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Hsiang-Yi Melody Ho | Phases


Phases The Accumulation of Resistance - Urban Retreat The Scale of Connections - Affordable Housing The Integrated Autonomy - Museum The Inverted Dynamics - Natatorium The Public Symbiosis - Bitcoin Mining Plaza The Expression of Lightness - Art Loft The Aggregation of Specification - Modular Pod Hotel The Gradient of Perception - Curtain Wall The Moments of Gathering - 人从众𠈌 , Installation The Automated Aggregation - Python Scripting The Repercussion of Movements - Boom!, Installation The States of Purification - Urban Cleansing Lounge The Rechoreographed Topography - Crown Hall Transformation The Layers of Depth - Analytical Drawings The Tracks of Elements - Rare Earth Production Visualization The Investigation of Details - Morgan Library Building Analysis

Spring 2015 Fall 2014 Spring 2016 Fall 2013 Spring 2014 Spring 2015 Fall 2015 Spring 2016 Summer 2015 Spring 2016 Spring 2015 Fall 2013 Fall 2015 Fall 2012 Spring 2014 Fall 2014


The Accumulation of Resistance

Urban Retreat, Rockaway, New York

Spring 2015 | Critic Karla Rothstein


Erosive forces, rising sea level, human activities, water runoff and contamination are the forces experienced on the site. Through the cycle of displacement, regeneration, and reinforcement, incorporating the internodal relationship between levels of reinforcement and its range of migration, oscillation and expansion, responding to the social and natural forces, the visitors’ physical and mental health, and the natural environment are strengthened. The sequential experience of being in a gym, a cafeteria, dormitory, and yoga place reinforces the visitors’ physical health. The sequence of a reading room, floating tanks, sauna and galleries facilitates people’s mental stability. The deployable networked structures provide resilience to natural forces and accommodation to tidal shifts and seasonal changes. The oscillation created by the waves generates energy. The system on the water migrates annually. The structures on the land are rebuilt over a five year period and the old structures still function as a mechanism of filtering and reinforcement, but the program can be repurposed. Over a 15-year period, the whole peninsula can be reinforced. Jamaica Bay


Natural & Social Forces on The Site


Material Study


Intensity-Displacement Relationship


Site Plan

Structures on the water are anchored to the groin and interconnected. These floating pods or boats can aggregate, migrate and be reconfigured at different seasons and stages of reinforcement.


Aerial View


First Floor Plan


Water runoffs are collected, filtered, reused and discharged without contaminating the ground water. Energy generated by converting landfill gas and wave power supplements the networked system. Groins perpendicular to the edge collect sediments and fortify the land.

Section


Program Migration Over 15 Years


The Scale of Connections

Affordable Housing, Bronx, New York Fall 2014 | Critic Hilary Sample In collaboration with Yuhong Du


Social interactions in modern societies take place at various spaces in multiple forms. Individuals tend to identify with certain social patterns depending on their ages and personalities. In this project, the typology of social interaction serves as the basis of spatial organization. Four types of shared spaces, as a constituent of physical interaction, are calibrated according to the residents’ age groups and their social preferences. The overall layout is derived from the precedent study of projects with a central courtyard and atrium, where the courtyards function as “internal streets” connecting the private to the public as transitional constructs. These courtyards are also the center of circulation, indicating higher possibilities in physical interactions among residents and people in the neighborhood. In this project, smaller, scattered courtyards allow for a more intimate relationship between neighboring units, while connecting the streets to a waterfront accessible to the public. Courtyard View, IBA Block on Köthener Strasse

1


Typological Analysis Spatial Configuration

of Courtyards

2

3

1

4

162/ 3182 sqft 5%

1299/ 14199 sqft 9%

4305/ 17221 sqft 25%

15317/ 60710 sqft 25%

GlashĂźtte Residence Utscheid 1986-88

Museum Island Hamburg 1986-95

Block 1 Berlin 1987

The Apthorp New York 1906-08

5

7401/ 16883 sqft 44%

Perimeter Block Berlin 1979


Demographic Analysis


Unit Type Massing

Two Bedrooms (High Interactions)

Two bedrooms (Medium Interactions)

Studios for Elders (High Interactions)

Studios/ One Bedrooms/ Two Bedrooms (Medium to Low Interactions)


6 1 4

4 4

1

4 1

3

4

6 6

1 6

1

1

2

5

4

6

6

6

6

6

2 4 5

5

4

6 4

5

2

6 4

2 5

6

5

5

4

4

5

5

5

5

4

5

4

5

5

5

4

4 1

2

5

5 3

5

5

5

5

6

5

1 Street Entrance 2 Coutyard 3 Waterfront Terrace 4 Two Bedroom 5 Studio 6 Commercial

First Floor Plan


2

1

3

Site View

1 2 3

Green Roof Solar Panels Waterfront Terrace


1 Street Entrance 2 Coutyard 3 Terrace 4 Green Roof 5 Foundation Piles

4

1

3 2

5

Section


Green Roof


Type 1 High Physical Interactions Ground and Second Floors Two Bedrooms/ Studios All the courtyards are connected. Units for elders are juxtaposed with two bedrooms suitable for a family with kids. The elders have easy access to the street and riverfront. They can be revitalized through interacting with children and can also help with day care.

