrated Story 3 Design System 1 Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

second Year

fourth Year

Idea, Process, and Criticism Illustrated Story 1 Studio Elective Art History Survey Elective Literature Elective

Illustrated Story 4 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

Illustration 1: Drawing for Illustration Studio Elective Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Web Design 1 Studio Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


DIGITAL CINEMA

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The Digital Cinema program focuses on the development of time-based media from both narrative and experimental perspectives. Many delivery options including cinema, broadcast TV, alternative media and emerging technologies are introduces while the fine art of cinematography lighting, production design, sound, and editing are stressed as your primary tools to translate meaning to your audience.

RAH-IMHOTEP ISHAKARAH/DIGITAL MEDIA/DIGITAL CINEMA


THE DIGITAL CINEMA PROGRAM FOCUSES ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF TIME-BASED MEDIA FROM BOTH NARRATIVE AND EXPERIMENTAL PERSPECTIVES. MANY DELIVERY OPTIONS INCLUDING CINEMA, BROADCAST TV, ALTERNATIVE MEDIA, AND EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES ARE INTRODUCED WHILE THE FINE ART OF CINEMATOGRAPHY LIGHTING, PRODUCTION DESIGN, SOUND, AND EDITING ARE STRESSED AS YOUR PRIMARY TOOLS TO TRANSLATE MEANING TO YOUR AUDIENCE. 100


101


AMANDA WILLOUGHBY/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA

102


Digital Cinema

BFA IN DIGITAL MEDIA

overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 36 Studio Electives 18 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33

TOTAL 120

First Year

third Year

Drawing 1 Idea, Process, and Criticism Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

Digital Cinema 3 Sound Acquisition, and Editing Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

Experimental Cinema Production Dynamic Imaging 2 Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

second Year

fourth Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

3-D Design Digital Cinema 1 Intro to Animation Techniques Art History Elective Literature Elective

Senior Studio 1 2-D Animation 1 Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Digital Cinema 2 Dynamic Imaging 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

Senior Studio 2 3-D Computer Animation Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective

REQUIRED COURSES:

INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION TECHNIQUES DM200

The principles and history of animation are introduced. Working with digital programs as well as pre-cinematic toys, rotoscoping, and live pixilation, students explore “persistence of vision”—the process by which we perceive movement through still images. Students also gain a solid foundation in the history and techniques of animation through screenings and readings.

DYNAMIC IMAGING 1 DM230

This course provides an introduction to narrative story structure and presents strategies for the creation of character driven time-based compositions using a wide variety of media including traditional methods emphasizing drawing. Through lectures, practical assignments, and critiques students gain a technical command of industry standard software as well as the conceptual skills necessary for the production of meaningful and coherent narrative.

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104


105

REQUIRED COURSES continued:

DIGITAL CINEMA 1

SENIOR STUDIO 1

DIGITAL IMAGING 1

DM270

DM400

DM240

This course is an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on screenwriting, directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting, and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using non-linear editing software.

This course encompasses the conceptual and technical skills of the senior level student. Personal process, vision, and presentation skills are stressed. The development of works for the professional portfolio, and thesis is expected.

Students develop knowledge of image development, construction, retouching, and collage techniques using traditional film, digital images, and drawing as source material. A critical examination of intent will be stressed along with output options and color management. The implications of the digital image and new technologies are discussed and researched from both a personal and societal view.

DYNAMIC IMAGING 2 DM330

The goal of this course is to expand the student’s conceptual and technical understanding of digital motion sequencing as presented in Dynamic Imaging 1. Special emphasis is placed on the postproduction processes of stylization, enhancement, and creation of digital effects.

DIGITAL CINEMA 2 DM370

This is an advanced level production course. Students are pushed to further develop the technical processes introduced in DM270. Special instructional emphasis is given to cinematography and lighting.

SOUND ACQUISITION, AND EDITING DM375

This course focuses on audio as an art form in and of itself, as well as in the service of other mediums— video, animation, etc. We begin by exploring the fundamentals of acoustics: sound waves and how they travel; how microphones convert kinetic energy into an electrical signal; and how recording devices work. We then move on to sound acquisition strategies, including proper micing, field audio work, and foley recording. Students use the digital audio workstation to create original compositions, explore soundtrack design, and perform mix-downs.

SENIOR STUDIO 2 DM405

This course provides Animation and Digital Cinema majors the opportunity to complete a more indepth final project.

EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA PRODUCTION

Plus one of the following two courses:

DM475

3-D ANIMATION

“…the film experience…is not necessarily a projection of light and shadow on a screen at the end of a room…” – Gene Youngblood, Expanded Cinema. This class is designed to assist students in the development of alternative means of production and exhibition of media. Topics include camera experimentation, the position of the viewer, experimental animation techniques, the performative nature of exhibition and the forms and means of disseminating media. Additionally, students will analyze selected works to enlighten their understanding of the history of nontraditional forms in video and film.

DM300

Plus one of the following two courses: 2-D ANIMATION 1 DM225

In this course, students will learn the fundamentals of animation production, including pre-production planning, storyboarding, two-dimensional character design and jointing. Classroom assignments will utilize both traditional animation stand techniques and Toon Boom; students will have the option of creating a finished work in either environment.

This is an introductory course in stop-motion animation, a medium that requires a wide array of technical skills. We consider such techniques as sculpting, two part molds, foam rubber casting, armature configuration, set design, and lighting for small spaces. Through motion and movement tests, students explore the ways in which three-dimensional objects move through space.

3-D COMPUTER ANIMATION DM310

Students gain experience with creating 3-D animation, including geometric modeling, lighting, camera angles, texture formation, skeleton rigging and motion in a three-dimensional animation package. Students learn underlying principles of 3-D animation, including perspective, transformations, lighting and shadows, and modeling natural phenomena and motion.


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107

KAITLYN CHANDLER/DIGITAL MEDIA/DIGITAL CINEMA


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AMANDA WILLOUGHBY/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA


110


111

Student Name


112


113

DIGITAL MEDIA

Animation and Cinema: the combination, intersection, and dialogue between the two disciplines are the focus of this unique concentration where you explore the storytelling, production techniques, software tools, and best strategies for the professional creation of time-based artistic experiences. Students are pushed to solve problems creatively, work corroboratively, and analyze their own creation process and the processes of others.


KANDACE FULLER/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION

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ANIMATION AND CINEMA: THE COMBINATION, INTERSECTION, AND DIALOGUE BETWEEN THE TWO DISCIPLINES ARE THE FOCUS OF THIS UNIQUE CONCENTRATION W H E R E YO U E X P L O R E T H E STORYTELLING, PRODUCTION TECHNIQUES, SOFTWARE TOOLS, AND BEST STRATEGIES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL CREATION OF TIMEBASED ARTISTIC EXPERIENCES. STUDENTS ARE PUSHED TO SOLVE PROBLEMS CREATIVELY, WORK COLLABORATIVELY, AND ANALYZE THEIR OWN CREATION PROCESS AND THE PROCESSES OF OTHERS.


Digital Media BFA in design arts

overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 18 Studio Electives 36 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

First Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 1 Idea, Process, and Criticism Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

REQUIRED COURSES:

INTRODUCTION TO ANIMATION TECHNIQUES DM200 The principles and history of animation are introduced. Working with digital programs as well as pre-cinematic toys, rotoscoping, and live pixilation, students explore “persistence of vision”— the process by which we perceive movement through still images. Students also gain a solid foundation in the history and techniques of animation through screenings and readings.

DYNAMIC IMAGING 1

DM230

This course provides an introduction to narrative story structure and presents strategies for the creation of character driven time-based compositions using a wide variety of media including traditional methods emphasizing drawing. Through lectures, practical assignments, and critiques students gain a technical command of industry standard software as well as the conceptual skills necessary for the production of meaningful and coherent narrative.

DIGITAL CINEMA 1

DM270

This course in an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on screenwriting, directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using non-linear editing software. DM300 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK

SENIOR STUDIO 1

DM400

This course encompasses the conceptual and technical skills of the senior level student. Personal process, vision, and presentation skills are stressed. The development of works for the professional portfolio, and thesis is expected.

SENIOR STUDIO 2

DM405

This course provides Animation and Digital Cinema majors the opportunity to complete a more in-depth final project.

116

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

second Year

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits) 3-D Design Animation Techniques Digital Cinema 1 Art History Elective Literature Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Dynamic Imaging 1 Digital Cinema 2 Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

third Year

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Sound Acquisition & Editing Digital Cinema 3 Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Experimental Cinema Production Digital Cinema 3 Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year 7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Senior Studio 1 Dynamic Imaging 2 Studio or Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Senior Studio 2 3-D Animation Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


117

NICOLAS PFLUG/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION/ART HISTORY


MEGAN BUCKLEY/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION/ART HISTORY

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119

TRAVIS FOWLER/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION


AN ARTIST WHO USES CLAY AS PAINT TO DEPICT THE PASSAGE OF TIME IN HER WORK. “...using clay and pigments

“Time

from the Earth, in their

changes

raw form.”

things

-Eunika Rogers

but my paintings stay eternal.” -Eunika Rogers

CLAY IS PAINT

a film by

CAROLINA SALCEDO CAROLINA SALCEDO/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA/ART HISTORY

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JILL WISSMILLER

Associate Professor | Digital Media The small classes arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just good for the student. I love the opportunity I have to get to know exciting young artists and to be inspired by them.


AMANDA WILLOUGHBY/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA

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123

Student Name


JOHN FURR/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA/ART HISTORY

124


125


JORDAN JACKSON/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN

126


GRAPHIC DESIGN

127


WE DESIGN. GRAPHIC DESIGN IS AN INTERDISCIPLINARY, CREATIVE PROBLEMSOLVING PROCESS THAT COMBINES RESEARCH, VISUAL SENSITIVITY, DESIGN SKILLS, AND KNOWLEDGE IN AREAS OF VISUAL COMMUNICATION, TECHNOLOGY, AND BUSINESS. GRAPHIC DESIGN IS THE EFFECTIVE UNDERSTANDING OF A CLIENT’S PRODUCT, SERVICE, OR EVENT, AND ITS GOAL IS TO TRANSLATE THE CLIENT’S AND DESIGNER’S SHARED CONCEPT INTO A CREATIVE VISUAL SOLUTION FOR A TARGETED AUDIENCE. DESIGN IS CREATED THROUGH THE MANIPULATION, COMBINATION, AND UTILIZATION OF SHAPE, COLOR, IMAGERY, TYPOGRAPHY, AND 128


129

SPACE—BEAUTIFULLY CRAFTED ACROSS ALL APPLICATIONS—DIGITAL, ANALOG, AND ENVIRONMENTAL. SUBJECTS YOU MAY STUDY IN THE DEPARTMENT OF DESIGN INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING: ADVERTISING DESIGN, APP DESIGN, BRAND IDENTITY, DATA VISUALIZATION AND MAPPING, DESIGN RESEARCH, DESIGN THEORY, DESIGN THINKING, EXHIBITION DESIGN, GRAPHIC DESIGN (PRINT AND DIGITAL), INFORMATION DESIGN, PACKAGING DESIGN, PUBLICATION DESIGN, SIGNAGE DESIGN, SUSTAINABLE DESIGN, SYSTEM DESIGN, TYPOGRAPHY, WAYFINDING DESIGN, AND WEB DESIGN.


