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2012 - 2013

1


Contents Content

Page

Introduction

3

Important Headlines

3

Assessment Year Plan

4

Data Point/Report Year Plan

6

Reports and data Point dates

7

Overview – Key Stage 3

8

Overview – Key Stage 4

9

Overview – Key Stage 5

10

The Assessment and Reporting Process

11

Progress Review Days

12

Parents’ Evenings

14

Reports

15

Assessment and Report Guidance

16

Part 1 – Entering Data and Completing Subject Teacher Reports

16

(Spelling and Punctuation Tips)

20

Part 2 – Completing Form Tutor Reports

22

Withdrawing Year 11 Students

24

Changing Entry Tiers

24

Estimated Grades

24

Information Parents/Carers receive (Key Stage 3 progress)

25

SISRA

26

Target Setting

27

Data Available in Teaching Group Registers

27

Baseline data

28

3 levels of Progress

29

Expected Progress – 3 and 4 Levels of Progress

30

Residuals

31

Data Point and Report Year Planner 2012 2013

32

2


Introduction Welcome to the 2012 2013 “Tracking Students’ Progress” booklet. It is designed to be the one place you need to go for information, dates, procedures etc. for anything related to assessment and data at Tupton Hall. Please feel free to offer suggestions to further improve either the booklet or any of the procedures or information mentioned in the book. I have listened to many comments over the last year and tried to incorporate as many changes as possible. As well as this copy, you can also find this booklet in the following places: • On the “homepage” of e-portal (in school only) • On the school website – in the “staffroom” drop down box – select “Resources”. • In the following location on the school network: • Staff\All Staff\Staff Handbook\Operational Handbook

Important Headlines 1. Teaching Groups in e-portal Please let Nick Melton know when staff change teaching groups or when new staff need allocating to different teaching groups.

2. Deadlines for data point and report data entries Deadlines need to be kept please. If you have specific circumstances that mean you may not be able to meet a deadline, you must request this from Nick Melton BEFORE the due date. Line Management meetings will involve sharing the details of staff who have not completed the entries by the deadlines. • Data Point and Report Dates are available in a separate format on the back of the booklet and in the whole school calendar. • Controlled Assessment details are in the separate Controlled Assessment Guide.

3. Student data All student data is available in SISRA and on the school network in: • Staff\All Staff\Student Data\2012 2013 3


Assessment Year Plan 2012 – 2013 (page 1) w/c

Monday

03/09/2012

INSET

10/09/2012

Y7 CATs Start

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

ALIS Testing

Y7 Reading Tests

Friday

Y7 CATs End Open Y7 DP1

17/09/2012 24/09/2012

Y7 DP1 close ST

01/10/2012

08/10/2012

INSET

Open DP1 (Y8,9,10,11,12)

Open Y13 Rep

Y11 PE Y7 DP1 ready for PE

15/10/2012

Y7 PE (form tutors)

22/10/2012 29/10/2012 05/11/2012

November Exams Start

12/11/2012

Y11 Mocks Start

Y8 PE DP1 close ST Y13 Rep Close ST

November Exams End

Y10 PE

19/11/2012

Open Y11 Rep

Y11 Mocks End

Y13 Rep close FT

26/11/2012

INSET

DP1 to parents 03/12/2012

Y12 PE Open Y9 Rep 10/12/2012

Y11 English Lit Mock Exam

Y11 English Lit Mock Y11 English Lit Mock Exam Exam

Y13 Rep Issued

Y11 Rep close ST

Y11 English Lit Mock Exam

Y11 English Lit Mock Exam Open DP2 (Y7,8,10,12,13)