There are no private bedrooms in the units for elders. Round corners are safe and suitable for residents with wheelchairs. Bathrooms are in close proximity to the sleeping area. Interior spaces in the two bedrooms are arranged to maximize physical interactions within the units. Living spaces are located at the center. Sliding doors allow the rooms to be connected to the living spaces. Study rooms can be converted to baby rooms.


Type 1 Axonometric View (Ground Floor) 1 Street Entrance 2 Courtyard 3 Waterfront 4 Stairs to Second Floor 5 Studio (Elder) 6 Two Bedroom 7 Retail

6

6

5

5

7 5

4 2

5 1

5

7 5 5 5


Physical Model


Courtyard View


Type 2 Medium Physical Interactions Third and Fourth Floors Two Bedrooms Residents have a more private and intimate social experience with their neighbors. The circulation paths can only access 7-8 units at a time and are not connected to other units on the same floor.

Spaces in the units provide higher privacy than those in type 1, while sliding doors between the bedrooms allow two family members to share their living spaces.

Platform provides views to the river


Type 1 Axonometric View

1 Platform 2 Elevator Access from The Tall Building 3 Two Bedrooms

1

2


1

4

4

4

4

4

1 1

3

4

4

3

3

3

3

3

1

1 1

2

1

1 1 1 1 1

1

1

1

1 1

1 1

3

1

1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1

1 Two Bedroom 2 One Bedroom 3 Studio 4 Micro Unit

Third Floor Plan


Platform


Spatial Configuration of The Fourth Floor


Circulation Spaces


Type 3 Medium Physical Interactions All Floors (Tall Building) Micro Units/ Studios/ One Bedrooms/ Two Bedrooms The expanded corridors provide communal spaces for residents to chat, have coffee and use the Internet.

Perforated operable screens allow sunlight and provide control of privacy.


Type 3 Axonometric View

3

2

2

3

1

3

1 Expanded Corridor 2 Studio 3 Micro Unit


Type 4 Low / Virtual Physical Interactions All Floors (Tall Building) Micro Units/ Studios/ One Bedrooms/ Two Bedrooms The shared space between units is minimized. This type of unit is for residents who require physical isolation from the others. Their social activities might be virtual. Perforated operable screens allow sunlight and provide control of privacy.

Shared Units are for roommates who require high level of privacy.


Type 4 Axonometric View

2

2

1

1 Shared Unit 2 Studio 3 Micro Unit


View From the River


Structural Detail


Structural Detail

5 4

1

6

3

1 Steel Frame 2 Metal Deck 3 Concrete 4 Rebar 5 Shear Stud 6 Perforated Metal Screen

2


The Integrated Autonomy

Museum, Palm Springs, California Spring 2016 | Critic Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu In collaboration with Kaixiang Huang


In this project, the circulatory experience is a negotiation and articulation between the solid and void, light and dark, autonomy and integrity. We are interested in how distinct elements and programs can be integrated while maintaining their own properties. The transition happens when the main volume and the sectional object intersect. We use different types of architectural elements to articulate the difference. At the ground level, the sectional object is a long sculpture garden with large skylights. When it meets the volume, the part embedded in the volume become solid, while the remained parts are still transparent. When it gets higher, the sectional object becomes a circulatory atrium that delineates the way people experience the building. Staircases go around and within the atrium, connecting the internal void to the galleries at each level. The visual and spatial continuity created by the interweaving circulation and the apertures blur the boundary between the sectional object and the volume, while the contrast between the dark and the light, the solid and the transparent, the depth of the wall, and the interstitial space between the sectional object and the galleries help maintain the autonomy of the atrium.


Site Plan People can drive or take the amtrak to visit the museum. The parking lot on the north is connected to the highway. For those who take the trains, they can take the footbridge from the station and walk to our site.


From the ground level, visitors enter from both entrances at the two ends of the sectional object. Passing through the gallery, they take the stairs to the mezzanine level. To the next level, the staircase goes through the sectional object to the third floor, where there is an auditorium, a small cafe and people can access the outdoor terrace. From this level up, visitors can take the staircases that goes around and within the atrium up to the upper galleries. The top floor is an office for the museum.


