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MELRO E PARK

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1882路-1907

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SOUVENIR

THE

VILLAGE

OF

MELROSE PARK,ILL.

T I

PU8USHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF THE MELROSE

PARK VillAGE

BOARD

BY THE

BELLMAN ASSOCIATION, CHICAGO, IlU OIS

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MEL

ROSE PARK 2

ELROSE DARK, lying adjacent to the village of Maywood, is one of the coming suburban towns of Chicago, located 11 miles directly west of the Court House. It has splendid transportation facilities for rapid and cheap transit to and from the city. The Chicago & Northwestern Railroad runs many daily suburban trains at very low fare, and it. also has a direct surface electric street car line with 5-cent fare, making close connections with the elevated lines. The village was incorporated September 11, 1882; has a popu lation of about 4,000, and for a town of its size has a larger proportion of paved streets than any other town in the country, the sum total being more than 10 miles in length. The streets are beautifully lined with an abundance of trees, which makes it an inviting place for residences. The residence portion is in a prohibition district. The town has a complete and adequate sewerage system, which keeps it dry and healthful and is supplied with gas and electricity at low cost. The water of Melrose Dark is supplied by a good system from a fine Artesian well, and the water by expert analysis is shown to be the best in the land. This and the public schools are two great considerations to people that are looking for permanent homes. It has a well organized public school system, modern buildings and equipment, a strong teaching force, and a managing board to efficiently sustain them. The people of Melrose Dark have all the religious advantages, there being many churches and a variety of religious denominations represented. It is also noted for its sociability, there being many social organizations. On the outer boundary lines of the town are located the immense Latrobe Steel & Coupler Works, employing a vast number of men; also the Featherstone Foundry Company, which is a wealth-producing institution to the village. Melrose Dark is noted for its progressiveness in public improvements. Among other things now in contemplation of erection in the near future is beautiful modern village hall. The town has also been fortunate in having a good governing body. They have not only secured excellent street and sewerage improvements, but have also provided and maintain a sufficient protecting fire and police force. As the boundary lines of the town cover a large area, there are yet remaining many choice locations for homes, and an invitation is extended to all good people who would like to enjoy the many advantages offered them, to make Melrose Dark their home.

MEL

ROSE PARK ~

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Interesting Points for the Prospective "orne Buyers Melrose Park is situated on the highest ground in Cook County, only 11 miles West of the Court House. . No other suburban town can offer home locations with anything like the facilities for convenience and comfort at such extremely low prices as can be found here. Five cent fare to State Street on Madison Street or Lake Street surface electric lines. The Chicago and Northwestern Railroad runs 30 suburban trains daily to and from the city and only a 25 minute ride. The Chicago and Oak Park Railroad Co., will soon be running local and express trains through the village. The right of way is now secured. More large buildings have been erected during the last few months than ever before. The Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Company have just opened their new yards on the vast tract of land purchased by them on the west line of the town boundary. They are building hundreds of tracks and will also build shops on their property. There are many Churches, representing nearly all denominations. The Public and Parochial Schools are the best. There are 10 miles of paved Streets. The best water in the State of Illinois. Water works cost $45.000. Electricity and gas at low cost. Perfect drainage and many miles of sewerage.

Officers of the Village of Melrose Park SINCE ITS ORGANIZATION IN AUGUST, 1882 1882-1883 President. H. W. Mason Clerk. Samuel E. M. Allen

1893-1894 President. Daniel C. Goien Clerk. William Leeseberl/

1883-1884 President. Asa Knapp Clerk. Samuel E. M. Allen

1894-1895 President, Lewis A. Nottmeyer Clerk. William Leeseberl/

1884-1885 President. William Chapman Clerk. C. H. Martin

1896-1897 President. William Thomas Clerk. William Leeseberl/

1885-1886 President. William Chapman Clerk. C. H. Martin 1886-1887 President. The Board could no al/ree on the selection of a President. Clerk. C. H. Martin 1887-1888 President. The Board chose a President pro tern. at each meetinl/. Clerk. H. C. Giles 1888-1889 President. William Chapman Clerk. H. C. Giles 1889-1890 President. Arthur Jones Clerk. H. C. Giles 1890-1891 President. William Thomas Clerk. H. C. Giles 1891-1892 President. William Thomas Clerk. H. C. Giles 1892-1893 President. Daniel C. Goien Clerk. William Leeseberl/

1897-1898 President. G. f. Gehrke Clerk. William Leeseberl/ 1898-1899 President. G. f. Gehrke Clerk. William Leeseberl/ 1900-1901 President. E. W. Benson Clerk. William Leeseberl/ 1901-1902 President. E. W. Benson Clerk. William Leeseberl/ 1902-1903 President. E. W. Benson Clerk. William Leeseberl/ 1903-1904 President. Julius frillmann Clerk. Wiliiam'Leeseberl/ 1904-1905 President. Julius frillmann _ Clerk. Chas. J. Wolf 1905-1906 President. Chas. J. Wolf Clerk. R. H. Kuhlmann 1906-1907 President. Chas. J. Wolf Clerk. R. H. Kuhlmann

MEL RO SE PARK 3


Board of Vi Ilage Trustees MEL ROSE PARK -

lJ,

1906 PETER BOHLANDER

THOMAS GOODMAN

WM G. KORRELL

JOHN G. CARSON

CHAS. J. WOLF:Presidenl

G. W. BUCHHOLZ

CHAS. O. BURKHOLM

I

I I \


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Public Lib rary Board MEL ROSE PARK 6

1906 G. C. PAYNTO • Director

~IISS.

E. S. SM ITH. Librarian

E. M. ATHERLEY. Director

W. C. SMITH. Director

DR. P. B. KIOi\KA. President

1907 C. W. WIDNEY. Director

•

G. W. BUCHOLTZ. Director

The Public Library of Melrose Park was instituted August 16th, 1897, with the following Officers Dr. P. B. Kionka, President. Directors: A. W. Benson, L. Nottmeyer, E. A. Loewe, Dr. W. F. Scott, A. B. Dunn. On January 15th, 1898 the Library was opened for the circulation of books, 22 books being issued on that date. Since the organization the number of books purchased by the board are as follows: 1898, 424 books; 1901, 51 books; 1902, 300 books; 1933, 168 books; 1904, 139 books; 1905, 187 books; 1906,290 books; making Cl total number for circulation of 1559 books. The circulation at this time is 3500 volumes yearly or an average of 33 for each evening the library is open. The citizens' of Melrose Park take great pride in this public institution and its elevating influence is felt in the community. The public have free access to wholesome and up-to-date books. The Board is made from among the best citizens of the village which is a guarantee of its permanency and up-building. The Library is open at the village hall Wednesday and Saturday evenings of each week.


VILLAGE,

u.

S. AND TOWNSHIP OFFICIALS

MEL

ROSE PARK 5

R H. KUHLMANN, Village Clerk

PETER E. WOLF, Village Treasurer

ALEX FLDI 11 G, Sup!. Water Works

T E. BURGOYNE. Postmaster

L. W. RICHTER, Township Superviser

R. F. FOSTER. -Secretary School Board

H. C. GILES, Village Collector

S. S. ENDS LOW, Member School Board

CHAS. S. FIELD, Justice of the Peace

HENRY DINSE. Highway Commissioner


POLICE DEPARTMENT

MEL ROSE PARK 7

POLICE LEFT TO RIGHT Henry Decker

James Lavin Geo. Matters

Julius Karus Peter Roggenbuck C. W. Evans, Marshal Christ Neumann Aug. Schuette Tony Prabisch

Henry Pein

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT

G. W. Buchholz Wm, G. Korrell Frank Steinke Fred Werobke James Lavin C. H. Fritche, Capl. Herman Jedike. Chief A. Schuette. Lieut. Geo. Kopp, Sec'y Herman Puttkammer L. W. Richter. Treas.


MEL

ROSE PARK B

CHICAGO & NORTHWESTER

DEPOT

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LAKE STREET, ENTERING FROM THE WEST


MIE L ROSE PARK 9

NINETEENTH AVE.• LOOKING NORTH FROM FIRST ST.


MEL ROSE PARK 10

NINETEENTH AVE., LOOKING SOUTH FROM LAKE ST.

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FIRST ST.. LOOKING WEST FROM

INETEE TH AVE.


MEL ROSE PARK 11

EIGHTEEI TH AVE.. LOOKI:'\G ;-('ORTH FROM FIRST ST

SEVENTEENTH AVE., LOOKI G NORTH FROM FIRST ST.


MEL ROSE PARK 12

SIXTEENTH AVE., LOOKING NORTH FROM FIRST ST

.

SIXTEENTH AVE.. LOOKING NORTH FROM LAKE ST


MEL RO SE PARK 13

FIFTEENTH A E., LOOKI:->G :->ORTH FROM FIRST ST

SIXTH ST., LOOKING EAST FROM TWELFTH AVE


MEL ROSE

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PARK 14

LAKE ST.. LOOKING EAST FROM THIRTEENTH AVE.

LAKE ST. LONKING EAST FROM FIFTEENTH AVE.


MEL ROSE PARK. 15

LAKE ST. LOOKING EAST FROM NINETEENTH AVE

TWENTIETH AVE., LOOKING NORTH FROM FIRST ST.


MEL

ROSE PARK 16

TWENTY-FIRST AVE., LOOKING NORTH FROM LAKE ST.

. ,.

TWENTY-FIRST AVE., LOOKING SOUTH FROM LAKE ST.


MEL

ROSE PARK 17

TWENTY-SEeO, DAVE.. LOOKI 'G SORTH FROM LAKE ST.

TWENTY-THIRD AVE., LOOKIMG SOUTH FROM LAKE ST.


'M:'IE L ROSE PARK 18

TWENTY-THIRD AVE., LOOKING NORTH fRO 1 fiRST ST

TWE TY-fOURTH AVE.. LOOKI G

ORTH fROM LAKE ST


MEL ROSE PARK 19

VILLAGE H,.\LL Corner Lake 51. and Eighteenth Ave

WATER WORKS Water Tower 110 feet high, Well 1800 feet deep, Water drawn by air compressor


M E

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ROSE PARK 20

BUILDING AND STORE OF PETER BOHLANDER Nineteenth Ave and First SI.

BUILDING OF DR. GERRIT LIGHT HART 136-138 Nineteenth Ave.


MEL ROSE PARK 21

PUBLIC SCHOOLS

GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH AND SCHOOL REV. E. ZAPH. Pastor Services 10 A. M. Sunday Sundav School 2:39 P. M


SACRED HEART PARISH MEL ROSE PARK 22

From a small beginning in the year 1891, the Sacred Heart Parish has steadily grown, until to-day it is one of the most numerous and most substantial religious communities of this vicinity. In 1891 a building 24 x 50 feet was erected on a single lot 26x 125, which amply met the religious demand of the catholics of this territory. To-day the Parish owns a square consisting of 20 lots. a large two-story brick building containing a temporary church with a seating capacity of 325 persons, and four school rooms prepared to accommodate 250 pupils; a fine rectory and a convent for the venerable school sisters, known as the Poor Hand Maids of Jesus Christ. The social and fraternal life of the Parish finds its center in six societies, affiliated to the Parish: 1. SI. Aloysius Society, fo~ boys under 18 years of age.. L. Winkler, president; F. Caralun, vice president, J. Roggenbuck, r ecording secretary; " C. Reed, financial secretary; Rev. F. Burelbach, treasurer. Rec~ives Holy Communion in a body every first Sunday of the month and meets at 3 p. m.

2. Cat hoi i c Order of Foresters, an insurance society for young men and men above 18 years of age. Meets every first and t h i r d Monday at 8 p. m., at Society Hall. W. R. Sullivan, .Chief Ranger; George Gray, Vice Chief Ranger; Anthony Pruezinske, Recording Secreing; Anthony Gieser, Financial Secretary; F. Dunnebecke, Treasurer. ~

3. SI. Agnes Sodality, for girls under 18 years of age. Receives Holy Communion every second Sunday in the month and meets at Society Hall 3 p. m. Miss Alma Gieser, Prefect; Miss Sophie Wiedelman,Assistant Prefect; Miss Hazel Sullivan, recording Secretary; Miss Julia Sanders, Financial Secretary; Miss Laura Essig, Librarian; Rev. F. Burelbach, Treasurer.

4. SI. Francis Guild, organized to help the Parish financially. Meets every alternate ThursdayatSociet Hall at 2 p. m. Mrs. M. Dunnebecke, President; Mrs. P. Rosch, Vice-President; Mrs. A.Essig, Recording Secretary; Mrs. J. Rawle, Financial Secretary; Rev. F. Burelbach, Treasurer;

5. W 0 men s Catholic Order of Foresters, an inurance society for ladies. Meets every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at Society H a II at 2 p.m. Mrs.M. Dunnebecke, Chief Ranger; Mrs. M. Blau, Vice Chief Ranger; Mrs. N. Grady, Recording Secretary; Mrs. J. Rawle, Financial Secretary; Mrs. M. Gonya, Treasurer. ~

6. Society of Christian Mothers, organized for the spiritual welfare of the married women. Receives Holy Communion in a body every third Sunday of the month and meets on the same Sunday at 3 P. M. at Society Hall. Mrs. M. Dunnebecke, President; Mrs. Agnes Kennedy, Vice-President; Mrs. . Grady, Recording Secretary; Mrs. J. Rawle, Financial Secretary; Mrs. M. Gonya, Treasurer. SI. Aloysius society and SI. Agnes Sodality each has its own library.

The temporal affairs of the Parish ar~ managed by a church committee, consisting for the 'year 1907 of the following gentlemen: F. Dunnebecke, A. Prabisch, Jerry Smith, B. McGinn, George Gray, Wm. Essig. This committee meets on every 1st Sunday of the month after the evening services at the rectory.


F. Dunnebecke, Church Committee. Sec'y Treas. C. O. F.

Wm. Essig, Church Committee

Jerry Smith, Church Committee

B. McGinn. Church Committee

Geo. Gray, Church Committee V. C. R. of C. O. F.

Mrs. Mary Dunnebecke, Chief Ranger, W. C. O. F. Pres't, SI. Francis Guild Pres't Christian Mothers

Mrs. M. Gonya, Treas. W. C. O. F. Treas. Christian Mothers

W. R. Sullivan, C. R. of C. O· F

Tony Prabisch. Church Committee

REV. FRANCIS BURELBACH PASTOR

Mrs. Nellie Grady. Rec. Secy. W. C. O. F. Rec. Secy. Christian Mothers

P. Roggenbuck.

P. C. R. of C. O. F.

Mrs. Jennie Rawle. Fin. Secy. W. C. O. F.• Fin. Secy.SI.Francis Guile F. S. Christian 10thers

Mrs. M. Blau. V. C. R. ofW. C. O. F.

Mrs. P. Rosch. V. P. SI. Francis GUile

A. Gieser. Fin. Secy. C. O. F.

Chas. Essig,

C. O. F.


SACRED HEART PARISH MEL

RO SE PARK 24

first Catholic Church in Erected in

MRS.

~telro

e Park

189~

Autograph Quilt made under the direction of 1rs. Josephine Gllodman, by members of SI. francis Guild. This Quilt contains 2200 autographs, worked in QUilt by hand. It realized 51000 for the benefit of the Parish. It "'" presented to His Grace. Most Rev. James E. Quigle. rchbishop of Chicago.

ROSALIA BOURGEOIS

MRS. JOSEPHINE GOODMAN

fiRST GRADUATION CLASS Of SACRED HEART PAROCHIAL SCHOOL. 1906 Harry Hegele orman Johnson Jas. Pruczinske Lucy Olschefski Hazel Sullivan Madeline Gonya Alma Gieser Laura Es ig Agnes Glynn

NEW CHURCH SOCIETIES SI. Rose of Lima Sodality. for Young-Ladies

SI. Cecelia Choir Singing Society

,


ME L ROSE PARK 25

SWEDISH M. E. CHURCH REV. F. A. BENSON. Pastor Sunday Services 10.30 a. m .• 6.30 p. m .• 7.30 p. m. Sunday School 9.30 a. m.

M. E. CHURCH REV. GORDON L. GRANGER, Pastor Sunday Services 11.00 a. m .. 7.30 p. m .. Sunday School 9.30. Junior League 2.30 p. m. Epworth League 6.30 p. m.

FREE METHODIST CHURCH REV. D. M. SMASHEY, Pastor Sunday Services 11.00 a. m., 7.45 p. m. Sunday School 9.45 a. m. Class Meeting 6.30 p. m. Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting 7.45.

OUR LADY OF MOUNT CARMEL CHURCH REV. BENJAMIN FRANCH, Pastor Week days, Mass 8 a. m. Sunday, First Mass 9.00 a. m., High Mass 10.30 a. m. Sunday School 2.00 p. m.

\.


MEL ROSE PARK 26

UNION SUNDAY SCHOOL Established 1874

Mr. Richard Baily. Sr. Superintendent for 25 years

fOUR GENERATIO

Mrs. Hannah Larson Mrs. Robert Scheffer

Mr. Nels P. Larson Gertrude Estelle Scheffer

fAMILIES

Mrs. Geo. Kolstedt Mrs. C. L. Bender

Mrs. H. F. Glos M iss Hazel Bender


MELROSE pARK HOMES

M I. L ROSI. PARK

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27


MEL ROSE PARK 28

MELROSE PAR,K HOMEJS


-MEL~SE

PARK

I+0MES

MEL

ROSE PARK 29


~I

MODERN WOODMEN OF AMERICA THE GRE:J~~Tc~~R~~~IE~~ATERNAL 850,000 MODERN WOODMEN

12,500 WOODMEN LOCAL CAMPS

LEFT TO RIGHT. 1. Anton Gieser 2. Fred Andree 3. N. W. ,reene 4. Dr. Holliday 5. B. F. Coleman 6. F. Dunnebecke 7. Jno. G. Carson 8. W. Allen 9. Thos. Stahl 10. R. F. Foster II. A. M. Chirhart 12. E. Goddard 13. Henry Decker 14. Ceo. Whelstone IS. Wm. Bredenbeck 16. C. W. Evans 17. M. Young 18. C. E. Johnson 19. Chas. S. Field 20. E. elson 21. Jas. Lavin 22. Fred Murschill 23. has. 'olwitz 24. Wm. Kirchman 25. Peter Boyens 26. Chas. Guyer

A few members of Melrose Park Camp No. 8449, Modern Woodman of America. Melrose Park Campwa organized October 11th. 1901, with fifteen charter members. It has had a steady growth. At the present time the trong arm of Woodcraft furni hes protection for 75 hom in our village. A great many of our business men as well as workingmen are members of Melrose Park Camp. Meets 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month K. of P. Hall, 19th Avenue.


,

HARMONIE SINGING SOCIETY

MELROSE PARK, ILL

President, Henry Wachtendorf Vice-President, Fred Oetting Secretary, Harry Meiselbach Treasurer, Charles Hermann Ent. Treasurer, August Guenther Director, Prof. C. A. Boehler Ass't Director, E. Hasselbring Custodian, L. Hinz

Financial Secretary, William Jedike Banner Bearer, A. H. Rentz

28 ACTIVE MEMBERS. 1st TENORS. 1st BASS.

August Guenther A. Hardtegan Fred Oetting Herman Puttkammer Julius Spriestersbach Harry Meiselbach Fred Raedeker 2nd TENORS. Wm. Jedike Charles Hermann Henry C. Kopp Frank Raven Sam Sparmheimer Wm. Bormann G. Muehlenhaupt Henry Dinse Charles Heine S. Heusler Wm. F. Behrens Dr. P. B. Kionka Paul Heiden 2nd BASS. E. Hasselbring H. Wachtendorf E. Goldacker, Jr. B. Meyer L. Him F. Radoy F. Volkmann A, Volkmann

14 PASSIVE M EM BERS Henry Beling

Geo. Kopp

A. H. Rentz E. Goldacker, Sr.

L. W. Richter L. Nieland

C.J. Wolf M. H, Bormann

P.

E.

Wolf C. S. Field

R. H. Kuhlmann O. J. E. Urban

Wm. G. Korrell

~I

M. Kraft

..


MEL

ROSE PARK 32

MR. THOMAS BODDY AND FAMilY One of the largest families in number in Cook Co

THE CRACK BASE BAll TEAM-"RICHTER INVINCI BlES"

MELROSE PARK CUBS-"BlUE RIBBON" FOOT BAll TEAM


MEL ROSE PARK 33

J. Biermann and Family PARLOR IN BIERMAI N'S HOTEL. 1509 LAKE ST. CORNER FIFTEENTH AVE.

JULIUS FRILLMANN AND FAMILY Photograph taken at their home


Mrs. Catherine DODD. Mrs. Wm. Leeseberg, Arthur H. W. Leeseberg, Lester A. H. Leeseberg

Woman's Catholic Order of Forresters

Chas. Sallaz, First Night Policeman


MEL ROSE PARK 35

PETER BOHLANDER'S ORIGI:'oIAL STORE The First General Store in the Village Courtesy of Peter Bohlander

19TH AVENUE IN 1900

A NOTED CELEBRATION PASSING UP 19TH AVE. 1900 Courtesy of Peter Bohlander

OLD EMPLOYEES OF THE NOW LATROBE STEEL AND COUPLER WORKS (From Photograph taken about 15 years ago) Courtesy of Edward Goldacker


The Old Time Rag-a-Muffin Parade FOURTH OF JULY, 1894

M.E L ROSE PARK 36

12th Avenue, near Lake Street

19th Avenue and 1st Street

11th Avenue and Lake Street Courtesy Of Peter Bohlander


Reproductions ...

1894

l\lELHOtiE

TRIBU.\'E.

ROSE PARK

.

37

4th of -JULY I Programme of the great 4th of July celebration 1894. Courtesy of Mrs. Mary Dunnebecke.

The first newspaper published in the village. Courtesy of Mrs. Mary Dunnebecke.

PUBLIC MEETING THATCHER SCHOOL HOUSE, ALL VOTERS IN PROVISO,

...