17/12/2012

y11 Art coursework deadline

24/12/2012 31/12/2012

JAN exams start

GCSE ICT Exam

07/01/2013 14/01/2013

Y9 Rep close ST

21/01/2013

Year 10 English SPL moderation

28/01/2013

Y9 Rep close FT

Nov GCSE Results Y11 Rep close FT

Year 10 English SPL Year 10 English SPL moderation moderation

Year 10 English SPL moderation

DP2 close ST

Year 10 English SPL moderation Y11 Rep Issued JAN Exams End

04/02/2013

Y9 Rep Issued

DP2 ready for PRD PRD

11/02/2013

PRD

GCSE D and T/Y10 Art coursework deadline

18/02/2013

Open Y12 Rep

A Level Music Mock Exam day

25/02/2013

March Exams Start 04/03/2013

AS Art Coursework deadline

11/03/2013

A2 Art coursework deadline

GCSE Art Coursework moderation

GCSE Art Coursework moderation

AS/A2/GCSE Results Open DP3 (Y7,9,10,11,13) Open Y8 Rep

March Exams End

4


Assessment Year Plan 2012 – 2013 (page 2) GCSE Music Exam Y13 PE

GCSE Music Exam GCSE Art Exam 25/03/2013

Y13 Product Design/Y12 and 13 HSS coursework deadline

AS/A2 PE Moderation

Y12 Rep close ST 18/03/2013

GCSE Art Exam

GCSE and A Level Music Deadline

GCSE Art Exam Bank Holiday

GCSE Art Exam ICT OCR Deadline

01/04/2013 08/04/2013

Y12 Rep close FT 15/04/2013

AS/A2 ICT Final deadline

Y11 English Lit mock exam

GCSE Art Moderation GCSE Art Moderation GCSE Mus Moderation ALIS SEF surveys

ALIS SEF surveys

Y11 English Lit mock Y11 English Lit mock exam exam

ALIS SEF surveys

A Level Mus Mod

Y11 English Lit mock exam

Y11 English Lit mock exam

Y9 PE

Y8 Rep close ST 22/04/2013

DP3 close ST

ALANs start

GCSE PE Moderation GCSE PE Moderation GCSE PE Moderation Open Y10 Rep

29/04/2013

Open Y7 Rep

Y12 Rep Issued

DP3 to Parents

AS Art Moderation AS Art Exam

AS Art Exam

ALANs finish

Y8 Rep close FT 06/05/2013

Bank Holiday

A2 Art Exam

Y9 CATS start

A2 Art Exam

Y9 CATS finish

A2 Art Exam A2 Art Moderation A2 Art CW Moderation

13/05/2013

Summer Exams Start Y8 Rep Issued

20/05/2013

Y7 Rep close ST

AS ICT Exam

27/05/2013

Open DP4 (Y8,9) Y10 Rep close ST

03/06/2013

y10 GCSE ICT Exam Y7 Rep close FT 10/06/2013

y11 GCSE ICT Exam 17/06/2013

Y10 Rep close FT 24/06/2013

Y10 English Lit Mock Exam

Y7 Rep Issued

Y10 English Lit Mock Y10 English Lit Mock Exam Exam

DP4 close ST

Summer Exams End

Y10 English Lit Mock Exam

Y10 English Lit Mock Exam

01/07/2013

Y10 Rep Issued

08/07/2013

DP4 to Parents

15/07/2013 22/07/2013

INSET d/a

Key

INSET d/a

Data Point 1

Data Point 2

Data Point 3

Data Point 4

Year 13 reports

Year 9 reports

Year 8 reports

Year 7 reports

Year 11 reports

Year 12 reports

Year 10 reports

Exams etc DP:Data Point

Parents' Evenings

FT: Form tutor

INSET

Rep: Report

Holidays

ST: Subject Teacher

5


Data Point and Report Year Plan 2012 – 2013 w/c

Monday

03/09/2012

INSET

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10/09/2012 17/09/2012

Open Y7 DP1

24/09/2012 01/10/2012 08/10/2012

Y7 DP1 close ST INSET

15/10/2012

Open DP1 (Y8,9,10,11,12)

Open Y13 Rep

Y7 DP1 ready for PE

22/10/2012 29/10/2012 05/11/2012 12/11/2012

DP1 close ST

Y13 Rep Close ST

19/11/2012

Open Y11 Rep

26/11/2012 03/12/2012 10/12/2012

Y13 Rep close FT

INSET

Y13 Rep Issued

Y11 Rep close ST Open DP2 (Y7,8,10,12,13)

DP1 to parents Open Y9 Rep

17/12/2012 24/12/2012 31/12/2012 07/01/2013 14/01/2013

Y9 Rep close ST

Y11 Rep close FT

21/01/2013

DP2 close ST

28/01/2013

Y9 Rep close FT

Y11 Rep Issued

04/02/2013

Y9 Rep Issued

DP2 ready for PRD PRD

11/02/2013

PRD

18/02/2013 25/02/2013

Open Y12 Rep

04/03/2013 11/03/2013 18/03/2013

Open Y8 Rep

Open DP3 (Y7,9,10,11,13)

Y12 Rep close ST Bank Holiday

25/03/2013 01/04/2013 08/04/2013 15/04/2013

Y12 Rep close FT

22/04/2013

DP3 close ST Y8 Rep close ST

29/04/2013

Y12 Rep Issued

Open Y10 Rep

06/05/2013

Bank Holiday

Y8 Rep close FT

Open Y7 Rep

DP3 to Parents

13/05/2013 20/05/2013

Y8 Rep Issued

Y7 Rep close ST

27/05/2013 03/06/2013

Y10 Rep close ST

Open DP4 (Y8,9)

10/06/2013

Y7 Rep close FT

17/06/2013 24/06/2013

Y10 Rep close FT

Y7 Rep Issued

DP4 close ST

01/07/2013 08/07/2013

Y10 Rep Issued

DP4 to Parents

15/07/2013 22/07/2013

INSET d/a

INSET d/a

Key

Data Point 1

Data Point 2

Data Point 3

Data Point 4

DP:Data Point

Year 13 reports

Year 9 reports

Year 8 reports

Year 7 reports

Year 11 reports

Year 12 reports

Year 10 reports

FT: Form tutor

INSET

Rep: Report

Holidays

ST: Subject Teacher

6


Reports 2012-2013 Year

Internal Exams

Template Completed by Opens Subject Teacher

Completed by Form Tutor

Issued

7

Wed 1.5.13

Wed 22.5.13

Wed 12.6.13

Wed 26.6.13

8

Tue 12.3.13

Tue 23.4.13

Tue 7.5.13

Tue 21.5.13

9

Mon 10.12.12

Mon 14.1.13

Mon 28.1.13

Mon 4.2.13

10

Tue 30.4.13

Tue 4.6.13

Tue 25.6.13

Tue 9.7.13

Fri 23.11.12

Fri 14.12.12

Fri 18.1.13

Fri 1.2.13

12

Mon 25.2.13

Mon 18.3.13

Mon 15.4.13

Mon 29.4.13

13

Thu 11.10.12

Thu 15.11.12

Thu 29.11.12

Thu 13.12.12

11

Mon 12.11.12 to Mon 19.11.12

Data Points 2012-2013 Data Point

Year Groups

Template Opens

Completed by Subject Teacher

Issued to Parents

DP1

7

Tue 18.9.12

Tue 2.10.12

Tue 16.10.12

DP1

8 9 10 11 12

Tue 9.10.12

Tue 13.11.12

Tue 4.12.12

DP2

7 8 10 12 13

Fri 21.12.12

Fri 25.1.13

Thurs/Fri 14/15.2.13

DP3

7 9 10 11 13

Fri 15.3.13

Fri 19.4.13

Fri 3.5.13

DP4

89

Thu 6.6.13

Fri 27.6.13

Fri 11.7.13

7


Key Stage 3 Overview A: Attitude to Learning Grade

F: Forecast National Curriculum Sublevel

N: Current National Curriculum Sublevel

C: Comment

B: Main Barrier to Learning Thursday Monday Thursday Tuesday

Year 7

Wednesday Friday

06.9.12 Reading tests 10.09.12 CATs Start 13.09.12 CATs End 02.10.12 Final Date for Data Point 1, for Parents’ Evening (Attitude and Main Barrier to Learning Grades) 17.10.12 Parents and Form Tutors 08.02.13 Final Date for Data Point 2, for progress review days

