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Co-Operator official publication of the Cook County Farm Bureau®

A “staple” in the Farm Bureau member’s home since 1938

Mission:

Scan for more farm bureau info. & events

To serve all members of the Cook County Farm Bureau® with meaningful and beneficial programs that reflect our Agricultural Heritage.

Vol. 88 No. 2

Countryside, IL 60525

“Beekeeping Basics” A Beginning Beekeeping - 5 Week Course Begins Tuesday February 18, 2014 7-9 PM

Course Dates: Tuesdays -Feb. 18, 25th, Mar. 4, 11, 18th Time: 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm Registration: Call Debbie at 708-354-3276 or email membershipdebbie@cookcfb.org Cost: $60 for CCFB & CDBA Members $90 for non-members Location: Cook County Farm Bureau 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525 708-354-3276 The Cook County Farm Bureau and the Cook Du Page Beekeepers Association have joined together to help get you started down the right path in keeping bees. Over the course of 5 weeks, experienced beekeepers will provide direction and instruction on the history of beekeeping, beekeeping basics, setting up your hive, installing your bees, and maintaining your hive throughout the beekeeping season.

Course outline: go to www.cookcfb.org/buy-local/ programs or Events Calendar at cookcfb.org

Help us Celebrate Food Checkout Day 2014 For the past 14 years, Cook County Farm Bureau has partnered with the Ronald McDonald House Charities®. Through this partnership, Farm Bureau members and volunteers have been able to donate much needed food, pop tabs and funds to assist families during the most difficult time of their lives, when a child is sick. The 2014 Food Checkout Day program will be held on Thursday, March 20 at the world’s largest Ronald McDonald House located near Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago and at the Ronald McDonald House located near Advocate Hope Children’s Hospital in Oak Lawn. Please consider joining us in this great effort! With your support, we hope to raise enough food to feed 3,000 people! Food and pop tab donation can be dropped off at your local Country Financial Agency or the Cook County Farm Bureau office prior to March 14. Cash donations can be sent to: Cook CFB, 6438 Joliet Road in Countryside, IL 60525. Checks should be made out to Ronald McDonald House Charities®. In addition to food, pop tab and cash donations we are also seeking sponsors for the program. Thank you for your continued support of this tremendous partnership!

www.cookcfb.org

February 2014

Deadline Approaching for 2014 Foundation Scholarship Applications The Cook County Farm Bureau Foundation’s Scholarship Program continues to grow each year as the number of applicants increases. “Our members are realizing that an agricultural career provides broad and exciting possibilities”, explains Jim Gutzmer, Foundation President. And what is an agricultural career? It is a chosen pursuit or profession related to the broad area of producing, marketing, manufacturing, transporting, studying, teaching, and developing food, fiber, fuel and pharmacy products originating from the farm. Examples of agricultural careers include horticulturist, food scientist, animal nutritionist, genetic engineering, farmer, veterinarian, commodity broker, dietitian, turf producer, agricultural engineer and the list goes on and on. Perhaps you may wish to check out the broad and rewarding possibilities with one out of every four jobs in the United States related to agriculture. The Foundation is proud to announce the 16th Annual Agricultural Scholarship Program. The Cook County Farm Bureau Foundation is offering college students the opportunity to start or continue their higher

education with a scholarship. Last year, the Foundation provided ten scholarships ranging from $1,000 - $2,500 apiece. The Board will name the top applicant as the Howard Paarlberg Excellence in Agriculture Scholarship recipient. The Foundation will award a scholarship (s) to college students pursuing agriculturally related fields of study. The Conserv FS FFA Scholarship for $1,000 will also be offered to a high school Senior in an approved FFA Program. The Foundation Board has set the following criteria for the scholarship program… • Applications are available at the Cook County Farm Bureau Foundation office located at 6438 Joliet Road in Countryside, Illinois. We will also send applications upon request by calling 708-354-3276 or they can be printed out on the Foundation page of our website at www.cookcfb.org/cook-cfbfoundation/scholarships. • Applications must be completed and submitted to the CCFB Foundation by February 20th, 2014. Late applications will not be considered. • All applicants must be members or dependents of members in good standing with the Cook County Farm Bureau for at least one year. (Except for

the Conserv FS FFA Award) • All applicants must be high school graduates accepted for enrollment by, or currently enrolled at, an accredited college, university, or community college. • All applicants must be pursuing a field of study in agriculture, agri-business, or an agriculturally related major with a focus on an ag-related career. • Scholarships will be awarded following application evaluation for exceptional academic ability, financial need, demonstrated interest in agriculture, evidence of self-help, and character. There is no clear answer to the question we sometimes are asked, “Is …..an agricultural career? The Foundation board evaluates each application on its own merit and uses additional criteria of goals, past experience, and the agricultural connections to the career to determine eligibility,” indicated Bob Rohrer, Foundation Executive Director. For more information or an application, please contact the Cook County Farm Bureau Foundation at (708)354-3276 or print an application out from our website at www.cookcfb. org/cook-cfb-foundation/ scholarships

Upcoming Events

Farming on Your Balcony Workshop................... April 26th Document Shred/Electronic Recycling Day.......... April 26th Pre-teen Baby-sitting Class at CCFB...................... May 3rd White Sox Farm Bureau Night........................... August 5th

Question of the Month

Cook County Farm Bureau was recently recognized by the American Farm Bureau Federation for what program?

Call the Farm Bureau at (708)354-3276, email your answer to membershiplinda@ cookcfb.org (please include Name, FB # and phone number) or fax to (708)579-6056 with the answer for a chance to enter a drawing for a $25.00 gas card.

January’s winner is Murrell

Selden.

Last Months Question: What state raised the most soybeans this past growing season?

Answer: Illinois

Cook County Farm Bureau Winner of the Power of ‘A’ 2012 Summit Award


Co-Operator February 2014

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Cook County Farm Bureau

History and Development of Plant Breeding and Genetic Engineering (Part one of a three part series on genetic engineering) Around 10,000 BC, people began to harvest food and domesticating animals. Without conscious thought, families soon began to select better plants for propagation and better animals for breeding. Over thousands of years farmers began selecting desirable traits in crops, including shortened growing seasons, increased disease and pest resistance, larger seeds and fruits, improved nutritional content, longer shelf life, and adaptation to ecological diversity in their surroundings. Early plant crosses were made without a basic understanding of genetics until Gregor Mendel’s research began to explain how traits pass from parents to offspring. Mendel’s research provided the basis for traditional plant breeding in which new varieties are developed either by selecting plants with desirable characteristics or by combining qualities from two closely related plants through selective breeding. Genetic Engineering DNA provides the basic structure of all living organisms. It’s DNA that determines hair color, height, build, etc. In plants, it’s DNA that determines shelf life, disease resistance, drought tolerance, and pest

of crops (organic and GMO) are modified. The difference is that organic crops rely on traditional forms a plant breeding, which change the plant’s genome indirectly and in an uncontrolled manner. Biotechnology allows scientists to specifically target traits that they wish to duplicate. In addition, it allows scientists to track and recreate the transfer of genes.

resistance. In animals, it’s DNA that determines size, build, and texture. Biotechnology has developed to the point that scientists can remove one or more genes from a specific organism and introduce those genes into the genome of another organism. Unlike traditional plant breeding scientists are able to determine quickly if their crosses had the desired effect. In 1978, synthetic insulin was released after scientists were able to use recombinant DNA to produce insulin. Up until 1978, the only sources of insulin outside the human body were pig and cattle pancreatic glands. Plant Breeding v Genetic Engineering In the most basic form, all types

Safety and Testing Products derived from biotechnology are subject to extensive testing and review prior to being released on the market. Testing is completed not only by the developing company but also by the US Department of Agriculture, Environmental Protection Agency, and Food and Drug Administration. All three agencies must sign off on the product before it is released on the market. The safety and testing of biotech crops will be discussed further in the March edition of The Co-Operator. Sources Include: “Nature” magazine College Agricultural Consumer and Environmental Sciences at the University of Illinois Urban-Champaign Biotechnology Industry Organization

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Editor’s Note

Dear Reader, You receive the “Cooperator” because you or a family member is a Farm Bureau member. Our farm owners and operators, as members, benefit from a local, state and national organization committed to a strong and productive agricultural way of life. Members without direct ties to farming, help to promote a strong local and regional farming lifestyle, encourage wise use of our limited natural resources, and help preserve our farming heritage. In addition, members are provided the opportunity to enjoy our affiliated company, Country Financial and access to the many other benefits provided by Cook County Farm Bureau. Thank you for your membership and continued support. We welcome member input on content, including suggestions of farm, home, food, natural resource, renewable energy, agricultural heritage and farm history for future issues. Bob Rohrer, CAE, FBCM, Editor

Cook County Farm Bureau leaders attend American Farm Bureau Federation Annual Meeting

Co-Operator published monthly

Cook County Farm Bureau 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525 (ph) 708-354-3276 (fax) 708-579-6056 (e-mail) ccfb@cookcfb.org (website) www.cookcfb.org USPS No 132180 Periodical Postage Paid at LaGrange, IL 60525 & additional mailing office

Editor Bob Rohrer Cook County Farm Bureau leaders Ruth Zeldenrust and Gerry Kopping talk with visitors from across the country about the innovative farm camp the organization sponsored in 2013 and is planning for this upcoming summer.