MEL

[rre~pectiyc of party or nationality. who believe in Justie<: and Equal Rights, and who de ire to oppose the outrage of compelling thci Voters of the town to go almost to the Dupage Connty liues to Yote iu the pre ent emergency of aflairs, arc "eqnested to meet at the 'rH.\TCHER Scuoo,. HOUSE, 011

d-Lo.. vlv,

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SATURDAY EVENING, NOV. 4, '1'0 make arrangements to gO to the Poll. It is the riyht of Fi'eeUlen to Vote. alld when arbitrary power is used to prevent the exercise of that ri.liht, it is also a duty to Vote. Will you .,huHI by rJ,l1d sec this olltrage go uIHehuked, or ,rill you join ill at h:nst defeating it in future. :tnd teachiu)!; its :tllthor that the People of Pro\"iso I, l/lUle some n"glits which white mell a/"f' bill/AId to rcsped"?

W. 'I'.

~ICHOLS.

1. It ANDREWS.

A. MOSS. Hand bill printed 37 years ago. Courtesy of Mr. G. f. Gehrke.

Autograph letter of the celebrated artist. Mr. John T. McCutcheon. Courtesy of T. E. Burgoyne.


MEL

RO PARK 38

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES ============== AN D =============:::::::: PORTRAITS OF OLD SETTLERS AND BUSINESS MEN OF MELROSE PARK

Inl W

MR. RICHARD BAILEY.

MONG the few pioneer settlers of Melrose Park no\\' liying is Mr. Richard Bailey, who is held in high esteem by hi fellow townsmen, Mr, Bailey was born in Bristol, England, in 1844, He \\'a early apprenticed to a ship carpenter, and became expert at the trade. His spare hours were devoted to study to make up for the meager educational advantages of his boyhood, so that he is in the true sense a self-educated man, Learning of the possibilities of advancement for a young man in this country, he started for America, and arrived in Chicago in 1871 at the time of the great fire, only to find a city of burning embers and heated stones. Nothing daunted, he went at once to Maywood, IlL, where he lived for a short time, moving to Melrose Park in 1872, He follo\\'ed the trade of house carpenter until 1874, in which year he \yas engaged as foreman by the ~Iaywood gricultural IIachine Company. From 1886 until 1894 he held the po ition of superintendent of the machinery department of the Chicago Sere", Company. He then became engaged with the Illinois Screw Company at Chicago Heights. but. preferring to ,,'ork nearer his home, he took a position \\'ith the _-\merican Can Company at ~Iay,,'ood in 1905, where he is now employed. Although Mr. Bailey has ah\'ays been a yery industrious man, his home and Village have not been neglected, but have claimed considerable of his time and attention. He never sought public office, but "'as humane officer for 15 years. When, over a third of a century ago, he came to the place "'here this yillage now stands, a treeless prairie landscape greeted his eyes, only relieved here and there by a few cottages, separated by fields of tall, waving grass. He, "'ith a few other settlers, organized a tree planting day and set out hundreds of trees. The results of this labor are seen to-day in the rows of beautiful trees that shade the streets of the village, and will be appreciated by the generations yet to come. Mr. Bailey's present home on Lake Street and 15th Avenue is the original unremodeled house which he built on his arrival here, doing the carpenter and mason work with his own hands. Mr. Bailey is a practical, unselfish Christian gentleman. For 32 years he has been connected with the Union Sunday School, and has been its superintendent for 25 years. This organization, known locally as Bailey's Sunday School, is dear to his heart, and holds a unique position in the history of the place, its influence extending far beyond the village boundaries. Children of all creeds and nationalities have been his pupils. Many of these are now men and women, and have moved to distant states or foreign lands, while others who live here are sending their children to this old celebrated school. Mrs. Bailey assisted in this work up to the time of her death, and her daughters are still teaching there. 1\I[r. Bailey ,vas married in Bristol, England, in 1864, to Miss Mary A. James, an excellent Christian woman, who died in 1879. There were nine children. Those now living are Richard James, Edith M. and Alice D., the latter being the wife of Mr. M. J. Cramer of this village,


lUI

l\IIRS. MARY DUNNEBECKE.

N \iVRITIKG biographies of those who have been. or now are, actively engaged in village building, we should not omit Mrs. Man' Dunnebecke, who is one of the most progressive and an;bitious workers in this village. While it is not a woman's place to actually carry mortar and lay bricks, yet her work is just as necessary and important to the welfare of the community, in managing the home; also directing the charitable, religious and social affairs that form so important a part of life. Mrs. Dunnebecke has always promptly responded to calls from such sources, even in the early days when muddy roads and inclement "'eather would have been a sufficient reason for staying home, especially as there "'ere no modern conveniences for making life less strenuous, She is a model ,,'ife and mother and her home is most pleasant. Amidst the eyer increc. ina cares of a large familv she has found time to assist her hu band in his business. On several occasions she has put through large real estate deals unaided. Besides all this, she is now and ha been an officer in yarious benevolent and social organizations, among \yhich are The Catholic Order of Foresters, Christian Mothers, St. Francis Guild. Lo\'al Americans and Court of Honor. Mrs. Dunnebecke was born in Cah'ary. \Yis .. in 1859, her father being l\[r. M. Bourgeois, owner of a large general tore and bre\\"ery in that town. It is from him, no doubt, that he inherit her strong character and o'ood business ability.

Iml l!lJ

:-IR. CHARLES J. WOLF.

ELROSE Park first. the "Vorld afterward," is a motto always uppermost in the mind of Mr. Chas. J. \iVolf, president of the village, and a successful business man. His untiring efforts for the betterment and progress of the community are clearly seen by results in many directions, viz: A unified Village Board of Trustees, and all other officers, inspired by their president's honesty and ability are all working hand in hand for the advancement of the village and are making Melrose Park a model home suburb of the great city of Chicago. Mr. \iV olf was born 30 years ago, 1876, on a farm a few mjles west of his adopted village and was educated in the public schools there. On becoming of age, he left the farm, came to Chicago, and attended and graduated from the Metropolitan Business College. In 1897 he came to Melrose Park and accepted a position as bookkeeper for the Bryant Bros. Lumber Co. (l\Ielrose Park branch). By 'close attention to his duties, he became a valuable employee and remained with them for nine years. His ability, steady habits and business integrity soon became known to the people of the village and led up to his appointment to the office of village treasurer in 19째2, at a time when vast sums of money were being expended on public improvement. In 1904 he was elected clerk of the village and served his term. In 1905 the people believed an honest treasurer and an efficient clerk would make an excellent village president, to which office he was elected and now holds. During his incumbency in office as president he framed an ordinance making the resident portion of the village prohibition, which ordinance was adopted by the Board and is now in force. Another ordinance adopted by the Board through his influence limited the number of saloons to one for every 500 inhabitants. The qualifications which gained for Mr. "Volf the confidence of the people in his public capacity, were doubtless inherited from his father, Mr. John "Volf,

MEL ROSE PARK 39


MEL

ROSE PARK

a prosperous farmer and one of the oldest settlers of Proviso township, who was continuously elected to the office of assessor of the township for 25 years. NIr. Vi olf is now president of the Citizens' State Bank which he promoted and which was organized July 3rd, 1906. Its magical growth in the fe\y months past assures its future, and, with Mr. Wolf's zeal and business capacity at the helm, it is destined to become one of the leading financial institutions \yest of Chicago's路 limits. The handsome new bank building at 19th AYe. and 1 t Street is equipped with every convenience and in the most modern style. In the year 1902 ir. Wolf returned to the vicinity of his childhood home and claimed in marriage the hand of his former neighbor's daughter. ~Iiss Elizabeth Theile, a young woman of high character and refinement. They haye two sons, 'iValter John and Edwin C. Mr. Christian Thiele, the father of 1\1rs. 'iVolf, was also one of the earliest settlers of Proviso Township. Here he owned a farm and lived on it for 55 years.

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l\IR. THOMAS E. B RGOYNE.

MONG the self-made men and active village builders of Melrose Park the name of Thomas E. Burgoyne stands prominently. His genial, courteous manner and unselfish disposition has \von for him a host of friends. "Tom" Burgoyne is well-known to almost every inhabitant of the village, both old and young. , ~1r. Burgoyne was born in 1870 on a farm near 'iVelton, Ia. His parents came from Devonshire, England, and were among the thri fty and honest but poor pioneers who settled on the wild prairies of IO"'a nearly 60 years ago. The family being large all had to work, and ~Ir. Burgoyne's early education \yas limited to a three months' term each year in the country school. Haying an earnest de ire for more education he left his farm home at the age of ixteen with but a fe,,' dollar in his pocket, and entered the high school at De "路itt. Ia. Here he improYed his opportunity, and, when through school. \yas so well recommended by the faculty that he was at once offered a clerkship in the leading Drug store in De "路itt. The alary was very small but, by self-denial he sayed enough money in three years to take a course in Pharmacy at the Chicago School of Pharmacy, from which he graduated. He then passed the Ill. State Board examination successfully. He w~s now equipped, at the age of 21, but "'ith "brain and bra\yn only," to enter the battle for success. His first employment as a full-fledged drug clerk was at Evanston, Ill. Desiring to engage in business for himself h ~ visited ~Iel颅 rose Park in 1893 and it seemed full of promise to him. He then opened 'a drug store which he conducted successfully for a number of years. ~Ir. Burgoyne relates the many discouragements \rhich beset him on all sides in the beginning. The year he opened his store was the starting of the great financial and industrial panic in this country. The village industries were temporarily clo ed for -months to come. Then sickness, fire and burglary followed him in quick succession, and finally the death of his little daughter. It often seemed to him that his hip must be submerged by the sea of adversity but, keeping a stout heart he weathered the storm. Mr. Burgoyne has always taken a deep interest in civic affairs and he stands high in the council of the Republican party. In 1898 he "'as appointed Postmaster of the villacre, was re-appointed in 1902 and this office he no,,' holds. He has always "stood up" for the village and for improvements. Xot only has he built a handsome building of his own on 19th Ave, but he has been instrumental in the erection of other business buildincrs. Mr. Burgoyne does business in fire insurance, representing the Springfield


of JVlass., and the Phoenix of Hartford, two old and very strong cornpanies. In all great fires of this country these companies have paid their losses promptly. He takes a great interest in the social affairs of the village, is a charter member and has been a\\'arded the highest honors in the K. of P. and the Royal League, and has also been an officer in nearly a dozen other organizations. On June 15th. 1893, :\1 . Burgoyne married Miss Elizabeth Butterfield of De Witt, Ia., a \\'oman of artistic tastes and refinement, \"ho \\'as a class mate and companion of his high school days. They have a bright little son. Harold, \\'ho is their comfort and their joy.

MR. HEN RY DIN E. I~IOR nearly 20 years the subject 'of our sketch has been a

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resident of :\lle1rose Park and he can no\\' be enrolled as an old settler. Mr. Dinse was born in Germany in 1864. His parents were farmers. He served in the army in his nati"e country, belonging to a crack cavalry regiment. In 1887 he came to this country and traveled about for a \"hile, visiting a number of cities before settling down finally in thi Yillaae. On his arrival here he found employment \\'ith the pring \York , \\¡here he remained for sometime. He then engaged in the general teaming business on his own account. â&#x20AC;˘ In 1892 he \\'as employed as a bartender by :\1r. Henry Beiling, when at Lake St. and 12th rhe. In this position he remained for 6 years. ' Mr. Dinse was very popular \\¡ith the patrons of the house during this time, and as he was saving as well a industrious, he was able to purchase the business from Mr. Beiling in 1898. Fronl. that time he has had a large and successful trade. He has many friends, not only in the village, but in the adjacent towns. His buffet, as well as his stock of goods, is strictly first clas in every particular. Mr. Dinse has always taken an active hand in the social affairs of the village, and is ever ready with hand and purse to a sist in any enterprise for the enjoyment of its citizens. He \ras elected Highway Commissioner in 1895. and is now serving as president of the combined body of high\\'ay commissioner's. He is a member of the K. of P., Harugrude Society, Plattdeutch Guide, and also ~s ex-president of the Harmonie inging Society. He was married in 1900 to :\liss Dertha later, daughter of one of the old settlers of :\lelrose Park.

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R. JACOB OSWALD. is a progressive citizen and business

man as well as an old settler of :\Ielrose Park. He was born in Bis enaen, \iVurtemberg, Germany, in 1864; was educated in hi native land and learned the wagon making trade there. vVhen but 18 years old he came alone to this country to seek success in the New vVorld, arriving in New York in 1882. He traveled about for a year visiting several cities, an I reached Chicago in 1883. He remained there only a short time and then went to a farm in Illinois, where he worked for three years. He aftenrards spent three "ears in the tate of Iowa. In 1889 he decided to locate in l\lelro e Park and has made his home here ever since. On his arrival he \rent to work for the Chicago Tire & pring \\'ork and remained with them until 1903. when he

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MEL ROSE PARK

accepted a position with the N. W. Gas & Coke Co" at Oak Park, Ill., \\'here he is still employed. Mr. Oswald is of a modest and retiring disposition, but one of the " alt of the Earth" brand of citizens. Through industry and saving he has accumulated some fine property and is now the proprietor of a weli stocked confectionery and delicatessen store in his own building at No. 132 19th Ave. To this store he devotes his time evenings, but it is to his wife, vvho so ably a ists him in its successful management, that he gives much of the credit for his rapidly increasing business. Mr, Oswald was married in 1891 to Miss Emma Hoeppner of :-1elrose Park, whose parents are old settlers in the vicinity. They have two dalwhters, Margaret and Helen, The family are all members of the German Lutheran Church.

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MR. ANTHONY

J.

BUSSCHER.

N SELECTING materials to build a safe and substantial business community, young and vigorous timber, \\'ell seasoned, is one of the essentials. Of such a stamp is :-1r. :\nthony Busscher, the subject of this sketch. He was born in Niles Center, IlL, a few mile north of this village, in 1884. His father was the village blacksmith and an old resident of the place. Although the son inherited the physique of an ideal blacksmith, his mind turned in another direction, and, after finishing the country school, he went to the City of Chicago, ",here opportunitie were open for engaging in larger business affairs. He graduated from the Chicago Business College in 19째1, and at once accepted a position \\'ith the :-1etropolitan Trust & avings Bank of that city. He remained there for fi\'e year, commencing at the bottom rung of the ladder, and worked his \\'ay steadily up\\'ard until he became a \'aluable assistant in that large financial institution. A few months ago \\'hen the Citizens' tate Dank \\'a being organized at Melrose Park, Mr, Busscher, ",ho e integrity and bu iness qualification ",ere well known, was tendered the position of cashier. This he accepted, and thus, in 1906, Melrose Park gained another good citizen and business man. Mr. Busscher is genial, obliging, courteous to all, a conscientious \\'orker and one who has the best interests of the bank and its customers at heart. Through his ability he is assisting largely in building up this rapidly growing financial institution of the village. \!\1hile Mr. Busscher has arrived at a marriageable age, yet, up to this writing, Miss Business has claimed him constantly to the exclusion of the real live maiden.

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MR. GUSTAV A. GEHRKE.

CR allotment of space is inadequate to do justice to the pioneer village settlers and builders. This is especially true of Mr. G, F. Gehrke, who, from the very beginning has been actively associated in the upbuilding of the place and a worker for the general welfare of its people, Mr. Gehrke was born in Germany in 1848 and came to this country with his parent in 1855 when only seven years old, They settled in Algonquin, Ill., in 1856. His father was killed in the Battle of Shilo during the War of the Rebellion, and he also lost a brother in the service, Although too young to go to war Mr. Gehrke gave vent to his patriotism and became a member of that celebrated patriotic ~


organization, "The \Vide Awakes," which stood for a United Country and Lincoln. He attended the old Kinzie School in Chicago in 1861-2 and was also an attendant and member of the German Lutheran Church, then situated on Indiana St. between Franklin and vVells Streets. He learned the carpenter trade at Algonquin, and in 1868 came again to Chicago to live and to work at his chosen vocation. He can give a graphic description of the great fire in 1871 and tells how he drifted in front of it until he reached Lincoln Park. In 1869 Mr. Gehrke was employed as a carpenter to build the Maywood Depot (the first house) and can to-day show where the first nail was driven in that village. He boarded at Mrs. M. Laughlin's Hotel, situated on the Des Plaines River, a boarding house well-known to the early settlers. In 1870 he became foreman, for the Maywood Co., and built the noted Maywood Observatory, which was IS0 feet high and stood for a number of years, being finally destroyed by a storm. He also built Gen. Smith's home in Maywood 'and was given a village block of ground in payment. Here he erected a carpenter shop which the settlers named Bachelor's Rest. Besides this he built the mammoth wind mill with a wheel 30 feet in diameter. This furnished the motive power for the Maywood Scraper & D~tcher Company's works, and was one of the wonders of the village at that time. In 1873 Mr. Gehrke purchased the piece of ground and built his home at No. 137 IIth Ave., and he resides to-day in this house which he occupied long before the village of Melrose Park became incorporated. In 1887 he was engaged as foreman in the cabinet department of the Western Electric Works, which at that time, had a force of only 50 or 60 men, but which now employs 25,000 people. His is the remarkable record of 29 years continuous employment with this now great company. M;r. Gehrke was school director and a member of the board of education for several years. He was elected supervisor in 1888 and was also one of the original and first Melrose Park village trustees, serving three terms. He was elected village president in 1898 and served three terms. He is a member of the K. of P., and of the rational Union and Harmonie Singing Society. Mr. Gehrke was married at Maywood, II1., in 1875, to Miss Magdalene Gold, a noble christian woman. Their children are Leonard, Minna, Gustav F., Malvina, Ida, Alfred and Frank.

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MR. FERDINAND DUNNEBECKE.

NE of the most influential and public spirited men of Melrose Park is Mr. Ferdinand Dunnebecke. He has been so long identified with the upbuilding of the village and its business and social affairs that to him belongs a large share of the credit of its present prosperity. M~路. Dunnebecke was born in Detroit, in 1858. He moved with his parents to Dubi.lque, Ia., where he was educated in the public schools and where he held his first public office, that of deputy assessor. He came to 1Vlelrose Park in 1887 and opened a shoe store, but sold out in about a year. He then entered the real estate and contracting business in which he is now engaged. In 1889, in connection with his other business, he built and conducted the Melrose Park Savings Bank, which he sold to the Maywood State Bank in 1903. Mr. Dunnebecke was elected trustee of the village board in 1888. Besides this, he was elected to the office of justic of the peace and served in that capacity f~'om 1892 to 1898. He was also appointed village collector and served for SlX years.

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MEL ROS-E PARK

'When Mr. Dunnebecke first came to ~Ielrose Park the land on the South of the R. R. tracks was a swamp and considered valueless for residence property. However, after the drainage of this land, he sold the first two lots for the Proviso Land Association. The first election in the village was held at ~Ir. Dunnebecke's Hall on 19th AYe. The caucus \yas held at the depot. When he was trustee the board meetings \yere held at the home of Mr. F. R. Jeschke, at 17th Ave. and Lake Street. Ko salary ,,"as attached to the office. , :M!r. Dunnebecke is a charter member of the \Voodmen, Maccabees and Loyal Americans; also a member of the church committee of the Sacred Heart Church. He married Miss Mary Bourgeoi at Cah"ary, \Vis., in 1885, an excellent woman and helpmate. They haye six children Edgar, Hugo, Corinne, vVilliam, Joseph and Patrick.

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MR. F. R. JESCHKE.

is always a great stimulus and inspiration to the younger people of a community to haye brought to their memories the history of those pioneer settlers who came to the place when it was new, endured privations, struggled acrainst adyersity, planned, labored, and finally overcame ali difficulties, until they saw at last the full fruition of their brightest hopes. On them should rest the hicrhest honors. Among the few living veteran pioneers of the village is ~Ir. F. R. Jeschke. He was born in Germany in 1847 and learned the trade of a cabinet maker there. In 1869, when 22 years of age, he came to this country, settling in Chicago. \i\ ork at his trade becoming scarce during the great panic of 1873. he \yent to what i nmy ~Ielrose Park. and for a time found employment at the carpenter trade, but building on the then treeless space was slow. " He then turned his attention to makin cr ha\", which he crathered from the ground where the village no,," stand, and at that" he was quite successful. During this period he assumed the contract to shingle the pring \Yorks, nailing on every shingle with his own hands. His early home was the thirteenth house built in the village. It is still owned by him, and stands adjoining his present residence at 17th Ave. and Lake Street. Among Mr. Jeschke's recollections of those early days, he especially recalls how in the Spring of the year, there being no sewerage, the water would rise so hio路h. that boats could be used as means of travel. At one time he found it necessary to tie his 'work shop to a post to prevent it from floating away. The first sidewalk laid on Lake Street was built of lumber the cost of which was defrayed by voluntary contributions from the citizens. . The yillage board for a few years held their recrular sessions in the front room of his home. From the very beginning of the settlement, iVIr. Jeschke has always taken an active interest in its welfare. He was elected trustee from 188-1- to 1889. He was one of the original members of the Harmonie Singing Society. He holds the proud distinction of his son Charles being the first boy born in this community, 34 years ago. Mr. Jeschke is now, and has been continuously employed by the \\ estern Electric Co., Chicago, for a period of 21 years. He was married in Chicago in 1872 to Miss Albertina J eschke. ~ rrs. Jeschke's parents were old settlers of Chicago, coming here in 185-1-. Their marriage was celebrated by Pastor John Grosse, now living at ddison, Ill. Their children are Charles, vVilliam, Amelia, nna, Macrdalina, Gustave, Martha and Albert, all living in the village with the exception of Miss Magdalina, who lives in California.


MR. THOMAS BODDY.

1'j11 ofE Melrose of the best-known and most highly respected citizens Park is Mir. Thomas Boddy, also an old settler ~

of the Village. He was born in the town of Nunnangton, Yorkshire, England, in 185 I, and \\'as compelled to earn his own living at an early age. He first ,yorked on a farm in his native country, and later was employed as an iron stone miner, working underground seven miles from the shaft he would descend each day. In 1882 at the age of 31. fired with enthusiasm and the vigor of youth \\'hich \\'as hi only capital, and further strengthened by the stout heart of his young h~pmate, he decided to come to America. He came direct to Chicago, but soon obtained employment in Maywood, II!., assisting in the construction of what is kno\\'n to the old residents as "Butterine Row." In 1885 he moyed to ~Ielrose Park. Here he was employed as the village lamplighter and pecial policeman. Time pieces being scarce, his special duty as policeman ,yas to notify the only saloon 'keeper in the village of the closing hour each night. For this double duty he drew the munificent salary of $20.00 per month; extras being unheard of at that time. In 1888 his friends, appreciating his indu try, nominated him for county constable without his knowledge and elected him. To this office he has been repeatedly re-elected and has served continuously for 18 years with a clean and honorable record. Mr. Boddy holds the distinction of being the proud father of one of the largest families in this country, the total number of IS children have blessed the union of him elf and hi good wife, ten of whom are living.' The gold of a Rockefeller '\'QuId be no consideration in exchange for one of them, as he is to-day enjoying the bles ings and comfort of one of the brio-htest and happiest families to be found anywhere. Mr. Boddy was married to. Miss Mary Ellen Barker in Scarborough, England, in I88!. 1\Irs. Boddy i a woman of high character and charm and a sister of the Barker brothers of this village. Their children living are Jane E., Robert 'N., Maud A. E., Rose M., ,Tessie L., Thomas M., Lucy G., Madeline M., Josephine Maud., and Adolphus J. A.