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

19.04.13 Final Date for Data Point 3

Wednesday Tuesday Wednesday

Year 8

Friday

26.06.13 Reports Issued (Data Point 4) 13.11.12 Final Date for Data Point 1

ANFB

ANFB CANFB ANFB

07.11.12 Parents and Subject Teachers 08.02.13 Final Date for Data Point 2, for progress review days

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

21.05.13 Reports Issued (Data Point 3)

Thursday

AB

ANFB

CANFB

27.06.13 Data Point 4 closes

ANFB

Tuesday

13.11.12 Final Date for Data Point 1

ANFB

Monday

21.01.13 Guided Choices Evening

Monday

04.02.13 Reports Issued in Time for Progress Review Days (Data Point 2)

Year 9

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

19.04.13 Final Date for Data Point 3

Wednesday Tuesday

CANFB

ANFB

24.04.13 Parents and Subject Staff 07.05.13 CATs Start

Friday

10.05.13 CATs End

Friday

27.06.13 Data Point 4 and Final Date for End of KS 3 Assessments

8

ANFB


Key Stage 4 Overview A: Attitude to Learning Grade

F: Forecast GCSE Grade

G: Current GCSE Grade

C: Comment

B: Main Barrier to Learning Tuesday

13.11.12 Final Date for Data Point 1

Tuesday

13.11.12 Parents and Subject Staff

Year 10

Friday

08.02.13 Final Date for Data Point 2, for progress review days

AB

AGFB

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

19.04.13 Final Date for Data Point 3

AGFB

Tuesday

09.07.13 Reports Issued (Data Point 4)

CAGFB

Tuesday

09.10.12 Parents and Subject Staff

Monday

12.11.12 Mock Exams Start

Tuesday

13.11.12 Final Date for Data Point 1

Monday

19.11.12 Mock Exams End

Year 11

Thursday Friday

29.11.12 Post 16 Convention 27.01.13 Reports Issued (Data Point 2)

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

19.04.13 Final Date for Data Point 3

Monday Friday

AGFB

22.04.13 ALAN testing starts 03.05.13 ALAN testing finishes

9

CAGFB

AG FB


Key Stage 5 Overview A: Attitude to Learning Grade

P: ‘A’ Level Predicted Grade

AL: Current ‘A’ Level Grade

F: Forecast AS/A2 Grade

B: Main Barrier to Learning

C: Comment

Tuesday

13.11.12 Final Date for Data Point 1

Tuesday

04.12.12 Parents and Subject Staff

Year 12

Friday

08.02.13 Final Date for Data Point 2, for progress review days

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Monday

Throughout

29.04.13 Reports Issued (Data Point 3)

28.09.12 University predicted grade for all Oxbridge and Medicine applications

Friday

12.10.12 University Predicted grade for UCAS

Year 13

Friday

CA B AL F

P

13.12.12 Reports Issued (Data Point 1)

CPA AL BF

08.02.13 Final Date for Data Point 2, for progress review days

A ALB F

Thursday

14.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

15.02.13 Progress Review Day

Friday

19.04.13 Final Date for Data Point 3

Wednesday

A B AL F

09.12 AS results downloaded into system

Friday

Thursday

AB

20.03.13 Parents and Subject Staff

10

A AL B F


The Assessment and Reporting Process 1. Targets for each student for the ends of Key Stages 3 and 4 are set at the start of each key stage from FFT Live and 3 levels of progress data. Targets for the end of each year are calculated automatically from this. In Key Stage 4 the Year 10 target will be the same as the Year 11 target, except in maths, where there is a progression from Year 10 to Year 11 to match the modular tests. ALIS data is used for post 16 targets. From this year, they will be set using the more aspirational ALIS 25 data which is in line with the top 25% of schools.

2. All target data is downloaded or inputted centrally. 3. Target Setting should be considered by teachers. This is to enable specific individual students to access subjects or to set more Aspirational targets, and NOT for Performance Management reasons. Although targets are centrally set, there will be students who do not “match” the centrally generated data. Teachers should discuss students who may need higher or lower targets with their Faculty Leaders. This will be an item at Line Management meetings.

4. Additional data to be used to consider specific targets for students:     

Teacher assessment data Previous year or Key Stage data, including Key Stage 2 CAT data Student specific circumstances Students have already MET end of year targets

5. Each assessment window is approximately 3 weeks in length. During these windows, teaching staff input students’ current sublevels/grades (determined by agreed common criteria within each subject), forecast levels or grades, attitudes to learning grades, and barrier to learning codes into empty data boxes with drop down menus. Previous data is available on screen. Six hours of directed time is allocated for this.

6. Assessment data is processed, traffic lit, and made available to all staff and to parents. This is done in the following ways:    

On e-portal for staff and parents to see online (assessment templates and document storage). On paper “summary sheets” for parents – posted home. In spreadsheet format – faculty and pastoral. These are located in the following location: Staff\All Staff\Student data\2012 2013. In SISRA.

7. Text Messages will be sent to Parents when the data is ready to be sent out – data point summary sheets and formal reports.

8. After EVERY data point, Line Management meetings take place. The key discussion is progress, and SISRA (and other data) will be used to fully investigate this. Students in the following categories will be identified:  Students forecast to be behind targets  Students who are making poor progress compared to other subjects  Students who are making poor progress in several subjects  Students who are not making the expected progress (2 sub-levels per year)  Students with poor attitudes to learning or other issues

11


9. Intervention strategies will be discussed in Line Management meetings throughout the year. After each data point Curriculum and Pastoral Managers should identify target groups of students and discuss with their Line Manager the appropriate intervention strategies that will be implemented for them. Students’ targets should be discussed and any alterations taken to the Line Management meetings. Teaching staff are informed of intervention for identified students, using form tutor target cards, bulletin notices, additions to the RAP, or via middle leaders. Intervention should now be entered in a range of sub-categories in e-

portal.(Further information will be given on this)

10. Records of intervention offered and completed should be kept as they will be taken in to account by Line Managers when considering the non-entry of students for public exams. Other information which may eventually lead to a request for student examination non-entry should also be noted in Line Management meetings AND recorded on e-portal, as evidence. Students/Parents identified after EACH Data Point as in any danger of a request for non-entry should:  Receive a phone call and/or letter explaining the concerns and the intervention (or other proposed solutions) planned.  Have a discussion with a member of staff explaining the problems and potential solution(s) or intervention planned.  Have names and planned intervention shared with Faculty and Pastoral leaders.

11. There are significant changes within the A level system which only allow for students to be removed from exam entries at certain points within the school year. Please see Charlotte Evans for more details.

12


Progress Review Days Details of each student’s target and assessment data for the year so far, plus information about interventions and rewards, is available for discussion between form tutors and parents.

Background information: •

Students’ PROGRESS is to be discussed in comparison to TARGETS.