The Inverted Dynamic

Urban Recreation Center, Manhattan Valley, New York Fall 2013 | Critic Christoph a. Kumpusch


Recreation adopts its own dynamics as the antithetical response to life’s regular work and stress cycles. We seek out opportunities to relax in order to balance against our stressful lifestyles. When we grow accustomed to our daily routines, often we need some excitement to enrich our lives. In New York City, pedestrian and automotive traffic - manmade movements - are fast and busy, while the natural movements of the East and Hudson Rivers are slow and placid. In this urban recreation center, the mobility of human activities functions as an inversion of the mobility of natural counterparts, emphasizing the complementary relationship between recreation and daily life, and the contrast in mobility between aquatic and terrestrial activities. The site is the open space within Frederick Douglass Houses, a public housing project in Manhattan completed in 1958. Here the majority of residents are families with children and elders. The programmatic elements of the recreation center include a large open-air pool, a children’s pool, an indoor hydrotherapy spa, a playground, an auditorium and a skating pond (a skate park that can be converted into an ice rink in the winter). Each programmatic element engages different states of water at different temperatures via its distinct construct. Through analysis of the level of mobility on the site, the programs are arranged by matching the levels of mobility of the water activities to the conditions on the ground, while the mobility in the dry circulatory area is inverted in the wet area. Aquatic and Terrestrial Movements in New York City

6


Local Mobility Analysis


Two systems determine the mobility of the users in the dry area, the aperture system and the curvature system. Through varying the sizes and the distribution of the apertures, the viewers are visually conducted to a specific level of mobility. The larger and closer the aperture, the faster people will move. Secondly, the curvature of the floor regulates the speed of circulation. In the slower circulation areas, such as around the skating pond, the paths are more meandering and narrow, while the faster areas, such as those around the hydrotherapy spa, are straighter and broader.


This configuration enhances users’ spatial experiences in the recreation center. The hydrotherapy spa is mainly for the elders; broad open paths ensure their safety. Meanwhile, the meandering curvatures at the side of the skating pond allow visitors to look at the skaters and the surroundings at a slower pace. The city and the users become the natural performers for people watching.


Exterior/ Auditorium


Playground/ Children’s Pool


Skating Park and Pool


Spa/ Hydrotherapy


Auditorium


Model


The Public Symbiosis

Bitcoin Mining Plaza, Downtown Brooklyn, New York Spring 2014 | Critic Karel Klein


Google Server Farm Bitcoin as a digital currency redefines the transaction process. Contrary to the current banking industry which capitalizes knowledge and space, the Bitcoin mining community is based on an open-source database which provides codes and information to the public. This project accentuates the communal quality of Bitcoin. Public programs including a library, the physical counterpart of the information-sharing database, a green roof garden and a performance space coexist with a Bitcoin mining server farm. The private and the public programs facilitate each other structurally and environmentally. The symbiosis between the Bitcoin mining colony and the public exemplifies a new paradigm for the banking industry. In the adjacent image, the cooling system in Google’s server farm consists of numerous liquid-filled tubes going through the whole building. In the study models, by casting long balloons with different diameters at different lengths, continuous internal spaces are created. These spaces are nested within the three-dimensional honeycomb structure which provides structural strength while maintaining visual connectivity between spaces. 7


Study Model


Shadow Analysis


Summer Solstice

Winter Solstice


Exterior View From The Northwest/ Entrance of the Public Library


Unrolled Section


WIND DIRECTION AIR OUTLET

PUBLIC SPACE PRIVATE SPACE

HEAT SINK

ROOFTOP GARDEN

INTERIOR VENTIATION SYSTEM AIR OUTLET

STRUCTURAL MASS DISTRIBUTION PIPES

SERVERS

The porous facade, the central atrium and the apertures on the north accelerate natural ventilation, taking away the heat waste produced by the servers. In the winter, the heat stored in the concrete thermal mass allows the rooftop garden to stay unfrozen.


Office

Rooftop Garden

Library

Server Farm


Rooftop Garden


Public Library


The Expression of Lightness

Art Loft, Bronx, New York

Spring 2015 | Architectural Technology V | Critic David Dubrow, Anton Martinez and Elias S Matar In collaboration with Lindsey Wikstrom, Harrison Bush, Jesse Catalano and Abraham Bendheim


The art loft project embodies a passionate negotiation between the functional and the aesthetic. The concept for our building design was to create different forms of non-visual spectacle through a series of structural and architectural moves. We developed a building where the efficient structure enables an expressive, column free facade, the simple program responds decisively to the environment, and the celebration and suppression of the HVAC helps to define the character of different spaces. The illusion of lightness is accomplished through diverting structural loads and manipulating structural moment diagrams. The building is made up of three sectional bands each with a distinct program. The north side of the building features artist studios that benefit from even, indirect light. The middle volume, which runs from the east to the west facade is made up of double height gallery spaces that are divided by the building’s two cores. The south side of the building features offices.