United States Secretary of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack commended farmers and agriculture for leading the country as a major driving force in the overall economy and allowing the rest of the citizens of this country to pursue their interests and not to worry about where their food comes from and producing it themselves.

Diane Merrion poses with AFBF Diane Merrion also speaks President Bob Stallman. with visitors about the farm camp.

Left to Right: Cook CFB leaders Dan Biernacki, Kathy Bloomstrand, Jim Bloomstrand, Karen Biernacki and Jim Alan Robertson, the Gutzmer. “beardless” brother from Duck Dynasty, discussed the various quirks and life lessons from his family and message of “home” that has made the reality show so The Alamo… Site of the 1836 historic fight popular. between 200 Texan/Tejanos and General Santa Anna’s army numbering in the thousands.

Cook County Farm Bureau leaders from the Board of Directors participated in the 95th Annual Convention of The American Farm Bureau Federation in San Antonio in mid-January. The group included Pres. Jim and Karen Gutzmer, Dan and Karen Biernacki, Jim and Kathy Bloomstrand, Janet and Joe McCabe, Gerry and Linda Kopping, and Ruth Zeldenrust/Henry Campbell. During the Convention, the Cook County Farm Bureau was recognized for

AFBF President Bob Stallman reviewed the tremendous diversity in agriculture and the ability of the organization to develop policies that benefits all of the members from various areas and regions of the country.

its County Activity of Excellence award, Passport to the Farm Summer Camp and presented to the 7000 attendees information on activity. In addition, the group saw AFBF President Bob Stallman for his keynote address, Sec. of Agriculture, Tom Vilsack speak about United States agriculture, Alan Robertson of Duck Dynasty talk about his family, and retired four-star General Stan McChrystal address innovation and planning for the future.

Officers & Directors James Gutzmer, President Michael Rauch, Vice President Patrick Horcher, Secretary-Treasurer Dan Biernacki James Bloomstrand Michael Horcher Gerald Kopping Harold Stuenkel Mark Yunker

Cliff Harms Janet McCabe Ruth Zeldenrust

Farm Bureau Manager Bob Rohrer Office Staff Melanie Paffumi Bona Heinsohn Katie Smith Bob Heine Debbie Voltz Diane Merrion Kelli McSherry Jeanne Sommerfeld

Linda Tobias Kelly Stanley

Affiliated Companies Gerald Anderson......................... Insurance Agency Manager, Rolling Meadows Jeff Orman....................................... Insurance Agency Manager, South Holland Mike Cerf.............................................. Insurance Agency Manager, North Shore Victoria Nygren................................ Insurance Agency Manager, Chicago North Marc Rogala.......................................Insurance Agency Manager, Chicago South Mike Flynn............................................ Insurance Agency Manager, Countryside Jack Smith............................................ Insurance Agency Manager, Schaumburg Cary Tate................................................Insurance Agency Manager, Orland Park Dave Mottet..............................................................General Manager, Conserv FS Postmaster - Mail Form 3579 to 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525 “Co-Operator” (USPS No 132180) is published monthly as a membership publication for $2.50 per year to members as a part of their annual membership dues by Cook County Farm Bureau, 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525. Periodical postage paid at LaGrange, IL and additional mailing office. Postmaster: send address changes to the Co-Operator, 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525.


Co-Operator February 2014

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Cook County Farm Bureau

Downwind by Bob Rohrer, Manager

Labels

My 15-year-old son has a great sense of humor and is very funny. More importantly, when he finds something that tickles his funnybone (and the funnybones of his family), he repeats it…over and over. I suppose I encourage this by laughing at his “material” most all the time. Here’s an example. He loves to make fun of my dancing ability (as if there were such a thing) by swinging his hand back and forth like he’s conducting an orchestra, swiveling his hips and saying “do-tee-do- tee-do”. I’m not sure why it’s funny but I can’t stop cracking up. Tragically for me, the rest the family thinks it is pretty funny also. Here’s another example. My son will pick up one of our Lab dogs, Bill Otis, and set him in his lap like he’s a person. He will then point Bill’s front legs at me and flex the dog’s legs straight while simultaneously saying “you’re fired” in his best Donald Trump voice. He has created about 10 different versions of firing me with that Dog. He yells from the family room, “Dad, come here”! I walk around the corner to ask “what’s up” and get “fired” by the dog all the time. One more example… Anytime my son sees a bag of baby carrots in a store or at home, he makes me read the ingredients label. Ingredients: carrots. And then he laughs and repeats “carrots…get it?…CARROTS…can you believe that’s an ingredient?” My son has turned the irony of labeling requirements into his own, private joke! Labeling of products has gone out of control in this country. The consumer “right to know”, safety and liability protection, marketing, promotion, information, and rules, rules, rules is driving labeling to the nonsensical. At some point, with so much labeling, it becomes just background “noise”. Do these labels make us smarter? I suppose that’s like the question smart phones, do they make us smarter. The answer is most likely “sometimes” or “occasionally”. However, the label will also cause us to act less smart by influencing our buying, eating, and emotional habits. It’s my belief that labels for the most part have become important keys to today’s marketing of products, food included. We see these all the time… Caffeine free, All-natural, Artificial flavors added, Pesticide free, Organic, Hormone free, Natural sugar, Locally grown, Fair trade standards, Fat free, No trans fats, Humanely raised, etc., etc., etc. The labels may be packed with information but they also can cause us to think and act in certain ways regarding the product…positive or negative. The US Food and Drug Administration has a 9 page explanation on how to understand and use food label nutrition facts. Really? Who has time to review a manual every time you want to buy or eat. And how about this…The US Food and Drug Administration’s Food Labeling Guide for Industry is 132 pages of detailed explanation about how a food label is to be properly developed, printed and displayed. The important facts are getting lost in the forest. I did a quick look through our pantry at home and ran across a couple strange labels… A Popcorn label said, “WHOLE GRAIN” and then a statement said “Made with 100% whole grain popcorn”. Duh… everyone knows that popcorn wouldn’t pop if it was not whole grain, right? I found in the pantry a bag containing a deer antler dog chew toy (I’m not sure why it was in the pantry). The label read… Ingredients: Real Deer Antlers. I’m sure the

dogs are very comforted by that label. There was a Pastry Box with a warning label stating “pastry filling may be hot when heated”. A lawyer must have been involved with that one… These labels make me consider the recent labeling issues. There has been tremendous pressure by certain consumer activist groups and politicians to add more labeling to our foods…GMO’s and menu calorie counts. Two efforts have been made recently in states to force labeling of GMO’s on food products…California and Washington. Both of these efforts eventually failed at the ballot box, primarily due to the promise of increased food costs, the complexities of managing such a labeling system on a State by State basis and the continued confusion of

consumers. Many anticipate, however, efforts in other states will continue (including Illinois). Farmers and Food producers have a legitimate fear that labeling GMO on foods will infer that there is something unsafe about biotech products despite a lack of scientific evidence to support such a claim. I am growing weary that everywhere I look, there is a label attempting to make me feel guilty for what I eat. Stay out of my menus. Further, a section of the Affordable Care Act requires food companies to list calorie counts on menus, vending machines, and other forms of food marketing to consumers. Can you imagine the impact on restaurants, grocery stores, pizza chains, and convenience stores? Additional labeling seems to be simply a way to confuse the consumer even more…or provide my son with more humor “material”. Incidentally, for the bag of whole almonds in the pantry… Ingredient: Almonds.

Contact Information:

Cook County Farm Bureau, 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525 708-354-3276 708-579-6056 Fax E-Mail: ccfb@cookcfb.org www.cookcfb.org

What’s your idea of financial security?®

Jerry Anderson

Barbara Bator

Matt Broom

Mark Coon

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. E Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

23042 Main Street Prairie View, IL 60069

(847) 963-8823

(847) 963-8876

(847) 415-2666

(847) 963-8840 Agency Manager

Andy Czysz

Russ Delange

Tom Graceffa

Sarkis Hartoun

Tim Hranka

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. C Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

(847) 963-8904

(847) 991-3129

(847) 963-8851

(847) 963-8835

(847) 963-1540

Tom Jean

Robb Madej

4190 W Euclid Ave Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

Sean Lee

George Lundin

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. E Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. C Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

(847) 934-5112

(847) 963-8907

(847) 963-8821

(847) 934-6800

(847) 963-8817

Larry Jachec

Ray Massie

Nader Mikhaeil

Joe Moran

Matt Powell

Fred Resner

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. C Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. E Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

103 N. Arlington Hts. Rd. Arlington Heights, IL 60004

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. E Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

4200 W. Euclid Ave. Ste. C Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

(847) 991-0765

(847) 963-8874

(847) 818-6507

(847) 934-5117

(847) 991-2815

Michael Weinstein

Bill Schutz 51 W. Seegers Rd. Ste. 1 Arlington Heights, IL 60005

Gregory Stickels

Alex Swistun

637 E. Golf Rd. Ste. 202 Arlington Heights, IL 60005

4190 W. Euclid Ave. Rolling Meadows, IL 60008

225 N. Arlington Hts. Rd. Ste. 207 Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

5 E. College Dr., Ste. 112 Arlington Heights, IL 60004

(847) 690-1980

(847) 640-7745

(847) 963-8872

(847) 427-8280

(847) 749-1740

1213-528HO

Joe Sepsey

AUTO • HOME • LIFE • FINANCIAL SERVICES


Co-Operator February 2014

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Cook County Farm Bureau

“From the Country”