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MR. E. W. BEN SO .

LTHO -GH yet a young man, ~Ir. E. W. Benson, the subject of our sketch, is an old settler. He came to Melrose Park with his parent over 20 year ago, 1886, "vhen he was but 17 year old. At that time it was po sible, in the spring of the year, to go boat ridino-, and winter to skate, over nearly all the territory where the village now stands. Mr. Benson was born. in Sweden in 1869 and was brought to River Forest by his parents in 1871, receiving his education in the public schools there. On leaving school he learned the trade of a carpenter and in 1888 engaged in busines in Denver, Colo.. on his own account. He returned to Melrose Park in 1890 and engaged in the same business here. He has been quite successful and has built many of the largest buildino-s in the village, among them being the Sacred Heart Church. the M. E. Church and the Swedish M. E. church. Also the first brick building in the village and many busines house on 19th Ave. Owing to his popularity, progressiveness, and the deep interest he has taken in the development of hi adopted village, he has won nearly all the civic honors his fellow townsmen could bestow upon him. In 1893 he was elected

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MEL ROSE PARK 46

trustee, was re-elected, and served three terms of two years each. In 1899 he was elected President of the Village, was re-elected, and served three terms. He was also a member of the school board for three years and of the , library board for six. During his term of office as President the immense village improvements were started, viz.: The water works, gas and street improvements. Mr Benson now devotes most of his time to architecture. He is a member of the Swedish M. K Church and an active Sundav school worker. Between village building, carpenter work a;d architecture MT. Benson has overlooked one important thing in life, and that is the finding of a wife. He resides with his parents at No. 137 17th AYe. His father, Mr. John Benson, a pioneer settler, built one of the first buildings in the village, 34 years ago, and bought property here a year previous to this time.

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MR. CHARLES M. BRa' -N.

R. BROWN is a splendid citizen and business man, well known to all the people in the village and especially to the children, for his store is "their store" and 路'if it's not at Brown's, it's not in town." Mr. Brown was born in Frederick County, Maryland, in 1850, and was educated in the public schools there. He aftenyards learned the trade of a carpenter and followed this vocation in his native state for a number of years. In 1893 he decided to go west and the same year arriyed at Melrose Park, intending to make only a short visit. The attractiveness of this suburban village lead him. howeyer, to become a permanent citizen. Mr. Brown continued to ,,"ork at hi trade here and was employed by the Featherstone Co. as their foundry carpenter for a number of years. In 1904. desiring to change his business. he opened a confectionery, cigar and delicatessen store at No. 1404 Lake Street. ,,"hich yenture proyed entirely successful. He is very popular with his many little customers as well as with those who are larger in size. Mr. Brown was married in Highfield, Maryland, in 1870, to ~Iiss Eya V. "Vantz, who died in 1891, leaving a large family to mourn her loss. The children living are Cynthia K, Rosie B., Chas. R., William A. and Nellie B. Brown, who reside at Highfield, Me!., and Harvey A. and Eliza M., who live in this village. In 1896, Mr. Brown was married again to Mrs. Nancy A. Trimble, of Melrose Park, who is not only a good wife, but a valuable business assistant. Mrs. Brown has three children by her former marriaae, all living in Melrose Park: Almanzer, lola and Elmer. MR. FRANK RAVEN. We have made mention of a number of the early settlers and progressive citizens of this community, as well as the men who proved their faith in the future of Melrose Park, not only by large investments and the erection of handsome buildinas, but by their zeal in everything that pertains to the advancement and welfare of the village. Such men are the real village builders, and among them we must consider jVb-. Frank Raven, as one of the pioneers. Mr. Raven was born in Germany in 1852, and learned the trade of a machinist there. Believing that success awaited him in the New World, he came to the United States in 1882. For a while he stopped at Philadelphia, and other cities, but finally came to


Melrose Park in 1888, and found employment at Norton Brothers Co., Maywood, where he remained for a number of years. When he came to Melrose Park he bought property at the corner of 15th Ave. and Lake Streets for his home. In 1902 he erected the handsome business building on the corner, and in 1896 opened a saloon there, which he furnished in excellent style. His courteous treatment to patrons insured him success and his business grew rapidly. In 1902 he built an addition to his building at a large expenditure. This is now used for opera-house purposes and is called Raven's Hall. It is probably the largest hall in Cook County outside of Chicago. It has a large stage with handsome settings, and a fine polished floor which is often used for dancing. Mr. Raven is a quiet, unassuming man. He has often been importuned to enter political life, but refused, as it was not to his liking. This fact, however, does not in the least lessen his keen interest in the administration of civic affairs. He is very popular with his fellow townsmen and has a host of friends, not only here, but in the adjacent villages, and in Chicago as \yell. For years Mr. Raven was one of the promoters and hard \\"orkers in those noted Fourth of July celebrations which are so ,,"ell remembered by many of the citizens. He is married, and has a splendid \yife and family.

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MR. CHAS. S. FIELD.

NE of the essentials in village building is a live and readable newspaper, and in that respect this community is fortunate. "The Melrose Park Leader" is the only newspaper published continuously in the village and is non-partisan. It is owned and edited by an old resident, Mr. Chas. S. Field, who has always been held in high esteem by his fellow citizens. People who follow other vocations in life can hardly appreciate the strenuous effort necessary to conduct a village newspaper. It is, however, almost as vital to the welfare, comfort and happiness of the community as the municipal utilities. To those who have traveled to other lands, it is a blessing to receive their home paper. Mr. Field was born in Watertown, N. Y., in 1874. 路While young he moved with his parents to Decorah, Ia., where he received his education and learned the art of printing. He then engaged in newspaper work and rose rapidly in his chosen profession. In 1892, while yet a very young man, he became editor of the Lamwnt) 1awa) Advc1'tise'r. Later he moved to Dumont, Ia., 路where he conducted the Dum,ant Times) but he sold out this plant in 1894 and came to Melrose Park. "The Melrose Park Leader" was established in 1893 by Henry vVoodruff and 01as. A. Faust. Mr. Fiel-d purchased Mr. Woodruff's interest in 1894, and in 1897 bought out Mr. Faust, thereby becoming sole proprietor of the paper. Mr. Field has now published "The Leader" continuously for nearly ten years at No. II7 19th Ave. He also has in connection with his paper a first class job printing office, where he can turn out anything from the finest wedding stationery to the largest poster, and he is equipped to print in almost any language. Although not a seeker of political honors, he was elected Justice of the Peace, and this office he now holcls. Judge Field belongs to the K. of P., Royal League, \i\Toodman ancl Harmonie Societies. He is also a member of the Typographical Union No. 16. In 1896 Mr. Field married Miss Kathryn G. Merrill, of Bristow, Ia., a woman of wit and social charm, well fitted in all respects to be the wife of a man who is much in the public eye. ~

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MR. WILLIAM G. KORRELL. MEL ROSE PARK 48

IriillHERE are a fe\\' men in Melrose Park \\'ho have become U successful in business and prominent in Civic affairs, who can call this Village to all intents their birthplace. This is true of Mr. Korrell, who was born in 1872 only a few blocks south of his present residence, in what is now the village of Bellwood, but what was then farming lanel. Mr. Korrell \\'as educated in the public schools and enO'aged in farmjng until 1898 \\'hen he moved to this village and formed a partnership with his brother Edward in the coal and \\'ood business. In 1904 this partnership was dissolved and Mr. Korrel! continued in business for himself near 24th Ave. and 1 t Street. Through industry and that unswerving principle that calls nothing less than 2000 Ibs. a ton, Mr. Korrell has made a success of his business, which has rapidly grown to large proportions. Although a busy man, he is progressive and a hard worker for the best interest of the village. He is a member of the village board of trustees, and stands for right regardless of political consequences. He is also a member of the Harmonie Singing Society. Mr. Korrell was married in 1905 to Mrs. Mary Green of Chicago, a woman of intelligence and refinement. Her grandfather was foreman at the C. & N. W. R. R. shops over 40 years ago. Her father has also been employed there many years. Their one little daughter, Ethel Green, is a most winsome child. Mr. Korrell has a fine home at the corner of 24th Ave. and 1st Street. :\IR. CHRISTIA

R :\ISAIER.

I"I:\IO::\G the enterprising citizens and prominent busines men of :\Ielrose Park \\'e must mention :\1r. 01ristian Ramsaier. \\路ho ha one of the largest and mo t complete plants for manufacturing concrete building blocks \\'e t of Chicago. It is equipped \\'ith the late t and mo t impro\'ed hydraulic machinery. and the superiority of hi product i e\'inced by hi larO'e and fast increasing busine . He ha con tructed a model house of concrete blocks on 15th :-\\'e. and ::\orth\\'e tern tracks. at which place are also his works and office. Cement building material is fast becoming popular in the construction of dwelling houses and other buildings. It is cheap and durable, and stronO'ly \\'ithstands the attacks of fire and the elements. It will practically la t forever. It insures a cool even temperatrue in summer and is warm in \\路inter. Mr. Ramsaier is crowded with orders at this time, and visitors a~e im'ited to call at his facton' to examine his product and note the proces of manufacture. He was born in Germany in 1871 and came to merica in 1887. direct to Melrose Park. He is an expert stone cutter by trade, and ha been employed in Chicago and other cities. His services have always been in demand. He built the Lutheran School House at Harlem, the public school building and Citizens' State Bank at Melrose Park, the Maywood Bank, and has had the mason contract work on most of the Maywood houses. Mr. Ramsaier is a very congenial and pleasant gentleman. He pays clo e attention to hi business, but yet finds time to take part in the social affairs of the village. He stands up for l\Ielrose Park fir t and last and is one of the citizens who backs up his faith in the future of the village b\路 inve ting in property here. He was married in 1894 to Miss Adolphine Fink \\'ho \\'as born near l\Ielro e Park, which is another evidence of his faith in the community. They have three bright children, Paul. Gerhardt and Adelheid. The boys. attend the German Lutheran school and the little daughter, when old enough, will also become a pupil with them. The family lives in a beautiful home at No. 618 North 16th ve.

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MR. G. H. BOHLANDER.

R. G. H. BOHLANDER is not only a successful business man and much respected citizen, but he is also num. bered among the pioneer merchants of Melrose Park. He was born on a farm in this township in 1866 and lived there until he was 24 years old. Desiring to enter mercantile life and believing thoroughly in the future of this village, he located here in 1889 and, in partnership with Mr. M'. Young, opened a small hardware, plumbing, and tin shop at the corner of 1st St. and 19th Ave. Mr. Bohlander purchased his partner's interest in 1891, and moved to larger quarters on 15th Ave., where he remained for two years. His business grew so rapidly that he was again compelled to enlarge, and in 1893 he built one of the first and largest modern store buildings in the village' on 19th Ave .. at :'\0. 112. "'here he has )Ir. Bohlander been doing business continuously for nearly fourteen years. carries one of the largest stocks of everything knO\\"ll to the hardware line in Cook County west of Chicago, his business including tin ,,路ork. furnaces. stoves, agriculture implements, automobiles. buggies. e\\"ing machines. paints, oils. and glass. His trade extends into adjacent villages and to the country. He has other business interests also, bein o ' a stockholder in the )Ielrose Park and Maywood State Banks. Mr. Bohlander is a bus\' man, \"et he a!\\'a\"s finds time to assist in am' wa\", the advancement of the viliage anel the best [nterests and \\'eIfare of th~ con;munity. He has never aspired to political preferment to any degree, althongh he has been elected to the office of Commissioner of Highways continuous],I' for nine years. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias order. In 1898 Mr. Bohlander was married to Miss Minnie Banholzer, of Proviso Township, an excellent woman and a most valuable helpmate. They have two interesting daughters, Myrtle and Iona. -------

ImlR. DlJ

MR. L. W. RICHTER.

L. W. RICHTER is a man of public spirit and civic pride in his home town. He is one of the most popular citizens of the village, and is hailed as "Louie" many times each day by a host of friends. Mr. Richter is a native-born citizen of the great Prairie State. He was born in Shumway, IlL, in 1870, and lived there until 1887. His young blood was early fired with ambition to see the great City of Chicago and to travel, and, while yet in his teens he went there and leanied the trade of a barber. He afterward accepted a position in that capacity in Maywood. Believing in the future growth of Melrose Park, he came here in 1892 and opened a shop. Through his industry and steady habits he has built up a successful business, which he has conducted continuously for 14 years at No. 144 19th Ave. Mr. Richter has devoted a considerable portion of his time to the duties of citizenship. In 1893 he was appointed postmaster by the president of the United States, and served for five years. In 1901 he was elected Supervisor, to which office he has been re-elected successively and now holds. He was elected Village Trustee in 1895, and re-elected for three terms of two years each. During his incumbency in office as Trustee, many village improvements were made. Mr. Richter was Chairman of the 'Vater 'Vorks Committee at the time the Water 'Vorks were built, and committeeman on Street Improvements when so many of the streets were made beautiful. Much credit is due to him for

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MEL ROSE PARK 49


MEL ROSE PARK

hi judgment and faithful work in his public capacity. He was one of the prime movers and organizers of the Volunteer Fire Department, and has served as its treasurer since its organization. Mr. Richter is a member of the :\1a onic, K. of P. and Loyal American fraternities. In 1893 he married Miss Caroline :\ottmeyer, a splendid woman. "'hose parents are numbered among the old and respected citizens of the village.

50

I!iJ n

MR. \\ ILLIA:\1 LEESEBERG.

l1\10KG our most highly esteemed citizens is 1\1r. \\'illiam leeseberg. who has been identified for many year ,yith the progressive element of Melrose Park. In this yillage he has reared an interesting family, and lives in a pretty home on Eleventh Ave. Mr. Leeseberg was born in the year 1859 in the Village of Addison, about nine miles west of Melrose Park, where he spent his early days and school life. After graduating in 1878, he "'ent directly to St. Louis, and followed the vocation of instructor: being' engaged as teacher in the St. Louis 01rist Congregation and the Salem Lutheran educational institutions up to 1889. During that year he moved to Melrose Park, which was then thinly settled, the houses being very few and far between. The Latrobe Steel Works occupied but little space, and the Featherstone Foundry plant "'as unthought of. The line of ,york laid out for :\1r. Leeseberg in this new field ",as the formation of a school. .-\ number of Lutheran families "'ere obliged to send their children to Harlem. and. as the distance "'as so great. they felt the necessity of a school nearer hon e. :\ one-room building on Eleyenth AYe. and Lake Street ,yas. under the direction of :\1 r. Lee eberg. oon tran formed into the first German Lutheran chool in the locality. and the membership numbered thirty-four pupils at the pnd of tl e year. _ ixty-three ",ere enrolled in the second school Year, and during the third year the attendannce increa ed to one hundred and four. The,' no\\' haye a fineh' cOILtructed modern school building, and an average attel~dance of about t,,路o hundred and fifty. Through ::\1r. Leeseberg's untiring efforts and unselfish spirit in the maintenance of the school work, a general united interest became manifest among the German Lutheran people in the vicinity. which culminated in the organization of the German Evangelical Lutheran St. Paul's Church, with the Reverand Emil Zaph as pastor, who still holds the pastorage. and is greatly beloved by all. Mr. Leeseberg was married in St. Louis, in 1880, to Miss 1\1atilc)a Dopp, a lady of culture and refinement, who has been a great help to him in his educational work. They have five children. Arthur H. VV. is happily married to :\1iss Anna Koski, of Maywood. They live but a few blocks away. Matilda. the ..Idest daughter, occupies the position of supervisor for the Chicago Telephone Co. in the Oak Park office: \iVilliam A. C. was married in September to Miss Meta Schoen, of River Forest. Fred G., who resides at home, is enga~ed with the American Can Co. Gertrude, an attractive young girl of fifteen, also brightens the home, and is devoting herself to music. She has developed marked talent in this direction and give promise of becoming a fine musician. Although possessing no political aspiration, 1\Ir. Leeseberg was forced to accede to the popular demand of the people and was elected Village Oerk in 1892. So well did he fill the requirements of the office that he succeeded himself at every election until 1904, a period of ] 2 years. He take an active interest in church, town and county affairs, and is an upbuilder of the best interests of the community in which he lives.

"


MR. HENRY F. GLOS.

IriillHE birthplace of Mr. Henry Glos was within almost a U stone's throw of his present residence, so that he is practically a village-born citizen. He was born in 1860 on a farm adjacent to \yhat is now the Village of Bellwood, and lived there for 25 years, During his boyhood cfays small game was abundant in this section, and he ,,'ould often spend a few hours with his dog and gun, tramping over "'hat are now our pretty streets, to return home with a good bag of snipe, ducks, geese and prairie chickens, About 24 years ago Mr. Glos was employed for a time at the Spring "Works, and he relates how this large plant suffered many hardships at the beginning, being destroyed by fire three times. In 1888 he decided to enter the ice. coal and wood busines in South Mavwood, but two years later he moved to Melrose Park and engaged in the san;e business there. He has been highly succe ful and is no", one of the largest dealers in Cook County, outside of Chicago. A hort time ago he admittecl his son, Mr. Geo. Glos. an active and courteous youn<T business man. as his partner, and the si2'n now reads "H, F. Glos & Son." Mr. Glos is of a quiet and unassuming nature, yet he i ahyays in the foremost rank, both in word and deed, in the \york of upbuilding his home village. He has given considerable time to civic affairs. and, although not a seeker of political honors, was elected Village Trustee in 1895. He built and now lives in one of the handsomest re idences in the place. Mr. Glos is a member of several ocieties, among them the Royal League, of which he has been a member 15 year, and for 10 years has been treasurer of the local branch. He is also one of the Trustees of the Bellwood Evangelical Lutheran Church. The parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Glos are old settlers of Iilinois. Mr. Geo. Glos. Sr., the father of 1\1r. Glos, settled in Proviso Township in 1857, and died in 1903. In 1884 Mr. Glos married lV.Oiss Magdelena Kolstedt, of V\ ill County, Ill., a woman of fine social qualities. Their two children, George and Miss Ottilia, reside at home. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Kolstedt, the parents of :'1rs. Glos. also reside at the Glos hon:estead. :'1R. CHARLES O. BLJRKHOLM. InIJ'dONG the unas L1I11ing but influential citizens of Melrose Park we must mention :'1r. Chas. O. Burkholm. Mr. Burkholm wa born in S,,'eclen in 1855. At the age of 17, desiring to see the New \Vorld, he came to thi country, arriving at Chicago directly after the great fire in 1872. In 01icago he learned the trade of a garment cutter. In 1882, wishing to see still more of this great country, he went to Minneapolis, Minn., where he remained for six years, returnin o " to Chicago in 1888. Being attracted by the many advantages this village offered for a suburban home, Mr. Burkholm moved here in 1895. He has always taken a keen interest in the developillent and betterment of his home village. In 1905 he was elected a member of the Village Board of Trustees, which office he now holds. He is al 0 a member of several social and benevolent societies. Mr. Burkholm is endowed with considerable natural artistic ability. On the walls of his pleasant home at No. 133 17th Ave., hang several beautiful canvases of his own production, which are much admired by all ,,'ho see them. He was married in Chicago in 1884 to Miss Frederica Johnson. a woman of high character and fine social qualities. Their children are Grace. Lillian, Arthur, Gunhild and Lilia.

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MEL ROSE PARK 51


MR. PETER BOHLANDER. MEL ROSE PARK 52

IrolR. PETER BOHLA:\TDER, a man full of public spirit, and !!lJ faith which he has proven by becoming the pioneer merchant. and being active in everything pertaining to the \\'e!fare of Melrose Park, is counted as one of the most infl uential men of the place, He was born a few miles from the yillage on a farm in Proviso Township, where he lived until he \\'as sixteen years old, In 1879 he left the farm and went to Oak Park. III. where he was employed as clerk in a store. He remained there about one year, when, with a young men's ambition to adyance himself, he left to find a position in Chicago, VVhile in that city he became a student of the 1etropolitan Business College, from which he graduated. In 1882 Mr. Bohlander, having received a business education, entered the employment of his brothers, the old and well known firm of Bohlander Bros.. in Maywood and Oak Park. He remained with them until 1887. In that year, believing that it was time for him to engage in business for himself. and having faith in the location of Melrose Park, he opened the first store in the village at what is now ro. 105-07 19th Ave. This building later became a hotel and was afterwards partially destroyed by fire. 1eeting with success in this, his first business venture, he built his new building at 19th ve. and First St., in 1894, which he then occupied with his general store. In 1903 he disposed of the grocery department, retaining the dry goods department, which he still conducts. carrying one of the largest stocks of dry goods in Cook County west of Chicao-o. He i also a director in the Melrose Park and :-1an\'ood tate Banks. While :-1r. Bohlander has been successful in business, always having a large trade. he has yet found time to assi t in carrying the burden of civic duties of the village \"here the monetary consideration \"as no incentive. He was one of the first members of the board of education. district 89, which now comprises the public school system of :-1aywood and :-1elrose Park. This office he held for eleven years. Through his efforts while on the board the :\Torth School of :-1aywood \"as built, He \\'as treasurer of the yillage for about ten years and was also the second postma ter of :-1elrose Park. \\'hich office he held from 1890 to 1894. He is now a member of the yillage board of tru tees. Being one of the pioneer settlers, :-[r. Bohlander endured many inconveniences as all first comers to a new conUllUnity do.. When he came to Melrose Park there were only six houses on 19th Ave. Lots could be bought from the depot to Lake Street for $50.00 per lot, or less. North of Lake Street the land was used for farming purposes. The population did not exceed three hundred and there were not more than So houses. There were no paved streets; it was the everlasting mud, mud, mud. In the spring, water stood from 20th Ave. and Lake Street diagonally to 18th Ave., being two feet deep at times on 19th Ave. There were a few sidewalks built of one inch planks on one side of the street, but these were so narrow that the citizens were compelled to walk Indian fashion. Occasionally a kerosene street lamp could be seen. The first public school was held in a cottage on 16th Ave., north of Lake Street, and had but one teacher. The fir t church was held in the store building which afterwards became Mr. Bohlander's place of business. The first drainage consisted of ditches in the alleys connecting with a main ditch on Lake Street, emptying into the Des Plaines River. The citizens had a noted case in court when they attempted the introduction of hidden sewers instead of the open ditches. Vacant property owners claimed that the latter were sanitary and efficient and were used in some southern cities, but the courts decided that modern underground sewers were the proper thing for Melrose Park, and the first sewer was built on Lake Street at a cost of $20,000.00. The court granted the first five years' special assessment for this purpose in


Cook County. An efficient water ,,'orks system was also considered. After about three years of hard labor, this system, which i one of the best in the country, was installed at a cost of 45,000.00. Mr. Bohlander visited twentyfive villages at his own time and expense to ascertain the cost and the best water works system. Mr. Bohlander refers with pleasure to the great Fourth of July celebrations for which Melrose Park was noted for a number of years. Everybody turned out and three or four thousand people would be in attendance each year. The affair was gotten up exclusively by the citizens. In concluding the early reminiscences of l\1r. Bohlander. \\"e must not forget to mention that he saw the beginning of the great Latrobe Steel ~Torks, of which this village is justly proud. In 1875 it ,,'as only a small affair called the Chicago Spring Works, employing but a few men. In 1886 it \yas enlarged and became the Chicago Tire & Sprin<T vVorks, and later it grew into what it is to-day, one of the great iron works of the country. Mr. Bohlander was married to :.\1iss l\I'ary A. Haenel, of Chicago, in 1885, a woman of high character and fine ocial qualities. The\- haye t\yO children, Roy and Blanche.