HYUNA PARK

Assistant Professor | Graphic Design Teaching at MCA is a rewarding experience as I can see my students stepping up to succeed in their future and make positive changes in society.

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SPECIAL TOPICS: THE DESIGN LABORATORY


EMILY CHAPLAIN/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY

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133


134


135

DESIGN SYSTEM 1


1

9/25/13

9:07 AM

untain College of Art + Design| 1am - 3pm

Sat, Sep 28. Denver, CO,-Rocky Sat, Nov 9. Toronto, Ontario, OCAD University| 12pm 4pm Mountain College of Art + Design| 1am - 3pm

on School of Art and Design| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, 29. Indianapolis, IN, Herron Art and Design| 12pm - 4pm 10amSchool - 2pm|ofGRADUATE Sun, Nov 10. Chicago, IL, School of Sep the Art Institute of Chicago|

Sun, Nov 10. Chicago, IL, School of the Art Institute of Chicago| 10am - 2pm| GRADUATE

sual Arts| 1am - 3pm

Oct 5. Austin, TX, School of Visual - 3pm Sun, Nov 10. Philadelphia, PA,Sat, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts| Arts| 12pm1am - 4pm

Sun, Nov 10. Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts| 12pm - 4pm

demy of Cincinnati| 12pm - 4pm

Sat, Oct 5. Cincinnati, OH, Art Academy of Cincinnati| 12pm - 4pm Sun, Nov 10. Rochester, NY, Rochester Institute of Technology| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Nov 10. Rochester, NY, Rochester Institute of Technology| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Oct 6. SUNY: School of Art & Design| 12pm - 4pm Sat, Nov 16. Purchase, NY, Purchase College,

Sat, Nov 16. Purchase, NY, Purchase College, SUNY: School of Art & Design| 12pm - 4pm

sual Arts| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Oct 6. Dallas, TX, School 12pm of Visual Arts| 12pm - 4pm Sun, Nov 17. New York, NY, Fashion Institute of Technology| - 4pm

Sun, Nov 17. New York, NY, Fashion Institute of Technology| 12pm - 4pm

is College of Art| 12pm - 4pm

Sat,Institute| Oct 12. 12pm Memphis, TN, Memphis College of Art| 12pm - 4pm Sat, Nov 23. New York, NY, Pratt - 4:00pm| GRADUATE

Sat, Nov 23. New York, NY, Pratt Institute| 12pm - 4:00pm| GRADUATE

a Commonwealth University| 1pm - 5pm

Sat,ofOct Richmond, VA,Arts| Virginia University| 1pm - 5pm Sun, Nov 24. Boston, MA, School the12. Museum of Fine 12pmCommonwealth - 4pm| GRADUATE

Sun, Nov 24. Boston, MA, School of the Museum of Fine Arts| 12pm - 4pm| GRADUATE

College of Art + Design| 12pm - 4pm

Sat, OctCollege 12. Sanof Diego, CA, Laguna Sun, Nov 24. Charlotte, NC, Memphis Art| 11am - 3pm College of Art + Design| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Nov 24. Charlotte, NC, Memphis College of Art| 11am - 3pm

neapolis College of Art and Design| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Oct 13. MN, Minneapolis College of Art and Design| 12pm - 4pm Sat, Dec 7. Phoenix, AZ, Cornish College ofMinneapolis, the Arts| 12pm - 4pm

Sat, Dec 7. Phoenix, AZ, Cornish College of the Arts| 12pm - 4pm

College of Art, Design & Film| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Oct 13. Nashville, TN, Watkins College of Art, Design & Film| 12pm - 4pm Emily Carr University of Art + Design| 11am - 3pm Sat, Dec 7. Vancouver, British Columbia,

Sat, Dec 7. Vancouver, British Columbia, Emily Carr University of Art + Design| 11am - 3pm

kee Institute of Art & Design| 10am - 2pm

Oct 19. Milwaukee, Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design| 10am - 2pm Sun, Dec 8. Albuquerque, NM,Sat, Washington University|WI, Time: 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Dec 8. Albuquerque, NM, Washington University| Time: 12pm - 4pm Sat, Jan 11. Seattle, WA, Cornish College of the Arts| 11am - 3pm

Sat, Nov 9. Toronto, Ontario, OCAD University| 12pm - 4pm

he Art Institute of Chicago| 10am - 2pm

Sun, Oct 20. School of the Art Institute of Chicago| 10am - 2pm Sat, Jan 11. Seattle, WA, Cornish College of Chicago, the Arts| IL, 11am - 3pm

s City Art Institute|12pm - 4pm

Sun, Jan 12.

ts, 12pm - 4pm| GRADUATE

Los Angeles, CA, CalArts, Sat, Oct 26. Sat, Jan 18. New Orleans, LA, Memphis College of Art| 12pm - 4pm 12pm - 4pm| GRADUATE

Sat, Jan 18. New Orleans, LA, Memphis College of Art| 12pm - 4pm

r Creative Studies| 12pm - 4pm

Oct 27. Detroit, College for Creative Sat, Jan 18. San Francisco, CA,Sun, California College of MI, the Arts| 12pm - 4pm Studies| 12pm - 4pm

Sat, Jan 18. San Francisco, CA, California College of the Arts| 12pm - 4pm

Sun,College Oct 27.of San CA,12pm San Francisco Sun, Jan 19. Los Angeles, CA, Otis ArtFrancisco, and Design| - 4pm Art Institute| 12pm - 4pm| GRADUATE

Sun, Jan 19. Los Angeles, CA, Otis College of Art and Design| 12pm - 4pm

gton University| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, School Oct 27.ofSt.the Louis, Washington University| 12pm - 4pm Sat, Jan 25. Miami, FL, New World Arts|MO, 12pm - 4pm

Sat, Jan 25. Miami, FL, New World School of the Arts| 12pm - 4pm

kee Institute of Art & Design| 10am - 2pm

Sat, Nov 2. Des Moines, IA, Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design| 10am - 2pm Sun, Jan 26. Sarasota, FL, Ringling College of Art and Design|12pm - 4pm

Sun, Jan 26. Sarasota, FL, Ringling College of Art and Design|12pm - 4pm

Art School| 1pm - 5pm

Nov 2.College Hartford, CT,and Hartford Art10am School| 1pm - 5pm Sat, Nov 23. Washington, DC, Sat, Corcoran of Art Design| - 2pm

Sat, Nov 23. Washington, DC, Corcoran College of Art and Design| 10am - 2pm

Sun, NovInstitute, 3. Boston,College MA, Massachusetts Sun, Nov 24. Baltimore, MD, Maryland of Art| 1pm - College 5pm of Art & Design| 12pm - 4pm

Sun, Nov 24. Baltimore, MD, Maryland Institute, College of Art| 1pm - 5pm

Francisco Art Institute| 12pm - 4pm| GRADUATE

etts College of Art & Design| 12pm - 4pm

nstitute, College of Art| 11am - 3pm

Sat, Oct 26. Kansas City, MO, Kansas City Art Institute|12pm - 4pm

Sat, Nov 9. Atlanta, GA, Maryland Institute, College of Art| 11am - 3pm

Memphis College of Art, Graphic Design BFA 2013 Graphic Designer, Jennifer Johnson - Faculty Adviser, Hannah Park For more information: www.portfolioday.net

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Sun, Jan 12.

Memphis College of Art, Graphic Design BFA 2013 Graphic Designer, Jennifer Johnson - Faculty Adviser, Hannah Park For more information: www.portfolioday.net

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Alberta College of Art + Design Calgary, Alberta CANADA www.acad.ca

New York, NY www.cooper.edu

Marywood University Scranton, PA www.marywood.edu

Alfred University Alfred, NY www.art.alfred.edu

Corcoran College of Art and Design Washington, DC www.corcoran.edu

Massachusetts College of Art & Design Boston, MA www.massart.edu

Arcadia University Glenside, PA www.arcadia.edu

Cornish College of the Arts Seattle, WA www.cornish.edu

Memphis College of Art Memphis, TN www.mca.edu

Art Academy of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH www.artacademy.edu

Cranbrook Academy of Art www.cranbrookart.edu

Mercy College, Computer Arts + Design Program White Plains, NY http://artdesign.mercy.edu

Art Center College of Design Pasadena, CA www.artcenter.edu

Delaware College of Art and Design Wilmington, DE www.dcad.edu

Miami University Oxford, OH www.muohio.edu/art

Bowling Green State University, School of Art Bowling Green, OH www.bgsu.edu/art

Emily Carr University of Art + Design Vancouver, British Columbia CANADA www.ecuad.ca

Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Milwaukee, WI www.miad.edu

Bradley University Peoria, IL www.art.bradley.edu

Fashion Institute of Technology New York, NY

Minneapolis College of Art and Design Minneapolis, MN www.mcad.edu

Burren College of Art County Clare, IRELAND www.burrencollege.ie

FIDM/Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising Los Angeles, CA

Minnesota State University Moorhead Moorhead, MN www.mnstate.edu

CalArts (California Institute of the Arts) Valencia, CA www.calarts.edu

Grand Valley State University Allendale, MI www.gvsu.edu/art

Montclair State University, College of the Arts Montclair, NJ www.montclair.edu

California College of the Arts San Francisco, CA www.cca.edu

Hartford Art School, University of Hartford Hartford, CT www.hartfordartschool.org

Montserrat College of Art Beverly, MA www.montserrat.edu

Center for Art and Design at the College of Saint Rose Albany, NY www.strose.edu/art-design

Herron School of Art and Design Indianapolis, IN www.herron.iupui.edu

Moore College of Art & Design Philadelphia, PA www.moore.edu

Cleveland Institute of Art Cleveland, OH www.cia.edu

James Madison University Harrisonburg, VA www.jmu.edu/artandarthistory

Murray State University Murray, KY www.murraystate.edu

College for Creative Studies Detroit, MI www.insideccs.com

Kansas City Art Institute Kansas City, MO www.kcai.edu

University Boston, MA

Columbus College of Art & Design Columbus, OH www.ccad.edu

Kendall College of Art and Design of Ferris State University Grand Rapids, MI New Hampshire Institute of Art www.kcad.edu Manchester, NH 03101 www.nhia.edu Kennesaw State University Kennesaw, GA New World School of the Arts www.kennesaw.edu Miami, FL www.mdc.edu Kutztown University of Pennsylvania Kutztown New York School of Interior Design www.kutztown.ed New York, NY www.nysid.edu Kwantlen Polytechnic University Northern Illinois University School of Art Richmond, British Columbia CANADA DeKalb, IL www.kwantlen.ca www.niu.edu Laguna College of Art + Design NSCAD University (Nova Scotia College of Art and Laguna Beach, CA Design) www.lagunacollege.edu Nova Scotia CANADA www.nscad.ca Lawrence Tech

Concordia University Quebec CANADA

www.ltu.edu Lesley University College of Art and Design Boston, MA www.aiboston.edu Long Island University, Brooklyn Campus Brooklyn, NY www.liu.edu/brooklyn Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts Old Lyme, CT www.lymeacademy.edu Maine College of Art Portland, ME www.meca.edu

U.S. Postage PAID Memphis, TN PERMIT NO. 472

Memphis College of Art 1930 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38104-2156

Susan Millar 1930 Poplar Ave. Memphis, TN 38104-2156

OCAD University Toronto, Ontario CANADA www.ocadu.ca Portland, OR www.ocac.edu Otis College of Art and Design Los Angeles, CA www.otis.edu Portland, OR www.pnca.edu

Maryland Institute College of Art Baltimore, MD www.mica.edu

What Happens at National Portfolio Day

Choosing an Art College?