History of Food

Potatoes, a Favorite of Many Very few foods can claim responsibility for a quarter of the growth in the Old World population and urbanization between 1700 and 1900 BCE, but the potato can. After domestication in 8000 BCE in the region of modern-day southern Peru and far northwest Boliva, potatoes quickly spread around the world. Europeans met the potato after the Spanish conquest of the Inca Empire. The potato soon became a staple crop in Europe after somewhat resistant farmers began cultivating the plant. Early cultivations included a select number of potato varieties. Since early urbanization, potatoes quickly insinuated themselves into the American diet. Through favorites like mashed potatoes, hash browns,

12 ounces baby carrots 4 cloves garlic 1 (10 ounce) package frozen white corn, thawed ¼ cup butter ½ cup shredded Cheddar cheese Salt and pepper to taste

French fries, and baked potatoes, potatoes have quickly become an American staple. Cowboy Mashed Potatoes (recipe available at Allrecipes.com)

Ingredients: 1 pounds red potatoes 1 pound Yukon Gold (yellow) potatoes 1 jalapeno pepper, sliced

Place red potatoes, yellow potatoes, jalapeno pepper, carrots and garlic cloves in a large pot. Cover with water, and bring to boil over high heat. Cook 15 to 20 minutes or until potatoes are tender. Drain water from pot. Stir in corn and butter. Mash the mixture with a potato masher until butter is melted and potatoes have reached desired consistency. Mix in cheese, salt, and pepper. Serve hot.

Inviting Illinois Farmers to

Meet the

Multiple!! Buyers

Feb. 18, 2014

9:00 am to 4:00 pm

Buyers EVENT

@ Orland Park Civic Center 14750 S. Ravinia Ave. • Orland Park, IL

A special open floor concept for buyers and farmers: helping farmers to make the connection with market buyers looking for all types of local food: meats, poultry, dairy, value-added, fresh produce and more!

Your Hosts and Collaborators:

Mike Cerf

Agency Manager

Buy-Sell Agreements Can Work For You

When a farmer or business owner dies, what happens to the farm or business? Many times it is divided and the business dies with the owner. However, a buy-sell agreement can keep the farm or business alive and allow it to continue. Regardless of the type of business, the preferred method of planning for the disposition of a business interest is the buy-sell agreement. A buy-sell agreement can be an integral part of a plan which provides an orderly transfer of ownership when a farmer or business owner dies or becomes disabled. A buy-sell agreement can be with a partner, family member, a stockholder or an employee. The purpose of a buysell agreement, or any farm or business continuation plan, should be clear, and the agreement should be prepared by an attorney. The plan should allow the surviving owners to acquire the deceased’s interest and continue operating the farm or business. The plan can establish a value for federal estate tax purposes that is binding on the parties to the agreement and acceptable to the Internal Revenue Service. A buy-sell agreement funded with life insurance can help solve many problems arising at the time of death or disability of a farmer or business owner. For the farmer or business owner it: • ensures a buyer and a purchase price for the farm or business; • provides for continuation of the farm or business and avoids liquidation; • provides the funds for the purchase when needed without increasing debt; • may lessen conflicts with heirs; and North Shore Agency

• gives peace of mind to the owners because they know their heirs will receive their fair share of the business with a minimum of legal difficulties. For the heirs of the deceased, a buy-sell agreement: • ensures a fair price in cash for the farm or business; • helps establish the value of the business for estate tax purposes; and • reduces the potential for eliminates possible disagreements with each other over the disposition of the farm or business. Almost every farm and business has potential for a buy-sell agreement to be funded with life and disability income insurance. Life insurance is an excellent means of funding a buy-sell agreement because it can provide a funding mechanism to ensure successful completion of the agreement. Life insurance is a cost effective alternative to traditional financing. Life policies are written on the owners to ensure continuation of the business should any owner die. The life insurance premiums are advance payments toward the purchase of the deceased owner’s interest, and the death benefit guarantees the cash will be available when needed. A disability insurance policy can be used to provide money to hire a replacement when a farmer or business owner is sick or hurt and cannot work. It is important for any business to have a clear, wellwritten buy-sell agreement with the necessary funding to allow the agreement to be carried out. You should discuss your options with your attorney and a COUNTRY Financial Representative.

Purchase Your Bailbond Card Today!

& Surrounding County Farm Bureaus

RSVP’s to (708) 354-3276 required by February 14, 2014

The event is free to farmers.

RSVP’s needed by February 14th

Eligible Farm Bureau members can purchase bail bond cards through the Cook County Farm Bureau for only $5 per person. The Bail Bond application form is printed on the back of the dues notice. Bail bond cards are good for a year and expire November 6th of each year. Bail bond cards are available to members who are licensed drivers and whose 2013-14 Farm Bureau membership dues are in good standing. Cards may be requested for spouses and qualified dependents (children with a driver’s license up to age 21). The bail bond card can be posted in lieu of your driver’s license in the state of Illinois for a minor traffic violation.


Co-Operator February 2014

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Cook County Farm Bureau

Greenovations:

Cookfresh® Cook County Grant Program for Community Urban Gardens Lavender and Mint Provide Fragrant Perennial Flavor By Nancy Pollard, University of Illinois Extension Horticulture Educator

Lavender and mint are two plants that are a joy to brush by in the garden. Both are perennials. Lavender loves dry, mint loves wet locations. Harvested lavender flowers smell delightful scenting drawers, bath or bed linens. In addition to sachets or potpourris you could make your own lavender extract as you would make vanilla bean extract. This is done by steeping (pesticide free) snipped lavender flowers in vodka. Simple recipes are available at various online sites. Then use it the extract like vanilla extract in cookies, chocolates or truffles. Or steep the dried flowers to make a lavender tea or jelly. The first time I tried to grow lavender, it died. That is because I foolishly didn’t research the plant. I put it near a downspout and Lavender hates to be wet! It will develop root rot quickly if the soil does not drain well. Or will die over the winter if it is in a wet spot. If your only spot is soggy, make a raised bed. Lavender thrives in dry gravely soil as you would find along a driveway or foundation. It prefers neutral to alkaline soils and will grow well in a soil pH between 6.0 to 8.0. Most people grow lavender from transplants, but they can be grown from seed. The resulting lavender plants will not all be identical. The shades of lavender may vary as will the size and the growth habit. This may be an advantage in a home garden. But seed grown plants do take longer to establish but can be cost effective. Not all lavenders are winter hardy, so pay attention to the U.S.D.A hardiness zone listed on the packaging. They do well in dry wind swept areas. Lavenders are evergreen, with a blue-grey foliage. They are deer and rabbit resistant and attract butterflies. Trim them back in spring to encourage bushier growth; Regularly harvesting the flower spikes before they are fully mature will promote a longer flowering period. Lavender comes in many

varieties. ‘Hidcote Blue’ (zone 4 to 9) has a long bloom with deep purple flowers. It grows 24-36 inches tall and wide. ‘Munstead’ (zone 5-9) is an early blooming, medium lavender blue. It has a compact mounding habit 12-18 inches tall and wide. ‘Lavender Lady’ (zone 6-10; an annual in zone 5) is an All American Selection winner and has blue flowers. It blooms in 90 days from seed. It has a relatively uniform habit and grows 10 to 16 inches high and 10 inches wide, so it makes a nice border. Like lavender, mints add a delightful and refreshing fragrance to jellies, teas, sauces and extracts for baking. They make a lovely scented garnishes for meats, drinks, and desserts and ice tea. Mints grow best in full sun but tolerate part shade nicely. They root easily from stem tip cuttings in about 15 days either in water or soil. Or you can purchase transplants.

After another successful 2013 grant program, the CCFB Commodities/Marketing Team is sponsoring this year’s grant program, Cookfresh® Community Urban Garden Grant Program 2014. Cookfresh® Cook County is designed to “help” these gardens access needed supplies including plants, seeds, raised bed construction materials, soil, compost, fencing and more. Cookfresh® Cook County offers up to five $300.00 grants to urban/community gardens in Cook County that are seeking to enhance the garden’s success. A grant application subcommittee of the Commodities/Marketing team

Your South Holland Agency Jeff Orman

Agency Manager

708-560-7777

Sharon Stemke

Associate Manager

708-478-0423

Elliot Day

Bob Deenik

708-679-1870

Kirk Nickerson

Andrew Carrell

Randall Cox

708-596-3999

708-679-1870

South Holland

Matteson

Ben Garrett

Pat Hickey

Gary Molenhouse

708-474-5600

708-560-7799

708-361-4081

815-478-0190

Ted Parks

Jim Parthemore

Tim Perchinski

Yolanda Ross

708-331-3323

708-560-7777

708-226-1896

708-754-7300

708-239-0111

Bob Smith

John Tameling

Paul Turay

Josh Van Namen

Tim Van Zuidam

708-798-4844

708-474-5600

708-478-0423

708-361-3925

708-474-0006

John VanGennep

Jim Verduin

Mike McKenny

Kristyn McCormick

Travis Siebert

708-596-0008

708-560-7777

708-560-7777

708-361-4330

Matteson

South Holland

Mints are easy to grow. So easy, they need to be contained! They spread by underground stems called stolons. It’s best to grow the vigorous herbs in a container as they will otherwise invade the garden. Alternatively trap them in a deep bottomless plastic pot that is sunken into the garden. This keeps them inbounds. Be sure some of the edge of the pot is above ground to contain the roots. Generally mints will thrive in moist soils. The most popular mints are Peppermint: Mentha piperita; Spearmint: Mentha apicata; Apple Mint: Mentha suaveolens; and Pineapple Mint: Mentha suaveolens ‘variegata.’ All can be used in cooking. They also are welcome fragrant cut foliage to complement cut flowers bouquets in the summer.

will evaluate grant applications based on need, project goals, fund usage, number of people served, etc. Gardens awarded a grant will be asked to display a CCFB “support” banner. Cookfresh® funds will be distributed and redeemable for supplies by participating Greenhouse/Farm Stand members. To complete an application, go to http://www. cookcfb.org/buy-local/programs or contact Debbie at CCFB at 708-354-3276 or membershipdebbie@ cookcfb.org. Application deadline is Friday February 28th, 2014.