InlMONG W

l\1R. THO:.\1:\.

GOOD:.\L\X;

the substantial and prominent, yet unassuming citizens of Melrose Park, :.\1r. Thomas Goodman should be mentioned. He is an earnest and enthusiastic worker for the upbuilding and advancement of his home Village. Mr. Goodman was born in Bowmanville, Ontario, Canada, in 1851. He comes from sturdy Canadian stock, and he has an unbending will in standing always for what he believes to be the right in either public or private life. He learned the trade of wire working. He once owned a large factory in the city of Toronto. Canada, in the manufacturing of wire goods which he operated for ten years ,,-ith success. In 1882 he moved to Chicago. opened a factory, and has been continuously doing a large and successful business in that city since he started. Mr. Goodman, desiring a suburban home, selected Melrose Park,' and located here in 1894. He was one of the first purchasers of lots on 18th Ave. and 10th St., in the pretty north end subdivision, where he built a beautiful home and now resides. Mr. Goodman was chosen in 1906 to assist in the civic affairs of the village. He was elected as one of the Board of Trustees. During the short time he has served, his wise judgment and labor for the best interests of the community are appreciated by the citizens. He takes an active interest in social affairs of the town and is a n;ember of the K. of P. fraternity. In 1871 Mr. Goodman \\"as married in Toronto to Miss Elizabeth McDonald, who died in 1879, leaving two sons, W. J. and F. T. He was again marneJ in 1883 to Mrs. Josephine Thomas, who is the mother of F. J. Thomas, Mrs. M. V. C. Horlick, Mrs. L. E. PlantIer and E. C. Thomas. Mrs. Goodman is well known in church and social circles as a woman of high character, always ready at the call of charity, and a christian worker and mother.

MEL ROSE PARK 53


DR. F. L. TRAPPE.

MEL

RO SE PARK 54

I"IMONG !i.!

the progressive and successful citizens \yho have proven their faith in the future prosperity and growth of Melrose Park is Dr. F. L. Trappe. \iVhile not an old resident, his enthu iasm in the upbuilding of the village and its general welfare is just as great as if he were one of it founders. Dr. Trappe was born in Doemitz, Mecklenberg cl1\\-erin, Germany, in 1874. He came to this country with his parents when but seven years old. They settled in Elgin, Ill., where he attended the public and J:arochial schools until 1888. He then became a student at the :\cademy in that city. In 1890 he entered the Concordia College, at Fort \i\Tayne, Ind., from which school he graduated with honors in 1893. He then came to Chicago, where he resided and concluded his study of medicine. In 1904 he was attracted to this village and opened an office in the Peter Bohlander Building, and began to practice medicine in earnest. In this he has been very successful and is now enjoying a large practice. Taking note of the scriptural injunction that "it i not well for man to live alone," and the lady consenting, Dr. Trappe was married to Miss iIartha 1\ Ie enbrink. Oct. 8th, 1905, a well-known young woman whose parents are old and prominent citizens, residing a few miles west of the village. Last year Dr. Trappe purchased Dr. cott's former residence at No. 13 I 19th Ave., where he liyes and ha his office.

Iml l!lJ

:-IR. THO:-L\.

DA.'-I 0:\.

R. THO:-L\ D.--\.YI 0:\. enior member of the wellknO\\"11 firm of Davison & Thompson. cement contractors, who make a specialty of laying cement side\\'alks, building sewers and heavy iron pipe work, etc., wa born in heffield, England, in 1870. He was educated in his native to\\'n and learned the trade of a brick mason there. vVhen he was IS years of age he went to Cumberland, England, where he remained until he was 21. \iVhile there he met Mr. Thompson and the two formed a friendship which will last through life. They came to America together in 1891, coming practically direct to Melrose Park, where, after a short time they entered into partnership in the cement contracting business. Their venture was a succesS from the start and has only drawn closer the bond of friendship. Mr. Davison lived on 21st Ave. for over IS years, but recently moved just outside the village boundary. Hi interest in the welfare of the village, however, is no les keen than when he resided here. He never held public office, yet, on the other hand, he never neglected his duty of citizenship in voting' for officers he believed would act for the best interests of his adopted villa<Ye. 1r. Davison's success as a business malT is due only to industry, economy, and the best use of his talents, as he arrived here without capital or influence and had only his brain and brawn to depend upon. He was married in Melrose Park in 1899 to Miss May \iVorley, a woman of high character and great personal charm. She, too, was born in Sheffield, England. They have one daughter, Olive May.


:'1:R. MICH EL YOUNG.

1rt11 N E of the first settlers and successful business men of Mel~

rose Park is :'Ir. :'Iichael Young. He has seen the very beginnin o ' of this now prosperou and fast-growing community. His father built and occupied the fourth house in the place. :i\lr. Young ,,,as born in Germany, on the Rhine, in 1861, and came to this country with his parent in 1868. They located iT! Chicago, where he learned the plumbing trade ,,'ith the old north side firm of Gunderman Brothers. The family moved to :'Iaywood, Ill., in 1877, and occupied the old South Side school hou e. the only re idence obtainable. In 1879 they came to :i\lelrose Park. at that time nothing but a va t prairie with considerable 10'" land ,,,hich en'ed as an excellent hunting ground, a duck, prairie chicken, quail and snipe ,,,ere plentiful. :'Ir. Young, being fond of hunting, tells of these early days and ho,,' he bagged game in every ection of the territory now covered by the villa<Ye. In 1889 Mr. Young, associated with Mr. G, H, Bohlander. formed a copartnership under the firm name of Young & Bohlander. They did a uccessful plumbing and hardware busines. from the start, In I 91 the firm ,,'as dissolved, and since then Mr. Youn<Y ha been engaged alone in the plumbing. ga fitting and steam heating bu iness. He i the leading plumber in :'Ielrose Park and vicinity, and carries a large tock of merchandise and upplies. Hi office and store are at the corner of 19th _-\"e and 1st t. His work can be seen in nearly all the best buildin<Ys in this village and many in Maywood, and other nearby to\\"l1 . Mr. Young is also O\\"l1er of the bu ines building south of his store, and at one time owned the entire half-block on 19th Ave. south of 1St St. He ha given considerable time to social affairs, i a member of the K. of P., the 1\1. 'vV. . and the Royal rcanum, having been a member of the latter order for 2 I years. He was married in 1886 to Miss Margaret" Bohlander, who came from one of the oldest and best familie of Provi 0 Town hip, Their children are \iV alter P., Harry G., Irene ),1. and Bertram C.

In l1\1

NG the progressive busine men of this community is Mr. James Thompson. of the ,,'ell-kno,,"n firm of Davison & Thompson. :'lr. Thompson was born in Birmingham, England, in 1868, In hi nati,'e country he worked for his father in the coal mines at Old Hill, a suburban place near the city of his birth. In 18g1 he, with his friend, nIr. Davison, decided to come to this c untry, They had no capital, but posse sed what was better still, the fire of youth and the spirit of industry which make for success. On their arrival in Chicago they found employment at job work in cement construction. oon after this time the two friends entered into that partner hip, which has now la ted for 16 years, and ha only served to bind closer the tie of friendship, They are general contractors, thei r specialty being sewers, heavy iron pipe work, cellar Aoors and cement sidewalks, They have laid mile of sidewalks in i\Ielrose Park, :'Iay,\"ood and other towns and cities. Mr. Thompson was a re ident of the village for over IS years, but has recentl," moved just acro s the tracks, as he is intere ted in real estate there, He i , however, just as enthusiastic for the advancement and ,,'elfare of the village a if he till made it his home, lthough he advocate the u e of cement for almost every purpose he has not yet found out the ecret of cementing two hearts, he being a bachelor,

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MEL ROSE PARK 55


MR. EDWARD GOLDACKER. MEL

ROSE PARK 56

~"'I NE of the firm believers in the future of :.\1elro e Park is ~

l'1r. Ed\\'ard Goldacker, who has been a substantial citizen of the village for over 20 years. Mr. Goldacker was born in Xordhau en, Germany, in 1856, and learned the machinist trade there. He served hi native country a a soldier and an officer for three year. vVhile yet a young man. 29 year old, he came to this country, accompanied by his wife, and arri\'ed at Chicago in 1885. They remained there a hort time. and then Mr. Goldacker obtained employment with the Chicaao Tire & Spring ~Torks at his trade. As there \\'ere then only a very few houses in :.\1elrose Park, he was compelled to occupy for a while, one of the houses in l'1a)"\\'ood nicknamed "The Butterine Boxes," on account of their peculiar architecture and construction. These houses were certainly curiosities. and are remembered as such by the old citizens, In 1886 he moved to Melrose Park and has resided here ever since. When Mr. Goldacker first engaged \\,ith the pring Works, now the Latrobe Steel & Coupler \\1orks, only 50 men were employed. To-day the force numbers over 1300. There were then no sidewalks, and the principal thoroughfare wa the J'\orthwestern track, unless one was a good swimmer or boatsman. He remained with the company for I I years and then, in 1897, accepted a position with N orton Brothers, Maywood, which he held for seven year . By industry and saving he accumulated sufficient means during the period of his employment to enable him to retire from manual labor, and he erected a large bu iness building in 1904 at 1st t. and 15th Ave. Last year, 1906, a large addition \\'as added. :.\1r. Goldacker. \\,ho is associated with his son Edward, occupies the premise. and together they conduct a first class buffet in connection \\'ith bO\ding alleys. billiard and pool room, They ha\'e a host of friend. and a large patronaae among the be t people. :.\1r. Goldacker \\'a married in HanO\'er. Germany. in I 79. to :.\1is Elizabeth Ewald, who has shared her hu band' ucce a hi \'aluable helpmate. Their son, Edward. Jr.. an enterpri ina youn a busine man. wa recently married to Miss adie Ander on, of Chicago.

lUI

l'1R. HE-:\RY WOCHTEXDORF.

N writing brief sketches of the ubstantial citizen and successful busines men of Melrose Park, to omit :.\1r. Henry vVochtendorf would be amiss. He \\'as born in Oldenburg, Germany, in 1870, where he learned the trade of a baker. In I 88, at the ao'e of 18, he left his native land and came to Chicago with his parents, fe\\' month after his arrival he had the misfortune to lose hi father. This left him the support of hi widO\red mother 0 that he began life in earnest while yet in his teens. He found employment at his trade and, by pluck and saving accumulated enough means to go into busines for himself. In 1895, after visiting thi. villaae, he decided to cast his lot here. He purchased the bakery and buildin a at No. 141 19th Ave., where he ha been doing a large and successful business ever since the day he started. His success can be largely attributed to his practical knO\dec1ge of the busines , the use of the best materials, the makin a of his goods with the right taste, and la~t but not lea. t, to the perfect cleanliness of hi9 store and shop, which is well-known to all the citizens. Mr. Wochtendorf always stands first for any measure to advance the interests of his home village. He belongs to several social and benevolent societies. His mother, Mrs. Amalie Wochtenc1orf. makes her home with him. Mr. Wochtendorf was married in 1894 to Miss nnie Berger, of Chicago, an excellent woman. Their children are-Herbert, Erna, Alice and Katherine.


l\1R. HENRY BELING. IrnlR. HEKRY BELIKG is one of the substantial and best !!tJ knO\\"I1 citizens and bu iness men of the village. He \Ya~ born in Germany in 1861, and came to thi country alone, in 1880, when but 19 years old, without capital, but with plenty of youthful viaor and ambition to help him to win his place among men of integrity and succes. Thi aim he has fully accomplished, by industry and the best use of his talents. His first place of residence was near Freemont, Ohio, where . he worked on a farm for some time. He then moved to Cleveland, and in 1890 came to Melrose Park. From the very first he became active in working for the welfare and progres of hi adopted village. X at only has he always taken a great intere t in citizenship, but he has proyen hi faith in the future progress of the place. He has invested his saving in building one of the first large busine blocks at 19th Ave. and 1st St. He al a has con. siderable other property. He first ,,'ent into bu iness on 12th ve. and Lake t. but. after everal years moved to 19th Ave and Lake t., where he remained until 1902. He then moved into his handsome ne,,' building at the corner of 19th A,Ye. and 1st St., where he conducts one of the most finely equipped sample room. bowling alleys and billiard halls in any suburb of Chicago. His courteous manner and the open business-like treatment extended to hi customers has made his place both popular and refined. Among his patrons are many from the City of Chicago, as well as from the urrounding yillage . Mr. Belin a \I'as elected a Tru tee of the Yillaae Board and served with credit from 1902 to 1904, at a time \I'hen much work as well as wise judgment was required in judiciously spending large l1111S of money in the public improvements which are now enjoyed by the citizens. He belonas to several social and benevolent ocietie, i a lover of sport, and can relate many stories of the hook and line. He married Miss Anna Kairies, of Chicago, a most estimable woman. They have two daughters, Minnie and Elsie. MR. JOHN ENGBRECHT. InlLTHO GH yet a young man, the ubject of our sketch can be numbered among the" earlier citizens and business men of the village. 1\Ir. Engbrecht is a native of Germany, where he wa born in 1878. He came to this country with hi parents in 18 6, when but 8 year old. The family came direct to Elmhurst, Ill., where they ettled. \Yhen a boy he first attended the German Lutheran School in Austin, III., and afterwards in Melrose Parle He holds the distinction of being the first boy confirmed in St. Paul's German Evangelic;>] Church in this village. t an early age he learned the bar T trade under :\Ir. L. "-. Richter. Mr. Engbrecht faced life in earnest befo e many young people begin to formulate their life's work. He opened a barber shop on his own account at the age of 17, and married a most estimable ~'otmg woman \I"hen he wa but 18 years old. Mr. Engbrecht is no\\' in the barber busine s at the same stand he opened twelve years aao at N 0, 15-1- 19th Ave. His shop is a model of cleanliness, well equipped with modern fixtur and furni hinas. His bath rooms are warm and up to date. By hi steady ha 'ts and courteous treatment to all he has made many friends and has built up large and ucce sful busines . He is alway active for a y measure that tends to the advancement of his adopted home village. He was married in 18¢ to l\liss Maud Adams, a member of one of the best families of Melrose Par. They have two sons, Edward and John, Jr.

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MEL RO SE PARK 57


MR. WILLIAM BREDEN BECK. MEL ROSE PARK 58

he has 8W 1 LTHOUGH village, the subject

only recently become a citizen of this of our sketch is a staunch believer in the future growth and prosperity of his ne\\' home town. and is to-day an earnest worker in the ranks of the village builders. :\Ir. \¥illiam Bredenbeck was born in Segin, Germany. in 1868. and was brought to this country by his parent \\'hen only two years old. The family settled in :\I'aryville, 1\10., and a a boy he attended school there and worked on his father's farm near the town. At the age of 20 he came to Chicago and obtained a position with the General Fire Extinguisher Co., and remained with them seven years. He is no\\' employed by the utomatic Sprinkler Co., Chicago. Mr. Bredenbeck is an expert workman and has installed their system in many large business hou es ami factory buildings in the city. Two years ago, being attracted by the many advantages of Melrose Park, Mr. Bredenbpck decided to make his home here, and purchased the pretty hou e at No. 1315 18th Ave. In 1899 he married 1\1iss Lena Kelaenski in Chicago. She is a woman of fine qualities and is also a native of Germany. They have three interesting Children, Wilhelmina, born January 21, 1901, in Maryville, Mo.; Frederick, born March 2nd, 1903, in Chicago, and Edward Otto, born in Melrose Park, February 8th, 1905. 1

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:\IR. J.

J.

BILLIN GHEIi\IER.

R. J. J. BILLIN GHEIl\IER has always taken great interest in the development and progress of his adopted yillage and is to-day one of the most popular citizens of :\Ielro e Park. al 0 a taunch worker in its social and civic affair. He \\'a born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1857, and received the usual public school education. vVhi1e yet a young man he \\'a engaged a mauager of the Bellevue House, a summer resort He remained there for five years and was sucnear Cinci . cessful in h' k. He then accepted the manacrement of the ti. This hall was the largest in the country Billingheimer Billiard Halls, and many championship games played there by noted international players. Mr. Billingheimer remained the 10 year. In 1887 he came to Chicago an the employ of the old cigar and tobacco house of \¥. H. Heegard & Co., he remained for 15 years as salesman. Upon the death of Mr. Heegard, he ed a position with the Challenge Cigar Co., and is still connected with this . as salesman. He is very popular with his trade and is doing a large b . S~ throughout the western part of Chicacro and the suburban towns. Mr Billincrheimer was elected village in 1904 and en'ed two years. He belongs to several social and benevolent f:....,Iti·jti·E~J among them, the Knights of Pythias, in which he lias held all the 0 d the Loyal mericans, of which he is now President. In 1886 he married Miss Caroline Coughlin, of endelon, Ohio, a splendid woman and companion. They have four _.:i~_·_._ David, Bessie, Rebecca and Benjamin.


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MR. JOHN G. CARSON.

EN with strong convictions of the right, optimistic rather than pessimistic, progressive in civic, business, and social affairs, 'make up the essentials of manhood necessary to , prosperous community. Such men are found in Mlelrose :Park and among them is 1\1r. John G. 路arson. This villaO'e wa found ed by those who commenced life from an obscure beginning, who by perseverance. toil and the be t use of their talents have, in a few years, built up a town with modern public improvements, pretty street and last, but not least, beautiful home. Mr. Carson is counted as one of the early settlers. He came to this Village He was born in Sweden 38 years ago (1868), and came alone to in 1888. the New World when 18 years old. His capital was something better than gold; youthful vigor, an honest hopeful heart, and a thorough knowledO'e of the blacksmith trade. He landed in Chicago in 1886. Two years later he ecured employment in Melrose I ark with the Latrobe Steel & Coupler \\forks, where he remained for seven years. In 1895 he accepted a position \\'ith the American Can Co. at Maywood, Ill., where he has been employed ever ince. Desiring to utilize hi spare time evening. :-1r. Car on engaged in the in urance busines , as a ide line. In 189-1- he \\'as offered the aO'ency of everal good fire in urance companies. He no\\' repre ent what he consider the stronO'est companie in the world, giYing hi patron an excellent list to elect from. He also ha plate glas in urance. The companies represented by 1\1r. Car on are the Aetna, :\'iagara. HanO\路er. Commercial Union. Germania, Hamburg-Bremen and Fireman' Fund. Hi business i constantly increasin<Y, and he can be found in his office at :\'0. 132 19th _ yeo every evening. He is a member of the Chicago Board of -nderwriters and a ~ otary Public. He draws up legal papers and as ume the management of estates, etc. Mr. Carson is al 0 a member of the board of directors of the Citizens' State Bank. 'While his variou busines interests keep him very busy he still finds time to devote to church, civic and social affairs. He is a member and trustee of the Swedish Lutheran Church, also an officer and member of several fraternal societies. In 1902 he was elected Village Trustee; he has been continuously re-elected and this office he holds to-day. Mr. Carson was married in 1894 to Miss Josie Anderson, an excellent woman. Their happy home is brightened by three intere ting children. \Yalclamar, Lester and Viola.

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MR. JOHN KRISKI.

R. JOHN KRISKI has been held in high esteem by his friends and fellow citizens for nearly a quarter of a century. He is an old settler of Melrose Park and has witnessed the rapid dev'elopment of this now vigorous and prosperous town almo t from its very beginning. \iVhile the majority of people, perhaps, lead seemingly uneventful lives among the familiar surroundings of their birth, some are privileged to travel all over the world and to take part in scenes that pass into history. Such was the good fortune of Mr. Kriski. He was born in Danzig, vVe t Prussia, in 1848, and lived there until a young man. He then entered the German Navy and served for twelve years. During this ervice he visited nearly all the important sea ports of the world, and the remini cences of hi sailor life are fascinating enough to keep the small boy'

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MEL ROSE PARK 60

from the streets at night, afe in the light of the evening lamp. He ,yas present at the dedication of the opening of the great Suez Canal in November, 1869, on which occasion four hundred battle ships of different nations participated. Mr. Kriski also witnessed the punishment meted out to Chinese pirates captured by his ship on the high seas. Instead of being put to death at once. their ship was dismantled, the masts cut, the food and water confiscated, and the then helpless pirate ship was turned adrift and left to its certain fate. On leaving the Javy in 1876, he went to England and shipped on a merchantman at Liverpool, ,Yorking his way to San Francisco, arriyin CT d' ere after a voyage of six months. This ended his sea-faring career. . For a time he made his home in Portland, Oregon, where he met :.\lrs. Louisa Frillman, to whom he was married in 188!. Mrs. Frillman was born in Leyden Township, only a short distance from the village. Her father. :'\[r. Fred Mesingbrink, is one of the oldest settlers. In 1846 he bought a farm on Lake Street, about one and a half miles "'est of i\Ielrose Park. Mr. Kriski came to Melrose Park in 1883, two years after his marriage. Here he was for a time in the express business and was afterward employed bv the Latrobe Steel vVorks for ten years. At present he is connected ,Yith Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co. Mr. and 11,r . Kriski have two sons, Ed"'in and Frederick. Edwin is an electrician with the Latrobe Steel vVorks, and Fred learned the trade of a molder and has worked in different parts of the country.