National Portfolio Days are educational events for young artists held at host colleges throughout the U.S and Canada. Portfolio days bring together students and experienced college representatives who

Art making is a special kind of learning experience. Of particular concern to art students should be a college’s faculty, facilities, and equipment. You should also consider the school’s proximity to museums, galleries, and other cultural resources, in addition to its academic standards, extracurricular activities,

development, look forward to reviewing your work, and will provide you with helpful information for this next important step in your development as an artist. We suggest that you work with as many representatives as possible.

We encourage you to gather enough information so that you may choose a supportive and stimulating art college environment that meets your individual needs. Try your best to visit the colleges that

At National Portfolio Day, you will get a small taste of what it could be like to attend a professional art

accreditations and the transferability of their credits, and be sure you understand each school’s degree

the college representatives how you develop your ideas and where you want to go with them. the college representatives may accept the portfolio you presents the visual portion of your application, review. All expect that your artwork will progress in the coming year. If you are interested in graduate programs, we encourage you to contact individual institutions, as all colleges will not be prepared to review graduate portfolios at the National Portfolio Day.

What should I bring to a National Portfolio Day?

What is National Portfolio Day Association? accredited US colleges and universities that are accredited institutional members of the National membership represent the highest standard of visual arts education available in the United States and Canada.

your original artwork whenever possible. We suggest that you do not spend time and money matting or framing your work. Keep your presentation simple; the work itself is what is of interest

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JENNIFER JOHNSON/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN


138 ALEXANDRA LEE/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN


139

Graphic Design BFA in Design Arts

overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 18 Studio Electives 36 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES: DESIGN SYSTEM 4

DESIGN SYSTEM 1

GD305

GD200

This studio introduction to visual communication explores the unique meanings and principles of design and its supporting elements. As a companion to the first semester, students are instructed on a Macintosh platform utilizing current professional design software.

The intermediate level of study concludes with the continued application of physical and theoretical design principles with an emphasis in identity systems and emotional branding. Supplemental demonstrations, lectures, readings, and research activities compliment the course of study.

DESIGN SYSTEM 2

DESIGN SYSTEM 5 GD400

GD205

The second course in a sequential series for majors of the discipline, the primary focus is the expansion of introductory concepts secured in Design System 1. This formation extends the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s natural artistic intuitiveness on an elevated conceptual and technical level. Areas of investigation include: pure typography; the grid as structure; and the development and realization of two- and three-dimensional design solutions.

The final year sequence commences with Design System 5, a comprehensive course in a professional and rigorous studio environment. The system accentuates a continued linear design methodology and its proven tenets. Concurrently presented multi-level projects are designed to simulate the vigor and expectations of a practicing professional.

DESIGN SYSTEM 6 GD405

DESIGN SYSTEM 3 GD300

Design System 3 calls attention to the experimental integration of structures, imagery, and typography as form. Extended thought is placed on the systems of letterforms in relation to history and technology. A project example, Volume Discourse, examines the multiple utilizing the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vandercook letterpress and digital technology.

The conclusion of the formal program of the discipline, the student applies the collective knowledge to a defended, undergraduate senior thesis and exhibition. This endeavor requires the whole of the student and illustrates their verbal, academic, and artistic aptitude. Discipline centered, the thesis encourages transdisciplinary influences.

FIRST YEAR

SECOND YEAR

THIRD YEAR

FOURTH YEAR

Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

Idea, Process, and Criticism Design System 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Literature Elective

Design System 3 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

Design System 5 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Design System 2 Studio Elective Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

Design System 4 Studio Elective Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

Design System 6 Studio Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits)


DESIGN SYSTEM 1

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141


142


143

Student Name SHELDA EDWARDS/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN


GLENN BUXTON/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART HISTORY

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Schedule of Events 29 30 30

Sep Sep Sep

Rocky Mountain College of Art + Design Vincennes University Minneapolis College of Art and Design

Denver, Colorado Vincennes University Minneapolis, Minnesota

06 06 07 07 13 13 14 14 14 20 21 27 28 28 28

Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct Oct

Academy of Cincinnati Woodlands Waterway Marriiott Columbus College of Art and Design Hilton Anatole Otis College of Art and Design Memphis College of Art Watkins College of Art, Design & Film Laguna College of Art + Design California College of the Arts Syracuse University School of the Art Institure of Chicago Kansas City Art Institute University of Michigan Washington University Parson The New School for Design

Cincinnati, Ohio Houston, Texas Columbus, Ohio Dallas, Texas Los Angeles, California Memphis, Tennessee Nashville, Tennessee San Diego, California San Fransico, California Syracuse, New York Chicago, Illinois Kansas City, Missouri Ann Arbor, Michigan St. Louis Missouri New York, New York

03 03 04 10 10 11 11 17 17 18 18

Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov

Hartford Art School Minneapolis College of Art and Design School of the Museum of Fine Arts OCAD University Milawaukee Institute of Art & Design Moore College of Art & Design School of the Art Institute of Chicago Purchas College Maryland Institute, College of Art Parsons The New School for Design Memphis College of Art

Hartford Connecticut Des Moines, Iowa Boston, Massachusetts Toronto, Ontario Milwaukee, Wisconsin Philadelphia, Pennsylvannia Chicago Illinois Purchase, New York Atlanta, Georgia New York, New York Charolette, North Carolina

01 01 02 08 08 09

Dec Dec Dec Dec Dec Dec

Corcoran College of Art and Design Emily Carr University of Art + Design Maryland Institute, College of Art Virginia Commonwealth University Cornish College of the Arts Washington University

Washington, DC Vancouver, British Columbia Baltimore, Maryland Richmond, Virginia Phoenix, Arizona Albuquerque, New Mexico

12 13 19 19 20 26 27

Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan Jan

Cornish College of the Arts Oregon College of Art and Craft Memphis College of Art San Fransisco Art Institute Art Center College of Design New World School of the Arts Ringling College of Art and Design

Seattle, Washington Portland, Oregon New Orlean, Louisiana San Fransisco, California Pasadena, California Miami, Florida Sarasota, Florida

2014-2015 NATIONAL PORTFOLIO DAY

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For event location details visit www.portfolioday.net

LAURA MILLER/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN


146


147

JOHN PENNINGTON/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


HERBERT JOYCE/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN

148


149

DUSTIN LESTER/PHOTOGRAPHY


ILLUSTR 150


RATION

151


DOMINQUE PERE/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY

152


153

ILLUSTRATION IS THE ART OF TAKING INFORMATION— ABSTRACT, TEXTUAL, AND NARRATIVE—AND MAKING IT VISIBLE. THE TOOLS WE BRING TO THIS TASK ARE A RIGOROUS GROUNDING IN REPRESENTATIONAL DRAWING, TRADITIONAL AND DIGITAL MEDIA, PROFESSIONAL APPLICATION, AND PERSONAL EXPRESSION.


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155

ALYSSA FICKS/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY

Alyssa Ficks


CLARE FREEMAN CALDWELL/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY

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157

ROB MCELHANEY/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


SAMANTHA WIGGINTON/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION

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159

Illustration BFA in Design Arts overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Concentration Requirements 18 Studio Electives 36 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES: ILLUSTRATION 1: DRAWING FOR ILLUSTRATION

IL240 This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of representational drawing for the purposes of communication. Images are created in several media, utilizing a variety of visual references, including photography, life, memory, and found sources. Conceptualization, composition, clear rendering, and staging of the figure are emphasized.

ILLUSTRATION 2: ILLUSTRATED MEDIA IL270

This course continues the development of representational drawing and communication skills from Illustration 1. Perspective, color composition, and wet media are explored as tools for solving narrative and conceptual challenges. Assignments include both planned studio-based work and responsive sketches at off-site locations.

ILLUSTRATION 3: PROFESSIONAL APPLICATIONS IL360

This course is an overview of Illustration as a field. Assignments reflect the scope of Illustration, including Editorial, Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Business, and Book, using a combination of digital and traditional media. Emphasis is placed on concept development, communication, and professional practice.

ILLUSTRATION 4: PROFESSIONAL APPLICATIONS

IL365 This course continues the survey of Illustration as a practice begun in Illustration 3. Assignments reflect the scope of Illustration, including Editorial, Entertainment, and Information Illustration. An emphasis is placed on concept development, communication, and professional practice, with a particular focus on developing visual metaphors and integrating illustration with type and graphic design.

ILLUSTRATION 5: VISUAL ESSAY IL460 In pursuit of a personal voice and process, students develop Visual Essays: self-directed series of related images on chosen subjects. Additionally, the professional business and contractual practices necessary for a working illustrator are covered in detail.

ILLUSTRATION 6: PORTFOLIO AND PRESENTATION IL465 Advanced students continue creating a personal and professional body of work in preparation for graduating and seeking work in their field. This includes development of a portfolio, web representation, and selfpromotional materials.

First Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

second Year

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits) Idea, Process, and Criticism Illustration 1: Drawing for Illustration Studio Elective Art History Elective Literature Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Illustration 2: Illustrated Media Studio Elective Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

third Year

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Illustration 3: Professional Applications Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Illustration 4: Professional Applications Studio Elective Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Illustration 5: Visual Essay Concentration Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Illustration 6: Portfolio and Presentation Studio Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


160

NATALIE JACKSON/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


161

MICHELE NOISET

Assistant Professor | Illustration I love the feeling of collaboration and creative community at MCA. The opportunity to play a role in the truly extraordinary foundation given to our students is so exciting and I am thrilled to be a part of the structure.