Data Point 2 data (and Y11/Y9 reports) to be shared – students, staff, parents.

Online reporting information shared.

Key action point(s) recorded where necessary.

All students invited to attend 15 minute interview with FT or another member of staff.

Part time staff – come in on usual days only.

Pastoral leaders to have an overview of their year teams and how to allocate staff fairly and effectively, and allocate rooms – usually form rooms.

Appointment sheets are emailed to all staff. These should be complete and sent to Reprographics.

Appointments made with students over the 2 days. (At convenience of parents)

The sessions on the appointment sheet are for guidance – earlier and later sessions MAY be arranged.

4 sessions per day – staff generally to do 6 sessions including 1 evening session (4.30 to 6.30pm) – breaks should be scheduled – 4 hours MAX per session. Staff may leave after 2pm on Friday.

Year 9 tutors have a member of LT following up each appointment for options guidance – communicate over appointment sheets.

Enhanced Learning, other agencies and online reporting advice available on the days.

Food available both days including evenings.

Letters are sent home describing the process.

The Year meetings near to the days should be used to plan the days.

Staff should use PCs or laptops – see helpdesk if you need to arrange an alternative PC.

Students need to be in uniform and must attend.

Students should bring their planners.

All data will be available on the day on data point sheets, Y9/11 reports, e-portal or the student data folder. (Staff\All Staff\Student data) (DP and TRICS)

Online reporting guidance and further information will be provided for staff.

Work to be set via Faculty Leaders – e-learning (SAM/My Maths)?

13


On the Progress Review days: •

Information sheets, Data Point and reports available for all staff.

E-portal information shared.

Parental online reporting – reminder for parents.

Advertise Online reporting and e-safety “helpdesk” in the main school foyer and/or other agencies/enhanced learning.

Progress, attendance, TRICS and behaviour data discussed.

Data Point 2 and target information entered into student planners.

Staff to make note of questions for Faculty Staff – passed on by email or trays.

Any specific action points noted in planners.

Non-attendees chased up – FT, HOY, other staff. Attendance recorded by staff and forwarded to Pastoral leaders. (student with or without parents)

Year 9 students and parents directed to LT member of staff.

Parents’ Evenings Traditional, subject-based Parents’ Evenings are held during the year. The dates for these are on the assessment calendar and the whole school calendar. Appointments are made by students with subject teachers in the days leading up to the evenings. Staff will be able to get a meal before the meetings and refreshments are available throughout the evenings. Interview slots are short, so it is worth planning what you want to cover on each student. General guidance on the content of the discussions:

• • • • •

Progress in the subject Effort in class Homework/Organisation Strategies to further improve Behaviour and attitude

Specific behaviour issues involving other students and more detailed discussions with parents should not be done on Parents’ Evenings. These should be dealt with on an individual basis.

14


Reports •

One data point for each year group is a written report.

The report is generated using assessment templates in e-portal like the data point entries.

Report comments include targets for improvement.

The student’s full, official name (as held in the system), MUST be used the first time it is mentioned. Subsequent mentions of the name may be the name the student likes to be called.

Checking is done by form tutors, with curriculum managers doing spot checks.

Corrections are done by subject teachers.

At each report point, Nick Melton will liaise with the relevant Pastoral Leader(s) to decide on a timescale for corrections. This will be published to all staff.

Reports are also Quality Assured by Nick Melton with the help of various members of staff. A Guide book on report writing is available separately and included hints and tips and some exemplar report comments.

Reports should be thoroughly checked including being spell checked.

Staff Training on “Report Writing” will be offered to new staff and to staff who write inadequate reports.

Refined comment banks may be included with 1 or more year groups. Further information will follow.

Report dates 2012 - 2013 Year

Internal Exams

Template Completed by Opens Subject Teacher

Completed by Form Tutor

Issued

7

Wed 1.5.13

Wed 22.5.13

Wed 12.6.13

Wed 26.6.13

8

Tue 12.3.13

Tue 23.4.13

Tue 7.5.13

Tue 21.5.13

9

Mon 10.12.12

Mon 14.1.13

Mon 28.1.13

Mon 4.2.13

10

Tue 30.4.13

Tue 4.6.13

Tue 25.6.13

Tue 9.7.13

Fri 23.11.12

Fri 14.12.12

Fri 18.1.13

Fri 1.2.13

12

Mon 25.2.13

Mon 18.3.13

Mon 15.4.13

Mon 29.4.13

13

Thu 11.10.12

Thu 15.11.12

Thu 29.11.12

Thu 13.12.12

11

Mon 12.11.12 to Mon 19.11.12

15


Assessment and Report Guidance for Staff Part 1: Entering Assessment data and completing Subject Teacher Reports At the bottom of your e-portal home page, under assessment entry, click on the assessment or report that you need. This must involve the same year group as the teaching group for which you are entering data. • • • •

This will take you to the “choose a teaching group” page, which lists your teaching groups. Click in the circle next to the group that you are entering data for. Click on Enter results. The teaching group that you have selected appears, ready for you to enter data.

Previous data will be visible. This is read-only and is there to give background information about students. The spaces for entering new data are next to this information. It is VITAL that ALL students have data entered in the templates of the YEAR that they are in, and at the SAME TIME as the rest of that year. For instance, Year 14 students doing a Year 13 course will need to have data entered through the Year 14 template. Also, there will be occasions when a Year 13 student is doing one or more AS courses, please remember to enter the Data point information and the report in the Year 13 templates. The system should make it impossible to enter students data in the wrong template – if a student section appears “blacked-out”, then you are trying to do just this.

Attitude to Learning We expect all students to behave in a manner which encourages and motivates everyone to learn effectively. Every student is graded on their attitude to learning in each subject. Click in the attitude to learning column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the attitude to learning grade, using the following criteria. 1. Outstanding – Mature, thoughtful behaviour. Very supportive of others. Takes responsibility for their own learning and goes well beyond the minimum contribution expected in lessons and homework. 2. Good – Sensible behaviour. Responsible and responds to routine expectations. Rarely needs guidance on how to conduct themselves. Homework is usually of a high standard. 3. Satisfactory – Acceptable behaviour. Does not interfere with the learning of others and doesn’t waste time. Able to work on their own or in small groups effectively. Homework usually of a satisfactory standard. 4. Inadequate – Frequently affects progress or well-being in lessons, through persistent lowlevel disruption or deliberate disobedience, or does not complete a satisfactory amount of work in the lesson. Homework rarely done/Revision techniques are poor.