:.\1R. GEORGE C. KOPP.

lrAl\ O:.\II::\G alone to this country in 1891, when he was only 15 year old, :.\1r. George C. Kopp is to-day one of the public ~

pirited and successful business men of Melrose Park. He was born in Germany in 1876, and came to Oak Park, Illinois, in 189!. He was first employed as a clerk by the A. \iV estphal Bottling Co., River Forest, Ill., but in 1893 he moved to this yillage and took a position as bartender with Mr. John Gold, where he remained for four years. He was then employed in a similar capacity with Mr. Frank Raven for about six years. In 1903 he formed a partnership with l\f r. . H. Rentz, under the firm name of Rentz & Kopp. T\yo and a half years later :.\1r. Kopp became the sole owner and is still conducting business at the old stand, corner of Railroad Street and 19th Ave. He has a most popular buffet in connection with first class bowling alleys, billiard and pool room, and also a fine ummer garden which ha plendid patronage during the season. NIr. Kopp, unaided, has been the author and builder in his achievements. Industry, saving and steady habits were his only capital in the beginning, as he had in his pocket only $2.50 to begin life "'ith on his arrival in this country. Mr. Kopp is a property owner, and also a stock holder in the Citizens' State Bank. He is Secretary of the Volunteer Fire Department and belonCTs to several social and benevolent organizations. In 1896 he married i\Ii Minnie Schuett, of vVinfield, Ill., whose parents are one of the best families in that town. They had three children, Ella, deceased, Gertrude, now five years old, and Arthur. Mjrs. Carolina Kopp, the mother of Mr. Kopp, visited him during the Summer of 1906, and has now returned to her home in Hamburg, Germany, well pleased with her son's progress.


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MR. AUGUST W. B CHHOLZ.

MON G the well-knO\Yn citizens is Mr. ug. Buchholz, a man always active in the support of any interests that tend to the advancement and welfare of his home village. He is a member of the Board of Trustees, and chairman of that important committee, fire and water. His generous heart and courteous manner makes him very popular among his fellowtownsmen. He was born in New York City, December IIth, 1867, and is the son of a veteran of the civil' war. He was brought up in Philadelphia, where he received his early training and lived until he was twenty-sevf'n years old. He then came west (1893) and located at ::'I[elrose Park, where he was employed by the Latrobe Steel & Coupler Co. For a number of years he has been successfully engaged in the decorating, painting and Paper-hanging business on his own account. He employs a number of workmen in season, and his patrons are constantly increasing. Hi office is at his home, No. 154 20th Ave. Mr. Buchholz has always taken great intere t in athletics. At one time he was a member of the Y. M,. C. . Athletic Club in Philadelphia. He organized the first baseball team in this village. He was married in 1896 to l\Iiss Emma Doering. an excellent woman. They have two sons, Charles and Elmer.

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::'IR. WILLIA::'I THO::'IAS.

N MAKIKG mention breifly of the village builders and old """,, citizens, the name of Mr. vVilliam Thomas as one of the f "." early, active and tireless workers a a citizen. and official, with only the upbuilding and best interest of the village at I heart, is well known to all, unless citizens of very recent date. The present generation can scarcely conceive the many diffi-" culties that beset those pioneer town builders during the formative and building period. The lack of all conveniences made the simplest duty a task. nceasin cr labor and even the burning of midnight oil in conference was the price paid for the comforts now enjoyed bv all in the shape of modern sanitary public improvement. The highest prai~e and honor belong to them. 1\-11". Thomas waf born in hl'crland, of Welsh parents, in 1852. He \,"as e,lucated in his native country, and learned the machinist trade there, coming to America in 1880. He remained in the east for two years, and then came to Chicago and entered the employ of Norton Brothers. vVhen the firm moved to May\'rood, Ill., in 1885, he went with them, and was the second advance machinist in tl1\:~;r employ at that time. In 1887 he accepted the po ition of foreman for the Chicago Tire & Spring Works, and when, in 1894, the company merged into what is now the great Latrobe Steel & Coupler 'Norks, NIr. Thomas was made master mechanic. This position he held until 1899. During the following year he erected the hand ome building at Lake Street and Nineteenth Avenue, where he has since conducted a first-class sample room and billiard hall. Mr. Thomas has always taken an active interest in civic and social affairs. He was elected President of the village in 1889, '91, '92, '95 and '96, and trustee in 1888. The first street lamps were put up during his administration and electric light put in. "

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Our space is far too small to recount many of Mr. Thomas's interesting recollections of the early days in the history of the village. He relates, however, that Mr. Thomas Boddy was the first village constable, at the munificent salary of $15.00 per month, but he was paid extra as the official lamplighter, and his ladder was presented by Mr. Thomas to the Fire Department some time ago. . During his presidency in 1889 he appointed Mr. 'William Iken, village engmeer. . Mr. Thomas was also Grand Master of the first of those famous Fourth of July celebrations, and he obtained the money to pay for the big flag and pole which were raised June 18th, 1898, costing $235.00. The pole was destroyed by a storm March IOth, 1905. He also made a cannon worth $200. and its detonations have notified the adjacent villages of the live patriotism abounding in Melrose Park. When Mr. Thomas first came to the village there were ditches six feet deep on each side of Lake Street. At one time a citizen accidenally drove his team into one of them and both the horses were drowned. This incident gives some idea of what the early settlers had to contend against. Mr. Thomas was married in Philadelphia in 1880 to Miss Ellen Shearer of Aberdeen, Scotland, an excellant woman. They have one son, William, Jr.

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MR. HENRY C. GILES.

K old settler and enterprising business man is Mr. Henry C. Giles. Always an active and willing worker for the advancement of the best interests of his adopted home village, whose growth he has witnessed almost from the beginning, to-day, more than ever, he "stands up" for NIelrose Park. Mr. Giles was born in Jersey City, N. ]., in 1853. and was educated in the public and private schools there. He learned the trade of a carpenter, and in 1872 succeeded his father in the cooperage business in New York city, carrying it on successfully for ten years. Desiring to go west, he sold out his business in New York in 1882, and came to Melrose Park, where he engaged with the Chicago Tire & Spring VI orks in the spring department, residing, however, in ifaywood until 1885. He remained with the works until 1895, when wishing to enter business on his own account, he opened a cigar and stationery store at 19th Avenue and 1st Street. a very small beginning, the space being only 12X12 feet. He afterwards took larger quarters in the Henry Beling building, but his busine s outgrew the ~pace there, and in 1904 he moved to his commodious store at No. 6 19th Ave., ""here he carries the largest retail stock of cigars, tobacco, stationery and confectionery in the village. He also has a fine store in Maywood at 19th Avenue and St. Charles Road. In addition to his retail trade, Mr. Giles has an extensive \:vholesale cigar and tobacco business at No. () 19th Avenne. "Mr. Giles has always taken considerable interest in civic affairs. He was elected Village Clerk in 1886, when the total votes numbered only 85, and served eight years. In 1894 he was elected trustee, and served two years. He was appointed Collector in 1900 and also in 1905. He is a member of several fraternal and benevolent societies. Mr. Giles was married in Jersey City in 1875 to Miss Mary Sutherland, who died in 1884, leaving two sons, James and Charles. In 1893 he married Mis3 Ella Lewi~, by whom he has one son, Clay. The sons are all residents of 1\1 elrose Park.


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MR. PETER STERT.

N reading of successful men, there is alw3.y'; the keen desire to look back and follow their career from its beginning. It is this feeling which makes us trace with interest the steps by which lVIr. Peter Stert, the subject of this sketch, rose from a mere peddler to be one of the successful merchants of Melrose Park. Mr. Stert came direct from Russia to Chicago in 1891, reaching a distant country, where the language and customs were strange to him, with only a few pennies in his pocket. He had been a dry goods clerk in his native land, and he at once turned his knowledge of business to good account. He parted with his meager capital fGr a handful J£ merchandise, and, with only his basket and a sto'Jt pair 0 f legs, backed by unfailing courage, started west from Chicago towards this village peddling his wares. His honesty and industry secm'ed him many customers and insured his success from the start. He continued peddling for 13 years, until. in 1904, inspired by the large and constantly increasing business acquaintance formed during the years he carried his basket, he opened a store at 18th ,-\venue and Lake Street. Here his business grew so rapidly that a year later he \\'as again compelled to enlarge, and, in 19°5, he built his own commodious tore at ~ o. I04 19th Avenue, where he conducts a large business in dry goods. clothing. boots and shoes. etc., with a future as promising as its past \"as brillia:l 1 . Mr. Stert is a progressive man, and is always active in any measure that will promote the advancement of the village. He i the owner of some fine residence property in Maywood, and is a stockholder in the Citizens' State Bank, Melrose Parle He was born in Jetamer, Russia, in 1862, and was married in his native country to Miss Rebecca Ratner, a \\'oman of high character, in 1883: Their children are Abraham, Benjamin. Henry, Ethel, Rose and Israel, all living at home.

MR. PETER J. ROGGENBUCK.

J. Roggenbuck has been one of the substantial and much respected citizens of Melrose Park. He is justly proud of his adopted village, and is ever ready to assist with heart and hand in any measure that will promote its welfare and advancement. Mr. Roggenbuck was born in Germany in 1861, and served his apprenticeship as a miller there. In his young manhood his thoughts, as is the case with so many citizens of our great country. turned to the New vVorld, and in 1884 he decided to come to America. He came direct to Chicago, arriving there with very little money, but with the vigor of youth and plenty of determination. In 1886 he moved to Melrose Park, and became an employee of the American Can Company at M::otywood. Ill. He remained with them for 13 years, and his steady habits and strict application to business won for him the position of foreman. This position he held for eight years. In 1899 he eng'aged in the saloon l)\lsiness on his own account, first at 11th Avenue and First Street, and afterwards at 19th Avenue and Lake Street. Tn 1905 he disposed of his business interests and was appointed patrolman of the Village police force. which position he now holds. Mr. Roggenbuck was married in 1890 to Miss Barbara Knippen of Lombard, Ill., daughter of one of the oldest and best families in that vicinity. They have seven children, John. Peter. Frank, Arthur, Anna, Clara and George. Mr. RogO'enbuck and his family are earnest members of the Sacred Heart Church.

I~I OR over 20 years Mr. Peter

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LIGS TREN (LER.

lriill HE village of :-1elrose Park has its full quota of eli-made I.J men; men "'ho, starting from a humble beg-inning, have. with a stout heart, by their own hon~st cffcrt~. combined with industry as their only capital, overCO:T,C :;eel11ingl~' unsurmountable difficulties, until they have won places among the successful and respected citizens of the commlinity. Amon,:S tilese men ,,'e especially mention :-1r. JlIlin.., Trenkler. He \"as born in Germany in 1861, was reared in his natiYe land, and learned civil engineering there. He came alone to thi country in 1884, \"hen but 23 years old, and went direct to :-1aywood, Ill. In 1885 he entered the employ of the Maywood pioneer business house, Bohlander Brothers, and remained with them until 1891. On leaving his employers, he accepted a position as cashier in the general store of Peter Bohlander in this village, and moved here. His industry and economy enabled him, in association with his cousin, Mr. Robert Trenkler, to purchase the grocery and meat department from his employer in 1903. The firm of Trenkler & Trenkler has to-day a larcre trade among the be t people, in one of the finest market and crrocery stores west of State Street, Chicago. By trictly adhering to their golden rule, 16 ounces to the pound to man. woman or child, and nothing but the best of everything to eat, they have become very successful. While Mr. Trenkler's business requires his close attention, he always finds time to interest himself actively in any measure that tends to the advancement and upbuilding of his home town. He is a member of the -:\1asonic fraternity, and was "\ illage Treasurer of :-1aywood, Ill., from 1889 to 1890. In 1889 :-1r. Trenkler married Mrs. Louise Blume, an estimable woman and an old re ident of this to\mship. Their children are 'Walter, l\1agdalene, \Vilbert, Emily, Alene and Clarabelle.

:-[R. ROBERT TRENKLER. I~I NE

of the most popular merchants of the place is Mr. Robert Trenkler of the well-known firm of Trenkler & Trenkler. He was born in 1862 within two miles of the villacre boundary, so that he can almost lay claim to the distinction of bein cr a native-born villager. \Vhen a boy he attended the public school during the "'inter, but as soon as the fir t robin made its appearance hi book ,,'ere laid aside for a practical education in the art of tilling the soil. He remained on the farm until he ,,'as 25 years old, In 1888 he moved to Oak Park, 111., where he re ided, but he \"as employed in the machinist department of the \J\T estinghouse l\Iachine Company at Craigin for ome time. For about five and a half years he was a member of the police department at Oak Park. In 1903, desiring to enter business on his own account, he a ociated himself with his cousin, NIr. Julius Trenkler, and together they purchased the meat and grocery department of :Hr. Peter Bohlander of this village. In this venture they have been highly successful, and their store ranks to-day as one of the most complete retail groceries and markets in Cook County, not excepting Chicago. Mr. Trenkler was married in 1885 to Miss Alvina Hacker, who is a splendid wife and mother. They have seven children living, Clara, Amelia, J uliu" Edwin, Elenora, Clarence and Florence. ~


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DR. PAUL B. KIONKA.

LTHOUGH his professional duties make pressing demands upon his time, Dr. Paul B. IZionka can always be found in the front ranks of the leading active public-spirited and progressive citizens of the village. His ambition and work have had a great influence in elevating the general character of the community. He was born in Roseland, Ill., (now part of Chicago) in I87!. His father, ::'.Ir. Carl Kionka, was born in Germany, but emigrated to this country at an early age and was one of the pioneer settlers of that territory now in the vicinity of I 11th Street. Dr. Kionka receiyed the rudiments of an education in the puhlic and parochial schools of his native village. At the age of 14 he began work in a drug store. In 1885 he attended and graduated from the Bryant & Stratton Business eollea-e. He then returned to the drug store in his home town, where he acquired a full knO\dedge of pharmacy. In 1890 he entered the Bennett Medical College and a-raduated from that school in 1893. Desiring, however, to gain further kno\dedge in his chosen profession. together "'ith practical experience under eminent instructors, he sailed for Europe in the fall of that year, and at once became an assistant in the great Charite Ho pital in Berlin, Germany. Here he received practical instruction under the world-famous educators and doctors, Prof. Von Bardeleben in surgery. and Prof. Gerhardt in internal medicine. On his return to this country he commenced the practice of medicine in Chicago. In 1 96 he moved to :-Ielrose Park, where he has been hia-hly ucces ful. He occupies a fine uite of office in the Citizens' State Bank Building at 19th Ave. and I t Street. Dr. Kionka i a director of the Citizens· State Bank and ha been Health Commissioner ince 1905. He ha served as president of the library board since 1897, being its first president. Dr. Kionka takes great personal pride in and devotes much of his pare time with his Co,\\'orker to the upbuilding of the village Public Library. This institution is much appreciated and liberally patronized by the citizens. He belongs to the Masonic Fraternity, also a member and the physician for the Royal League, Loyal Americans and Modern 'Voodmen of America. He is a member of the ux Plaines and Chicago :-Iedical ocieties. In 1896. Dr. Kionka was married to i-lis Amanda Sturm. a talented young woman, who e father was a city official of Chicago for a number of years. They haye t\yO children living, Paul. Jr.. and :-Iarvel.

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:-IR. :-IA.TTHE"·

J.

CR.-\:-IER.

R. l\I TTHEW J. RA.:-IER is one of the strong pillars of the community. a citizen held in high esteem by his fellow townsmen, and is an earnest and unselfish worker in all that tends to promote the public good. He wa born in Portage. 'Vis.. February 3rd, 1866. There he attended the public schools and lived until he \\'as 19 years old. Being ambitiou to fit him elf for a practical life he went to Rockford. Ill., in 1885. and learned the trade of a machinist. In 1887 he went to Chicago, where he was engaged at his trade for a number of years. In 1895 he accepted a position with orton Bros. Company at their ~IaY\\'ood works and, at this time became a

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resident of }Ielrose Park. His industn" and stead," habits made him a valuable employee and he remained \\"ith the com1'any for- ten years. Out of his own savings he \\'as enabled in 1900 to purchase his pretty home at ::\0, 133 15th Avenue. In 1905 he received a flattering offer from one of the largest and trongest life insurance companies in the \\'orld. the }Ietropolitan of ::\e\\' York. and wa induced to leave hi trade and accept it. }Ir. Cramer has been immensely successful in his new work. He has the rare combination of Cjualities that go to make up the "born salesman." and is one of the best workers in the compan~'. He was one of the ten solicitors "'hose ratings tood highest in the Oak Park district last year. Mr. Cramer was married in 1897 to Mrs. Funger. Her maiden name was Miss Mary Porter. and she was a descendant of the historical Porter family, the first of whom landed in America in 1640. She died in 1982 and three years later 1\1r. Cramer married lUi s Alice D. Baile\'. one of the first dalwhters born in Melrose Park. Her father \\'as }Ir. R. Bailey, one of the few pioneers of the village \\'ho are living to-day. }Irs. Cramer is an excellent Christian woman.

:'IIR. G, BRIEL DE I~I OR

l~RANCO

nearly t\\'enty years 1\1r. Gabriel De Franco has been a resident of this village. His name can now be engraved on the roll of the earh' settlers. He \\"as born in Casteolione. Italy, in 1869. and came to this country \\"ith his parents in 1882. first settling in ::\ew York, but later. in 1885. he came to Chicago. Desiring to see more of the ,,"orld. he made t\VO trips to British Columbia and the Pacific Coast \\'hen yet a young man. For a time he \vas employed by the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company in the construction of their famous snow sheds. known the world over as one of the great engineering feats. In 1888 he' came to Melrose Park with his brother Leonard. and they were the first Italians in this vicinity. He first engaged in the barber business. and, for a number of years was the general circulator of the Chicago papers and periodicals for this territory. He was also in the cigar and tobacco business for several years on Lake Street. By his thrift and economy Mr. De Franco has been quite successful in his early enterprises. During and after the time that he became a citizen of this vill;l;~ he has occupied several lucrative positions in construction work. In 1891 and 1892 he was made foreman in the placing of the natural gas pipe line, laying pipes from Kokomo, Ind., to 12th and State Streets, Chicago. He had charge of over 800 men. He also held similar positions with the :Milwaukee & St. Paul and the Chicago & Northwestern and Lake Shore Railroad Companies. In 1902, associated with his brother Leonard, he erected the substantial brick building at 1400 Lake Street. In part of this building he conducts a firstclass buffet. He is very popular, and has a fine trade. In the adjoining room the firm of De Franco Brothers, of which he is a member, have their real estate, insurance and steamship agency office. This business has made remarkable progress since its inception, and has now assumed very substantial proportions. In 1893 Mr. De Franco married Miss Mary 1. Bertuccio of Chicago, a woman of intelligence and a splendid helpmate. They have five very interesting children, Peter, Michael, Tessie, Lucy and Margaret.

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~[R.

FRANK R. VOSBGRGH.

1\ making brief mention of a number of citizens of ~Ielrose Park, the name of ~[r. Frank R. \'osburgh should be included, because he is not onl\' an earl\" settler, but also a self-n~ade business man and a village-builder. " He \\"as born and reared on a farm. \\"hich gave him Ylgor and bra\\"ll to follo\\" his bent in am" direction, His mind in youth first turned to\\'ards mechanics. but he aftenrards studiecf la\\", and once became a publisher. The~e varied pursuits tended to make him a broad-minded man. one successful in large affairs, ~[r. Yosburgh \ra born in ~Iarshall. \\"is .. January 15th. 1l69. and he lived on the farm l ntil he \\'as seventeen years of age, recei\'ing t le rudiments of an education at the countn" school during the short-term \\'inter months. After leaving the farm he ,,'ent to Beloit. \\'is,. \\"here he attended the high school. He also learned the machinist trade there, A.t the ag-e of 22 he ,,'ent to Chicago, but. soon after his arrival. moyed to ~[elrose Pa;路k. ,,"here he ,,'as employed at his trade by the then Chicaao Tire & pring \\"orks. He remained with them for five years, \rhen he accepted a position in the machine shops of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad Company. He ,,'orked there for a number of years, until he was promoted to the claim department. ,,"here he remained for some time. During the years he ,,'orked at his trade he compiled and had publishe 1 a work entitled. "In truction to Foremen." ,,'hich is accepted as standard. and has had a large ale throlwhout the country, This \\'Ork establishes without a doubt the mind of a genius. Desiring to advance himself ~till ~further. he attended the night school of the Kent College of La,,'. although it often meant the burning of midnight oil after a hard day's work. So ,,"ell did he apply himself. however. that he received the degree of Bachelor of La \\'. In 1904 he opened an office at Lake Street and 19th venue. but is now located at 147 19th Avenue. where he is doing a large and successful business in real estate. having in charge a large quantity of the best vacant and improved property in the village. In connection with this he represents a number of the best fire insurance companies, makes loan!" and collections, draws up legal papers, and takes charge of estates, etc. 1\1r. Vosburgh was married in 1894 to Miss Jessie E. McGovney of ~[okena, III.. a woman of high character, whose parents were among the pioneer settlers of Illinois. her father being one of the oldest lawyers in the state. M r. Vosburah was a member of the local Machinists' Union for several years. and, during the time he worked at his trade, was an active member, holding the position of shop chairman. He also held the position of library trustee for the village. and ,,'as not only a very attentive member. but also an ardent worker for the promotion of education.