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163

AMANDA LUCAS/DESIGN ARTS/DIGITAL MEDIA


164


165

MELINDA PARRA/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY


166


167

MELINDA PARRA/DESIGNARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY

ALEXA SHAUNAK/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY


168

GEORGE BROOKS/DESIGN ARTS/COMICS


169

SHANE MCDERMOTT Instructor | Illustration

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantastic that our students have so many opportunities to intern at great firms and to have strong support networks of alumni and recent grads.


PAINT DRAW 170


TING/ WING

171


IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY PRACTICE THERE IS NO CLEAR D I V I S I O N B E T W E E N W H AT CONSTITUTES A DRAWING AND A PAINTING. MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART’S NEW PAINTING/DRAWING PRO GRAM IS INTENDED TO PROVIDE STUDENTS WITH A WIDE RANGE OF EXPERIENCES WITH MATERIALS, TECHNIQUES, PROCESSES, SUBJECTS, AND IDEAS FROM WHICH TO BUILD A PERSONAL APPROACH TO PICTURE MAKING. THE POSSIBILITIES ARE ENDLESS. FROM TRADITIONAL REALIST 172


173

UPON GRADUATION, STUDENTS WILL BE PREPARED TO ENTER GRADUATE SCHOOL FOR FURTHER STUDY OR TO PURSUE AN INDIVIDUAL, INDEPENDENT STUDIO PRACTICE.

Fidencio Martinez

IMAGERY TO ABSTRACTION AND BEYOND, THE CURRICULUM IS DESIGNED FOR STUDENTS WHO DESIRE A LONG-TERM CAREER OF ART MAKING. IT WILL PROVIDE A THOROUGH GROUNDING IN TECHNIQUES, METHODS, AND THE DISCIPLINE OF STUDIO PRACTICE.


SUSAN MAAKESTAD Professor | Painting/Drawing

I value the relationships I form with students, working one-on-one with them in our small classes.

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175

FIDENCIO MARTINEZ/FINE ARTS/PAINTING


176


177

KATHERINE MATTINGLY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY


178


179

LINDA LANGLEY OSBORN/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


180


181

JOHN PENNINGTON/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION


JEFF MUNCY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING

182

KATHERINE MATTINGLY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY


183

BEVERLY SPEAKES/FINE ARTS/PAINTING


BFA

in

Painting/Drawing

overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 33 Studio Electives 21 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES: PAINTING I

PD100 Introduction to the materials and techniques of oil and/ or acrylic painting. Includes working on and preparing various paint supports and basic traditional painting techniques. Emphasis is on developing skills and understanding the plastic qualities of paint.

PAINTING 2

PD120 Continuation of PD100 Painting I. Further material and method exercises in painting with a stronger focus on color and paint handling.

THE FIGURE

PD320 We are what we paint and draw. The Figure class recognizes the importance and the central role that images of humans have played in the history of art. Working with the figure is not only about objective representation, but an implicit (sometimes explicit) confrontation with self and other human beings. Like the Subject classes, The Figure is less about technique or a set of rules and more about the human form as a source of imagery, information, ideas, emotion, and inspiration. It deals with both believability of representation and the figure as concept.

LIFE DRAWING

PD201 Life Drawing explores the “anatomy of drawing”. Primary focus is on the structure of the human figure through planar development and the understanding of spatial relationships. Advanced problem solving, the raising of conceptual and technical skill levels, increased self-discipline, and enhanced analytical thinking are essential parts of the class structure.

DRAWING COMPOSITION

PD230 An extension of the skills and ideas developed in 2-D, 3-D, Drawing I and II, with a concentration on design of the 2-D picture plane. Underlying the assignments are various representations of space based on late-19th and 20th century precedents.

COLLAGE/MIXED MEDIA PD300

An investigation of the use of multiple mediums within a single image. The idea is to gain an understanding of how materials affect the meaning of images. Precedents range from Picasso and Braque’s initial experiments with papier colle up to contemporary ideas about mixed media. Many and various materials will be used with an emphasis placed on the student’s ability and willingness to experiment and explore unfamiliar effects.

CONTEMPORARY CONCEPTS

PD310 Emphasizes both Modern and Post-modern ideas with particular stress given to honing critical and conceptual abilities as well as continuing technical development and increasing self-discipline. Students are urged to expand their familiarity with a variety of styles in a broad range of mediums.

184

SUBJECTS IN PAINTING/DRAWING LANDSCAPE PD330 STILL LIFE PD331 ABSTRACTION PD332 WORKSHOP PD333 Students take two of the four Subjects classes. These are designed to provide an intensive semester investigating various types of imagery that have been of interest to painters and draftspersons throughout history. The various Subjects classes in Still Life, Landscape, Abstraction, and Workshop are not “how to” classes. They do not present specific techniques or rules for approaching these themes. Rather they are presented as subjects the artist goes to for imagery, information, inspiration, ideas, and emotion. In each class, the student must be able to communicate his/her ideas about each theme to others through their work and to articulate those ideas in relation to art of the past and present.

PAINTING/DRAWING SEMINAR 1 PD400 Students work with the instructor on a more individualized basis. The focus is on developing the student’s ideas and skills with the goal of a more intense personal approach to artmaking. Periodic class critiques and interaction with PD cohort is also important. Includes professional practices lectures and assignments.

PAINTING/DRAWING SEMINAR 2 Continuation of PD400.

PD401


185

MOLLY VAN ROEKEL/FINE ARTS/PAINTING

FIRST YEAR

SECOND YEAR

THIRD YEAR

FOURTH YEAR

Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

Idea, Process, and Criticism Painting 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Literature Elective

Drawing Composition Collage/Mixed Media Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

Subjects in Painting/Drawing 1 Painting/Drawing Seminar 1 Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Painting 2 Life Drawing Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Contemporary Concepts The Figure Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Subjects in Painting/Drawing 2 Painting/Drawing Seminar 2 Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


186


187

Mary Berh Weber

MARY BETH WEBER/DIGITAL MEDIA/ANIMATION


KELSEY WINDHAM/FINE ARTS/DRAWING/ART HISTORY

188


189

JESSE NABERS/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY


190


191

FRED BURTON

Professor | Painting/Drawing MCA is a personalized place to learn, I have been able to watch students grow as they become captivated by the breadth and depth of art, then return years later with fascinating tales of success.


192


Establish a firm grounding in the skills of

PHOTOGRAPHY

photographic seeing, production, and presentation while exploring and incorporating a personal visual direction. The curriculum

encourages cultivation of a distinctive visual narrative through the development of artistic and technical skills, as well as a

broad understanding of the role photography plays in contemporary culture. Students

graduate from the program with a portfolio

that shows their conceptual and stylistic

confidence while providing them the instruction to be knowledgeable about every aspect of photography.

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194


195

Student Name

BRITTNEY SCALES/PHOTOGRAPHY


SIGNE JOHNSON/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY

196


197

Student Name

NATALIE SCHUH/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


MIM BROOKS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

BFA in Photography overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Major Requirements 36 Studio Electives 18 | Art History 12 | Liberal ArtsYear 33 First

TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES:

1st semester (15 credits) Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

third Year

5th Semester (15 credits) Photography 3 Sequence as Story Book Arts/Digital Cinema/Digital Imaging 2 Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

2nd Semester (15 credits) 6th Semester (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design PHOTOGRAPHY 1 PH100 PHOTOGRAPHY Photography 2 PH250 4 Studio Lighting Foundations In this course, students become technically proficientDigital in This course is focused on advanced technical skills as a means Web Design Writing 2 basic black and white photography, including exposure, gaining and aesthetic Math/Science Elective understanding. Art HistoryofSurvey 2 greater personal developing, darkroom printing, and presentation. Photography Students work with Liberal medium and large format cameras, Arts Elective is presented as a tool to understand the world and as a means museum quality paper, basic studio lighting, and experimental FOURTH YEAR YEAR of image making of expression and communication. Students learn howSECOND to techniques and printing. 7th Semester (15 credits) 3rd Semester (15 credits) interpret and discuss the visual language of photography. Photography 5 Idea, Process, and Criticism SEQUENCE AS STORY PH275 Alternative Processes Photography 1 DIGITAL IMAGING 1 DM240 By investigating historical and contemporary documentary Studio Elective Studio Elective Students develop knowledge of digital workflow, construction, and the classicLiberal pictureArts essay this course concentrates Elective History ofimages Photography Liberal Arts Elective Literature on Elective retouching, and printing techniques using traditional film, using images to tell a story. Students take on the role of a digital images, and drawing as source material. A critical photojournalist to document exercises seen in media contexts. 8th semester (14 credits) 4th Semester (15 credits) examination of intent will be stressed along with output The2culmination of the course is a self-published book that Photography 6 Photography options and color management. The implications of the digital documents the semester-long project of documenting a Liberal Arts/Art History Elective Digital Imaging 1 Studio Elective Studio Elective image and new technologies are discussed and researched socially relevant group. Studio Elective Art History Elective from both a personal and societal view. Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective 198


199

PHOTOGRAPHY 3 PH300 This studio course explores the photograph in contemporary art. Photography’s integral tie to light serves as the backbone of this course as it investigates the alternative and contemporary spaces used by photographic artists. Students explore the extension of the photographs off the page and into the realm of installation, performance, and projection. Digital and analog tools and skills blur as students are encouraged to experiment and challenge their ideas of what defines a photograph.

PHOTOGRAPHY 4 PH310 Students build a strong foundation in the technical and aesthetic aspects of color photography through projects utilizing color transparencies and negatives and instruction in color printing and studio lighting as it pertains to the nuances of color. Discussions and critical writings focus on the history and theory of color photography. This course combines analog and digital techniques and skills, as well as a thorough discussion of Lightroom software.

STUDIO LIGHTING

PH325 This is a course on studio lighting as it applies to fine art and commercial photography. This course includes technical instruction in the lighting studio, as well as on location with both portable lights and natural light. Students use a wide range of analog and digital cameras. This course is defined by critiques and continued technical and conceptual advancement.

ALTERNATIVE PHOTO PROCESSES PH351 This course explores various nineteenthcentury and experimental photographic processes such as cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, platinum/palladium, salt and wet plate collodion printing. Students learn to use experimental as well as analog and digitally enhanced negatives. Many of these processes blur the line between

photography and drawing. This course is also useful for students concentrating in Printmaking.