16


Achievement 1. National Curriculum (NC) Level (Key Stage 3) Click in the achievement column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the student’s current national curriculum sublevel. This is the current National Curriculum Level, plus a letter, where a represents a high achievement at that level b represents working securely at that level. c represents working at the lower end of the level. Use criteria agreed in your subject area to determine each sub level.

2. Key Stage 4 Grade Click in the achievement column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the student’s current achievement grade. In Key Stage 4, this is a GCSE grade (A*-G, U), or Entry Level Grade (3-1), based on assessment information using criteria agreed in your subject area.

3. Forecast Grade Click in the forecast column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the student’s forecast grade. In Key Stage 3, this is the NC level that, using your professional judgement, plus agreed criteria in your subject area, you predict the student will obtain by the end of their current year. In Key Stage 4, this is a GCSE, or equivalent, grade (A*-G, U), or Entry Level Grade (3-1). For vocational/applied courses, D*, Dn, M, P, W should be used. (Distinction*, Distinction, Merit, Pass, “Working towards”). It is the grade that, using your professional judgement, plus agreed criteria in your subject area, you predict the student will obtain in their final GCSE or Entry Level examination. In Key Stage 5, this is an AS/A2 or equivalent, grade (A*-E, U). It is the grade that, using your professional judgement, plus agreed criteria in your subject area, you predict the student will obtain in their final AS/A2 examination.

4. Current Grade (Post 16) Click in the achievement column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the student’s current achievement grade. This is the grade (A*-E, U) at which the student is currently working using criteria agreed in your subject area. If the student has results from an external examination, this should be used as one of the criteria.

17


5.

UCAS Predicted Grade (Year 13) Subject teachers must provide the predicted grades for the students in their class – predicted grades will be used for their UCAS application and form no basis for performance management or value added data. If staff share a group, the teachers must discuss the grade and input one grade only. Please do not use split grades. These grades should be based on a combination of their AS performance, base-line predictors, and of course, your professional judgement. If a student intends to re-sit an exam please, take this into account. If you feel the students’ expectations are wholly unrealistic, please speak to the student and feel free to contact Head of Sixth Form Charlotte Evans directly. There are a number of students who require certain grades before their chosen university will even consider them, please consult with the students about their entry profile. Students applying for Oxbridge, Medicine and Dentistry will need to complete their forms and submit all data by 11 October. Please input predicted grades for these students by Friday 28th September. If there are any queries please contact Charlotte Evans, Head of Sixth Form.

Barrier to Learning Code If you have concerns about a student’s learning or progress, click in the barrier to learning column in the same row as the student’s name. Use the drop down box to select the barrier to learning code 1-6 for the main reason for your concern, using the following criteria: 1.

Poor attendance and/or punctuality in lessons.

2.

Poor behaviour

3.

Unsatisfactory personal study (homework)

4.

Unsatisfactory class work

5.

Poor organisation / lack of equipment

6.

Unsatisfactory / unfinished coursework

7.

Literacy

8.

Numeracy

Report Comment- (see Reports section on pg15 also) Note that the report is addressed to parents. Avoid comments such as ‘Well done’ which are addressed to students. The student’s full, official name (as held in the system), MUST be used the first time it is mentioned. Subsequent mentions of the name may be the name the student likes to be called. Click in the Comment column in the same row as the student’s name. This will open up the comment box in which the comment can be typed. This needs to reflect the current and potential achievement of the student, and any concerns that you have (particularly if you have given a 18


barrier to learning code). It also needs to give a target or targets for improvement. It is critical that your targets offer advice on how the student can move forward: e.g. to achieve level 6b, xxxx needs to ……. Please talk to or email Nick Melton if you have any doubts about this. In Year 9 reports, avoid identifying a student’s suitability or otherwise for Key Stage 4 courses. Similarly in Year 11 for Post 16 courses. However, Year 12 subject reports need to contain a reference to whether the student is capable of studying the subject at degree level. (This will be included in the comment bank structure). For non-attenders who appear on class lists, type a short comment stating that you are unable to make a comment. When you have typed the comment, please check it using the spellchecker, and by proof reading it. Ask a colleague to check your comments. Common mistakes include: •

Wrong names / spelling of names

Mismatch of he/she/his/her

Copying and pasting that has gone wrong

Glowing comments on students who do not attend

A Quality Assurance group is to ensure the quality of report writing. Exemplar reports will be generated and training and support offered to staff. Staff Training on “Report Writing” will be offered to new staff and to staff who write inadequate reports.

Submitting the Data Every few minutes and when you have come to the end of your data entering session, you must press submit to send the data. There are two submit buttons, one at the top of the page, and one at the bottom. You can use either button.

Correcting Mistakes At each report point, Nick Melton will liaise with the relevant Pastoral Leader(s) to decide on a timescale for corrections. This will be published to all staff. If you have made any mistakes, you will receive annotated printouts of your report from your curriculum manager. Complete the corrections electronically by the requested date, and return the printouts with the cover sheet to Tricia McGrogan in the office.