DR. Wj\I. F. SCOTT. Very few people, if any, living in Melrose Park, are better or more favorably known than Dr. William F. Scott. He was born in 18&) on a farm near Victor. Ia.. and received his elementary education in the country schools. VlThen he was 14 years old he moved to Victor and attended the high school there, graduating in 1887. He took up the study of medicine and surgery under the tutorage of a prominent physician, Dr. L. Reynolds. Aftenyards he went to Chicago, where he entered the Rush j\[edical College, finishing his course there in March,

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1892. Then, inspired by a keen love of his profession, he did post-graduate work with the college until December of the same year. Realizing that a man may do more for himself and others by contributing his young strength to a growing community, Dr. Scott moved to :Melrose Park and opened an office here, being the first resident physician in the community. He served the village faithfully as health commissioner for twelve years, and has been surgeon for the Latrobe Steel & Coupler Works for 14 years. In spite of the arduous duties of his profession, Dr. Scott has, for 15 years, been closely identified with the upbuilding of the village, always interested in civic matters and prominent in social affairs. He belongs to the Masonic Order, and is a member of a number of fraternal and social societies. . He has aided in the improvement of the realty holdings of the town by building a handsome residence on 19th Avenue. This house was one of the first built with terra cotta blocks west of State Street, Chicago. Dr. Scott is now local surgeon for the Cllicago & Northwestern Railway Company, gynecologist of the West Side Hospital and surgeon of the Oak Park Hospital. He is also a member of the American and Chicago Medical Societies, and is interested, in an incidental way, in other business enterprises in the village. He has an elegant suite of offices in the New Citizens' Bank building. Dr. Scott was married in 1893 to :Miss Stella R. Eastman of Victor, Ia., a woman of culture and refinement. They have three daughters, all born in IIelrose Park-Dorothy, Lucille and Katherine.

I"'" ~

:\IR. LEONARD DE FRANCO. ~E of the chief history-making, progressive, enthusiastic

and self-made men of i\Jelrose Park is Mr. Leonard De Franco. He ,,-a born in Ferandina. Italy. in 1876. His ancestors were of the educated and refined class. and successful business people in his nati,-e country. He ,yas brought to America by his parents in 1882, ,,-hen six years old. The family settled in :\'ew York state temporarily, then moyed to Chicago. He received his education in the public schools. \J\fhen a young man he entered the service of the Canadian Pacific Railroad Company, and for a time was on the personal staff of Sir \\'illiam Van Horne, then chief engineer of the road. Afterward he became connected with the construction department of the road, in the building of the vast snow sheds in the far northwest. He came to this village in 1888. Having learned the trade of a barber, he purchased property on 16th Avenue and 1st Street, and opened a shop in 1891. In 1892 he moved to 1406 Lake Street, where he conducted a tonsorial parlor successfully for a number of years. This shop is still open and is yet known as De Franco's Shaving Parlor. Associated with his brother. Mr. Gabriel De Franco, he has also conducted 路a real estate, insurance and steamship agency for several years, combining with same the writing of legal papers, looking after estates, notary public, etc. In 1902 De Franco Brothers (Leonard and Gapriel) built a large and handsome business building at 1400 Lake Street, which is now occupied by them. Mr. De Franco was appointed deputy sheriff in 1904, and was first assigned to the Civil Court as bailiff for the late .T udge Tuley. Later he was assigned to the Criminal Court, and has been identified in an official way with many of the celebrated trials before that court. Mr. De Franco has been a student of law for several years, and is now connected with Mr. Leo Brunhild, a noted Chicago lawyer, with offices in the Unity Building. He has devoted considerable of his time to citizenship and social affairs, and served as Village Trustee for two years, being elected in 1903.


He was chairman during his term of the two important committees, Police and Health, and Streets and Alleys; also a member of the Board of Local Improvements., During his incumbency about seven miles of streets were paved, sidewalks laid, etc., and a ne,,' air compressor was' put in at the water works. He proposed the' measure, which was adopted, to change the street numbers from the numerical to the decimal system, which has proved a great benefit by its simplicity. He was one of the original members of the Volunteer Fire Department, organized in 1894. He is now president of the Twelfth Precinct Republican Club. Mr. De Franco was president for two years of that celebrated Italian organization, Maria S. S. de Monte Carmelo; organizer of Bellina Lodge 571 K. of P., and is now a past chancellor and trustee of that lodge, a past president of the Columbian Knights Lodge, a member of the A. F. & A. M., and was organizer and is now active president of the first Italian society of 1'-1elrose Park, the Societa Mutuco Soccorso, Gnita Italiana. incorporated December 5th, 1902. (Society of Mutual Aid, T;nited Italians of :.\1elrose Park.) Mif. De Franco was married in 1900 to :.\1iss Josephine Passarella of Ital) , a splendid woman of good family. They haye three daughters. Lucy, Lilly and Angeline. Their home is at 1408 Lake ~treet. '

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l\1R. :.\1AX HELKE.

NE of the unassuming and yet mo t yalued citizens of ~1el足 rose Park is 1\1r. :.\1ax Heike, ,,'ho ,,'as born in Stockholm, . Sweden, in 1849. His parents were industrious, well-to-do people, who gave him all the advantages of a good education' and of a practical training under the leading decorators and painters of his native city. It is natural that those who have fought for success should look back with pride on their early struggles, but it also takes courage, although of a different sort, to resist the temptation to idleness that comes with easy circumstances. It is much to the credit of 1\1 r. Heike that he fully appreciated all that was given to him, and used his advantages 'so well that he became one of the first men in his line. In 1892 he received the official appointment of his government to assume cOIT1plete charge of the decorations and painting of the Swedish Building at the vVorld's Columbian Exposition, and this honor was directly due to the talent and skill displayed by him in his ,,'ork. So well did he execute this delicate task that he was retained in Chicago to oversee a large part of the decorative work and signs inside and outside of the Art Building, l\Iachinery Hall, \Voman's Building and others. The marbling of the interior and exterior of the Siam Building was an artistic' creation that attracted the favorable attention of artists and architects. V/hile he was thus engaged abroad. his wife, Anna Sophie, of Yester Os, Sweden, whom he married in' 1873, passed away in Stockholm, and he finally decided to remain in America. His four children, vVilliam, :.\1arie, David and Signa, joined him soon afterwards. The year follovving the vVorld's Fair, 1\1r. Heike located in Ravenswood, and did contract work there. He aften,'ards resided for a short time in Chicago, where he married l1iss Selma Forsman, who ,,'as born in Chustianastad, Finland. In 1896 they settled in l\Ielrose Park, ,,,here :.\1 r. Heike conducted a successful business in the painting and decorative line, numbering the leading people of this vicinity and Chicago among his customers. Mr. Heike has been employed since 1905 with E. A. Cummings & Co., the leading real estate firm of Chicago, having charge of the decorative work in

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their Harlem houses. He is at present directing the painting and decorations of their new River Forest homes. :\lr. Heike is the inventor and patentee of a portable scaffold chair for painters. an ingenious contrivance which does away \yith the often dano-erous painter's scaffold, and can also be used for windo,," \Va hing and cleaning the out side of buildings. This chair can, in case of fire, be used as a life preserYer, as the occupant can 0"0 all around the face of any building from basement to roof with rapidity and perfect safety, ascending and descending with ease, and stopping at any point with little difficulty. By this means he could take several persons at a time from a burning building and land them more easily than by the use of the fire escape or ladder. A stock company has been organized, and a market will doubtles be found for this usefui invention a soon as manufacturing operation are begun. Since comino- to l\Ielrose Park, I;lr. and :\Irs. Heike have resided in an attractive home on 13th Avenue. They have three children, Ruth, Carl and Naomi.

!ml !!lJ

l\IR. JOSEPH F. VVIPFLI.

ANY ambitious and enterprising men have been attracted to the village of :\I'elro. e Park by the great number of advantages it offers, and have become prosperous and influential citizens. Among these we note :\f'r. Joseph F. \Vipfli. He was born under the bright skies of beautiful Switzerland at the foot of the great St. Godhart Mountain in the city of Erstfeld in 1862. " During his boyhood he attended school in this, one of the prettiest valleys of the world, as. isted in farming, and herded sheep upon the mountain ide. But he longed to see the great world beyond those ,,"i mountains and yalleys, and so, at the age of 18, he embarked for ~-\merica. He left home \yith only a dollar and a haif in monev aside from his passage, but rich in the prayers and blessings of hi parf'nts. " He landed in St. Loui in 18 . and remained there for t\yo years. In 1882 he went to Chicago and engaged in the occupation of bartender in one of the best places in the city In 1898 he accepted a similar position in :\Ielrose Park, and was employed continuously until 1905. During this year he decided to engage in business on his own account at 14th .-\yenue apd 1st Street. His courteous and obliging manners have \yon him many friend!., and he is to-day enjoying a large trade as the direct resuJ~ of his 0\\"11 efforts. Mr. vVipfli was married in I9or:. to Miss Louisa chutz of Chicago, a splendid" woman and an excellent helpmate. Their only daughter, l\Iiss Carolina, lives at home. :\IR. ED\;VARD A. BARKER. IE of the most strenuous and progressive men in :\1elrose Park is l\Ir. Edward A. Barker. By his earnestness and activity he has done much to advance the community interests, and" can truly be called a village-builder. He is always ready with heart and hand to espouse the cause of the people and to encourage any measure that tends to in ure the people's welfare. Mr. Barker is an early ettler of this village and a seif-made man, having started from a humble beginning. He arrived here, in company with his brother George, in 1886, direct from Eno-land, his native land, where he was born in the city of Yorkshire in 1866. By perseverance and hard labor he has won success, and can now be numbered among the business men of large affairs. His first work was that of well digging, which he followed for several years.


Later he branched out into the general contracting line. Hi business expanded and extended to many lines. He excavated for man\" of the sewers in this village and paved 22nd Avenue. In the year 1903 he a'dmitted his son Kenneth as a partner, and the firm is now E. A. Barker & Son. They are equipped with the largest and most improved machinery for sewer building and street paving, and do a very extensive business. Among their contracts last year were $55,000 in Oak Park, $5,000 in Lake Forest, $5,000 in Libertyville, $8,000 in Downers Grove. and they are at present engaged on a $27,000 contract for the Village of Park Rido-e. Mr. Barker has been a great social factor in the conununity, a.nd has given considerable time to civic affairs. He sen'ed as Village Trustee with credit and honor in 1903 and 1904. In 1893 NIr. Barker was married to :\Iiss Johanna Larson, a woman of character and charm. Her parents \\'ere among the earliest settlers of the Village. Their children are Kenneth ..-\.. and Omie E.

lrol l!tJ

:\IR. JOH)."" \\"lLLI.-\:\IS.

R. JOHK WILLIA:'I is remembered as one of the early settlers of this no\\' prosperou and fast gro\\"ing village, and his practical interest in its general affairs has been a great help to the community. He came to :\Ielrose Park in 1888 and proved his faith in its future by investino- his money in property here. Mr. \iVilliams was born in Staffordshire, England, in 1855. He went to school until he was about IS and then worked along general lines for three year. For the next twelve years after this he devoted himself to mining in the local coal mines. but. lono-ing to see the Jew \iVorld, he decided to go to America. He spent a short time in Montreal where he landed, and then secured employment across the line in New Hampshire with a railroad construction company. Mr. Williams had a cousin, Thomas Cooke, then living in Melrose Park, with whom he corresponded. and it was through the representations and advice of thi. man that he was induced to come to this village and to make it his home. Soon after his arrival he purchased a house on T\\'enty-first Avenue. In the meantime he had secured employment \\"ith the Chicao-o Tire and Spring V\l orks. Among hi reminiscences as an "Old Timer" he relates ho\\'. in the early winter mornings, he would buckle on his skates and skim over the flooded and frozen prairie to his work. Tho e who desired a dry path would make their way to the C. & N. W. track, the best way possible, and walk on the right of way. Mr. \iVilliams was married in Stafford hire in 1879 to Miss Elizabeth Barrett. They had one child, Louisa Ann. The \\'ife and daughter are both deceased. Mil". 'Williams made his home in :'Ielrose Park for nineteen years, working first for the Chicago Tire and Spring Works. and afterwards for the Latrobe Steel and Coupler Company. For the last three years he has been connected with the large contracting firm of Davison & Thompson. He has been a prominent member of the Sons of St. George, and has always taken a general interest in the village affairs.

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?lIR. JOHK BIER1'vIAKK.

MONG the younger ambitious and progressiYe CitIzens of Melrose Park, none can be more highly mentioned than Mr. John Biermann. He \\'as born in Chicago in 1875. A year later his parents moved to Elk Grove, Ill., \yhere he was brought up and \\·here he attended school until he was IS years old. He then came to this village and began his Ii fe's work by finding employment with Torton Bros.' Company in :.\Iay\\·ood, Ill. At the age of 17. desiring to learn a trade. he \\'ent to \york for the Chicacro Tire & Spring Co. in the village. He remained with them for nine years, and \\'hi!e there learned the trade of an iron moulder. In 1903 he accepted a position with the Featherstone Foundry Company. where he i now employed. 1\1r. Biermann also has other business interests. but, to his honor be it said, he has never let them interfere for a moment \\·ith his duties to his company. He '1as won and holds the confidence of his employers by his steady habits and strict attention to business, and is recognizf'd as an efficient workman. Since his early boyhood he has been compelled to fight life's battles single-handed. but the. struggle \\'on for him that bodily trength which is sometimes undervalued, while his faithfulness made him master of his trade. This is no licrht record at a time when thoroughness i becoming more and more insisted upon in the working world. In 1899 NIr. Biermann sought and won the heart and hand of Miss :.\Iathilda Arndt, \\·ho \\"as also born in Chicago, her parents being old settler. :.\Irs. Biermann is a very ambitious \\·oman. and assists her husband ably in the management of "Biermann's Family Hotel," at Ko. 1509 Lake Street. \\'here they have a good business. Thel' haye one son living. Edll'ard H.

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,.: r .~

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:.\IR.

TeLIc,

FRILL:.\L-\);:\.

HE great teel \\'ork of :.\Ielrose Park ha\"e in their employ men who are not only artisan of the highe t type but II'ho 1, .... are just a. capable as '-illage builders and in filling re~. ~ sponsible positions in civic affair. nIr. Julius Frillmann, the ubject of our sketch. i an old ~ '. resident of the village, and takes great pride in the deYelopment of the place. devoting much of his spare time to that end. He \\'as born in 1865 on a farm in Leyden TOI\"nship. but a short (istance from illelro e Park. "'hen he \\'a tll'eh'e I'ears old the family moved to the state of Oregon. locatin o' about 20 miles from Portland. Here he was reared and received his ed~lcation. In 1885 the fan1ily returned to nlinois and again took up farming near this village. In 1892 :.\Ir. Frillmann left the farm and \\"ent to \\"ork in the foundry of the Chicago Tire & Spring Company, now the great Latrobe Steel & Coupler \\·orks. By teady application he attained such proficiency at hi craft that he \\'a made foreman. and this position he has held continuously for twelve years. Mr. Frillmann was elected president of the village in 1903 and served the first two year term. He has al 0 been one of the Villao-e Trustees. and is nOI\" vice president of the Proviso Town hip Republican Club. In 1893 he was married to :.\Iiss Lena Blecke, of ddison. Ill., a \\'oman of intelligence, who has proved a valuable helpmate to him. Their children are Arthur, vVilliam, Louis, Eleanor, Louisa, Dorothy and Paula. '

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101 W

MR, R. H, KL HLMANN,

MONG the well-known citizens of the Village who possess ( in the highest degree the esteem and confidence of thcir fellow townsmen is Mr. R. H, Kuhlmann, He was born in 1879 on a farm which lay almost \\,ithin walking distance of the northwest portion of the Village, During the winter months he attended the public and parochial chools and worked on the farm the rest of the year. At the age of 14 he left the farm an'd entered the employ of Mr. 'V, F, Langguth as clerk in his grocery store in this villao'e, He remained there for six years, slo\\'ly but surely laying the foundation for his future success. not only by his industry, \\'hich marked him as a man to be relied upon, but by his obliging manner and cheerful disposition that \\'on for him popularity among the customers. About this time, desiring to engage in bu iness for himself, and wishing to gain that thorough kno\\"lecige which makes for succe s, he attended and rrraduated from the ~1etropolitan Busines College. Chicago, He \\'a no\\" fully equipped to enter the battle for uccess. In 1902. associated \\"ith hi brother, Mr. F, 'V. Kuhlmann, he purchased the store of his former employer. It \\'as now that he reaped the full r \\'ard of hi labors of a fe\\' month back, He had sown only kindliness and truth, \\'hich blo somed into that confidence that gaye patronage just when he needed it most. This firm is to-day one of the largest and mo t progressiye retail grocery establishment in Viestern Cook Count\路. and is doin rr an extensive business at 16th Avenue and Lake Street under the' firm name of Kuhlmann Brothers, In 1905 he \\'as elected yillage clerk by a handsome majority, and thi position he now holds. He i one of the acti\'e and intere ted citizens in any measure that tends to the uplifting and upbuilding of his home to\vn, and is, in fact, one of the pillar on \\'hich rest the \\"clfare and advancement of the community. He is a director in the ne\\' itizens' tate Bank, and al 0 has other business interests. 1\1r. Kuhlmann was married in 1904 to Miss Mathilde Thiemann of Arlington Heights, IlL, an accomplished daughter of ex- tate Representative Thie. mann. They have one daughter and one son, Maro'aret and l\Iartin.

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MR. ROBERT W. BODDY.

KE of the young bu ine men of the village, who \\'as born \\"ithin a fe\\' blocks from \\路here he wa raised in ~[elrose Park. i ~1r. Robert ,V. Boddy, the son of one of the early' resident , ~1r. Thomas Boddy, "Bob" Daddy inherits the "get there" that is in him and ha de\'eloped into a pushing, aggre sive busines man. He was born in May\\'ood, Ill., in 1883, but before he knew it, his parents moved \\'ith him to Melrose Park. He attended school in Melrose I ark, i\Iay\\"Ood and Austin. After finishing the public schools in 1904, he studied law for two years. During his school vacation, when a boy, he not only earned money, but obtained mu cle, working for his uncle, 1\1r. E. A, Barker, at se\\'er digging and later on, at brick work. 'i\lhen he was 20 years old, he \\"as made foreman for D, A. Thatcher & Co" roadbuilder , where he remained for two year. He is now superintendent for H, G. Goelitz. \\'ho ha the contract for paving Fourteenth and Twenty-fourth Avenues. ~1r. Boddy is also an independent contractor for this cIa s of work. He take considerable interest in politics and in a few more years we could undoubtedly say considerable about "Bob Boddy, politician." He was married last year, 1906, to ~1iss Ellen Balgemann, of Elmhurst, a young woman held in high esteem by all. They reside at 1314 North Twenty-first Avenue.

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路路 t

:'1R. JERRY S:'IITH.

exemplary citizen. an early ettler and one of the Yillage builders is :'1r. Jerry Sm1th. :'1r. Smith "'as born in St. Louis, :'10., :'larch 18th, ,,; 1861. A year later hi parents moved to Chicago, \\'here he rej ceived his education in the Dl1blic schools and the HolY FamihCollege. . ~ .-\t the age of 16 he began life in earnest. and. haying a natural bent for mechanics, started his career as a machinist. Tn 1877 he engao-ed with Norton Brothers, who at that time had a comparatively mall tin can factory in Chicago. :'1r. Smith beo"an in the sample line ,,路ork. \\"here he remained for about four years, advancing from there through the various department. He has won his \\'ell-merited succe s by unexcelled fidelity and integrity and by genuine pride in his ,,"ork. \Yhen the Xorton Brothers moved their plant to :'Iay\\路ood. Ill., :'1 r. mith \\'ent \\-ith them in charae of the can-making machinery. He is today foreman in this areat indu trial institution which operates under the name of the .-\merican Can Company, and is not only one of their mo t valued employes, but bears the unusual record of 30 years' continuou service. having worked his \yay up step by step from an apprentice to the re ponsible position which he n \\" holds. On January 17th, 1884, :'1r. mith was married to :'Ji" s Julia Barney of Chicago, a woman of marked ability and sterling qualities. The following May (1885) they moved to l\lelrose Park, and now re ide in an attractive home on 15th Avenue, \yhich :\1 r. mith purchased a number of years ago. Mr. mith ha ah\-ays taken great interest in his home town, and is active in its ci\'ic and social affair. He is a member of several societies, and served as Viliage Trustee in I 93. 1894 and 1 9j. He is also a prominent member of the Sacred Heart Church. and is one of the church committee.