Homewood

Mokena

708-478-5500

Lansing

Oak Forrest

Lansing

South Holland

Oak Forrest

Orland Park

Mokena

Oak Forrest

AUTO I HOME I LIFE I DISABILITY INCOME LONG TERM CARE I FINANCIAL SERVICES 0513-540HO

Worth

Steger

Worth

Oak Forrest

Manhattan

Alsip

Lansing

Worth


Co-Operator February 2014

6

Cook County Farm Bureau

Agricultural Literacy & Public Relations

Ag Lit Bit By Diane Merrion

Ag Literacy featured in Super Bowl Ad Did you see it? Hope your munchies were good, your friends had fun and your television sets were tuned in for Super Bowl XLVIII (48). For most of us the highlight of the whole event is watching the commercials and then talking about them for weeks after, or maybe 24 hours after. The ads stick with us long after the game and invoke different emotions such as pride (think Dodge Ram Truck from last year on why God made a farmer), laughter (Betty White and the Snickers), tears (Budweiser training commercial where horse gets picked to be Clydesdale) and even provides us with new information (the 1984 introduction of a computer known as Macintosh). So what was this ad for Ag Literacy? Unfortunately the farm bureau doesn’t have an ad budget of $4 million for a 30 second ad, or much of any advertising budget at all. If we could run an ad, however, it would be a wonderful way to keep our mission of expanding students’ awareness and appreciation for the importance of agriculture everywhere. Imagine our joy at letting the world know how critical it is to teach everyone about the importance of agriculture. Our commercial might feature a car with seats made from soybeans, a carpet

made from corn, a new snack made from whole grain wheat, clothes made from cotton, or adult refreshment made from hops. It might be like Monster. com or Jobs.com highlighting the vast need for ag professionals and listing the positions related to this growing field of employment. I imagine if you look more closely at all of the Super Bowl advertisements, you will see how agriculture is linked to just about everything that is shown. Those of us in Ag Literacy would jump at the opportunity to reach a Super Bowl size audience to spread our word. However, we have you, our loyal Cooperator readers and members who can share our story. It might not be as funny as the Fed Ex Stanley Cup commercial of 1999 or as memorable as the Dorito’s Goat 4 Sale spot last year, but we hope you spread the word about our many educational programs. Check out our website at www. cookcfb.org and click on Ag Literacy to see what we have to offer in 2014. We are excited about our Summer Ag Institutes for Educators, our many grants such as School Garden Grant and National Ag In the Classroom Conference Grant and our “in-school” visits focused on agriculture and nutrition, as well. So if you missed our spot, we welcome you to tune in online and take advantage of all we have to offer.

Open the door to a career in ag! The field of agriculture mechanics is booming! While some individuals may go to four year Engineering Schools, others will learn skills on the job during an apprenticeship or enroll in a two year program such as Agriculture Mechanization at a junior college like Joliet Jr. College.

Ag Service Technician – If you’ve always loved tinkering with engines or machines, this may be the field for you. The ability to take things apart and put them back together again is just the type of skill needed to be a successful Service Technician. Farm machines are so high tech now that specialists often travel to farms to repair equipment and research ways to improve the operation of equipment. Service Techs may also get involved with welding, metal fabrication and electrical assembly. This job often requires an apprenticeship or junior college certification program. Electrical Engineer – Having a B.S. Degree in Electrical Engineering opens many doors into the field of agriculture. Sophisticated technology is often used to service, repair, design and install electrical systems. You may be designing tires for ag equipment or be a part of the Product Engineering and Design team at a company like John Deere. Another option might be to work in the wind power industry where electrical engineers design, develop, test, and supervise the manufacture of turbines’ electrical components, including electric motors, machinery controls, lighting and wiring, generators, communications systems, and electricity transmission systems. As you can see, you would be in high demand in this field. Check out this new you tube video on Ag Careers. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQwjkEUXEN0

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Diane Merrion, Ag in the Classroom Coordinator 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60526 aitc@cookcfb.org Phone: 708-354-3276 fax: 708-579-6056

AITC

Free Professional Development - Spring 2014 Earn 2 CPDUs Sponsored by the Cook County Farm Bureau® EARTH DAY WORKSHOP DATE: APRIL 2, 2014 TIME: 4:30-6:30 P.M. (2 CPDU’S) LOCATION:

Cook County Farm Bureau 6438 Joliet Rd. Countryside, IL

We will use our inquiring minds to explore the many ways we can teach environmental awareness in the CORE classroom. Hands-on experiments, literature connections and even outdoor education will be explored. Guest presenter from Friends of Chicago River. .

SCHOOL GARDEN WORKSHOP DATE: MAY 8TH TIME: 4:00-6:00 P.M. (2 CPDU’S) LOCATION:

Historic Wagner Farm 1015 Wagner Rd Glenview, IL 60025 From seedlings to plants, we will explore horticulture as it relates to classroom lesson plans. Learn fun ways to teach about soil, seeds & plants native to our great state. Hands-on projects to replicate back in your K-8 classrooms.

To register: call 708-354-3276 or email aitc@cookcfb.org

Cook County Farm Bureau® 6438 Joliet Rd. Countryside, IL 60525

www.cookcfb.org/ag-literacy/teacher-resources

Food Check Out Day 2014 School Food Drive

Join us in a Community Service school project by donating food and pop tabs to the school food drive benefiting the Chicagoland and NW Indiana Ronald McDonald House Charities®. We welcome Grade Schools, High Schools, Student Council, or other school activities groups. Schools donating the most amount of food are eligible for a school assembly with Ronald, himself, and/or a certificate to buy books for your school library. It’s a WIN-WIN for all!

Proviso West’s Key Club participates in our school food drive every year!

Last year’s schools donated over 5,000 pounds of food! Email aitc2@cookcfb. org to sign your school/club

up for the school food drive. Food will be collected during February.

Valentine’s Day Activity Hershey Kiss Flowers (From: Illinois Ag in the Classroom) Suggested Reading: Chocolate Riches from the Rainforest by Robert Burleigh ISBN-13: 9780810957343 Materials Needed: · 2 Hershey kisses · Glue · 3’x 3’ square cellophane · Floral stick · Floral tape · Scissors · Ruler

Directions: 1. Begin by reading an informational book about chocolate and where it comes from. 2. Use glue to attach the kisses at the bottom. 3. Wrap the kisses with a 3’ x 3’ square of cellophane, and draw the edges together at the bottom. 4. Insert a floral stick into the base of the ‘rose.’ 5. Wrap floral tape around the stem. 6. To see an example check out: http://www.sunscholars.com/2011/01/hersheykiss-rose-valentines.htm. Caution: Do not eat the candy after the glue has been applied or use a piece of rolled tape to keep the kisses together instead of glue.


Co-Operator February 2014

7

Cook County Farm Bureau

AGRICULTURE ADVENTURES FOR FAMILIES The United States is one of the leading soybean producers in the world! A pig’s diet is mostly made up of ground up corn and soybeans. Illinois and Iowa are among the top states for corn and soybean production, and the same is true for pigs. Could there be some connection to pigs, corn and soybeans? Corn and soybeans are important ingredients in a pig’s diet, so many farmers who raise pigs will often grow corn and/or soybeans too.

Farming is a year long job! Planting and harvesting may only take 4-5 months, but there is a lot more preparation that goes into growing a great crop.

Spring -Prepare the soil and plant seeds. Summer - Control weeds and insects and irrigate where necessary. Fall - Harvest, store beans and work the soil. Winter - Market the crop, order seeds and take care of machinery.

Feed makes up for more than half the cost of raising a pig! A lot of science and research goes into making sure the pigs get a balanced diet. Animal nutritionists look at many combinations of feed ingredients to figure out which mixture of nutrients and minerals are best. The pigs will eat a variety of these mixes at difference stages of their life so they get the nutrients that they need.

After the soybeans are harvested, they are taken to a grain elevator where they are stored and prepared for wholesale. When the soybeans are ready, they are loaded onto semi-trucks, freight trains or barges and shipped all over the U.S. and around the world where it will be processed into soy oil and soy meal. The soybeans will be used for animal feed, biodiesel and many other products.

You’d be surprised at the number of things that are made from pigs! There are over 500 different types of important things besides meat that come from pigs. Examples of pig by-products are chewing gum, animal feeds, leather, glue, combs, buttons, plastics, paintbrushes, plywood, adhesive, insulation, upholstery, cosmetics, antifreeze, cellophane, floor waxes, cement, crayons, chalk, matches, putty and linoleum.