19


Spelling and Punctuation Tips An apostrophe is used to show that something belongs. e.g. Sophie’s homework (singular), but other students’ progress (plural). (Exceptions for the plurals are men’s and women’s.) The plural of an abbreviation does not have an apostrophe, e.g. GCSEs. An apostrophe is also used to join two words together e.g. don’t (do not); it’s (it is); you’re (you are); they’re (they are). • It’s is used when the meaning is it is but its is used as a possessive pronoun e.g. It’s pleasing that Sophie is now taking this subject and its homework seriously. • They’re is used when the meaning is they are, but their is used as a plural pronoun e.g. They’re working well together and their project should be completed on time. • When writing a target, phrases such as ‘To improve’ should be followed by a comma. e.g. To improve, Sophie needs to complete all homework on time. • e.g. To improve her homework, Sophie needs to… • Avoid using too many commas to create very long sentences. It is often better to use a full stop and start a new sentence. • Be careful with the use of however, especially in the middle of very long sentences. If it is used to start a sentence, use a comma afterwards e.g. However, Sophie needs to complete homework on time. • Avoid starting sentences with And, But, So and Because. • Avoid using too many exclamation marks. These are not usually included in a formal document. • Use a capital letter I when referring to yourself. • Use ‘try to’ not ‘try and’ e.g. Sophie must try to hand homework in on time, not Sophie must try and hand homework in on time. • Our is used to refer to a group we are part of (e.g. our group) but are is used for phrases like ‘we are pleased with Sophie because…’ • Practise is a verb but practice is a noun. e.g. Sophie needs to practise her skills but Sophie also needs to attend practice. It often helps to think about advise and advice e.g. Sophie needs to advise her teacher about her choice of topic but she also needs to accept the advice offered by her teachers. • Affect is used as a verb but effect is usually used as a noun e.g. Sophie’s behaviour has a negative effect on the rest of the group. Poor concentration affects Sophie’s ability to learn new skills. An exception to this rule would be Sophie has effected a change… • Be careful about singular and plural forms of verbs, e.g. Sophie’s lack of effort, attitude to other students and behaviour in lessons are affecting her progress, not is affecting. • Disinterested means impartial, NOT not interested. Use uninterested or shows no interest in… • The past tense of focus can be spelt in two ways: focused and focussed, as can focusing and focussing. • Targeting and targeted have one t but be careful with commitment and committed. • A lot is two words. • • • • •

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Further literacy/punctuation guidance for reports Effect and Affect Report examples:  Sam’s behaviour has affected her work this year.  Sam’s lack of concentration has begun to affect the standard of her work.  Sam’s lack of concentration has had a negative effect on the standard of her work.

ICE and ISE Endings Report examples:  To seek subject specific advice.  Hamza has been advised to revise thoroughly for all tests, yet sadly there is little evidence that this has taken place.  Hamza has been undertaking lots of exam practice in preparation for his GCSEs.  Hamza has been practising his spellings, which has led to a marked improvement in the quality of his work.  Target: To practise his … in his own time.

There, Their and They’re Report examples:  Whilst there are clearly many positives in Kyle’s attainment, there are many negatives with his behaviour.  There have been a number of problems this year regarding Kyle’s attention span.  Students are working on their coursework.  They’re constantly misbehaving.

Which or That Report examples:  Suman makes regular contributions to class which / that are interesting and thoughtprovoking.  Suman’s geographical knowledge has improved this year, which is as a result of her conscientious attitude towards her studies.

Commas – Where do they go? Report examples:  Sophie’s strengths lie in analysing, interpreting and evaluating texts.  Despite being a conscientious pupil, Sophie makes few contributions to class discussion.  Sophie has an excellent work ethic, but she makes few contributions to class discussion.  Sophie has made excellent progress this year on her understanding of texts. However, the quality of her writing is poor. 21


Assessment and Report Guidance for Staff Part 2: Completing Form Tutor Reports At the bottom right of your e-portal home page, under “Assessment Result Entry”

• •

• • •

Click on Year XXXX Full Report for Form Tutors and HOY. Type in the student’s name or number (contact Janet Sketchley in the Admin Office if you want a list of numbers). The number will take you straight to the student’s report. If you type in the name, you may then have to select the student from a list, before clicking on Enter results. Ignore dummy subjects such as XXX and target review. Scroll down to the Reg row. Do not put any data into the Attitude to Learning, Achievement, or Learning Barrier boxes. For years 7 to 11, click in the ‘to improve’ box. The heading ‘to improve’ will not appear in the printed report.

What should go in the form tutor comment? The form tutor should make reference to the following: •

Attendance and punctuality

Attitude and behaviour for learning

The number of positive/negative referrals

Contribution to tutor time and PSD/L4L activities

TRICS

Positions of responsibility held

Extra-curricular activities, including sporting activities

Personal qualities

Themes coming out of the subject reports

The form tutor comment should also show that the student’s performance is being monitored and should therefore offer constructive criticism and offer suggestions for improvement where underachievement has been identified.

What should not go in the form tutor comment? The form tutor should not: •

Address any comment to the student – the parent is the audience, for example avoid comments like “Well done”.

Make any personal or sarcastic comment.

Endorse or make any recommendation for further study of a subject at transition points e.g. Year 9 and Year 11.

22


Sixth Form Attendance (This should not take into account authorised holidays) Click in the attendance box, and use the drop down menu to select a code from A to E, using the following criteria A Excellent – Attends all designated registrations. B Very Good - The occasional absence C Good – The occasional unauthorised absence and lateness D Frequently absent or late E Rarely attends registration

Sixth Form Comment Click in the comment box. Please include the following information: • • • • • •

Information regarding how the student is coping with their workload. Demonstration of Independent Learning Commitment shown to the Sixth Form Community. Contribution to the wider school community through Sport/Drama/Council. Employment and Higher Education Planning Relationship with peers and staff

All Years: Checking Reports When you receive draft printouts please check the subject teacher comments of your tutor group’s reports. There are some common errors to look out for in subject reports that can be easily overlooked when reading through so many. Try to look out for: •

Wrong names / spelling of names

Mismatch of he/she/his/her

Copying and pasting that has gone wrong

Glowing comments on students who do not attend!

Highlight any mistakes, write in a correct alternative, and highlight any missing comments or grades. If there appear to be any major mistakes, annotate them for the attention of Nick Melton. When you have checked the reports, please return them to Tricia McGrogan in the office by the requested date.

23


Withdrawing Year 11 Students from GCSE Examinations or other courses When considering whether to withdraw a student from a GCSE examination, please adopt the following procedure. •

If the student is taking a GCSE course, they should be entered for the examination unless there is a good reason for them not completing the necessary amount of work. Normally the only reason is very poor attendance, although there may be a co-ordinated reduction of entries for some students, to reduce their examination load.

Subject teachers, heads of department and /or curriculum managers should take reasonable steps to ensure that students are eligible for entry e.g. kept them in to catch up on missing coursework, followed up any subject-specific truancy from the lesson. In all cases, please make sure that you have contacted home to discuss problems.

Line Management meetings after data points should be used to discuss students in danger of being withdrawn and to discuss the strategies taken with students/parents to date.

Discuss any exam entry withdrawals, for all subjects taught in your faculty, with your line manager. Their approval will be needed.

Details of withdrawals requests will be requested by Nick Melton.