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:'1R. FRED \\-. I--::CHL:'I.-\::\:\" the most prosperous and energetic 8W 1 i\IO:l\G Melrose Park is :'Ir" rred \Y. Kuhlmann.

business men of .-\ a citizen he is always found in the front rank of \\"illing \\"orkers for the advancement and expansion of his home to\n1" 11r. Kuhlmann \yas born in 1869 \\"ithin a short distance of the boundary lines of the"-illage. His father, i\Ir. Frederick Kuhlmann, one of the early settler of the vicinity, i a respected and successful citizen, \yho came to this country from Germany in 1858. He served as a Union soldier and at one time, durin a the Civil Vvar, was tationed at Camp Douglas, Chicago. The subject of this sketch spent his early life on the farm and was educated in the public and parochial schools. After hi marriage he moyed to Elk Grove, Ill., where he eno-ao"ed in farming. In 1902 he returned to IIelrose Park and, in association with his brother, Mr. R. H. Kuhlmann, purchased the well-known grocery store and market of Mr. \!I/. F. Langguth, at 16th Avenue and Lake treet. They have by courteous treatment and honest dealing built up an immense trade. They carry a large stock of the highest grade and pure t food products obtainable. . t their store even the litttle child, that is so often overlooked, receives the same attention as an older person. In 1896 IIr. Fred Kuhlmann set the pace for his younger brother by marrying l1iss Martha Thiemann of Elk Grove, Ill., a woman of charm and refinement, daughter of ex-representative Thiemann, and sister of ?-1rs. R. H. Kuhlmann. They have four children. Elmer. Walter. Hulda and Gertrude. 1


Selections from Recent Editorials of Leading Papers Advising People to Own Suburban flume and "6et Closer to Nature." BE A

iI

LANDLORD

MEL ROSE

From Tile Chicago EVl'nillg Post. T is often said that the secret of Anglo-Saxon strength lies in the belief that "a PARK man's house is his castle." Roman travelers wrote of the singular spectacle that 75 greeted their eyes of groups of small fortified dwellings-not common households, but individual structures where every man considered his house his castle. I-Ie ruled over one wife and his children and his servants. He was master within his walls and governed a monarchy in the little.' FroEl that proud hearthstone sprung the Saxon virtues of loyalty, family honor, untarnished integrity and name, and a sturdy sense of i.ndependence. It is a remnant of that strain of character which gives the Briton born to-day an aggressive determination to bend the knee to none and to keep to the front at all hazards-a feeling little understood by those whose ancestry hails from many lands of varying traditions. The most stable neighborhoods are those that cluster about churches and public schools. In these vicinities are the reliable families-perhaps neither rich nor fashionable, but well-to-do, who own their own homes and who stay there because of the influence of the church societies and the schools for the children. Here are the little gardens and the real homes. Few scandals come from these parts. The schools and the churches keep the children occupied and furnish entertainment and interest for the grown-ups. Every family has an individual part in the life of the Community-it watches affairs and watches its neighbors and in turn is watched. It is somebody. Apropos of this is a bit of private history of a bachelor who erst\\'hile di\'ided his time between his hotel and his club. Last summer he lost his heart to a widow with children and is now married, occupying his own house in a suburb. At a recent annual club dinner he naively confessed: "I advise all of you to do likewise. For the first time in my life I am somebody. I have bought a home. The letter man, butcher, grocer and milkman speak to me e\'ery morning. The school principal looks on me with respect because I have children, and for the same reason every boy and girl within a mile knows me. I am somebody. The club women speak to me because my wife is in the club and I have joined the church because my church is held in respect the world over. I ran over to Paris on business and hunted up the American church and had friends at once. It was the same in Dresden and in Rome. To be a church man gives a man standing. Queer, I had to live fifty years to find this out. Be a family man if you want to be somebody in a community." When thinking of buying a house one is beset with temptations in venner, weathered oak and gingerbread decoration. Yet the wise person goes over these attractions and checks them off and balances against the solid virtues of location, sunshine, sewerage, water, heating, transportation, church and school, the character of his neighbors, and the possible future of the locality. From Collie1-s' J;1/eeldy.

The seasons mean more to Americans every year. Outdoor life means more; gardens, hillsides, beauty, air, and exercise. Our great cities are growing more slowly than they used to grow. In talking about why the love of country life affects first the well-to-do, one of the periodicals in which we personally find most wisdom and acumen, "The Christian Register," says that the laboring classes "have lost their homing instinct," and are more controlled by the propensity for herding. The reasons that the laboring classes prefer the city are weighty and many, but these reasons will steadily decrease, with rapid transit, telephones, rural mails, and other facilities for intercourse and education. Electricity is now carried in Germany, France and our own \iVestern States, from city factories out into farms and country homes, so that manufacturing can be as conveniently done far from city centers. The demand for books and periodicals about nature topics increases and reflects this .drift. which is so rapid that even from one season to another its effect is visible in the temper of our thought. From The Chicago Ame1-ical1.

Take your families out of the big cities. The cities murder the children. The hot pavements, the dust, the noise are fatal in many cases, and harmful always. This is the time as we have told you before, for buying land in the suburbs. The development of electrical transportation in a very few years will have annihilated distance so far as a radius of fifty miles is concerned. At present, land can be bought at low prices by those who select intelli. gently. Real estate near the big cities is inevitably bound to increase in value. The population must spread. You could do no better thing than have your children in the country di~ging, weeding, playing in the fields. And if you buy wisely, increased population will mean considerable profit and increased prosperi ty for you. While you stick in the city, increased population simply means that it increases your rent. You get nothing out of it. You can build in two years as cheaply as now, but in two years you might have to pay double or more for land.


MELROSE PARK GREAT INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

FEATHERSTONE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE COMPANY MELROSE PARK WORKS

'.

,


MELROSE PARK GREAT INDUSTRIAL PLANTS

LATROBE STEEL AND COUPLER COMPANY MELROSE PARK WORKS


路CITIZENS STATE BANK MELROSE PARK, ILL.

MEL

RO SE

PARK

Capital Stock

- - - - - -

$25,000.00

78

H. D. Fidelke. Architect

CHARLES J. WOLF. Pres.

OFFICERS ANTHONY J. BUSSCHER. Cashier

G. A. HART, Vice-Pres.

DIRECTORS CHARLES J. WOLF GEORGE A. HART FRANCIS BURELBACH

PAUL B. KIONKA WILLIAM F. SCOTT JOHN G. CARSO

REI HOLD H. KUHLMANN LOUIS A. NOTTMEYER FRA K LAPI SKI

THREE PERCENT INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS CHECKING ACCOUNTS SOLICITED, . REAL ESTATE LOANS FIRST MORTGAGES AND IMPROVEME T BO DS BOUGHT AND SOLD

SAfETY DEPOSIT VAULTS

~

fiRE INSURANCE


PETER BOHLANDER M EL ROSE PARK

, DRY GOODS, HATS AND CAPS GE TS' FURNISHINGS, MILLINERY

TELEPHONE MELROSE PARK 760 .

19th Avenue and 1st Street

MELROSE PARK,lLLlNOIS

-

79


5000 feet floor space MEL ROSE PARK

-80

WE SELL

EVERY路 T"IN6

TUE NATIONAL The Two Big Stores

DEPARTMENT STORE

R. R. ESSERY. Prop.

106 and 10819th Ave. Phone Melrose Park 7293

5100 feet ,

floor space

Quality "igh ~

...

Prices Low

fURNITURE AND STOVE ANNEX

125 and 126 19th Ave.


MELROSE PARK STATE BANK 114 NINETEENTH AVENUE

MEL ROSE

SAME STOCKHOLDERS AS

PARK

MAYWOOD STATE BANK

81

Combined Capital, Surplus and Profits, over $100,000.00 STOCKHOLDERS RESIDING IN

NELROSE PARK PETER'BOHLANDER G. H. GEHRKE G.H.BOHLANDER B. HAHN R. R. ESSERY G. LIGHTHART FRAXK LAPINSKI JO . TEFAXKIEWICZ HER~lAX WEI S GEARITT S~IITH HEXRY BELING E. B. ES ERY HEXRY F. GLOS GABRIEL DEFRANCO LEONARD DEFRANCO

eHleAGO H. R. CURTIS W. L. JACOBY WM. T. BRUCKNER E. C. AMLING

SO. BEN.D, IN.D. GEO. H. HEIDEMANN

NAYWOOD JOHN SOFFEL W~1. G. HEIDEMANN ALBERT F. A:\1LING HORACE ZOELLIN AUG. PETERSON P. A. McCARTHY HElnlAN KLUG O. J. WESTCOTT PETER BOEVERS E. C. , ICHOLS H. P. NICHOLS J. S. STEPHEN

ELNHURST JOHN NEU~lANN GEO. F. HEIDEMANN KATHERINE WOLF LORE Z WOLF F. \\T. :\1. HA)L\fERSCHMIDT JOHN S. DAR~lSTADT

HILLSIDE W~l.

BOEGER JOH,

WOLF

OFF[(~ERS

W. G. HEIDEMAN, ,

ALBERT F. k\'ILING.

PRESIDENT

JOHN SOFFEL, CASHIER

VICE路PRESIDENT

DIRE(~TORS

W. L. JACOBY. Mgr. Latrobe Steel and Coupler Co. W~'I. BOEGER, President Oak Ridge Cemetery HARRISON P. NICHOLS, Postmaster, Maywood HORACE ZOELLIN, :Manager Bryant Bros., Lumber

OLIVER J. WESTCOTT, Civil Engineer PETER BOHLANDER, ~'Ierchant, Melrose Park EDWARD C. NICHOLS, Vice-Pres. of S. Side Elevated R. R. G. F. GEHRKE, Dept. Mgr., Western Electric Co.

GENERAL BANKING

y

ALBERT F. AMLING, Wholesale Florist JOHN SOFFEL, President, Maywood Statp Bank W. G. HEIDEMANN, President, Melrose Park State Bank

SAfE DEPOSIT BOXES

y

INSURANCE


BRYANT

BROS.

MEL ROSE

DEALERS

PARK

IN

LUMBER

82

Lath, Lime,路 Brick, Cements, Hollow Blocks路 and Building Materials of all kinds

~elrosePark Yards, 1st St.

and 20th Ave.

HORACE ZOELLIN, Manager CITY OffICE

408 Chamber oi Commerce Bldg. TELEPHONE MAIN 1020

Phone Yards:

Melrose Park 730

Phone Residence:

Maywood 163


J. & R. TRENKLER GROCERYu MARKET

Crockery, Flour and Feed

Purveyors to all who want good things to eat

COURTEOUS TREATMENT PROMPT DEl-IVERY

TELEPHONE:

Melrose Park 707

MELROSE PARK, ILL.

M)E L RO SE PARK

-

83


Telephones: Melrose 737. 738 Residence. Melrose 7582 MEL ROSE

I

PARK 84

S. S. ENDSLOW Prescription Druggist -v-

-v-

Special attention given to Prescriptions. Ice Cream and Soda Water in season.

142 Nineteenth Avenue . }

-

-

. -.

.

-.. :.•

#_-;" •

H. F. GLOS. Pres. and Tre"as.

,

-1l.- __ :. ••

",I

• •• '

Melrose Park, III• G. H. GLOS. Vice Pres. and Sec'y

HENRY F. GLOS & SON Dealen in

ICE COAL and COKE

OFFICE

20th Ave. and R. R. St. Phone Melrose 768

Melrose Park,lIl.

I


Telephones: Melrose 737. 738 Residence. Melrose 7582

MEL ROSE

I

PARK

S. S. ENDSLOW Prescription Druggist -v-

-v-

Special attention given to Prescriptions. Ice Cream and Soda Water in season.

142 Nineteenth Avenue: . . â&#x20AC;˘

H. F. GLOS. Pres. and Treoas.

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it.

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.

. ,.

Melrose Park, III. G. H. GLOS. Vice Pres. and Sec'y

HENRY F. GLOS & SON Dealers in

ICE COAL and COKE

OffICE

20th Ave. and R. R. St. Phone Melrose 768

Melrose Park,lIl.

I


'F. W. KUHLMANN

R. H. KUHLMANN

KUH路LMANN BROS.

MEL

ROSE PARK

Meat Market Staple and Fancy Groceries

FLOUR AND FEED

1518 Lake Street 'Telephones: Melrose Park 758. 759

1'1ELR05E PARK, ILL.

-

85


MEL

Uamburg-Bremen fire Ins. Co.

ROSE

OF GERMANY

PARK

-

86

P.

C. f. 600DRICH

w.

SfNNf

AGENT

AGENT

201 lake Street BIUWOOD. ILL.

OAK PARK

,JOHN G. CARSON, Agent 132 Nineteenth Avenue

MELROSE PARK

WITKOWSKY & 4FFI:LD General Agents Telephone Central 5632

Room 648, 159 La Salle Street, Chicago

WILLIAN KO'PP General Tin and Sheet Iron Work FURNAeES INSTALLED OR REPAIRED Has done the Cornice and Metal Work on all the principal buildinlts built in this Villalte durin It the last few years.

TELEPHONES

gt~~ ~~~~S

No. 109 Nineteenth Avenue


E. JI. . BARKER & SON GENERAL CONTRACTORS

MEL RO SE PARK 87

.

FIFTEENTH AVENUE AND FIRST STREET

MELROSE PARK, ILL. PHONE 7261 MELROSE PARK CONCRETE WORK

STREET IMPROVEMENTS

eEMENT WALKS and FLOORS

SEWERS and WATER MAINS


MEL RO SE PARK 88

OffiCE Of

THE LEADER, 117

Nineteenth Ave.

OfFICIAL PAPER Of THE VILLAGE, AND LEADING JOB PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT

..

Established 1892

Phone Melrose 777

THE OQIGINAL A D OLDEST SHOP

L. W. RICHTER 144

ineteenth Ave.

THE SA ITAQY TONSOQIAL PAQLOQ

WAQM BATH QOOMS

SPECIAL ATTE 'TIO

GIVEN TO

CHILDQENS HAIQ CUTTING

COURTEOUS TREATMENT

CLEA

TOWELS AND

SHARP

RAZORS

POOL TABLE IN CON 'ECTION PHONE MELROSE 7843


OTARY PUBLIC

RENTING

F. DUN NEB E eKE EXCLUSIVE DEALER I

MEL

ROSE

REAL ESTATE

PARK 89

ABSTRACTS fUR ISH ED A D EXAMI ED

ESTABLISHED 1888

ESTATES SETTLED

TO GET TO MELROSE PARK 1. 2. 3. 4.

Take Madison Street Electric car to end of line, or Take Chicago & Northwestern train (Galena division) at Wells Street depot, Chicago, and get off at Melrose Park, or Take Oak Park Elevated to Oak Park, walk one block north to Lake Street electric line, conductor will transfer you to Melrose Park, or Take Lake Street electric car and transfer to Melros~ Park.

WHY? Because if you want s6me of the best bargains in Cook County Real -Estate, Melrose Park is the plac'e to get them. My office is one block north of where the car stops and one block east. I HAVE VACANT LOTS fOR $150.00 A D UPWARDS, $5.00 DOWN A D $5.00 A MONTH, HOMES fROM $1,500.00 TO $10,000.00, 0

I STALLME TS OR CASH.

Lots and homes on all streets in Melrose Park, Maywood and Oak Park. Absolute square dealing or no sales. Titles examined, estates managed.

RED OFFICE 18th Ave. and First St.

PHONE 7134

MELROSE PARK, ILL.


G. H. BOHLANDER .

I

\

DEALER IN

MEL ROSE

Builders' Hardware, House Furnishings, Stoves, Pumps, Paints, Oils and Glass.

PARK 90

AUTOMOBILE SUPPLIES

Buggies, Wagons, Harness and Agricultural Implements

112 Nineteenth Ave" MELROSE PARK, ILL. Telephone 7292

H. Wachtendorf

Bakery and Confectionery

141 Nineteenth Avenue MfLROS[ PARK TElE""ONE 776


MEL

ROSE PARK

In

Melrose Park

s.

M. BLOSS & CO.


Te{epnone J'<le{rose Park 7071 MEL ROSE PARK

The Lincoln Dairy Sanitary Netlzods

92

Pure Milk and Dilicious eream Your Trade Solicited

Henry Decker, Proprietor 1902 LAKE STREET

G. M.

Brown Dealer in

fancy Groceries, Cigars and Tobacco, Pure Candies, Notions, etc. 1406 LAKE ST.

Melrose Park. III.

THE MAN WITH THE GOODS

Ifilliutu Jkrtt Oliutl fnginttr au~ .~ltrurynr Qi)ftirp: 158 Niuptpputl! 2\upuuP. IDrlrl'l!l1l1r 2!H. filrlro",

i!{puillPurp:

m. lJI.

Vnrl'

105 3I'ift1'putl!

2\ llPUUP

wrlrp1lout' 26 I, :ffirlrl1sl' lIarlt

IDOUlU.6~ip

aub lIIillagr :1Iap.6 for

~alr


Davison

l

& .'

.

Thompson

6eneral Contractors

Telephone Maywood 1542

SEWERS AND ALL KINDS OF HEAVY IRON PIPE WORK Office:

CEMENT SIDEWALKS AND CELLAR FLOORS A SPECIALTY

47 South Seventeenth Avenue, Maywood


WILLIAN WALDER MEL ROSE

Watchmaker, Jeweler and Optic;an

PARK 94

PATRONIZE YOUR NEIGHBOR TRY, IT WILL PAY YOU

SUPPORT HOME INDUSTRIES

Watches and Jewelery at Lowest Pr;ces WORK GUARANTEED

140 Nineteenth Avenue

Phone 7841 Melrose Park

GOLDACKER BOWLING ALLEYS AND POOL ROOMS Fifteenth Ave. and First St.

TELEPHONE 7871

MELROSE PARK, ILL.


RA~SAIER

CHRISTIAN Man u f act u

r e r

.0

f

Be s t

Qua 1 i t y

0

f

Cel11ent Building Blocks

MEL ROSE PARK

Works and Office:

15th Avenue and C. &> N. W. Tracks

Contractor and Stone Mason ESTIMATES FURNISHED

GENERAL OFFICE:

618 N. 16th Ave., near Lake St.

l~~~e~~.?n~~a;P::a postal card will bring nle to you at once.

MELROSE PARK, ILL.

95


MEL

NIAGARA FIRE INS. CO. OF NEW YORK

ROSE PARK -

WESTER

96

DEPARTMENT

Chicago

159 La Salle Street I. S. BLACKWELDER, MA AGER

W. L. STEELE, ASST. MANAGER

P. F. CAMERON & CO., COOK COUNTY MANAGERS

JOHN G. CARSON, Resident Agent 132

ineteenth Avenue

Melrose Park, Ills.

Che"apest Lots In Melrose Over 300 Lots In Our New Sub-Division at the N orth-West Corner of Lake Street and Twenty-Fifth Avenue.:: :: :: :: ::

25 UL[P"ON[ MAIN 3164

X

125. $100 AND UP

TU[P"ON[

$5 Cash. $5

MAIN 3164

PER MONTH \

Also Houses and Lots in all parts of Oak Park, Harlem and M,aywood.

~~ ROO."

...

92_LA SALLE ST.


MEL ROSE

I.

PARK 97

l\fiCHAEL YOUNG PLU~1BER, GAS A1~D STEAM FIT~-"ER PLUMBERS' AND STEAMFITTERS' SUPPLIES

No. 10 NINETEENTH AVENUE

Telephone 7373 Melrose Park


OAKRIDGE CEMETERY OFFICE BUILDING TELEPHONE 路MAYWOOD 907. LAGRANGE R.F. D. NQ 1.

.~

.


Teleplzone 7134

earriaees Furnislzed

MEL ROSE PARK

J([e{rose Park Undertaking (3ompany Emhalmers and Funeral Directors 18th Avenue and Hrst Street, Melrose Park, [{{so F. DUNNEBEeKE, Manager

Francis G. Guest Undertaker 400-402 South Fifth Avenue MA YWOOD. ILLS.

Carriages Furnished Telephone Maywood 191

Night Calls Promptly Answered

â&#x20AC;˘

99


MEL ROSE PARK 100

.. :!ItIltnrry .. mrrnnmuktng 18 ~nut4 Nilll'tl'l'llt4 AUl'llUl'

flaywoob, 3111tno1,6

'~OUl' 1 fi 73

LADIES

SHOULD VISIT

BURNH AN'S Our Wigs and Coiffures are Made of the Best French Hair Hair Dressing, Marcel Wavinll by Expert Frenchmen: also water waving on the head. ELECTROLYSIS-Superfluous Hair Removed with the Electric Needle. COMPLEXIONS BEAUTIFIED.

FA

eI A L

MASSA GE

Our new Vibratory Method Softens and Beautifies the Complexion and Removes Wrinkles. E. BURNHAM'S SKIN FOOD has been used in our Operating Rooms with the most wonderful results. Price $1.00. Our Hair and Scalp Tonic Removes Dandruff and makes the Hair Grow. Manicuring, Hand Massage, Foot Massage. Every lady can have Beautiful, Smooth, White Hands.

LADIES VISIT OUR NEW TURKISH BATHS EXCLUSIVELY FOR LADIES

E. BURNHcRN, 70 and 72 State St., eHlecRGO


Day and Evening Classes WOMEN MAKE MANY FURNISHINGS FOR THE HOME IN

MEL ROSE

Drawing, Designing, Modeling for the Trades. Fashion Plate Drawing, Design~ ing and Stenciling. Stained Glass. Jewelry, Saw Piercing, Chasing, Plating, etc. Copper and Brass Work. Printing and Proofreading. Dressmaking, Pattern Cutting, Accessories, Embroidery, and all kinds of Fine Needlework. Plain Sewing and Home Dressmaking. Basketry, Pyrography and the Minor Arts. China Painting. Leather Work.

101

PARK

IF YOU WISH TO BECOME SELF-SUPPORTING, LEAR TO DRAW A D DESIG FOR A PURPOSE, LEAR TO MAKE THINGS THAT ARE GOOD IN DESIG AND FI ISH. STUDE TS MAY E TER AT A Y TIME.

ART eRA F. TIN- 5 TIT UTE REPUBLIC BUILDING

tate and Adams Streets

CHICAGO


MEL ROSE PARK 102

HAVEN'S SUBDIVISION THIS SUBDIVISION IS LOCATED IN THE EASTERN

PORTION

OF

THE

VILLAGE

AND EXTEKDS FROM THE RAILROAD TO THE TIO~.

ORTH LINE IT

OF

CO~TAIKS

THE

CORPORA-

THE MOST DESIR-

ABLE LOTS IN THE VILLAGE OF MELROSE PARK. ADDRESS ILL.,

THE

O\\'NERS.

FOR PRICES

DWIGHT

C.

A~D

TERMS

HAVEN, JOLIET,

REPRESENTATIVE

OF

THE


Frank R. Vosburgh ME L ROSE PARK

REAL ESTATE, LOANS and INSURANCE

103

HOMES $50.00 to $100.00 Down, Balance On Time

147 Nineteenth Avenue MELROSE PARK, ILL. TELEPHONES:

Office 7754 JAMES NIC'HOLS. Pres.

Residence 7273 H. A. SMITH. Vice路 Pres.

B. R. STILLMAN. Sec路y.

G. H. TRYON, Ass't Sec'y

Natjonat Fjre Insurance eo. OF HARTFORD eONN.