Building Section


Typical Odd Floor Plan

Typical Even Floor Plan

Ground Floor Plan

Seventh Floor Plan


North Elevation

East Elevation


Window Details


Details


Appendix C HVAC Calculations Appendix C HVAC Zones HVAC Calculations N1

N2

N3

Heat Gain

N4

N5

N5

N4

N3

N2

N2

N4

N3

R

G1 G1 S1 G1

R

R

N5

N5

G2 G2

R S2

G2

S4

S3

S1 S1 S2 S3 Zone (Sample Calculation) HVAC ZONES Floor Area 224 sqft Ceiling Height 14 ft

G2

S4

G2

N4

N3

S5

S5

S5

G2

N2

R

G2 G2 S5

R

S3

S4

S3

R

S2

G1

S2

Unit Heat Output (btu/h) *Heat Gain = Number of Units x Unit Heat Output Lighting 224 sqft Unit Heat 3.4 People 4 people Output255 Computer 4 number 1365.2 (btu/h) Printer 1 number 1365.2 Lighting 224 sqft 3.4 Coffee Brewer 1 number 1023.9 People 4 people 255 Computer 4 number 1365.2 Radiation Printer 1 number 1365.2 *Heat CoffeeTransfer Brewer = Intensity x Area 1 x Transmittance number 1023.9 Exposure

Number

Height (ft)

Radiation Glass N x Transmittance 14 14 *Heat Transfer = Intensity x Area Glass S 1 14 14 Exposure Glass E/W Number 1 Height (ft)14 Width (ft)16

Intensity (btu/hft2)

Length Ratio Width Length

HVAC

Length

Width

Length

Width

Length

(sqin) Section 308 Area 98 (sqin) 251 308 41 98 12 251 10 41

(in) 1:1

18 Length 10 (in) 16 18 6 10 4 16 3 6

(in) 1:2

(in) 1:2

(in) 1:4

S1

E/W S1 Interior S2

1843 46225 1530 29971

85 2140 71 1388

1000 1000 1000 1000

12 308 10 200

S1

S3 S1 S4 S2 S5 S3 N1 S4 N2 S5 N3 N1 N4 N2 N5 N3 G1 N4 G2 N5 G3 G1 R G2

47250 46225 29461 29971 29461 47250 37577 29461 12675 29461 21307 37577 12165 12675 12165 21307 3373 12165 3059 12165 3059 3373 1530 3059

2188 2140 1364 1388 1364 2188 1740 1364 587 1364 986 1740 563 587 563 986 156 563 142 563 142 156 71 142

1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000

G3 S1+S2+G1 R S5+S4

3059 79568 1530 58922

142 3684 71 2728

G2+G3 S1+S2+G1 S5+S4+G2+G3 S5+S4 S Corridor G2+G3 S Main Duct S5+S4+G2+G3

6118 79568 65040 58922 193388 6118 193388 65040

S Corridor N1+N2+G1 S Main Duct N5+N4

Transmittance

2140 cfm *Flow rate = Heat Gain/ (Factor(1.08) x Temperature Difference) 1 to 1000 4 1 to 1 fpm1 to 2 0.7 1.0 1.5=ftFlow Rate/ Velocity 2.14 sqft *Duct Area 8.8 12.4 17.6 in 1 to 4 2.9 1 to 2 2.1 1 to 1 1.5 ft 35.1 24.8 1.5 ft in 0.7 1.0 1.5 8.8 12.4 17.6 in 2.9 2.1 1.5 ft 24.8 1.5 in Calculations 35.1

Area

N1

Qtotal (btu/h)