Changing Entry Tiers • • • •

January results are available in March. These will hopefully be minimal and will be charged to faculty budgets. Please do changes as quickly as possible after this date as it leaves a very tight turn-around period. The deadline for changes will be advertised.

Estimated grades for exams Exam entry data will be taken automatically from Data Points 1 and 3. Please contact Nick Melton or Debbie Stanley if there are any problems with this.

24


Targets and Students’ Progress: Sharing with Parents and Carers A summary booklet is available on the school website for Parents. It is also sent out at the same time as the data point 1 sheets are sent out. It explains target setting, measuring and tracking progress and assessment and data information and timelines.

Key Stage 3 Progress The traffic lit information is more controversial at Key Stage 3 and is worth considering. We have for the last year allowed the “tolerances” at each data point to be staggered to try to allow for progress over the year. Key Stages 4 and 5 are NOT affected by this. Parents are given this information in the booklet and it is something that is very often discussed at Parents’ Evenings and/or Progress Review Days.

Year 7 and 8:    

Data Data Data Data

Point Point Point Point

1 : 1 full level below target 2 : 2 sub-levels below target 3 : 1 sub-level below target 4 : below target

Point Point Point Point

1 : 2 sub levels below target 2 : 1 sub-levels below target 3 : below target 4 : below target

Year 9:    

Data Data Data Data

25


SISRA Understanding and using data to further improve students’ progress. SISRA is available to all staff. It can be located as a link on the school homepage under the “Staffroom” drop down menu. To use SISRA’s own words: “SISRA Online is about making a difference by providing the insight and understanding to support informed decisions and enable effective action in raising attainment. SISRA has been developed specifically to assist all teaching and administrative staff with their analysis of exams, mocks and assessments, all against target, as well as residuals at whole school, subject, class and student level. The interactive reports have enhanced the speed at which schools can carry out analysis of performance across KS3, KS4 & KS5 by giving staff ownership of student data allowing for accurate assessment and appropriate timely intervention. The interactive reports have enhanced the speed at which schools can carry out analysis of exams, assessments and mocks. Detailed analysis of performance by Subject, Class, Gender, Ethnic Group, SEN Code, Key Stage 2 (KS2) Levels, Gifted/Talented, Free School Meals and Children in Care can quickly identify areas for improvement and facilitate the development of effective intervention strategies.” It is an excellent package – one we all need to be able to use to analyse exam results and data points for our classes, year groups, tutor groups, teaching groups and other “groups” to decide on any intervention to improve progress. A variety of staff training is provided and there are a series of useful guides on the SISRA homepage. These are available from Nick Melton as printed copies by request.

SISRA will be populated after EVERY data point and should be the start of the analysis process for all staff.

SISRA will be used at every Line Management meeting to discuss progress at Faculty and Year level.

SISRA is also used in discussions with the LA and OfSTED.

Please ask Nick Melton or Ronnie Pemberton if you have ANY questions about SISRA.

26


Target Setting • •

FFT D data and baseline data (based on 3 or 4 Levels of Progress) is used to centrally set “targets” for all students from Years 7 to 11. ALIS 25 (top 25% of schools) data is used similarly to set Post 16 students’ “targets”.

FFT data effectively provides estimates based on prior attainment of similar students and, in the case of FFT D, is toward Aspirational as it is data compared with the top 25% of schools nationally, taking into account certain contextualised information such as gender, FSM, birth date etc. The majority of students will need to retain this central target data as we cannot continue to succeed as a school if we don’t achieve in line with this. However, individual students do not always “fit” with estimates and these students may be able to have amended targets. Please talk to your Head of Faculty about any potential changes you may want to make. Line management meetings with Heads of Faculties will be used to discuss any students in this category. Targets may be amended upward or downward and may be for a variety of reasons: • • • • •

Not aspirational enough Physical issues Setting issues Health issues FFT D and/or 3 or 4 levels of progress data conflict with other data

Other data to be consider: • • • •

CAT scores at Y7 and Y9 TA levels Attendance FFT D “chance data” – this is viewed in every assessment template

Data available in Teaching Group Registers The FFT chance data mentioned above is available in assessment templates, along with each student’s actual target and assessment data over the key stage. This data gives the likelihood of each student achieving each grade – it can be useful for target setting and to inspire students to work beyond expectations. In every lesson registration screen in e-portal, there is a range of data available for all students in your teaching group. This data can be added to your group lists by clicking in the “add extra columns” button on the registration page: • • • • •

KS3 and KS4 FFT targets (In Year 10 Year 9 target will represent actual end of Y9) data) KS5 ALIS targets KS2 CAT data CAT data Literacy (and Numeracy) targets at KS3 27


Student data: Baseline Data Fischer Family Trust Data (FFT) This makes predictions of students’ performance at the end of Key Stage 3 and GCSE, based on their Key Stage 2 Test (SAT) results. SATs are designed to measure outcomes of specific learning and instruction. The progress of our students from the end of Key Stage 2 to the end of Key Stage 4 is compared to the progress made nationally by students, taking into account their gender, month of birth, free school dinners, deprivation, ethnicity, students with English as an additional language, SEN stage and student mobility. Schools are placed in rank order, based on the progress their students make, and given a number from 1 (top 1% of schools) to 100 (bottom 1% of schools). A school that is at number 10 is said to be at the 10th percentile FFT D data compares the progress our students make to that of schools at the 25th percentile.

Cognitive Abilities Tests (CATs) These are taken online by students at the start of Year 7 and again at the end of Year 9. The three tests are: Verbal: involving reasoning using the medium of words, and the ability to read and understand, i.e. predominantly literacy. Quantitative: reasoning based on patterns of numbers. Non-verbal: reasoning based on shapes and figures. This strand is least affected by teaching. Academically weak students may have a higher non-verbal score than in the other two areas. A difference of more than 20 between the non-verbal score and the others may indicate underlying difficulties such as dyslexia. In general, large differences between their three CATs scores may give significant information about a student. Verbal and quantitative CATs do not measure innate ability: scores are affected by teaching and parental support. A student has a 50% chance of achieving 5 A*-C passes at GCSE if their mean CATs score is: 97 in a school where students make good progress 99 in a school where students make average progress 102 in a school where students make poor progress

KS2 SATs (Standard Assessment Tests) SATS tests were originally given at the end of year 2, year 6 and year 9. (Maths, English, Science). They are used to show your child's progress compared with other children born in the same month. The mean (average) score for each age group on an assessment is set at 100 and the standard deviation at 15. For any age group a given numerical value has the same meaning in terms of standing relative to the group. For example, an eight year old and a nine year old, each of whom has a standard age score of 105, have performed equally well in relation to the average for their respective age groups. Since the tests became optional, students at the end of Key Stage 2 have not all taken tests and have often got only teacher assessment data.