PHOTOGRAPHY 5

PH375

Equal parts seminar and studio, this is the first semester course of a year-long seminar dedicated to professional practices of photography. Students create work and documentation to apply for academic post baccalaureate experiences such as graduate schools, Fulbright fellowships, and grants. An extensive amount of class time is dedicated to researching opportunities and learning the tools to develop professional documentation.

PHOTOGRAPHY 6

PH400

This is the second semester course of a year-long seminar dedicated to professional practices of photography. Students learn how to develop a brand that overarches all aspects of their portfolio presentation: website, leave behinds, and business cards. Students learn how to research and apply for post baccalaureate experiences such as jobs, internships, residencies, gallery representation, and freelance opportunities. Students create a commercial portfolio that demonstrates their technical photographic abilities.

HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY AH320 A topically arranged survey of world photography, this course takes as its central concern the multiple purposes to which photography has been adapted since its “discovery” in the early nineteenth century. Although the relationship between photography and fine art is considered, the many non-art uses of the medium are also discussed in an attempt to better understand the cultural contexts in which photography has been employed.

WEB DESIGN DM260

The conceptual and technical skills for creating art and design for the Internet

are stressed. The social implications and development of new media and new social system are discussed and researched. Hand coded HTML and layout programs are used.

Plus one of the following three courses: BOOK ARTS

PP170 This course is an introduction to bookbinding providing students with an intense conceptual and technical experience. Projects focus on competence in skill and craft, as well as the successful integration of ideas, materials, and techniques. Students learn to use the book as a vessel for artistic expression. Various areas of bookbinding, printmaking, and alternative photo/image transfer process are covered. Computer skills and knowledge are helpful.

DIGITAL CINEMA DM270 This course is an introduction to the elements of digital cinema production. Focuses are on directing, crew responsibilities, camera operation, lenses, lighting and sound recording. Beyond developing the basic skills necessary for field production, students also become proficient using the non-linear editing software Final Cut Pro. The basics of DVD creation using DVD Studio Pro including media capturing, video and audio encoding, interface design and testing are also introduced.

DIGITAL IMAGING 2 DM340

Students further their knowledge of the digital image and its development. The emphasis is placed on the student’s personal expression and understanding of the full potential of the image in digital and analog terms. A variety of advanced techniques and research are covered including issues of scale and custom color management.

First Year

second Year

third Year

Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

Idea, Process, and Criticism Photography 1 Studio Elective History of Photography Literature Elective

Photography 3 Sequence as Story Book Arts/Digital Cinema/Digital Imaging 2 Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Photography 2 Digital Imaging 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Photography 4 Studio Lighting Web Design Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year 7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Photography 5 Alternative Processes Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

Photography 6 Liberal Arts/Art History Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


JADE THIRASWAS/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

200


201

HALEY MORRIS-CAFIERO Assistant Professor | Photography Director of MFA Programs I like teaching at MCA because the small class size allows me to work one-on-one with students to help them achieve their specific goals.


202


203

COLE WHEELER/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY


204


205

COURTNEY WHITLOW/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY


Photography BFA in Fine Arts overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Concentration Requirements 21 Studio Electives 33 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES: PHOTOGRAPHY 1

PH100 In this course, students become technically proficient in basic black and white photography, including exposure, developing, darkroom printing, and presentation. Photography is presented as a tool to understand the world and as a means of expression and communication. Students learn how to interpret and discuss the visual language of photography.

projects utilizing color transparencies and negatives and instruction in color printing and studio lighting as it pertains to the nuances of color. Discussions and critical writings focus on the history and theory of color photography. This course combines analog and digital techniques and skills as well as a thorough discussion of Lightroom software.

DIGITAL IMAGING 1

Students develop knowledge of digital workflow, construction, retouching, and printing techniques using traditional film, digital images, and drawing as source material. A critical examination of intent will be stressed along with output options and color management. The implications of the digital image and new technologies are discussed and researched from both a personal and societal view.

Equal parts seminar and studio, this is the first semester course of a year-long seminar dedicated to professional practices of photography. Students create work and documentation to apply for academic post baccalaureate experiences such as graduate schools, Fulbright fellowships, and grants. An extensive amount of class time is dedicated to researching opportunities and learning the tools to develop professional documentation.

PHOTOGRAPHY 2

PHOTOGRAPHY 6

DM240

PH250 This course is focused on advanced technical skills as a means of gaining greater personal and aesthetic understanding. Students work with medium and large format cameras, museum quality paper, basic studio lighting, and experimental techniques of image making and printing.

PHOTOGRAPHY 3

PH300

This studio course explores the photograph in contemporary art. Photography’s integral tie to light serves as the backbone of this course as it investigates the alternative and contemporary spaces used by photographic artists. Students explore the extension of the photograph off the page, and into the realm of installation, performance, and projection. Digital and analog tools and skills blur as students are encouraged to experiment and challenge their ideas of what defines a photograph.

PHOTOGRAPHY 4

PH310 Students build a strong foundation in the technical and aesthetic aspects of color photography through

206

PHOTOGRAPHY 5 PH375

PH400 This is the second semester course of a year-long seminar dedicated to professional practices of photography. Students learn how to develop a brand that overarches all aspects of their portfolio presentation: website, leave behinds, and business cards. Students learn how to research and apply for post baccalaureate experiences such as jobs, internships, residencies, gallery representation, and freelance opportunities. Students create a commercial portfolio that demonstrates their technical photographic abilities.

HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

AH320 A topically arranged survey of world photography, this course takes as its central concern the multiple purposes to which photography has been adapted since its “discovery” in the early nineteenth century. Although the relationship between photography and fine art is considered, the many non-art uses of the medium are also discussed in an attempt to better understand the cultural contexts in which photography has been employed.


207

CHRIS SIMMONS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


ARIELLA GIBSON/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

First Year

second Year

Drawing 1 3-D Design Color Foundations Writing 1 Art History Survey 1

Idea, Process, and Criticism Photography 1 Studio Elective History of Photography Literature Elective

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

208

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits)

Digital Imaging 1 Photography 2 Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

third Year

fourth Year

Photography 3 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

Photography 5 Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Photography 4 Studio Elective Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Photography 6 Studio Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


209

RICHARD PHELPS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


CRYSTAL FOSS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

210


211

KAITLYN GARRETT/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


212


213

SUZIE HANSEN/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


ELAINE MILLER/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

214


215

YEINIER GONZALEZ/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

CRYSTAL FOSS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


EMMA SWALES/FINE ARTS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

216


217

NICOLETTE OVERTON/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


PRINTM 218


MAKING

219


EXPERIMENT TO FIND YOUR OWN ICONOGRAPHY. THE PRINTMAKING CONCENTRATION AT MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART ALLOWS YOU TO EXPLORE TRADITIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY PRINTMAKING PROCESSES WHILE CREATING INDELIBLE MULTIPLES OR ONEOF-A-KIND PRINTS OF YOUR OWN IMAGES. TECHNIQUES INCLUDE WOODCUT, INTAGLIO, SCREEN PRINTING, LITHOGRAPHY, COLLOGRAPH, AND MONOTYPE, PHOTO DIGITAL TECHNIQUES. 220


221

MIM BROOKS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


KATHERINE MATTINGLY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY

222


223

NIALAH BRATHWAITE/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY

JOSH ORR/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY


Printmaking BFA in Fine Arts overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Concentration Requirements 18 Studio Electives 36 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33

TOTAL 120

First Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits)

REQUIRED COURSES:

Drawing 1 3-D Design Writing 1 Color Foundations Art History Survey 1

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits)

INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING 1 PM100

This course is an introduction to the tools, history , and basic techniques of monotype, drypoint, relief print (woodcut or linocut) and lithography. Students are encouraged to explore the problems and concerns of their own images technically and conceptually through multiples and oneof-a-kind prints.

INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING 2 PM105

This course provides design strategies and techniques for creating time-based compositions using typography, video, sound, and image sequencing. Through lectures, practical assignments and critiques students gain a technical command of After Effects Software as well as the conceptual skills necessary for pre-production planning, storyboarding, and design of digital motion sequences.

(OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions PM200

(OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions PM200

(OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions PM300

ADVANCED PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP PM400

Students are required to write a proposal discussing the projects, techniques, and content of the work to be developed during the semester. Larger scale works and the inclusion of experiences from other areas (i.e. papermaking, book arts, and letterpress) is discussed and encouraged. A term paper on a professional printmaker is required. The student works independently with weekly meetings to discuss progress, contemporary issues in printmaking, and professional development.

224

Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

second Year

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits) Idea, Process, and Criticism Introduction to Printmaking 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Literature Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Introduction to Printmaking 2 Life Drawing Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

third Year

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits) PM200 or higher course Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits) PM200 or higher course Studio Elective Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year 7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) PM300 or higher course Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Advanced Printmaking Workshop Studio Elective Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


225

ASHLEY HOMEYER/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING


TYLER MURPHY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING/ART HISTORY

226


227

Student Name


228

GABRIELLE GALBRETH/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY


229

MARITZA DĂ VILA Professor | Printmaking

I love my students! I learn from my students as much as I hope they learn from me.


EMILY CHAPLAIN/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY

230


231

NICOLE TRIMBLE/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING


JADE THIRASWAS/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY

232


233


JESSICA VANDENBERG/DESIGN ARTS/GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART HISTORY

234


235

EVAN HOFFMAN/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY


JOSH ORR/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING/ART HISTORY

236


237

CHRISTIAN BROWN/FINE ARTS/PRINTMAKING


SCULPTURE

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239

Traditional and contemporary sculptural materials and processes are explored with focus on content, concept, and technique. Knowledge and competencies with a range of materials and tools develop into the constructive skills of object-making relevant for this century.


A MIX TURE OF RELEVANT, CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO SCULPTURAL EXPRESSION IS PRESENTED THROUGH CERAMIC, METAL, MIXED MEDIA AND EXPERIMENTAL PRACTICES. FLUENCY IN OBJECT MAKING STRATEGIES IS REINFORCED WITH RIGOROUS ATTENTION TO MASTERING STRONG SELFDIRECTED COMPETENCIES. 240


241

CHRISTI LEMKE/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE


242


243

IRYNA KURYLO/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY


HEATHER SMITH/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE

NICOLE CORNACCHIONE/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

244


245

HANNAH ROHRBACHER/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE


STEPHANIE BLACK/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE

246


247

BILL PRICE

Assistant Professor | Metals My position provides me the rare opportunity to not just pass along knowledge, but to accumulate and expand my own through interaction with the infinitely creative minds of MCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students and faculty.


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249

JUSTIN SMITH/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


250


251

JOSH BAGWELL/FINE ARTS/STUDIO ART


NICOLE CORNACCHIONE/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

252


253

NICHOLOUS DARMSTAEDTER/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


254


255

KASSANDRA LINE/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


TOM LEE

Professor | Sculpture Even after 24 years at MCA, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reminded every day of the important role we all play in our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives and education. Watching their curiosity grow into determination makes my heart smile.