0 0 0.65 0 196 80 0.26 4076.8 Area Intensity Qtotal 200 Transmittance 0.65 29120 B (sqft)224 (btu/hft2) (btu/h) Glass N 14 14 0 0 0.65 0 Conduction Glass S 1 14 14 196 80 0.26 4076.8 *Heat Area x Temperature Difference(20°) Glass Transfer = U-value xE/W 1 14 16 224 200 0.65 29120 B Area Qtotal U-value Number Height (ft) Width (ft) (sqft) (btu/h) Conduction Double Glazing N 0.53 14 14 0 0 *Heat Transfer = U-value x Area x Temperature Difference(20°) Double Glazing E/W 0.53 1 14 16 224 2374.4 Area Qtotal U-value Number 1 Height (ft)14 Width (ft)14 Triple glazing S 0.26 1019.2 (sqft)196 (btu/h) Wall E/W 0.07 14 16 0 0 C Double Glazing N 0.53 14 14 0 0 Double Glazing E/W 0.53 1 14 16 224 2374.4 Total Gain S 46225 btu/h 0.26 *Heat Gain1= A+ B+ C14 Triple Heat glazing 14 196 1019.2 Flow Wall Rate E/W 2140 cfm 0.07 *Flow rate = Heat Gain/14(Factor(1.08) 16x Temperature 0 Difference) 0 C Velocity 1000 fpm Section Area 2.14 btu/h sqft *Duct Area Rate/ Total Heat Gain 46225 *Heat Gain == Flow A+ B+ C Velocity Flow Rate Ratio Velocity Width Section Area

1:4

37577 46225 6083 14730 1843 37577 1530 6083

1365.2 764.5 1023.9 1020 A

Area (sqft)

1:4

14730 Gain

764.5 Qtotal 1020 (btu/h) 5460.8

Width (ft)

1:2

S

Qtotal (btu/h)

5460.8 1365.2 1023.9 A

(cfm) Flow 2140 Velocity 1000 Rate 682 1000 (fpm) (cfm) 1740 1000 2140 1000 282 1000 682 1000 85 1000 1740 1000 71 1000 282 1000

1:2

N1 S1 N S E/W N1 Interior N

Zone S1 (Sample Calculation)

14 ft

(fpm)

1:1

N1

*Heat Gain = Number of Units Unit Heat Output HVAC Floor ZONES Area 224x sqft Ceiling Height

Rate

Section

46225 Heat

G1 G1

R S4

G1

Velocity

S1

HVAC Zones G1 N1

Flow

8 9 3 5 2 8 2 3

35 Length 20 (in) 32 35 13 20 7 32 6 13

11 12 5 7 2 11 2 5

4 18 3 14

2 12 2 10

5 25 5 20

2 9 2 7

7 35 6 28

315 308 196 200 196 315 251 196 84 196 142 251 81 84 81 142 22 81 20 81 20 22 10 20

18 18 14 14 14 18 16 14 9 14 12 16 9 9 9 12 5 9 5 9 5 5 3 5

13 12 10 10 10 13 11 10 6 10 8 11 6 6 6 8 3 6 3 6 3 3 2 3

25 25 20 20 20 25 22 20 13 20 17 22 13 13 13 17 7 13 6 13 6 7 5 6

9 9 7 7 7 9 8 7 5 7 6 8 5 5 5 6 2 5 2 5 2 2 2 2

35 35 28 28 28 35 32 28 18 28 24 32 18 18 18 24 9 18 9 18 9 9 6 9

1000 1500 1000 1500

20 354 10 262

5 19 3 16

3 13 2 11

6 27 5 23

2 9 2 8

9 38 6 32

283 3684 3011 2728 8953 283 8953 3011

1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 1500 2000 1500

27 354 289 262 860 27 548 289

5 19 17 16 29 5 23 17

4 13 12 11 21 4 17 12

7 27 24 23 41 7 33 24

3 9 9 8 15 3 12 9

10 38 34 32 59 10 47 34

193388 53624 193388 24330

8953 2483 8953 1126

1500 1500 2000 1500

860 238 548 108

29 15 23 10

21 11 17 7

41 22 33 15

15 8 12 5

59 31 47 21

N Corridor N1+N2+G1 N Main Duct N5+N4

106909 53624 106909 24330

4949 2483 4949 1126

1500 1500 2000 1500

475 238 303 108

22 15 17 10

15 11 12 7

31 22 25 15

11 8 9 5

44 31 35 21

N Corridor Branch Ducts N Main Duct S1

106909

4949

1500

475

22

15

31

11

44

106909 46225

4949 2140

2000 600

303 257

17 16

12 11

25 23

9 8

35 32

S Branch Ducts N1 S1 N S E/W N1 Interior N

14730

682

600

82

9

6

13

5

18

37577 46225 6083 14730 1843 37577 1530 6083

1740 2140 282 682 85 1740 71 282

600 600 600 600 600 600 600 600

209 257 34 82 10 209 8 34

14 16 6 9 3 14 3 6

10 11 4 6 2 10 2 4

20 23 8 13 5 20 4 8

7 8 3 5 2 7 1 3

29 32 12 18 6 29 6 12

(in)

7

Width (in)