*One acre of soybeans can produce 82,368 crayons. *Soy ink is used in over 95% of America’s daily newspapers that circulate more than fifteen hundred copies per run.

A number of helpful products are made from pigs. Insulin, a medicine that helps people who have diabetes, comes from pigs (although most insulin is now synthetically made), as well as dressings for severe burns and heart valves for human survival.

Information provided by Illinois Ag Mag: Pork

Auntie Yang’s Great Soybean Picnic Story by: Ginnie Lo, Illustrations by: Beth Lo

Chinese-American Jinyi and her family are visiting their Auntie and Uncle Yang outside Chicago. While on a drive, the extend ed family discovers a soybean field (In Illinois, soybeans were grown to feed cows and pigs...but in China, soybeans were one of the most important foods of all), and they share their first “soybean picnic� which becomes a new tradition. Every year after that, Auntie Yang invites more people to share the food and fun. Pretty soon more than two hundred friends and neighbors gather at the picnic to play games and eat soybeans together.

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%RDULVDPDOHXVHGIRUEUHHGLQJ %DUURZLVDPDOHSLJWKDWLVQRWXVHGIRUEUHHGLQJ )DUURZPHDQVWRJLYHELUWKWRSLJOHWV *LOWLVDIHPDOHSLJWKDWKDVQRWJLYHQELUWK /LWWHUPHDQVDJURXSRISLJOHWVERUQDWWKHVDPHWLPH/LWWHUVL]HVDUH XVXDOO\EHWZHHQSLJOHWV 3LJOHWLVDEDE\SLJ 3RUNLVWKHIRRGDQGSURGXFWVWKDWFRPHIURPSLJV3RUNFKRSVEDFRQ KDPVDXVDJHDQGSRUNURDVWDUHVRPHH[DPSOHVRISRUN 6RZLVDIHPDOHSLJXVHGIRUEUHHGLQJ3LJVDUHSUHJQDQWIRUWKUHH PRQWKVWKUHHZHHNVDQGWKUHHGD\V :HDQPHDQVWKDWWKHSLJOHWLVELJHQRXJKWRHDWRQKLVRZQDQG doesn’t nurse from the sow anymore. Information provided by Illinois Ag Mag: Pork

Soybeans/Pork Word Search Last month’s winner of four movie tickets was :

David Rivera *The winner of our year long Ag Adventures contest was:

Mary Pecora!

She submitted a word search entry every month in 2013 and was chosen at random and will receive a basket full of ag themed goodies! You could win a products basket & movie tickets! Complete the Word Search puzzle and your name will be entered into a drawing for 4 movie tickets! Deadline is the 15th of this month. Mail to: Cook Co. Farm Bureau Ag Adventures Word Search 6438 Joliet Rd Countryside, IL 60525 Fax to: (708)579-6056 Email to: membershiplinda@cookcfb.org

Complete and send the puzzle all 12 months and your name is automatically entered into an “End of Year� drawing for an Agricultural

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Barrow Biodiesel Boar Crops Farmer Farrow Gilt Harvesting Litter

Piglet Pigs Pork Production Sow Soybeans Soy Ink Soy Milk Wean

Name:__________________________________________ Address:_______________________________________ _______________________________________

Phone #:______________________________________

Membership #:_______________________________ (on front of paper above name/address)


Co-Operator February 2014

8

Cook County Farm Bureau

Foundation for Agriculture Announces

Book of the Year

To-do list scrambled? Check. The calendar flips to February, the time of year when cabin fever runs high and most New Year’s resolutions succumb to old ways. In fact, a quick browse online reveals some 8 percent of Americans who set resolutions actually achieve them. While I do not officially set resolutions, I admit the postholiday timeframe encourages fewer M&Ms and more time on my feet. My problem: I don’t like to exercise for sake of just exercising. Give me a weedy patch of sweet corn to hoe. A field speckled with sizable rocks or tree roots to gather. Even manure to scoop, and I’m there. The side benefit of exercise while a job must be done proves my ideal calisthenics. In other words, if a task that improves our farm or home requires exercise, I’m usually in with both feet. One summer, I participated in a wellness incentive program that involved a four-week exercise challenge. I met it with some forced jogging and necessary garden and farm work. I was thrilled to discover that a single day of squarebaling straw exceeded an entire week’s worth of CDCrecommended aerobic and muscle-strengthening exercise. I demanded a spot on the baling squad and tied off that week’s requirement with twine. Still fitness on the farm challenges me more than my farming ancestors. Our farm bales straw only every few years. Combines shell corn for us. The list continues.

Labor intensive activities still exist. It’s just when put in the perspective of six generations of farming, we have more demands in equipment cabs and office chairs. If only the winter season’s flurry of 1099s, input pre-payments and 2014 decision-making burnt calories. I would be teenage size in no time. When I use the treadmill, it’s while watching the AgDay news program. When I need a run this time of year, I opt for basement tag with the kids. Hand-hauling water and feed to the chickens through near-knee-deep snow works the body, too. And I choose a brisk walk over an ATV ride to the far storage shed to gather paperwork from the cab of a semi or tractor. Now I know why Grandma -- for what seems like forever -- cruises out to the farm yard on her bike in good weather. Another example of how life and farm intertwine. -- -- -On a side note, here are some fun kid tidbits from the last couple months: You know you’re a farm kid when… Santa puts tractors in your stocking. You give Lego people a hayrack ride while you “farm” the carpet. You pick this winter’s sledding spot based the crop residue. About the Author: Joanie Stiers, a wife and mother of two, farms with her husband and family on a multigenerational grain farm in West-Central Illinois.

The American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture presented its seventh annual “Book of the Year” award to Laurie Krebs for “The Beeman.” The book introduces young readers to bees, beekeepers and the pollination process. Krebs is a retired elementary school teacher. She began her writing career by creating stories for her class. Today she lives in Virginia with the Beeman himself, her husband, Bill. “I am thrilled and honored to have ‘The Beeman’ selected by the American Farm Bureau as its Book of the Year,” Krebs said, adding “I wrote the story because I am married to The Beeman!” As her husband began reading about his new hobby, he shared his enthusiasm and knowledge with Krebs, who was fascinated and invited him to talk to her first grade class.

Jean Sommerfeld, Ag in the Classroom Assistant, reviews ‘The Beeman’ book.

“The children, in turn, learned so much and loved his photographs and beekeeping equipment,” Krebs said.  “I wrote ‘The Beeman’ so that honeybees could be introduced to classrooms that my husband couldn’t visit,” she explained. The Book of the Year award springs from the Foundation’s effort to identify “accurate ag books,” a collection of more than 400 books for children, teenagers and adults that accurately cover agricultural

topics. Book of the Year selections are educational, help to create positive public perceptions about agriculture, inspire readers to learn more and touch their readers’ lives as well as tell the farmer’s story. The Accurate Ag Books database is available at: http:// www.agfoundation.org/. The Foundation has created an educator’s guide and the Bee Ag Mag publication as companion pieces to “The Beeman.” Also for the first time ever, the Foundation is offering a Spanish text version of the Bee Ag Mag. In honor of Krebs’ recognition and the host city of the American Farm Bureau Federation’s 2014 Annual Convention, the book’s publisher, Barefoot Books, has generously donated 100 copies of “The Beeman” to San Antonio Public Schools.

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Co-Operator February 2014

9

Cook County Farm Bureau

PUBLIC POLICY UPDATE Policy Question of the Month Did Illinois Farm Bureau® delegates approve Cook CFB’s resolution during the delegate session in December? Email your answer to bona@cookcfb.org or membershiplinda@ cookcfb.org or call (708)354-3276 to be entered into a drawing for a $25 gift card.

JANUARY’S WINNER for the Public Policy Question of the Month was Theo Mueller. Congratulations! January’s question: Name one candidate or elected official who met with leaders from Cook CFB during the Illinois Farm Bureau® Annual Meeting. Possible Answers: **We apologize for our error last month. Due to spacing issues, the photo with the answer to the question of the month was not placed in the paper. Anyone who called in regarding the answer was automatically entered into the drawing.

Coming to Your Mailboxes Soon:

Viewpoint Surveys

Just as a reminder, voting members in South Cook County will soon be receiving the 2014 Viewpoint Survey. This is an important tool in Cook CFB’s grassroots arsenal. Not only does this survey enable us to get a “pulse” on voting members’ positions on local, state and federal issues but it provides the basis for future policy discussions, meetings and submittals. Survey topics include: Forest Preserve fees, the County’s Ethics Ordinance, and municipal beekeeping ordinances. This year, members will again receive the Viewpoint Survey in a staggered fashion beginning first with members residing in South Cook County. Each survey will include area specific questions, which will enable the organization to get a better “pulse” on the issues impacting our members. Voting members are encouraged to return their surveys as soon as possible.

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT: Bona Heinsohn, Director of Governmental Affairs and Public Relations 6438 Joliet Rd., Countryside, Il 60525 bona@cookcfb.org phone: 708.354.3276 fax: 708.579.6056 Please visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/Cook.County.Farm.Bureau.IL to be updated on agricultural issues and Cook County Government.