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257

LAUREN TAYLOR/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

JUSTIN NUNEZ/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


RACHEL MCCASKY/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

258


259

STEPHANIE BRAY/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE


LEANDRA URRUTIA Associate Professor | Ceramics

Our teacher student ratio allows me to give time, access, and attention to the needs of each student in accomplishing their creative aspirations.

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261

Sculpture BFA in Fine Arts overall curricular requirements Foundations 21 | Concentration Requirements 27 Studio Electives 27 | Art History 12 | Liberal Arts 33 TOTAL 120

REQUIRED COURSES: SCULPTURE 1

SC100

Introduces contemporary approaches to conceiving and building sculptural objects through a range of problems in a variety of materials and hand building processes.

INTRODUCTION TO CERAMICS SC120 This class introduces sculptural building techniques for the production of three-dimensional forms. Additive and subtractive ceramic methods will be covered and used in various ways depending on assignment and concept. Surface finishes will also be explored as students gain a basic understanding of clay, glaze, and firing principles. As the semester progresses and technical proficiencies strengthen, individual artistic content will become the driving force of assigned work.

INTRODUCTION TO METALSMITHING SC150

First Year

1ST SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 1 3-D Design Color Foundations Writing 1 Art History Survey 1

2ND SEMESTER (15 credits) Drawing 2 2-D Design Digital Foundations Writing 2 Art History Survey 2

second Year

3RD SEMESTER (15 credits) Idea, Process, and Criticism Sculpture 1 Studio Elective Art History Elective Literature Elective

4TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Introduction to Ceramics Studio Elective Studio Elective Art History Elective Liberal Arts Elective

This is an introduction to the materials, tooling and processes involved in the creation of small sculptural units, body ornamentation, and utilitarian objects. Processes experienced include lost wax casting, metal forming, surfacing and finishing options.

third Year

SC200 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions

6TH SEMESTER (15 credits)

SC200 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions SC200 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions SC200 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions SC300 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions SC300 (OR HIGHER) COURSEWORK Go to www.mca.edu for course descriptions

5TH SEMESTER (15 credits) Introduction to Metalsmithing SC200 or higher course Studio or AH Elective Social Science Elective Liberal Arts Elective SC200 or higher course SC200 or higher course Studio Elective Math/Science Elective Professional Practices

fourth Year

7TH SEMESTER (15 credits) SC200 or higher course Studio Elective Studio or AH Elective Liberal Arts Elective Liberal Arts Elective

8TH SEMESTER (15 credits) SC300 or higher course SC300 or higher course Studio Elective Studio Elective Liberal Arts Elective


NICOLE CORNACCHIONE/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

262


263

NICHOLOUS DARMSTAEDTER/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


GENERAL INFORMA 264


L ATION

265


JEFF MUNCY/FINE ARTS/PAINTING

266


267


about MCA From its founding in 1936 as the Memphis Academy of Arts, the mission and purpose has been to provide a rigorous curriculum in an intimate, diverse community to empower generations of leading artists, designers, and educators to flourish professionally and contribute valuable ideas to society. Our current coursework reflects an increasingly broad blend of traditional artmaking practice and contemporary digital technologies. Our undergraduate programs are structured to provide a comprehensive education to those for whom art, in all its many forms, is a passion while at the same time providing guidance in establishing and achieving artistically centered career goals. In 1981 the academy was renamed Memphis College of Art to reflect its degree-granting status and the addition of two new MFA programs. A new facility (in the South Main Arts District) was identified, purchased, and renovated for the Nesin Graduate School, home to our current MFA in Studio Art, and Photography, and Art Education graduate programs. This building also includes the Hyde Gallery and the 477 retail store, extending the college’s public exposure in downtown Memphis. A renovated administration building, Gibson Hall, now houses Admissions, Student Affairs, Business Office, Facilities, Institutional Technology, and many faculty offices. And to better accommodate our students’ housing needs, we added two new residences to our existing Parkside and At the Park apartments, Metz and Fogelman Halls each accommodating 48 students. Rust Hall, nestled in Overton Park remains our architecturally award-winning building, which houses most of MCA’s academic activities and facilities including the G. Pillow Lewis Library, Callicott Auditorium, Sleaze and Slime Café, Main and Lower Galleries, Ernice Brode Gallery, and Alumni Gallery.

Memphis College of Art offers the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in •DIGITAL MEDIA (with concentrations in Animation and Digital Cinema), •FINE ARTS (with concentrations in Drawing, Painting, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture) •DESIGN ARTS (with concentrations in Graphic Design, Illustration, Sequential Narrative (Comics) •PHOTOGRAPHY •PAINTING/DRAWING

Memphis College of Art offers the Master of Fine Arts degree in •STUDIO ART (interdisciplinary) •PHOTOGRAPHY

Memphis College of Art offers the •MASTER OF ARTS IN ART EDUCATION • MASTER OF ARTS IN TEACHING ART EDUCATION (with licensure)

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Campus

The MCA campus is located at 1930 Poplar Avenue in Memphis, Tennessee, 38104-2764. All mail should be sent to this address. Our main building, Rust Hall, is located within 342-acre Overton Park in Midtown Memphis. Student residences are adjacent to the park: Fogleman Hall is located at 139 North Barksdale Avenue, Metz Hall is located at 149 North Barksdale Avenue, At the Park is located at 165 North Rembert Avenue, and Parkside is located at 1969 and 1973 Poplar Avenue. Gibson Hall, the administrative building, is located at 1939 Poplar Avenue. The Nesin Graduate School, located at 477 South Main Street, houses MCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduate programs, Hyde Gallery, and 477 store (MCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fine art boutique). The Nesin Graduate School is on the Memphis Trolley line and located in the historic South Main Arts District.

Calendar

Two 15-week semesters begin in August and January with three three-week summer sessions from mid-May through July. Applications for undergraduate study are accepted for fall and spring semesters on a rolling basis. Scholarships are available based on merit and need through the application process. Applications for our named full-tuition award are due by March 31 each year for fall semester applicants.

Faculty

There are 22 full-time and 44 part-time faculty. 87% of full time teaching faculty have terminal degrees in their field.

Housing

Four student residences provide living space for over 160 students. Off-campus housing is available nearby. Assistance in finding housing to fit your lifestyle is provided through the MCA admissions office.

Students

A diverse population of over 400 students represents 25+ states and three foreign countries, including Zimbabwe, and Kenya. Students serious about a career in art choose an independent college of art to study with other serious art students in dedicated facilities with all resources available to provide a challenging art education and a directed career path.

Veterans

Memphis College of Art is approved under Title 38, US Code for the training of veterans. MCA participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program, and is a Veteran Friendly School.

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ADMISSIONS Admission

Memphis College of Art uses a rolling admissions system. That is, completed applications are reviewed when they are submitted, and notification is sent to applicants continuously from December until mid-summer. After August 1, applicants will be considered only if space permits. Students can apply to enter for the spring (January) semester as well. A priority application deadline to be considered for our full-tuition scholarship award is March 31 for the fall semester. An undergraduate online application can be found at www.mca.edu. You can request a paper application at info@mca.edu. There is no application fee. The following credentials are required to complete your application:

Freshman Applicants: Application High school (and any dual enrollment college) transcripts or General Equivalency Diploma (GED)

ACT

(MCA code 3991) or SAT (MCA code 1511) test scores

Portfolio (see portfolio requirements below for more details)

Transfer Applicants: Application College transcript(s) Portfolio (see portfolio requirements below for more details)

International Applicants: Application High school or all college level transcripts Portfolio (see portfolio requirements below for more details) TOEFL (MCA code 1511) or IELTS scores Affidavit of support

(from a bank or sponsor)

Portfolio Requirements

Your portfolio should contain 10 to 20 examples of your best work preferably from direct observation and using a variety of media, techniques, subject matter, and scale. Your portfolio may be submitted as originals, CD or flash drive, website, or electronically to portfolio@ mca.edu. Portfolios can also be reviewed on campus or at one of our many admissions events, such as a campus tour, National Portfolio Day, or Weekend Workshop to be considered as the portfolio requirement of the application. Check with our admissions office to make sure we can view your format, or if you need more information on putting together a strong portfolio. More information on portfolios can be found on our website at mca.edu.


LINDA LANGLEY OSBORN/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION

ERIC QUICK/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY

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273

HEIDI GRUNDY/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


ADMISSIONS POLICIES Admission Without High School Completion Applicants who have not completed high school may qualify for admissions consideration by earning a General Equivalency Diploma (GED).

Adult Students Adult students who have been out of high school for more than five years and have never attended college are not required to submit an ACT or SAT test score.

Deferred Admission Accepted students may defer their enrollment and scholarship offer for up to one year. Written notification of the decision to defer must be communicated to the admissions office.

Life Threatening Illness or Disability The existence of a life threatening illness or disability should not be a factor in decisions regarding admission to MCA so long as the individualâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s physical condition is such that he or she can participate fully in the required activities of the college. Discrimination against students on the basis of race or gender is prohibited in education programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance.

Readmitted Students Students who left MCA in good standing and who wish to be readmitted must submit a new application. If the student has been absent for three or more years, a new portfolio submission is required.

Remedial Coursework Incoming students who score below a 17 English score on their ACT exam will be placed in Grammar and Composition, a remedial preparation course which does not apply toward degree completion, but is a skill-building class to prepare students for college level writing coursework. Successful completion of Grammar and Composition will place the student in Writing 1 for the next term.

Transfer Credit Undergraduate students transferring from another accredited institution can transfer up to 33 liberal arts credits, 12 credits in Art History coursework, and/or 48 credits in studio art for a combined total of 72 credits. Memphis College of Art considers credit for International Baccalaureate Higher Level Examinations, Advanced Placement coursework with a score of 3 or higher, life experience, and portfolio proficiency. Details of the transfer credit policy are available online at mca.edu and in this catalog under Academic Policies. An admissions counselor can also clarify any questions regarding transfer of credit. 274


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TUITION/ FINANCIAL AID

The annual room costs vary by housing building, and are subject to availability. The cost of board is estimated at $1,000 per semester and varies according to lifestyle and eating habits.

Books and Supplies

Students are responsible for providing all materials and books required for courses. Memphis College of Art has an online bookstore for purchasing textbooks and an on-campus art supply store for supplies. We estimate that students will likely spend $800 per semester on these items.

A quality education does cost more, but then something handcrafted always costs more than something mass-produced. And, we’ve got an excellent financial assistance program.