9

(in) 1:4

25 Length 14 (in) 22 25 9 14 5 22 5 9

Width

12

5

E/W

1843

85

600

10

3

2

5

2

6

Interior

1530

71

600

8

3

2

4

1

6


Typical Odd Floor HVAC Plan

Typical Even Floor HVAC Plan

Interior Renderings - Gallery & Studio


The Aggregation of Specification

Bee Hotel, Modular Pod Hotel

Fall 2015 | Modular Architecture | Critic David Wallance In collaboration with Cindy Shihhsin Hwang, Chang Qi and Yu Wu


Bee Hotel is a hotel comprised of modular units. Individual modules are 40’x10’x10’, a size that fits in a truck container and can be easily shipped to the site. Considering the zoning envelope, views towards the Gowanus Canal, and the daylight quality of each unit, the modules are stacked into two parallel volumes, taller on the northwest and lower on the southeast. This creates intimate and easily accessible pockets of rooftop terrace on upper levels of the southeast volume. The modules are push-and-pulled alternatively to create variations on the facade. The 3’ offset allows the roof of the lower module to become the balcony of the upper unit. The facade system consists of metal panels which form beveled shapes corresponding to the building mass. The repetition of the panels creates interesting optical effects on the facades, creating the iconic signature of Bee Hotel. The hotel offers five different types of rooms to its visitors, basic 1, basic 2, premium, extended & accessible 1, and extended & accessible 2. Basic 1 is 126 square feet, and has a total of 94 rooms. Basic 2 is 153 square feet, and has a total of 95 rooms. Premium is 171 square feet, and has a total of 41 rooms. Extended & accessible 1 is 293 square feet, and has a total of 10 rooms. And extended & accessible 2 is 331 square feet, and has a total of 11 rooms. Due to our desire to provide a higher level of quality and feeling of luxury at the Bee Hotel, we opted for more generous rooms that feature balconies to


drop off entrance

drop off exit entrance

ramp

delivery

retail

lobby

back of house

check-in

open kitchen theater

dining

bar

SACKETT STREET

cafe

dining

UNION STREET GOWANUS CANAL 5

Ground Floor Plan

10

20


Unit Types

Basic 1

Basic 2

Premium

Extended & Accessible 1

Extended & Accessible 2

126 sqft 94 rooms

153 sqft 95 rooms

171 sqft 41 rooms

293 sqft 10 rooms

331 sqft 11 rooms


Short Section

A

B

C

D

E

+ 85 feet

+ 75 feet

+ 65 feet

+ 55 feet

+ 55 feet

+ 45 feet

+ 45 feet

+ 35 feet

+ 35 feet

+ 25 feet

+ 25 feet

+ 15 feet

+ 15 feet

+ 13 feet

+ 13 feet

+/- 0 feet

+/- 0 feet

5

10

20


3

2

1

2

4

1

2

4

1

2

4

1

2

4

1

2

1

2

3

2

2

1

2

1

2

2

1

2

1

2

3

2

1

2

5

5

1 2 3 4 5

5

1

2

1

2

1

2

Basic 1 Basic 2

Premium

Extended & Accessible 2 Public Area

Typical Floor Plan

5

10

20


Longitudinal Section

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

+ 55 feet

+ 45 feet

+ 35 feet

+ 25 feet

+ 15 feet + 13 feet

+/- 0 feet

5

10

20


Facade Details

Module Structural System

EDPM

STEEL FORM DECK

4" CELING JOISTS

6"X2" HSS

3" CONCRETE STEEL FORM DECK

3" STUD WALL

STEEL WRAPS (WELDED TO FRAME)

12"X6" HSS

6"X4" HSS

6"X2" HSS


The Gradient of Perception

Curtain Wall, Singapore

Spring 2016 | Critic Robert A. Heintges and Daniel Vos


The unitize curtain wall system is composed of faceted glass panels framed with bent 4”x10” mullions with external vertical fin-like shading devices. The design is originated from the painting Grille Collor Noir by Jean Degottex, in which two sets of diamond grids shifts slightly from left to right to create different degrees of overlap. This façade system provides similar optical illusion. The perceptional overlap of the vertical fins changes according to the viewers’ positions relative to the façade and provide a dynamic visual experience for people moving around and within the building. There are two types of unit. Each is the vertical reflected version of the other. Each unit is 5 ft wide, 14ft tall, and comprised of two trapezoidal glass panels and half of the “fin”. In elevation, the two trapezoidal glass are the rotated 180 degree version of the other, complementary at the slanted edge in the middle and form a rectangular elevation when combined. The top and the bottom of the unit frame, where the stack joints are, are horizontal in elevation. In section, the glass panels are slanted inward. The innermost part of the unit is the mullion in the middle. Right below the stack joints, vertical mullions are connected to the slab with anchors which provide tolerance in movements. The floor plates are zigzagged in plan to follow the edge of the facade. The frames of the “fins” are screwed onto the vertical mullions. Jean Degottex Grille Collor Noir, 1983