Farm Bureau Delegates Approve Cook CFB’s Resolution During Illinois Farm Bureau® Annual Meeting, Farm Bureau delegates amended Cook CFB’s resolution on its face to read: We support: “Prohibiting individuals from serving concurrently as an elected mayor and an elected county board member.” The amendment as proposed and approved by delegates removed “in counties with a population of greater than 150,000.” The portion removed by delegates was

added during the July Resolutions Committee meeting by a subcommittee of the Illinois Farm Bureau® Resolutions Committee. The resolution as amendment was overwhelmingly approved by delegates. Eighty-two (82) percent of Cook County Farm Bureau® members responding to the 2013 Viewpoint Survey opposed individuals serving concurrently as an elected mayor and an elected county board member.

This issue came to light after a suburban State’s Attorney crafted a legal opinion that found such dual roles “incompatible” with one another. The Public Officer Prohibited Activities Act (50 ILCS 105/1) prohibits a county board member from serving on a community’s governing board only if the county government and community have a contractual relationship.

Farm Bureau Leadership Reviews Proposed Constitutional Amendment In May of 2013, two proposals were introduced in the Illinois General Assembly to amend the Illinois Constitution to remove the current authorization for a flat income tax in the Revenue Article and replace it with language authorizing the creation of a graduated income tax on both individual and corporate taxpayers. After review, Farm Bureau opposes amending the Illinois Constitution to change the flat income tax rate to a graduated tax rate and to remove the corporate/ individual tax rate ratio. Existing Farm Bureau policy lays out a preference for a flat state income tax and opposes the elimination of the corporate/ individual tax rate ratio. In 2012, the Center for Tax and Budget Accountability released “The Case for Creating a Graduated Income Tax in Illinois”, which argues that Illinois would be better served by a graduated/ progressive state income tax rate. The report also argues that current tax policy: • Will not sustain current service levels into the future, • Fails to impose a tax burden in a fair manner that corresponds with ability to pay, and • Is regressive, especially on low and middle class families. However, the report further argues that a

graduated income tax rate would more fairly impose a greater tax burden on affluent taxpayers and would result in a reduction of tax on 94 percent of current state income taxpayers. Existing Farm Bureau state income tax policy declares a preference for a flat state income tax rate and existing Farm Bureau policy on state and local finance opposes a constitutional amendment to reduce the state income tax rate between corporations and individuals. At this time, there exists two options to amend the Illinois Constitution. The first is by seeking and securing the passage of a Joint Resolution of the General Assembly, followed by voter approval. The second option, which only allows the Legislative Article to be amended in a very strict and narrow way, is by voter petition. The Committee for Legislative Reform and Term Limit’s proposal would be by voter petition. Since the adoption of the 1970 Illinois Constitution there have been 18 proposed amendments of which 10 have been approved and seven failed voter approval. All but one amendment was placed on the ballot by action of the General Assembly. The proposals seeking to change the state’s income tax structure to a graduated income tax structure are examples of pursuing a Constitutional amendment through the General Assembly.

Manifolds, Manolos, and Manure

In 1999, Isaac “Ike” Carothers joined the Chicago City Council after defeating eight opponents, including By Bona Heinsohn incumbent alderman, Sam Burrell in a February primary and Floyd Thomas in an April run-off. According to sources, seven years later Carothers was named more than any other Alderman on a list of clouted job seekers and their political sponsors during the Federal trial of patronage chief Robert Sorich. For those who don’t remember, Sorich was sentenced to 46 months after a Federal court found him guilty of rigging City Hall hiring. A year later, Carothers allegedly accepted an $11,000 campaign contribution in exchange for a zoning change. The kicker was that the real estate developer who offered the contribution was cooperating with the Federal Bureau of Investigations. Soon after Carothers received a subpoena requesting (ok demanding) documentation of Aldermanic expenses, 29th Ward zoning changes, ordinances introduced by

Carothers, correspondences between Carothers and the Mayor’s office regarding zoning changes, transcripts of floor and committee comments, and committee and floor voting records. In the meantime, a real estate developer traded a zoning change for approximately $40,000 worth of home improvements to Carothers’ personal residence. A year later, US Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois Patrick Fitzgerald indicted Carothers on Federal corruption charges. Although, he initially pled not guilty, by June 8, 2009 Carothers and the Federal prosecutors office entered into a plea agreement. Under the plea deal, Carothers pled guilty to one count of failing to report home improvements on his income taxes and one count of corruptly accepting items of value for supporting zoning changes. The plea agreement dropped four wire and mail fraud charges. Carothers was sentenced to a 28-month prison term and paid $40,000 in restitution. Upon pleading guilty, Carothers was forced to immediately vacate his City Council seat. To the chagrin of onlookers, in November of 2013, Carothers filed the

appropriate paperwork to fill incumbent Cook County Commissioner Earlean Collins’ first district County Board seat. Collins announced earlier in 2013 that she would not seek another term on the County Board. Carothers is one candidate in a field of six running for the first District, but unlike three of his colleagues he’s unchallenged despite being a convicted felon and despite the Illinois Constitution prohibiting a felon from holding any office created by the Constitution. Yes, county board districts are created by the Constitution. However, after the statement prohibiting felons from holding office comes the following statement “Eligibility may be restored as provided by law.” Going one step further, Chapter 730 of the Illinois Compiled Statutes, which addresses corrections provides that the prohibition of felons seeking office ends upon the completion of the felon’s sentence. So not really a prohibition. Given that, Carothers can technically seek a seat on the Cook County Board. Carothers; however, cannot seek an Aldermanic seat. Chapter 65 of the ILCS, which deals with municipalities bars anyone “convicted in any court located in

the United States of any infamous crime, bribery, perjury, or other felon” from seeking a municipal office. It’s important to note that municipal offices are not created by the Illinois Constitution. Why the difference? No one really knows. Attorneys have postulated that it’s because the media scrutiny for municipal races is less than the media scrutiny for Federal or State races. I’d argue that in Chicago just the opposite is the caseeveryone knows what Ward they’re in and who coordinates their garbage pick-up but farm fewer can name their Illinois State Representative or Senator. Even more interesting is that Carothers who cannot run for a municipal office can run for the State Senate or State House as can a former Senator or Representative who was convicted of corruption related to their tenure in office. Technically, even former Governor Rod Blagojevich could legally run for US Congress. Many critics, myself included, argue that Illinois statute in conjunction with the Constitution needs to be clarified and streamlined regarding the eligibility of convicted felons running for office, any office. But will it happen? Probably not. This is Illinois after all.


Co-Operator February 2014

10

Cook County Farm Bureau

MEMBER RELATIONS Workshop on Preparing Wills and Trusts and Transferring Non-Titled Property Sponsored by the Cook County Farm Bureau

When: Thursday, April 10, 2014 from 6:30-9 p.m.

Presented by Thomas J. Olofsson, J.D., Estate Planning Attorney Do you need to update your will? Do you know what to do in preparing a will and a trust? Do you understand what probate court is? This program will provide the advantages and disadvantages of preparing a will and trust. The program will inform you what types of information you will need to gather and decisions you will need make before meeting with a lawyer to prepare a will or trust. Also, tips will be shared on what to look for in choosing a lawyer and where to locate a lawyer for this task.

Where: Orland Park Country Financial 9731 W 165th St. Ste 36 Orland Park, IL 60467 Cost: No charge for Cook County Farm Bureau Members $10 per person for non-members To Pre-register: Call the Cook County Farm Bureau at 708354-3276. Registration Deadline:

Wednesday, April 2, 2014 Limited seating!

Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate and Grandpa’s Pocket Watch? Transferring Non-Titled Property! Presented by Katherine Reuter,

Speakers and Program Descriptions: What You Need to Know About Preparing Wills and Trusts

Consumer and Financial Education Consultant Distributing personal items such as wedding pictures, a vase, furniture, jewelry, Grandpa’s pocket watch, or even Grandma’s pie plate is an issue that impacts almost all families. Attorneys say that personal property, not the more valuable titled property, causes the most problems when settling an estate. This program will provide tips to help you distribute your own or others non-titled property such as understanding the sensitivity of the issue; deciding what you want to accomplish; deciding what the word “fair” means in your family; identifying the meaning of precious possessions; recognizing distribution options and consequences; and learning how to manage conflicts, if they arise.

Cook County Financial

Representatives of the Month The Financial Representative of the Month program is designed by Country Financial Agency Managers of Cook County to recognize overall Insurance Leaders in Life, Disability, Auto, Home, and Health production during the month. The agent earns the award through efforts to provide quality service to existing and new clients. Listed below are the various agents honored by their agency manager with the Financial Representative of the Month designation. Ilir Numani Chicago North Agency, Vicki Nygren, Agency Manager Ilir Numani has been named Chicago North Career Financial Representative of the month for December 2013. His office is located at 4708 N. Milwaukee Avenue in Chicago, IL. His phone number is (773) 427-4364. Ilir has been a Financial Representative since April 2005. Maggie Borowiec Chicago North Agency, Vicki Nygren, Agency Manager Maggie Borowiec has been named Chicago North Employee Financial Representative of the month for December 2013. Her office is located at 3703 N. Harlem Ave in Chicago, IL. Her phone number is (773)427-2851. Maggie has been a Financial Representative since February 2011. Leo Maldonado Chicago South Agency, Marc Rogala, Agency Manager Leo Maldonado has been named Chicago South Career Financial Representative of the month for December 2013. His office is located at 3458 S. Halsted St. in Chicago, IL. His phone number is (773)254-5810. Leo has been a Career Representative since November 2012. Jose Martinez Chicago South Agency, Marc Rogala, Agency Manager Jose Martinez has been named Chicago South Employee Financial Representative of the month for December 2013. His office is located at 6239 S. Archer Ave in Chicago, IL. His phone number is (773) 284-9000. Jose has been a Financial Representative since June 2009. Tony Munno Countryside Agency, Mike Flynn, Agency Manager Tony Munno has been named Employee Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Tony’s office is located at 6438 Joliet Rd. in Countryside, IL. His phone number is (708) 352-5555. Tony has been a Financial Representative since September 2012. His email address is tony.munno@countryfinancial.com.