Billing and Payments

Many of our families cannot afford to pay the full cost of attending MCA. In fact, 95% of our students receive some type of financial assistance, and we do everything we can to help students meet the cost of obtaining a Memphis College of Art degree. Many students use loan programs to help meet their educational needs. They borrow because they know that their MCA education is perhaps the greatest investment they’ll ever make, and it will be their greatest asset in the future.

Tuition Deposit

There are three sources of financial aid: 1. Institutional scholarships and grants 2. Federal and state government aid 3. Outside scholarships and grants

And two ways that assistance is awarded: 1. Based on merit 2. Based on need

How to apply for Institutional and Federal Aid

Through the admissions process you will be considered for Memphis College of Art scholarships. These awards can be based on merit and/or family income. Memphis College of Art has an extensive institutional aid program to help make our private school education affordable for all families. Once you have completed the application for admission, we encourage all applicants to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) online at fafsa.gov. (MCA’s federal school code is 003507.) This form is required for federal and state aid programs including Pell Grants, federal loans, and the Tennessee Hope Lottery Scholarship and Tennessee State Assistance Award. Students may also be awarded work-study through the admissions/financial aid process.

Tuition Information

Current undergraduate tuition information can be found online at: mca.edu. Beyond tuition and fees, we estimate a student’s budget for one-year based on payment of room and board, personal expenses such as transportation, clothing, and books/art supplies. Our budget estimates are based on the higher end resident housing costs and other miscellaneous costs. You may spend less than our estimates. 276

Housing/Board

Invoices are mailed twice per year in advance of the fall and spring semesters. Payment plans of four payments per semester are available through the MCA Business Office.

A non-refundable $100 tuition deposit should accompany the student’s Letter of Intent to hold your place in the entering class. The deposit is credited toward the first semester’s tuition.

Housing Deposit

To reserve space in MCA’s student residences a $300 housing deposit should accompany the student’s housing Lease Agreement. The deposit is credited at $100 toward the semester’s rent and $200 toward a damage deposit.

Scholarships/Financial Assistance

Memphis College of Art awards up to $1.4 million in merit scholarships to entering students. Awards average more than half tuition. Scholarships are renewable each year by maintaining a cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.00 for freshmen, 2.25 for sophomores, 2.50 for juniors, and a 2.75 for seniors. These awards are based on full-time attendance and will be pro-rated for part-time enrollment. Renewal is evaluated each May. Scholarships that are not renewed will be re-awarded the semester after achieving the required CGPA. Scholarships are renewable for as long as the student works toward completing degree requirements.

MCA Special Merit Awards

Once a student attends Memphis College of Art there are continuing opportunities for merit awards based on the student’s performance in class. Special merit scholarships are awarded for excellence each year by faculty nomination and CGPA. These one-year awards range from $100 cash awards to $5,000 per year tuition discounts. Some awards are based on criteria set by the donor and others are open to all students. More information on this policy can be found in MCA’s Student Handbook at mca.edu.


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MCA Grants

Transfer Grant: $1,000 is awarded for the first year at MCA to any transfer student entering with 30 or more transferable credits from a community college. Governor’s Honors Grant: $1,000 is awarded for the first year at MCA to any entering student that has completed a Governor’s Honor program in their state.

Need-based Grants

Memphis College of Art has need-based grants for students that need additional financial support for college. The Rust Need Grant can be awarded through the Financial Aid Office based on FAFSA information and availability.

Outside Scholarship Opportunities

MCA recommends that you do research to find outside scholarships available through organizations and companies that help students go to college. The best method for locating scholarships is via free online searches. Parents, employers, churches, or other organizations where a family might be active are potential resources. The financial aid office maintains a web resource to help get your search started: mca.edu

Special Circumstances

If you have a unique financial situation at the time of application or in any future semester, you can contact the Financial Aid Office for assistance.

MCA’s Tuition Payment Plan

To assist families with managing college costs, MCA has established a Four Payment Plan for each semester of the academic year. The MCA Plan includes: •Outstanding tuition and student housing balances for each semester (after all allowances are made for scholarships, grants, and loans) are divided into four equal payments. The first payment for new students is due at registration prior to the student beginning classes. A Promissory Note, which indicates all payments and dues, must be signed and dated. •If the student is receiving or anticipating receiving any federal financial aid, all FAFSA and loan application paperwork (along with required documentation) must be completed and returned to the MCA Financial Aid Office. •No interest or application fees are necessary or required as long as payments are made as scheduled. A late fee of $100, or 10% of payment due, will be assessed if the payment is not made as scheduled.

DOMINQUE PERE/DESIGN ARTS/ILLUSTRATION/ART HISTORY


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JUSTIN SMITH/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE/ART HISTORY


MCA’s Tuition Refund Policy

The MCA refund policy is based upon the date of formal withdrawal from a course or from the college. Formal withdrawal must be made by the student to the college in writing. Withdrawal may not be retroactive to an earlier date. Failure of a student to officially withdraw will void any entitlement he or she may have to a refund. No refund will be made to any student suspended or dismissed for any academic or disciplinary reasons. Refunds cannot be made for employment conflicts, medical problems, moving out of town, or other reasons that are beyond the college’s control or responsibility.

The following refunds apply to students who withdraw from the college, or who drop to part-time status: 1. 100% refund of tuition will be made for courses canceled by MCA or dropped on, or before, the official registration day.

2. 75% refund of tuition and fees will be made if withdrawal is within the first 10 class days of the semester.

ACADEMIC POLICIES Academic Distinction

The Dean’s List is a designation awarded to full-time undergraduate students who achieve a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.5. This designation is noted on the student’s permanent record. Undergraduate students may graduate with honors by fulfilling all BFA degree requirements and by completing at least 49 semester hours at MCA. Graduating with academic distinction requires the following cumulative GPA:

Cum Laude Magna Cum Laude Summa Cum Laude

3.25-3.49 3.50-3.79 3.80-4.00

3. 50% refund of tuition will be made if withdrawal is between the 11th and 15th class days of the semester.

4. 25% refund of tuition will be made if withdrawal is between the 16th and 20th class days of the semester.

5. No refund will be made if withdrawal is after the 20th class day of the semester.

6. No refund will be made of student activity fees on or after the official registration day.

7. A pro-rated refund policy is in effect for all degreeseeking students who receive some type of Title IV federal or state financial aid funds (Pell, SEOG, TSAA, TELS Lottery, Direct Loans, Plus Loans, and/or Federal Work-Study). Tuition will be refunded according to a pro-rated refund policy as defined in 34 CFR 612.606. Ask the Business Office for information concerning this policy. Refund calculations for summer courses are in the MCA Student Handbook at mca.edu.

Academic Probation and Suspension

Continuing students at MCA who fail to maintain the grade point average required for academic progress will be placed on academic probation for the following semester. A probationary student must consult with his or her advisor who will recommend enrollment in no more than 12 semester hours for undergraduate students in order to improve academic standing and meeting with achievement support staff. At the end of the semester, students who have not raised their grade point average to the required level will be suspended. The suspended student may apply to re-enroll after an interval of one semester. Failure to maintain the appropriate grade point average upon re-entrance will result in dismissal. The student may petition the college to reconsider his or her suspension.

Course Load

Full-time undergraduate students may take between four and seven courses (12-21 credits) for the same cost. However, 18 credits or more require good academic standing and prior approval from the Faculty Advisor. A course load of 15 credits taken per semester will enable students to complete their degree within four years.

Degree Requirements

BFA candidates must complete 120 semester hours of credit. Of these, 75 must be in studio subjects and 45 in liberal arts. In fulfilling undergraduate requirements, the student may not enroll in advanced courses before completing prerequisite courses. It’s the student’s responsibility to know and understand the degree requirements and the

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283 needed prerequisites for each course. Assistance from an advisor does not relieve the student from this responsibility. BFA candidates must complete their degree requirement within 10 years of their enrollment date. Candidates wishing to apply credits older than 10 years, must have their credits approved by the Admissions Committee.

Enrolled Students Transferring in Outside Credit Currently enrolled MCA students who plan to attend another college and apply that credit toward their MCA degree must have their plan pre-approved by the Office of Academic Affairs for any required coursework, and should get pre-approval for any elective coursework. Students must complete and obtain required signatures and course transfer verification through the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Petition to Enroll at Another Institutionâ&#x20AC;? form. A student may take a maximum of three credits per semester at another institution (six credits during the summer) while simultaneously enrolled at MCA (the Mobility Program being the exception). It is the policy of MCA to require students to complete the last 30 credit hours of their degree at MCA. If a student withdraws from MCA for at least a semester and takes coursework at another institution, those courses must be declared upon reapplying to the college in order to be considered for transfer credit. Coursework not declared

Filing for Graduation Students must file an Advancement to Candidacy form at least one semester prior to the expected date of graduation. The Registrar will ensure that the student has met all necessary degree requirements in order for the student to be eligible to graduate. There is a $150 graduation fee assessed in the studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final semester at MCA.

Leave of Absence

A leave of absence is designed to allow a student to temporarily suspend his/her attendance at MCA with no academic penalty. A leave may be medical, personal, or academic. The student must notify in writing the VP for Enrollment and Student Affairs stating the reason for the leave and the anticipated date he/she will return to normal study. If the student does not return to MCA by the specified date (in writing to request an extension) he/ she will need to reapply to the college.

Minimum GPA Standards Freshmen must have a GPA of at least 1.75 for each semester during the first 29 semester hours of credit. All other undergraduate students must have a semester GPA of at least 2.00 in each semester and cumulative grade point average of 2.00 upon completion of 120 semester hours of credit to qualify for graduation.

upon readmission will not be transferable.

FIDENCIO MARTINEZ/FINE ARTS/PAINTING


Right to Use Student Work The college reserves the right to use images of student work and campus activites (i.e. images of artwork, video footage, papers) and images and/or video footage of students in publications or other promotions for the college.

Transfer Credit MCA will consider transferring a total of 72 credits (including Advanced Placement credit earned while in high school) that have been earned within the past 10 years and are applicable to MCA’s undergraduate degree requirements, with a grade of “C” or better from colleges accredited by any of the regional accrediting associations or by the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). Of those 72 credits, a maximum of 12 credits in art history coursework, and/or 33 credits in liberal arts coursework, and/or 48 credits in studio art may be considered. Grades for transferred credit will not be calculated into the MCA cumulative grade point average. When transferring to MCA, students must submit official transcripts of coursework attempted at all the regionally accredited institutions they attended. The Office of Academic Affairs will evaluate each course to determine equivalency to MCA courses. Courses without an exact equivalency will transfer in as an elective course related to the specific area. Transfer students will not receive credit for courses that are not at the college level or are not appropriate to MCA’s curriculum, such as technical or vocational coursework. Placement of coursework into major course requirements will be determined by portfolio review by the program’s Area Head. As not every course from another institution will have an automatic equivalency within a degree program, course descriptions, syllabi, and a portfolio review will be used to assess comparable and appropriate credit transfer toward MCA’s degree program.