28


Three Levels of Progress This is a raw measure of students who make 3 levels of progress from key Stage 2 to Key Stage 4.One of the key issues here is the lack of consistency and accuracy in the data we receive from Key Stage 2 – for instance we receive only FULL level data, not sub-levels so an assumption has to be made in year 7 that all students are in the “middle” of that level.

Relationship between National Curriculum levels and GCSE grades for determining whether 3 levels of progress are made

For example a student makes three levels of progress if they achieve level 4 at the end of Key Stage 2 and then go on to achieve a GCSE grade C.

Year 11 (2011) progress against Government “floor targets”

The 3 level of progress figures are (bizarrely) set by the National MEDIAN meaning by definition that half of all schools will be below this!! This is surely going to be re-considered but as it stands: Floor target 5 A* - C including English and Maths – 35%

2011 results 67%

3 levels of progress in or more in English – 72%

76%

3 levels of progress or more in Maths – 65%

63%

3 levels of progress or more in Science – n/a

55%

Our students tend to under achieve at key Stage 3 and then achieve in line with “expectations” at Key Stage 4.

29


Expected Progress – 3 and 4 levels of Progress The National Expectation is that at least 3 levels (9 sub-levels) of progress should be made by each student in each subject between the end of Key Stage 2 and the end of Key Stage 4. More able students should be making 4 levels of progress.

L5+ making 4LP Targets will be set based around this model. FFTD will be used in conjunction with this to set aspirational targets. 30


Subject and National residuals Subject residuals show how students’ results in one subject compare with their average attainment in other subjects. They provide an indication of relative strengths and weaknesses of subjects within the school. In RAISEonline these residuals are called the RPI – Relative Performance Index. National residuals usually take into account national differences in subject difficulty. Residual scores always add up to ZERO so are useful only for comparison.

Subject residuals – different approaches Two methods are used nationally: 1. The NCER (National Consortium for Examination Results) method calculates the average APS for a subject and compares this with the average APS obtained by the students in all subjects, including that subject. This is the method used by Derbyshire. 2. The OfSTED method – used in the PANDA and RAISEonline - calculates the average APS for a subject and compares this with the average APS obtained in all other subjects by the students taking that subject, excluding that subject. This is shown for comparison purposes. 3. The SISRA method is a combination of the 2 methods above. In-school residuals do not take into account national variations in the grades achieved by students in different subjects. For example, if the residual for Latin in a school is 3.0, students are achieving on average half a grade higher in Latin than in the average of their other subjects’ results. However, the national residual for Latin might be -3.0, meaning that students nationally achieve half a grade lower in Latin. Therefore, compared to national data, the school-national residual in Latin is actually 6.0: students are achieving one whole grade higher in Latin than they do nationally. This is the type of residual that we receive in school as part of our results analysis. In-school and national residual data will be distributed when it is available. SISRA has the ability to display both in-school and national residual data.

Points The points value of each GCSE grade is: A*

58

A

52

B

46

C

40

D

34

E

28

F

22

G

16

So, the difference between one grade and the next is 6 points. Non-GCSE qualifications have their own points equivalents, based on the same system. *RPI = relative Performance Indicator = the difference between school and national results (APS)

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Data Point and Report Year Plan 2012 – 2013 w/c

Monday

03/09/2012

INSET

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

10/09/2012 17/09/2012

Open Y7 DP1

24/09/2012 01/10/2012 08/10/2012

Y7 DP1 close ST INSET

15/10/2012

Open DP1 (Y8,9,10,11,12)

Open Y13 Rep

Y7 DP1 ready for PE

22/10/2012 29/10/2012 05/11/2012 12/11/2012

DP1 close ST

Y13 Rep Close ST

19/11/2012

Open Y11 Rep

26/11/2012 03/12/2012 10/12/2012

Y13 Rep close FT

INSET

Y13 Rep Issued

Y11 Rep close ST Open DP2 (Y7,8,10,12,13)

DP1 to parents Open Y9 Rep

17/12/2012 24/12/2012 31/12/2012 07/01/2013 14/01/2013

Y9 Rep close ST

Y11 Rep close FT

28/01/2013

Y9 Rep close FT

Y11 Rep Issued

04/02/2013

Y9 Rep Issued

DP2 ready for PRD

21/01/2013

DP2 close ST

PRD

11/02/2013

PRD

18/02/2013 25/02/2013

Open Y12 Rep

04/03/2013 11/03/2013 18/03/2013

Open Y8 Rep

Open DP3 (Y7,9,10,11,13)

Y12 Rep close ST Bank Holiday

25/03/2013 01/04/2013 08/04/2013 15/04/2013

Y12 Rep close FT

22/04/2013

DP3 close ST Y8 Rep close ST

29/04/2013

Y12 Rep Issued

Open Y10 Rep

06/05/2013

Bank Holiday

Y8 Rep close FT

Open Y7 Rep

DP3 to Parents

13/05/2013 20/05/2013

Y8 Rep Issued

Y7 Rep close ST

27/05/2013 03/06/2013

Y10 Rep close ST

10/06/2013

Open DP4 (Y8,9) Y7 Rep close FT

17/06/2013 24/06/2013

Y10 Rep close FT

Y7 Rep Issued

DP4 close ST

01/07/2013 08/07/2013

Y10 Rep Issued

DP4 to Parents

15/07/2013 22/07/2013

INSET d/a

Key

INSET d/a

Data Point 1 Year 13 reports

DP:Data Point FT: Form tutor

INSET

Rep: Report

Holidays

Data Point 2

Data Point 3

Data Point 4

Year 9 reports

Year 8 reports

Year 7 reports

Year 11 reports

Year 12 reports

Year 10 reports

ST: Subject Teacher

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Tracking Students Progress 2012 2013