Cook County Farm Bureau Nights SUNDAY, MAR. 2, 2014 AT 3 P.M. VS. Iowa Wild SATURDAY, MAR. 15, 2014 AT 7 P.M. VS. Texas Stars SATURDAY, MAR. 29, 2014 AT 7:00P.M. VS. Lake Erie Monsters FREE HAT FOR THE GROUP LEADER OF GROUPS 15 PEOPLE OR LARGER!

GOLD SEATING (rows 2-7 off of the glass)

GROUP PRICES

*$38.00 TICKETS FOR $32.00

*$18.50 TICKETS FOR $12.50

SEE CHICAGOWOLVES.COM/TICKETS FOR

HOW TO ORDER

GREEN SEATING (lower level corner/end OR 2nd level sides – based on availability)

BY PHONE: Stefanie Starck (847) 832-1939

# of tickets = _______ at $12.50 = $ _______

BY MAIL: Chicago Wolves Attn: CCFB, c/o Stefanie Starck 2301 Ravine Way Glenview, IL 60025

BLUE SEATING (2nd level corner/end)

Game(s) of choice: ____________________

BY FAX: (847) 724-1652, Attn: Stefanie Starck

TOTAL ENCLOSED: $ ACCT. NO: 48-17792

G#4 (APON)

This flyer cannot be used in conjunction with any other ticket offer. All payments must be received by NOON on the day prior to your chosen game.

Name: ________________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________

Please make all checks payable to: CHICAGO WOLVES

City/State/Zip: __________________________________________________ Email: _________________________________________________________ Phone (C):_______________________ (W):___________________________ / AMX / MC/ VS No.: ______________________________________ Card Exp.: ____________________Sec. Code: ________________________

Kurt Mass Northshore Agency, Mike Cerf, Agency Manager Kurt Mass has been named Employee Representative of the Month for December 2013. His office is located at 25 S. Prospect Ave in Park Ridge, IL. His phone number is (847) 696-9484. Kurt has been a Financial Representative since April 2013.

*$21.50 TICKETS FOR $15.50

FURTHER INFORMATION

# of tickets = _______ at $15.50 = $ _______

May 2004.

*$28.50 TICKETS FOR $22.50

# of tickets = _______ at $22.50 = $ _______ ORANGE SEATING (lower level center ice)

Paul Choi Northshore Agency, Mike Cerf, Agency Manager Paul Choi has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. His office is located at 333 E. Dundee Rd. in Wheeling, IL. His phone number is (847) 419-1281. Paul has been a Financial Representative since

ENJOY GREAT SEATS AT SPECIAL

*Indicates day-of-game price

# of tickets = _______ at $32.00 = $ _______

Bill Asimakopoulos Countryside Agency, Mike Flynn, Agency Manager Bill Asimakopoulos has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. His office is located at 737 Plainfield Rd. in Darien, IL. His phone number is (630) 887-7788. Bill has been a Financial Representative since March 1999. His email address is bill.asimakopoulos@countryfinancial.com.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT Stefanie Starck at (847) 832-1939 skstarck@chicagowolves.com

Billing Address: __________________________________________________

Tony Palumbo Orland Park Agency, Cary Tate, Agency Manager Tony Palumbo has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. His office is located at 8760 W. 159th St., Ste 200 in Orland Park. His phone number is (708)403-5708. Tony Palumbo has been a Financial Rep since October 1984. Nora Beverly Orland Park Agency, Cary Tate, Agency Manager Nora Beverly has been named Employee Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Her office is located at 9731 W. 165th St., Ste 36 in Orland Park, IL. Her phone number is (708)226-1111. Nora Beverly has been a Financial Rep since August 2011. Matt Powell Rolling Meadows Agency, Jerry Anderson, Agency Manager Matt Powell has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Matt’s office is located at 4200 W. Euclid Ave in Rolling Meadows, IL. His phone number is (847)963-1540. Matt has been an agent since February 2005. Tim Hranka Rolling Meadows Agency, Jerry Anderson, Agency Manager Tim Hranka has been named Employee Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Tim’s office is located at 4190 W. Euclid Avenue in Rolling Meadows, IL. His phone number is (847)963-1540. Tim has been an agent since January 2011. Kathy Spiewak Schaumburg Agency, Jack Smith, Agency Manager Kathy Spiewak has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Kathy’s office is located at 11 W. Wise Rd., in Schaumburg, IL. Her phone number is (847) 716-1010. Kathy has been a Financial Representative since February 2007. Tomasz Spiewak Schaumburg Agency, Jack Smith, Agency Manager Tomasz Spiewak has been named Employee Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Tomasz’s office is located at 2435 W. Schaumburg Rd. in Schaumburg, IL. His phone number is (847) 891-3072. Tomasz has been a Financial Representative since June 2013. Jim Verduin South Holland Agency, Jeff Orman, Agency Manager Jim Verduin has been named Career Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Jim’s office is located at 17080 S. Park Ave in South Holland, IL. His phone number is (708) 596-0008. Jim has been a Financial Representative since

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

Katie Smith, Director of Membership, 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, Il 60525 membershipkatie@cookcfb.org phone: 708.354.3276 fax:708.579.6056 Cook County Farm Bureau’s Member Service Center is now on Facebook. We will keep you up-to-date on all upcoming events, new membership benefits and programs. Look us up by searching “Cook County Farm Bureau Membership/Benefits”

March 1982. Mike McKenny South Holland Agency, Jeff Orman, Agency Manager Mike McKenny has been named Employee Financial Representative of the Month for December 2013. Mike’s office is located at 4845 W. 167th St, Unit 101 in Oak Forest, IL. His phone number is (708) 560-7777. Mike has been a Financial Representative since February 2013.


Co-Operator February 2014

“502,000”

is the number of Cooperators sent to households in the last year! It’s no wonder the classified ad section is so popular with our members!

Classifieds All items listed are for the accommodation of the membership and without guarantee of the publisher.

Miscellaneous Dining room table, 4 extra leaves, 6 chairs, China hutch cabinet, oak. Made in the USA. Table closed 65” with leaves 109”. Excellent condition. Call 708-418-5869.

11

Brown leather swivel rocker chair $135; Roll top desk, light oak $75; Singer Creative Touch sewing machine in cabinet $200; solid wood 8-drawer dresser 16x44 $75; Solid oak lamp table 18 x 48 x 26 $60; table with shelves 15x26x27 $25; Craftsman steel work bench 24x60 – composite top, 5 drawer $100; Delta ½” work bench drill press, $30; Wagner power paint sprayer Model 317-E $30; Misc. shop tools. Rock-ola Juke Box 1973 #460, set-up free, player includes 1200 45 records. Works, excellent $2,000; Fold up tables (8 total) 30” x 6’8 & 30” by 8’, $12 each; Chain saws 14” Stihl brand, gas $60; 14” Poulan, electric $25. Call 708-269-6987.

Motorized Vehicles and Accessories One owner, excellent condition, gently used. Great mechanical esthetic condition; meticulously maintained. Winterized. Ford E450 w/hitch. Sleeps six-plus. Only 60,000 miles. Call Karen 847-588-3601.

Vacant lot, all utilities. Meadow Creed air park in Monee, IL. 3,600 sq ft. $24,900. Call George at 708-218-0428. Charming 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch home in Streamwood on a quiet street.

Dyson DC50 Animal Vacuum in original box. Factory sealed, never opened. With tangle free turbine tool. 5 year manufacturer warranty. $399.99 or make an offer. Call 708-306-0248. Princess cut engagement ring for sale. The approximate weight is .45 ct. The diamond is an F/G S1. Ring size is an 8. The appraisal value is $900 and willing to sell the ring for $375 OBO. Call 630-710-1065. New; never used: New Wave Stove worth $99.99, grill worth $29.85, griddle worth $19.95. All three for just $80 (very cheap). Call 630530-8680. 2.4 GHz wireless multimedia keyboard and optical mouse combo only $10 (very cheap). Call 630-530-8680.

Kitchen w/

newer appliances & dishwasher. Also included is washer/dryer and wall-to-wall carpeting. Attached 1 car garage, large yard, not fenced. No pets. 1 yr leas required, $1,350/month. Call 847-208-0991 or email johnbegley@att.net. Lake home for sale: 2 bedroom 1 ¾ bath home on lake in Cissna Park in move-in condition. Has two car attached garage. 80 miles south of Chicago and 40 miles north of Champaign. Please call 815-464-5658. 1 bedroom Apartment on the first floor for rent in Justice. Great location, close to the expressway! Central air condition & private parking. Call 708-349-8388.