CREDIT BASED ON LIFE EXPERIENCE/PORTFOLIO PROFICIENCY Entering students can be considered for credit based on life experience through the admissions process for related work or study experience or for credit older than 10 years from MCA or accredited colleges. Credit will be considered for transfer on a case-by-case basis if they are from classes with content unlikely to change significantly over time (i.e. Writing 1 and 2, foreign languages, history, literature, basic math, basic drawing, 2-D design, etc.) and for which there are program course equivalencies. These credits will be reviewed for acceptance by the Faculty Admissions Committee with required documentation of resume, portfolio, timeline, and recommendation from an instructor/provider. The committee will review course descriptions if applicable, or program/ experience content. These non-traditional experiences are held to high standards to ensure a quality comparable to the MCA coursework they would replace. Credit transferred to studio elective coursework through portfolio proficiency, or other experiential learning programs will be evaluated by rubric. Credit earned at non-accredited institutions will not generally be accepted, however can be considered through the process described above. Each case will be handled individually by the appropriate discipline or office to guarantee comparable quality with MCA’s curriculum.

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ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM EXAMINATION Students who earn AP credit during high school

INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE (IB) CREDIT

may apply those credits to their MCA graduation

Students who have completed IB Higher Level

requirements, within the guidelines indicated

(HL) exams and receive a score of five or higher in

below. MCA uses the college boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommended

any of the Liberal Arts subject areas are eligible to

acceptable scores to indicate the student has attained

transfer three college credit hours in the applicable

an acceptable level of knowledge of the subject in

area. Classes that are not considered Liberal Arts

question, which could be seen as a replacement for

courses will not be transferable: Music

comparable collegiate coursework. Credit earned

and Theatre Performance, Computer Science, and

through the advanced placement program will not be

Business Management.

included in the calculation of the grade point average. Students who have completed IB HL exams and

Art History 1. A student must earn a score of three or better on the examination to transfer AP credit.

will receive three college credits toward studio electives credit. A total of 12 credit hours may be

2. Students will receive three semester credits,

applied toward MCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s graduation requirements.

satisfying the Art History Survey 1 requirement.

No credit is given for Standard Level (SL) exams.

Liberal Arts 1. Students must earn a score of three or better on the examination to transfer AP credit.

2. In the case of English or Composition AP courses, students will receive three semester credits applied to the Writing 1 requirement.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) Memphis College of Art will accept credit for successful completion of relevant subject area examinations of the college Level Examination Program (CLEP). Individual departments determine

3. For all other Liberal Arts AP courses, student

the standards for the acceptance of CLEP credit.

will receive three semester credits, which will be applied to the Liberal Arts and Sciences elective requirements.

Test scores must be submitted directly to the

Studio Classes

general education requirements with CLEP credit.

The Foundation/Core Program at MCA is a carefully

Credit earned through the CLEP program will

planned integrated curriculum designed to provide all

be entered on the transcript as passing credit

students with a consistent background of experience

but will not be included in the calculation of the

and language for all subsequent coursework at the

grade point average.

college. For this reason, all students coming directly from high school will be required to complete the entire MCA Foundation experience and AP credit will be awarded toward studio electives.

1. Students must earn a score of three or better on the examination to transfer AP credit.

2. Students will receive three semester credits, applied as studio elective credits.

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receive a score of five or higher in Visual Arts

Admissions Office from CLEP. Students may earn up to fifteen (15) elective hours, but cannot satisfy


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TED KASPAREK/FINE ARTS/PAINTING


AMANDA NALLEY/FINE ARTS/SCULPTURE

BRITTNEY SCALES/PHOTOGRAPHY

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AMANDA GAHAN/PHOTOGRAPHY/ART HISTORY


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COURSES FOR WHICH STUDENTS MAY OBTAIN CREDIT Studio All traditional media practice General Studio Digital Media (computer based creative coursework— offered through an art program) Art Conservation

Art History Visual Art History

Liberal Arts English Language/Composition Speech Communication US and World History Government and Political Science European History Journalism Literature Humanities coursework Foreign Language Philosophy Social and Behavioral Science coursework Mathematics Natural Science coursework Performance histories of other arts (appreciation): music, dance, theatre

COURSES FOR WHICH STUDENTS WILL NOT OBTAIN TRANSFER CREDIT Art Appreciation (visual art) Institution-specific freshmen experience courses Business coursework Except as it may relate to independent studio business practice Physical Education Health Science and/or Wellness courses Computer Science coursework as studio requirement or elective Exceptions will be considered on a case-by-case basis

QUARTER CREDITS VERSUS SEMESTER HOUR CREDITS Credits at MCA are semester credits. Any other credit will be converted to semester hours.

Withdrawal From the College Students wishing to withdraw from MCA must do so in writing to the Vice President for Enrollment and Student Affairs. Absence from classes, non-payment of fees, or verbal notification (without written notification following) will not be regarded as official notice of withdrawal. Failure to formally withdraw from a course or from MCA will result in the grade of “F” for each course.


RESOURCES AND INFORMATION International Students There is a special orientation at the beginning of each semester for international students that includes information about the college and its policies, INS regulations, employment, and life in the US and Memphis. The Director of Student Life arranges appointments to take international students to apply for social security cards if they plan to participate in the work-study program. Students are also given information about health insurance, as international students are required to purchase insurance while at MCA. The Student Affairs Office provides programs throughout the year for international students in cooperation with area colleges, universities, and organizations. International students that plan to travel or apply for employment opportunities can get assistance from the Office of Student Affairs.

Health/Medical Resources and Insurance MCA strongly encourages all students to carry some basic form of health insurance. International students are required to carry health insurance. It may seem expensive but the cost of one trip to the emergency room for even a minor emergency could exceed a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth of major medical insurance premiums. For studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; convenience there are brochures available in the Office of Student Life. Referrals for health, dental care, and psychological counseling for students with or without insurance can be made through the Office of Student Life. Referral information can be found in the MCA Student Handbook.

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Board of Trustees Officers Chair: Robert F. Fogelman II Vice Chair: David Lusk Treasurer: Henry P. Doggrell Secretary: Marc Willis Assistant Secretary: Cecil C. Humphreys, Jr. Immediate Past Chair: Gary Backaus, BFA ‘84

Members Susan Arney Ruth Bowlin Doug Ferris R. Marsh Gibson Harry L. Goldsmith Rose Johnston Mike Landrum Bob Loeb Myron Mall Jim Raines Veda Reed, BFA ‘56 Murray Riss Jeff Sanford Douglas Scarboro Carroll Todd, BFA ‘76

Trustees Emerita / Emeritus Eleanor Baer Emerita Trustee Robert Fogelman Emeritus Trustee

Representatives Carl E. Moore President, MCA Alumni Association Ellen Daugherty Faculty Representative

Administration Ron Jones, President Remy Miller, Dean/VP for Academic Affairs Sherry Yelvington, VP for Finance & Administration Susan Miller, VP for Enrollment & Student Affairs Shawna Engel, VP for College Advancement

Faculty Emeriti Veda Reed, Professor (1956-1999) Dolph Smith, Professor (1965-1995) Robert Riseling, Professor (1974-2011)


FULL TIME FACULTY

Maria Bibbs BA, University of Tennessee-Knoxville MA, PhD, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Colleen Fitzgerald BFA, Boston College MFA, Parsons The New School for Design

Elizabeth Brown BFA, School of the Art Institute of Chicago MFA, University of Georgia

Adam Hawk BFA, Memphis College of Art MFA, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Fred Burton BFA, MFA, Wichita State University MA, Kent State University

Tom Lee BA, Montana State University MFA, University of Mississippi

Ellen Daugherty BA, MA, PhD, University of Virginia

Susan Maakestad BA, MA, Central Washington University MFA, University of Iowa

Maritza Davila BA, University of Puerto Rico MFA, Pratt Institute Don DuMont BFA, Memphis College of Art Shannon Elliott BFA, Pratt Institute MSED, Queens College EdD, University of Rochester

Remy Miller BFA, University of Connecticut MFA, Bowling Green State University Haley Morris-Cafiero BA, BFA, University of North Florida MFA, University of Arizona

D I S C L A I M E R T H I S P U B L I C A T I O N C O N T A I N S I N F O R M A T I O N O N C U R R E N T P R O G R A M S O F S T U D Y, C O U R S E S

C O L L E G E O F A R T, P L E A S E V I E W O U R W E B S I T E ( W W W . M C A . E D U ) . T H E I N F O R M AT I O N I N T H I S P U B L I C AT I O

MCA RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE ANY CURRICULAR OFFERING, POLICY GOVERNING STUDENTS, OR

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295 James Ramsey BA, Vanderbilt University MA, PhD, Tulane University

Cat Normoyle BS, Georgia Institute of Technology MFA, Georgia State University

Mark Rouillard BFA, Memphis College of Art MFA, Memphis College of Art

Hannah Park BFA, Parsons the New School for Design MDes, York University, Toronto, Ontario

Zark Strasburger BA, Oberlin College

Soyoung Park BA, MA, Kyunghee University-Seoul, Korea PhD, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Bill Price BFA, Memphis College of Art MFA, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale

Leandra Urrutia BFA, Southwest Texas State University MFA, University of Mississippi Jill Wissmiller BFA, Arizona State University MFA, Northwestern University

FULL TIME FACULTY

Michelle Noiset BFA, Rhode Island School of Design MFA, University of Massachusetts

S , F A C U L T Y, A C A D E M I C S C H E D U L E , A N D P O L I C I E S A N D P R O C E D U R E S . F O R M O R E I N F O R M A T I O N O N M E M P H I S

O N I S A C C U R AT E T O T H E B E S T O F T H E A D M I N I S T R AT I O N â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S K N O W L E D G E AT T H E T I M E O F P R I N T I N G .

R F I N A N C I A L R E G U L AT I O N S W I T H O U T N O T I C E A S T H E R E Q U I R E M E N T S O F M C A D E M A N D .

SHIRIN SHAHIN/STUDIO ART


Find out more about us www.mca.edu | info@mca.edu facebook.com/memphiscollegeofart @applymemphisart There’s much more to see and know about Memphis College of Art. Hit mca.edu and check out the ever-updated list of events, exhibits, and programs. It’s also where you’ll find a complete listing of policies, contacts, notices, faculty members, classes, forms, and other information you’ll need.


1930 POPLAR AVENUE | OVERTON PARK | MEMPHIS, TN 38104 901.272.5151 | 800.727.1088 | MCA.EDU | INFO@MCA.EDU


2014 MCA Catalog