STACK JOINT

FIXED JOINT

DETAIL 1 STACK JOINT

PLAN 1

FIXED JOINT

PLAN 2 DETAIL 2

DETAIL 3 STACK JOINT

ELEVATION

PLAN 3

SECTION 1/2"=1'-0"


PLAN 3

SECTION 1/2"=1'-0"

ELEVATION FIN LOUVER

FRITTED GLASS

STACK JOINT INSULATION GALVANIZED PANEL

FLOOR FINISHING ANCHOR POCKET (GROUT) ANCHOR CONCRETE METAL DECK BEAM ROD (DROP CEILING)

ANCHOR

TEE MULLION INSULATION FRITTED GLASS FIN

FRITTED GLASS

FIN LOUVER

TRANSOM MULLION TEE

PLAN 1

MULLION FRITTED GLASS FIN

DETAIL 4

DETAIL 1

FIXED JOINT

ANCHOR

PLAN 2 DETAIL 2

DETAIL 5 DETAIL 4

MULLION FRITTED GLASS FIN

FRITTED GLASS

FIN LOUVER FIN LOUVER

FRITTED GLASS

STACK JOINT INSULATION GALVANIZED PANEL

FLOOR FINISHING ANCHOR POCKET (GROUT) ANCHOR

DETAIL 5 CONCRETE METAL DECK BEAM ROD (DROP CEILING)

PLAN 3

DETAIL 3


人从众𠈌 ,

The Moments of Gathering

Taipei Fine Arts Museum X-Site Installation Proposal (Third Prize)

September 2015 Project Architect: Po-Wei Lai (Willipodia) In collaboration with Chao-Ming Teng and Chia-Hua Lee Wind Analysis: Chun-Jung Chang Structural Engineer: Ming-Chan Kang


人从众𠈌

is the aggregation of a single element – the red plastic chair, a common object in Taiwanese daily life. A chair is the simplest existence to define the space an individual occupies, while occupying spaces collectively constitutes the recognition of assembly. As a place of gathering, 人从众𠈌 aims to become a space to reflect on the idea of “meeting.” Seen everywhere, in multiple variations - on streets, in front of temples, used by street vendors, in political aggregations, in weddings and all kinds of celebrations - these red plastic chairs represent the prototype of a Taiwanese chair. This common object does not induce an implication, but the proclamation of gathering at all scales, from two to millions. A gathering point is an intermediate space, a place to stay temporarily between the starting point and the final destination. 人从众𠈌 transforms this immaterial moment into a space of experience. The one-dimensional gathering point is stretched to become a multi-dimensional congregation. 19


Aerial View


Aggregation Plan


Dome


View From Sec.3, Zhongshan North Road


Outdoor Theater


Night Bar


The Automated Aggregation CubeRun, Python Scripted Animation

Spring 2016 | Critic Ezio Blasetti


This project explores the aggregation of single element. Starting with a base cubical geometry, each loop makes a new duplicate with one of the seven possible aggregation types. In order to prevent intersections of the elements, the center points of each cube are used for testing intersection. Whenever a new element intersects with the existing ones, the new element will be deleted. The cubical geometry can be replaced with other geometries as long as they share the same reference points. In this project, the cubical geometry is substituted with two different shapes. Whenever a new cubical geometry is made, a new shape is created according to the orientation and position of the cubical geometry. The base geometries and the substitutional shapes are assigned to different layers and the base geometries are hidden after the shapes are made.


Base

Move 1

Move 2

Move 3

Move 4

Move 5

Move 6

Move 7


#.1

#.2

#.3

#.4

#.5

#.3

#.7

#.8

#.9

#.10

#.11

#.12

#.15

#.20

#.25

#.30

#.35

#.40


#.150

#.200

#.250

#.300

#.350

#.400

#.450

#.500

#.550

#.600

#.650

#.700

#.800

#.900

#.1000

#.1100

#.1200

#.1300

#.1900

#.1900

#.1900

#.1900

#.1900

#.1900


The Repercussion of Movements

Boom!, 2015 GSAPP EOYS Installation, Columbia University, New York Spring 2015 | Critic Mark Bearak & Brigette Borders In collaboration with Jessie Baxa, Abraham Bendheim, Jesse Catalano, Ayesha Ghosh, Mimi Ho, Mondrian Hsieh, Pei-Chia Hsu, Louis Jin and Ekkaphon Puekpaiboon Website: http://booooom.cc/


BOOM is an interactive enclosure that engages and connects occupants. Inhabitants transform the walls by walking through the space. BOOM is an environment that changes over time. Inherently ephemeral, the experience is dependent on the actors present at any moment. A product of the Fast Pace, Slow Space course at Columbia University GSAPP, the pavilion is on display May 16, 2015 at GSAPP’s End of Year Show.