WESTERN DEPARTMENT \7\ La Salle Street. Chicago

FRED. S. JANES, General Agent GEO. W. BLOSSON, Asst. Gen'l Jlgen{ eHAS. R/(!HARDSON, 2nd Jlsst. Gen'l Agent

STATEMENT, JANUARY 1, 1907 Capital Stock $1,000.000.00 Total Assets 7,076.852.54 Total Liabilities 4.848.410.80 Policy Holders Surplus. 2,228,441.74

ISSUES LIBERAL FIRE and TORNADO POLIeIES


~~~~~~mD:9~a~mBPB~BBe:€lae&...aa€l~6e8e8B-~~~d'ea:a

~ m MEL ROSE PARK 104

ESTABUSHED 1873

I

METROPOUTAN

~

BUSINESS COLLEGE

PJ

CHICAGO

~ mm

~

Students May Enroll at Any Time Strongest Faculty Finest Equipment Employment Bureau Most Up-to-Date School 34 Years Under Present Maaagement

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fd

COLLEGE BUILDING

156 WABASH AVENUE Summer Term, July 8, 1907

~ BRANCH COLLEGES:

Joliet Aurora Elgin Englewood (Chicago) Wicker Park (Chicago)

~

m~aBaB':&B]?E.&B8El?~~m~~ae:€f-""""""'~~a:regaeaeftQ;'-~QB"""~a8

ESTABUSHED 1846

PAid in Capital, $2,000,000

150 LAKE STREET, CHICAGO

Largest Manufacturers of Fire Hose, Fire Apparatus and All Classes of Fire Department Supplies

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DAILY DELIVERY TO ALL POINTS BETWEEN

Melrose Park, May"W"ood and

MEL RO SE

~~~~CHICAGO~~~~PARK 105

Baggage Checked Direct to all Depots and Docks, also Transferred to all Parts of Chicago and Suburban Towns ..

. .

'

~-

i

OUR. "BLUE RIBBON PRIZE OUTfiT" Business Men's Parade of Maywood and Melrose Park. September 3d. 1906

FURNITURE AND PIANO MOVERS OFFICES: MELROSE PARK

MAYWOOD

138 NINETEENTH AVE.

FOURTH &- ST. CHARLES AVES.

TELEPHONE: Melrose Park 7543

CHICAGO OFFICE

TELEPHONE: Maywood 1262

40 FRANKLIN ST. TELEPHONE: Main 4297

~aywood

Transfer &

Residence Telephone: Maywood 1033

Storage Co. S. P. WIDELL. Manager


LOU I S ARNDT MEL

ROSE PARK 106

All Work Promptly Jlttended To.

Sanitary Plumhing, Gas, Steam Fitting and -Sewerage

Jobbin g a Specialty. PHONE:

Maywood 3861

RESIDENCE

OFFICE

606 S. Third Ave., Maywood

1716 Lake Street, Melrose Park

EVERY DAY

MIG"Ul4N GITY

"CONEY ISLAND OF THE WEST" 3. TRIPS DAILY. 9:45 A. M. 1.00 P. M., 11.15 P. M.

75 Cents Round Tri 1'-' Q

Saturday 2:30 P. M., instead of 1 o'clock

SAfE

CHICA60'S

SPEEDY

6REATEST

CO MfORT路

SHIP

AILE THEODORE ROOSEVELT

Finest, Fastest and Largest Ship Crossing the Lake

t:Vt:RY NI6"T Moonlight Excursion 8: 15 to 10:45 ALONG THE SHORE EXCURSIONS 35 CENTS . Telephone Central 5046

DOCKS: CLARK STRf:f:T BRIDGE


DAY

CHICAGO BUSINESS COLLEGE

AND

EVENING SESSIONS

67 WABASH AVENUE, CHICAGO

FIRST-Satisfy Yourself, by thorough, personal investigation, or write for our Illustrated Pro pectus. SECOND-All Banks Are Not Reliable- either are all Business Colleges worthy of public confidence. THIRD-We Make No Unwarranted Claims-They are not nece sary to either our stability or success. FOURTH-Our School has enjoyed a steady and healthful growth from the beginning-nearly 20 years ago. FIFTH-Not the Oldest, nor yet the youngest, but possessing the vigor and strength of maturity. SIXTH-Our Student Body, in age, respectability, etc., will compare favorably with that of other similar institutions. SEVENTH-We Satisfy Our Patrons by doing precisely as we agree, and giving "value recei"ed" for money expended. EIGHTH-Each One of Our Instructors is an expert in his own particular line of work-not in e\'erything. JL\'TH-OUr Shorthand Department ranks with the best as to System, time required and quality of instruction. TENTH-Our Business Practice is the best manned and equipped, of any in this city or elsewhere, and strictly "up to date." ELEVENTH-The Above Department consists, in part, of 18 offices, 3 banks, and a daily clerical force of 48 young people. TWELFTH-Our Graduated Students are found in the best business houses of this city which is self-explanatory. THIRTEENTH-We Can Serve Your Interests if you will but afford us an opportunity to demonstrate what we can do.

F. B. VIRDEN, PRINCIPAL

MEL ROSE PARK 107


MEL ROSE PARK 108

We carry a full line. and sell

YOU GET THE BEST WHEN YOU CALL FOR

Sprague, Warner £:;

Co's Celebrated

CANNED GOODS THE BEST THJ\T MONEY CAN BUY

Arbuckle Bro's

COFFEES AND

TEAS

J.& R.Trenkler 19th Ave. and 1st St.

J. &R. TRENKLER 19th Ave. and 1st St.

E. P. DOUGLAS U.6. flDDELKE 20 I Lake St.

OAK PARK. ILL.

ARCUIT[CT OFFICE HOURS 9 to 12 A. lVI. Saturday and Monday Eyenings 7 to 9. TELEPHONES Office, 4982 Residence, 6004

Printer Does High Grade Commercial, Catalogue, and Plain and Fancy Printing Phone Melrose Park 7583 1I07 Sixteenth Avenue MEL R 0 S EPA R K. ILL I N 0 1 S


Why Not Own a Summer "orne? Waukazoo, on Macatawa Bay near Holland, Michigan, is a forest resort of 500 acres, subdivided into lots 50x 150, 100x200 and 100x500, prices $100 to $1,500. Plat, photographs and list of Chicago owners sent on request. Cottages for sale. One elegant residence with boat house for sale, price $5,000.00. : : : : : : : :

A SUMMER HOME AT WAUKAZOO

W AUKAZOO INN has become in five years one of the most popular resorts in Michigan, with those desiring good service at moderate prices. There is no objection to children and its proximity to Chicago makes it an IDEAL FAMILY HOME for the season, as those engaged in business can at a small expense come to WAUKAZOO every Friday night and return Sunday or Monday. Bed rooms have running water and are lighted with gas.

TRANSPORTATION:

Graham & Morton Boats, or Pere Marquette R. R.

FOR INFORMATION. ADDRESS AFTER JUNE 1st WAUKAZOO INN. R.F.D. No.1!. HOLLAND. MICH.

JOHN

e.

EVERETT

HARTFORD BUILDING

140 Dearborn Street

Telephone Central 1085

CHICAGO

MEL ROSE PARK 109


MEL

RO SE

THE USE OF A GAS RANGE

SAVES

PARK 110

1 HO R A DAY 7 HOURS A WEEK :30 HOURS A MONTH 365 HOURS A YEAR

THINK OF IT!!! OVER 36 DAYS WORK SAVED EVERY YEAR

BY USING A GAS RANGE MELROSE

PARK

IS SUPPLIED WITH GAS BY ORTHWESTERN GAS LIGHT

THE

I IS PHO"E

N. OAK PARK AVE.

&

COKE CO.

OAK PARK

9

WHY DO 'T YOU TRY

.. Ionic Paint.. A superior quality paint made from the best White Lead and Linseed Oil When seeking economy, ask for IONIC PAINT. It lasts longer, spreads better, and costs no more.

"White House Floor Paint"

TELEPHONE

ALWAYS GIVES SATISFACTION

MONROE 2658

IONIC PAINT MFG. CO. 435-437 West Lake Street

CH ICAGO, ILL.


Aurora, Elgin and Chicago Railroad THE FOX RIVER VALLEY ROUTE FREQUENT SERVICE.

FAST TIME.

THROUGH TICKETS.

==FROM CHICAGO TO=-

LOMBARD, GLEN ELLYN, WHEATON, AURORA, ELGIN, BATAVIA, ST. CHARLES, GENEVA, OSWEGO, YORKVILLE, DUNDEE, CARPENTERSVILLE, BELVIDERE, ROCKfORD, fREEPORT, BELOIT, JANESVILLE AND INTERMEDIATE POINTS. ===FOR FULL INFORMATION CALL OR ADDRESS===

PASSENGER DEPARTMENT 256 Fifth Avenue

CHICAGO


N. P. LARSON FLORIST and DEeORcJITOR

MEL ROSE PARK

Melrose Park Greenhouses

112

PLANTS AND CUT flOWERS

WEDDING AND FUNERAL DESIGNS

Seventeenth Avenue

MELROSt: PARK

One Block South of Lake Street

The New Resta u ra nt Corner Eleventh Avenue and First Street MELROSE PARK First-Class Hot Dinner, 20 Cents Meal Tickets, 21 Meals, $4.00 SHORT ORDER MEALS SERVED AT ALL HOURS

H. T. MANSFIELD, Prop.

PHONE 7694

Jas. & A. C. O'Laughlin eRUSHED LINESTONE = = = = = = = FOR = = = = = = =

MACADAM and CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION TELEPHONE MAIN 4145 WORKS:

OffICE:

BELLEWOOD. ILL

172 Washington Street CHICAGO. ILL.

Tel. Maywood 906

Henry Boese MANUFACTURER OF

Monuments, Ueadstones, Tombs, fENCE COPING, UC. OFFICE AND WORKS:

Opposite Oakridge eemetery TELEPHONE: MAYWOOD 907

R. f. D. No.1

P.O., LA GRANGE, ILLS.


Palace ~aundry

MEL ROSE PARK

c. G. MALMGREN, Prop.

.. ..

73 North 48th Avenue TEL.

AUSTIN

113

CHICAGO

2212

, I Strictly High=Grade Domestic Finish Soft Water Used Exclusively "

r

WE GUARANTEE OUR WORK AND OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT. DROP US A POSTAL AND OUR WAGON WILL BE AT YOUR DOOR

,I

I I

~

J

Our Melrose Park Agencies: N. M.

GUSTAFSON, BROWN,

-

IIOS

169

.

Lake St. 23d Ave.

I

JACOB OSWALD,

13 2 19th

FRA~K REBEL,

1301

Ave.

First St.


ADOLPU WESTPUAL BOTTLIN6 CO., Inc. 79 LAKE STREET

ol~L~';.~?ri52

RIVER FOREST. ILL.

MEL ROSE PARK 114

INTERIOR Of WORKS Bottlers of fine Carbonated Bevera~es. Gin~er Ale. Root Beer. etc. Distributers of Neptune Triple Distilled Water. Mammoth Sprin~s Water. Attica Natural Lithia Water. APPLE CIDER IN SEASON

LIQUID CARBONIC ACID

Prompt Delivery

YOU CAN'T DO BETTER

Your Patronage Solicited

fOR YOURSELf OR fAMILY T"AN TO INS TAL L A

SysteIll of HOIlle Lighting Which will always ~ive satisfaction. which will add a world of comfort and pleasure to the evenin~ hours spent at home. and which will dispense with the dirt. the soot. the unhealthful and unpleasant odors and fumes. the dan~er of fire and the inconveniences involved in the use of the time-worn methods. the place of which. in the modern home. has been taken by

Phone Maywood 81

ELECTRICITY

Phone Maywood 82

THE LIGHT OF TO-DAY Every day finds new homes illuminated with the "Ideal Li~ht." as people are fast be ~ained in its use. At a minimum cost of 37:; cents per day you can have a home Ii~hted with ELECTRICITY. the most adaptable. the most serviceable. the most economical. the most luxuriant li~ht possible.

realizin~ the advanta~es to

Shore Electric Company

;


-------<q.~---------.;", MEL ROSE PARK

Established 1872

115

Graham's Steam Dye Warks 733 and 2016 W. Madison Street Chicago

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Garments CLEANED, DYED and NEATLY REPAIRED SEE OUR PRICE LIST

LADIES' GARMENTS Waists

-

Skirts

Jackets

75c up 75c up

Dresses

$1.50 up -

GENTS' GARMENTS French Dry or Stearn Cleaned

Cleaned or Dyed

75c up

Suits Trousers Overcoats

-

$1.50 50c $1.00 up

PRESSING

Suits Sponged and Pressed Trousers Overcoats -

50c 15c 50c

West 1629 PHONES { Kedzie 582 Austin 297

CONVENIENT TRANSFER POINT MADISON OR LAKE STREET CARS

GRAHAM'S STEAM DYE WORKS路 20 16 West Madison Street, Chicago Near 40th Avenue

<:::::j"'t:::::::>------v


6i1es News Co. Official Newspaper Distributors

MEL ROSE PARK

fine Stationery Cigars and Tobacco

116

Wholesale and Retail 6 NINETEENTH AVE. Phone Melrose Park 7073

BRANCH 19th Ave. and St. Charles Road MAYWOOD. ILL.

Established 1892

E. 8. Essery D E ALE R

Charles Bishop

Joseph Preede

Druggist

MERC"ANT

TAILOR

I N

Dry Goods, Boots, Shoes, G ro ceries, furniture, Paints, Oils, Hardware, Etc.

Perfumery and Toilet Articles Gigars and Stationery

in latest styles Prescriptions carelully compounded day or night 1309 Lake Street

20th Avenue and 1st Street

" line line 01

liE IS' fURNISUINliS

Phone 7183 Melrose Park

A.SC"ERRER

158

ineleenlh Ave.

Melrose Park. III.

Gleaning, Dyeing and Repairing

Commercial and Landscape Photographer' No.6 Desplaines Avenue. Harlem. Oak Park P. O. Ills. Telephone 9313 Harlem.

Most of the Photos printed in this book are from the Photographs mad e by A. SCHERRER

MY CHARGES ARE REASONABLE.

If you want a Photograph of yourself or home, insideor outside. "roup. or any animal. etc.. call me by telephone or mail and I will res p 0 n d promptly

PLATES DEVELOPED.

P R I N TIN G, TON I N G AND RET 0 U CHI N G DON E


MEL ROSE PARK 117

Lal"'1!est oldest-. Dest"路 o

DA.V & NIGHT COURSES

Business路Shorfhand路EnS!lish路 MosrLuXLlRlOUSlYFUR"'ISHF.DSCHOOl,+AMERICA

GOOD POSITIONS BY SECURED

51\JDENTS

BUSIOnessFinns &J'uppit'&U tuf With Uelp


MEL ROSE PARK UB

Oak Park Young Men's Christian Associa tion

Gymnasium, Swimming Pool, Shower Baths, Bowling Alleys, Night School, Debating Club, Musical Clubs, Bible Classes, Dormitories. Membership open to men 16 years and up. Boys Department for boys from 10 to 16 years. Visitors always welcome. A special invitation is extended to Melrose Park men and boys. Our night school is in successful operation from October to March inclusive. Telephone Oak Park 288

220 N. Oak Park Avenue

....-


"

MEL ROSE

-

PARK 119

The One Place In Chicago Not to be overlooked when selecting a Piano is at Four floors of spacious display rooms-Colonial Room, Art oveau Room, Louis XIV Room, Dutch Room! any different makes and styles-all pianos of accepted superiority in tone, action and durability! Piano a low as 150.00. Others up to $1,000.00 and higher. Terms as low as $10.00 down and 5.00 monthl. All sales made at minimum figures. We are Sole Agents for the

Two Eleven Wabash Ave.

KNABE-CROWN-ESTEY CHICKERING BROS.-MACPHAIL GRAND CONCORD-H. P. NELSON and many others

Before Making a Selection Visit the Piano Rooms of

G EO. P. BENT Phone Harrison 4767

211 Wabash Avenue CHICAGO, U. S. A.

C. H. Fanthalll

Suburban Representative

418 North Third Avenue Phone Maywood 3794

MAYWOOD

Over Seventy sa {jsfied Piano Purchasers in Maywood


MEL

RO SE PARK 120

CHICAGO, ILL. THE MOST BEAUTIFUL AMUSEMENT PARK IN THE WORLD Open from May 25 to October

Be Your Own

~illiner

Design and Fashion Your Own Hats You can learn in a few lessons and be assured of profitable employment if you wish it.

Madam Hunt School of Millinery 1201 Masonic Temple

Chicago

Conducted by Madam Hunt, President of the National Milliners Association, and the world's greatest teacher of the millinery art. (Evening classes.)

Charles Bleck

Frank Rayunec

Carpenter, Contractor and House Mover

Grocery and Market

All Work Guaranteed

Fresh Bakery Goods

Twenty-Second Ave. and Lake St.

703 14th Avenue. Corner 7th Street Telehone Melrose Park 723<\ MELROSE PARK, ILLINOIS


CUICA60 VARNISU COMPANY OF

MEL ROSE

NOVEL VARNISU EFFECTS

PARK

ORIGINATORS

If you are building a horne or remodeling your residence you will be interested in the up-to-date effects produced by Chicago Varnish Company's materials. These not only save both time and material in the application, but produce beautiful effects, finishes which are very popular with the horne builder and architect. The commonest woods can be given a fine appearance with our Wood-Tints. These are oil products of the highest class, having great staining power and developing the beauty of the grain instead of covering it up as do the cheaper stains. They are easily and quickly applied upon the unfilled wood and do not raise the grain. The natural beauty of the grain is brought out by these Tints in the most charming manner, and the finishing coat of Dead-Lac, (which dries perfectly dull), thoroughly protects the work. These finishes have large covering capacity, making them very economical and are very durable.

路路You can't slip on Florsatin. Grandmamma"

Florsatin imparts to a floor an artistic effect never before secured. It drics with a soft satiny lustre, and while it has all the beauty of the finest wax finish it is far superior in that it requires much less care and is never slippery. By reason of its flinty surface, dust and disease germs never adhere, and it always presents a charmingly clean appearance.

FOR SALE BY

6. U. BOULAND[R Tel. Mel. Park 7292

112 Nineteenth Avenue

121


THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH MEL

ROSE

- (-

PARK 122

THE LAGOON AT WHITE CITY ON A STILL DAY

WHITE eITY Sixty-Third Street and South Park Avenue Open from Nay to November. Take the {jale folks and spend several hours. The expense is sma{{ and enjoyment great.

A Tip to Travelers Why pay $2.00 for a stuffy room in a second-class hotel. or $4.00 for a cheerless apart-ment in a first-class hotel

In Chicago When you can secure comfortable lodging. supplemented by a Turkish Bath, a scientific rub, a shower and a plunge in the finest swimming pool in America for

One Dollar MORAL:

When in Chicago: stop at

The New Northern Baths and Hotel SYLVESTER J. SIMON, Pres.

14 QUINCY ST. (near State)

rr


VIA ELEVATED TRAIN AND SURFACE LINES

VIEW Of ELEVATED TRAIN

Lake Street surface line or Madison Street surface line, with transfer at Harlem A venue. Makes close connection, only a few steps to walk. EXPRESS SERVICE MORNING AND EVENING

Chicago and Oak Park Elevated Railroad


MEL ROSE PARK

Warrington Theatre OAK PARK

124

FRANK H. JUNE, Lessee and Manager I

~,

Seating Capacity 1100

A first-class place of amusement. offering only the very best attractions and catering to the patronage of Melrose Park and Maywood. especially; thoroughly equipped and modern in every particular; centrally located directly opposite the Chicago and Northwestern and the Oak Park Elevated Stations and one block from the Lake Street surface line and the Harlem Avenue cross-town line. Seat reservations for all performances can be made either through the mail or by telephone. Address,

FRANK H. JUNE, Manager Warr;nl/ton Block Long Distance Telephone 73

OAK PARK, ILLINOIS


MEL ROSE PARK 125

. . Three of a Kind.. .

THOS.C.HARDY

PAUL S. COWARD

WALTER C. FOSTER

"Here we are." Ready to show you a complete line of new Spring and Summer woolens. We have special designs that differ !rom ones shown by other tailors. Come early and see them all. Particular dressers will enjoy a wealth of originality and absolute satisfaction in every garment made by us. The clothes are ours until you are pleased.

Respectfully yours, Fourth Floor

ATWOOD BUILDING CHICAGO

HARDY BROS., FOSTER & CO. TAILORS

Clark and Madison Sts.

Madison Street Cars Pass Our Door


)

Of HIGH CLASS

Pictorial and Historical Souvenir Books Special Booklets for Railroads. Real Estate. or other Interests. Our "ads" Talk. We take the Photographs, Nake the euts, Write the eopy, and Do the Printing We carry in stock, or can make Post Cards of any Street, Public Building, etc., shown in this book. Originators of l'<le(a( Bound Post eards

324 DEARBORN STREET

, l

CHICAGO. ILLINOIS


• What makes the city great and strong? Not architecture's graceful strength. ot factories' extended length, But men who see the civic ",rong And give their lives to make it right And turn its darkness into light.

What makes a city full of power? Not wealth's display or titled fame, Not fashion's loudly boasted claim, But women rich in virtue's dower. Whose homes though humble still are great Because of service to the State.

MEL ROSE

PARK 127

Publishers' Note 1itttE have endeavored through our illustrations, and brief sketches of many of the old settlers and prominent business men to show the progress of this thriving community from the beginning, to the presenttime. The· momentum of changes is now more rapid, and should anyone hold this book, not many years hence, the comparison would certainly be interesting.

1tlI1

There may be some errors which are so easily made in printing, however careful our endeavors may have been. We trust they will be charitably overlooked. We thank the citizens and contributors for their encouragement, good wishes and patronage. RespectfuIly, THE BELLMAN ASSOCIATION J. F, WOOD

What makes a city men can love? Not things that charm the outward sense, Not gross display of opulence, But right, the wrong cannot remove. And truth that faces civic fraud And smites it in the name of God.

H, S. NEWMAN

This is il city that shall stand, A light upon a nation's hill, A Voice that evil cannot still, A source of blessing to the land: Its strength not brick, nor stone, nor wood, But Justice, Love and Brotherhood. -Selected.


....

~

-----

,...,.-, ; ..

~

..,...

.

J.

}.-' r~r .;"'~.' ' ..;.~ ,. ..

.,

;'"

~---

..

-._.J-.

.'--

. ,. .

".. -.." f

-

.5 'Cents

'.-

.~.

.-

_.

.. ~

FROM ~

.

,

.~ :Melrose Park TO

Chicago ,

r-路 I

.~.

".:.,

,j,""

1907 Souvenir Book  

This souvenir book was published in 1907 under the auspices of the Melrose Park Village Board by the Bellman Association, Chicago, Illinois.

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