Camper for sale, 5th wheel must, 1 slide out, very good condition. Like new, $6,000 OBO. Call 708-534-6659. 1998 Chevy utility van, low miles on newer motor, ice cold AC, spacious box-type storage, working space, excellent vehicle for contractor. Lift door needs repair. $4,500. Call 708-2980317. OLD Western plow 8’ x 6’ blades $400, off 85’ Blazer. Call 312-969-4831. 2006 Ford Econ –E250 (EXT), 5.4 Liter eng, AC, chrome wheels, tool bins, cabin divider, trailer hitch. $8,200 OBO. Call 708-269-6987.

Tractors/ Farm Equipment

Timeshare for sale. The home base is Wyndham Wisconsin Dells, Glazier Canyon. You can purchase any vacation location that Wyndham and RCI has. The current points are the following: present to Mar 31, 2014 – 77,000 pts; April 1, 2014 to Mar 31, 2015 – 77,000 pts. If you don’t use up the points in one year you will lose them. Monthly maintenance fee is $49. Closing cost is $299. Housekeeping points is 77 pts per day. Have access to 4,000 + RCI and Wyndham resorts worldwide. Timeshare is worth $12,500. Selling it for $8,000 OBO. Call 630-710-1065.

Vacation Rentals/Sales For rent: Hilton Grand Vacations Condo Suites Resorts in Orlando, Las Vegas, Miami Beach, Hawaii, New York, Colorado. 5-7 nights in a one bedroom suite, sleeps 4. Anywhere Hilton Grand Vacation Clubs are located. Check out www.stayhgv.com. This is my timeshare I’m renting. ABSOLUTELY NO PRESENTATION REQUIRED. $750 for 5-7 nights depending on dates & peak season. Call John at 708-280-7975 to check availability on dates & details.

Wanted 1972 or older cars/trucks, unfinished projects/ parts. Call 708-439-9770. Your coin collections and wheat pennies. Top dollar paid for your coins. Call for a quote. Get some cash back in your pocket. Call Ken the Coin Collector at 630-863-3648. Taxidermy items, also vintage fishing items, rods & reels, lures, outboard motors, etc. Call 708-361-8230. Wanted: old, vintage, antique bikes from about 1940 and earlier. Please let me know what you have and are interested in selling. I’m looking to expand my bike collection a little. Call 708341-1481 or email me at msreust@comcast.net.

FREE Classified Ads

Vinyl records and 45’s for sale in the Gurnee area. Call 847-782-5988.

Cook County Farm Bureau

for Cook County Farm Bureau members

All Cook County Farm Bureau members may run four non-commercial classified ads annually free in the Cooperator. Ads must be in our office by the 15th of each month. Ads received after the 15th will be in the following month’s paper. Category:

o For Sale Misc.

o For Sale Other

o For Rent

o Wanted

Name ____________________________________________________________________________ Farm Bureau # __________________________________ Phone ______________________________

Snowblower’s, tractors, chainsaws, generators “all power equipment. Repair, parts, service – pickup/delivery service. Lockport, IL. Please call with questions 815-588-1200 or 630-2024940.

Please be sure to include a contact phone number where interested buyers can contact you. Attach your ad to this form (typed or written) and please PRINT CLEARLY.

Real Estate For Sale/Rent

Mail this form and attached ad to: Cook County Farm Bureau, 6438 Joliet Rd, Countryside, IL 60525. You can also fax your ad to (708)579-6056 or email to membershiplinda@cookcfb.org. Non-member ad rate: $.75 per word; $15.00 minimum.

Private Pesticide Applicator Testing

We are looking for your favorite Recipe that you proudly cook using fresh, locally grown and raised ingredients for the Cook County Farm Bureau:

Cookfresh 2014 Recipe Collection Submit a recipe favorite and we will include you in a drawing to win a $50 gift certificate to a county member Farm Stand or grocery retailer near you. Email or mail your recipe along with your name and phone number by March 21st to: Cook County Farm Bureau Attn: Debbie Voltz membershipdebbie@cookcfb.org 6438 Joliet Road Countryside, IL 60525 708-354-3276 708-579-6056 (fax)

The University of Illinois Extension in Cook County in cooperation with the Cook County Farm Bureau and Illinois Department of Agriculture will be offering a private pesticide applicator testing opportunity on Tuesday, February 11, 2014. Those individuals whose license is expiring or those who may need to become licensed are encouraged to attend. Private pesticide applicator licenses are for those persons who apply pesticides to produce an agricultural commodity on property they own or control. Private licenses are not for those operating commercial greenhouses that employ outside help. The testing will take place at the Midwest Golf House complex located at 11855 Archer Ave. Lemont, IL. Testing will start at 1:00 pm and will end approximately at 3:00 pm. Questions and reservations can be made by calling Nancy Pollard, Horticulture Educator at 708-679-6889 or by email at pollard@illinois.edu. Registration closes at Midnight on 2/9/14.

A snowmobile outing provided a great outing for a gathering of the new Young Leaders group in early January.

During a warmup break, the group grabbed pizza and held a brief meeting. Left to right around table: Sam Thompson, Asher Horcher, Robert Schabes, Jim Hopkins, Doug Yunker. Asher Horcher

The Young Leader group will be engaged in fun and educational/promotional activities. The group is made up of members age 18-35 interested in agriculture. Contact Bob Rohrer, CCFB Manager, at (708)354-3276 if you are interested in information.

The Cooperator, official publication of the Cook County Farm Bureau, does accept paid advertising. A copy of the rate card may be accessed at www.cookcfb.org in News and Views or call the CCFB office at 708.354.3276 for a copy. The publication goes to more than 40,000 households each month.


Co-Operator February 2014

12

ga n i c n u o n An NEW MEMBER BENEFIT! 10% Off Grainger Farm.Catalog Family. Prices Food.

TM

Cook County Farm Bureau

Checkout localfarmproducts.org!

Keep your Family Safe and Secure For Less As an Illinois Farm Bureau member, you can take advantage of great discounts from ADT Security through its most tenured Dealer, PowerLink, LLC.

FREE security system ($850 Value) • $5 off monthly monitoring •Free monitored Smoke Detector • Homeowners Insurance Savings Call 1-877-289-4070 to speak with an ADT representative.

$99.00 Customer Activation Fee. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $31.99 per month ($1151.64). Form of payment must be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or savings account. Offer applies to homeowners only. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. Certain restrictions may apply. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Dealer customers only and not on purchases from ADT, LLC. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other offer. TN Cert C-0332, TN Cert C-1544, Ill Lic # 127-001567.

Income Tax Service Offered Through Farm Bureau The Cook County Farm Bureau will again be offering income tax

preparation services for members as a benefit in 2014. As members consider their income taxes, the Professional Tax Service available through the Cook County Farm Bureau is an attractive program that members will want to use. The Cook County Farm Bureau has enlisted the expertise and talents of our affiliated company, the Illinois Agricultural Auditing Association (IAAA), to offer the service. We have set up dates and times at three locations throughout Cook County. Please call Katie at the Farm Bureau office at 708-3543276 for pricing and to schedule your appointment at any of these locations. Cook County Farm Bureau 6438 Joliet Road, Countryside, IL 60525 3/4, 3/6, 3/18 Schaumburg Country Financial 2435 W. Schaumburg Road, Schaumburg, IL 60194 3/3, 3/10, 3/21

LocalFarmProducts.org the website dedicated for the entire Chicagoland area to help consumers find local farm product marketers. Localfarmproducts. org offers everything “farm” from fresh food to hay to green industry producers. Earlier this year, the Commodities/Marketing Team approved funding to redevelop the website (originally built in the year 2009) for better consumer and farmer usability. Improvements to the site include better searchability and more complete data on farms and producers, a mapping feature for locating farmstands and other

services, robust listing of area products and services, member and nonmember involvement for maintaining currency and expanding detail, and more. The site will continue to feature information about area farmers markets; a variety of recipes using fresh, local products; how-to guidance when it comes to canning and food preservation; Cook area agricultural statistics; meet local farmer Videoettes, and local foodie news. Another feature will be an events calendar for farm and agriculture related activities which farmers and farm groups may

wish to promote to the general public. As the premier organization serving farmers of Cook County, the Cook County Farm Bureau is excited to offer this service for farmers and the general public, as consumers continue to focus their “food buying dollars” on locally produced products and services. We hope that farmers and consumers alike find this meaningful programming linking local consumers in a way that helps to fulfill our goal for financial strength amongst our producers.

South Holland/Oak Forest Country Financial 4845 167th Street, Oak Forest, IL 60452 3/20

Vote for Your Favorite Food Checkout Day Photo of Year’s Past Farm Bureau members and guests are encouraged to vote for their favorite Food Checkout Day photos. For every vote we receive, Farm Bureau will donate $1 to Ronald McDonald House Charities® of Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana, up to $1,000 in honor of Food Checkout Day. Photos will be available on February 1 and voting will continue through March16. The winning photo will be announced on March 19. All voting will occur on the Farm Bureau’s Facebook page.

$500 Bonus For Illinois Farm Bureau Members Illinois Farm Bureau members get $500 Bonus Cash* toward the purchase or lease of any eligible 2013/2014/2015 Ford vehicle. Enjoy valuable savings on your choice of vehicles from a lineup of cars and trucks.

Take advantage of this exclusive special offer today! Visit www.fordspecialoffer.com/farmbureau/il

February 2014 Cooperator  

The official publication of the Cook County Farm Bureau

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