Aerial View


Construction Plan


Base Detail


The States of Purification

Riverside Cleansing Lounge, West 125th Street, New York Fall 2013 | Critic Christoph a. Kumpusch


The site on 125th Street is a waterfront park where people rest, run and bike. Engaging with different states of water, the riverside restroom comprised of a shower, a toilet, and a sauna, provides a sequential cleansing experience which not only takes away the physical waste, but also reinvigorates the users’ minds. The conical structure oriented to the prevailing wind direction increases ventilation and serves as a cooling device. The spherical structure is arranged to block or to collect sounds according to the need of each program. Apertures and the orientations of the structural elements regulate the levels of sunlight and privacy. Bikers in Riverside Park


Casted Model


Warer System


Roof Apetures


Cooling Funnels


Light Study


The Rechoreographed Topography

S. R. Crown Hall Transformation, IIT, Chicago Fall 2015| Critic Bernard Tschumi In collaboration with Choonghyo Lee


We notated and analyzed the movements of a skater’s performance in an ice rink at intervals of two seconds. Through measuring the scale of expansion of her body, the height of the center of her body, her distance to the ground, the edge of the ice rink and the orientation of her body, we found her movements tended to get slower when she was in the middle between the center of the rink and the edge, where she could be seen most clearly by the audience. With this relationship between speed and visibility, we propose an exhibition space in transformation of Crown Hall. We open up the façade to emphasize the ground floor as a public space and transform the floor into a topographical landscape. Since the “solid” structural elements will be where the artworks are exhibited, the ground is gradually elevated according to the proximity to the solid edge. People tend to slow down while approaching the artworks. In addition, with sequences of movements we found in the skating performance, we recontour the topography to reflect the space required for each sequence and provides more spatial possibilities in Crown Hall. The glass facade is flattened to the “static areas” (skylights on ground) to become the real enclosure, defining the boundary between public and private. The dimensions of the mullions for the skylights are based on the length of the exterior I-beams on the original facade so that the mullions can be reused. The “static areas” remains untouched as the spaces not influenced by the movements. 20


220 ft

200 ft

B I

F I H

DE A

E

120 ft

100 ft

C

F

B

GH

D

G

A

C

structure wall structure wall

+

SOLID

interior wall translucent glass

speed

transparent glass staircase

A

B 18 sec

0:00

C 8 sec

0:18

E

D 20 sec

0:26

16 sec 0:46

-

VOID

F 24 sec

1:02

20 sec 1:26

H

G

1:46

15 sec

I 32 sec

2:01

Vancouver Pacific Coliseum Arena / Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics

I’

A

17 sec 2:33

E 18 sec

2:50

0:00

B 24 sec

0:18

D 8 sec

0:42

16 sec 0:50

15 sec 1:06

F

H

G

32 sec 1:21

C 20 sec

1:53

Illinois Institute of Technology, Crown Hall / Mies Van Der Rohe

I 20 sec

2:13

I’ 17 sec

2:33

2:50


Real-Time Analysis


The Layers of Depth

Analytical Drawings

Spring 2012 | Critic Thomas de Monchaux & Jane Kim


Depth Analysis of The Flatiron Building Triangular Display Window


Metropolitan Opera House Facade Reflection Analysis


The Tracks of Elements

Rare Earth Production Process Visualization

Spring 2014 | Critic Jason Vigneri-Beane


Rare Earth Metal Production

Power of 50 Increment

The process of rare earth production includes mining, refining and disposal. In each stage, the levels of dispersion and aggregation of elements vary. With a rotational device creating torques, one set of drawings records how these parameters influence the interactions of the rare earth magnetic balls at different scales. The other set of drawings is generated by grasshopper definitions. Mining

Refining

Disposal

8-16


High Dispersion

The rotational device records the interactions between rare earth magnetic balls distributed at different levels of dispersion and elemental aggregation.

Medium Dispersion

Low Dispersion

Aggregation of 4

Aggregation of 2

Aggregation of 1


The grasshopper definition tracks the dispersion and aggregation of a point cloud. The scale of dispersion is determined by the diameter of a spherical base frame and the intensity of aggregation depends on the strengths of the attractive points on the sphere.


2D Definition

3D Definition


The Investigation of Details

Renovation and Expansion of the Morgan Library Building Analysis Architect | Renzo Piano

Fall 2014 | Architectural Technology IV | Critic Anton Martinez In collaboration with Lin Su, I-Hsuan Wang and Joann Feng


PIAZZA SKYLIGHT DETAIL


READING ROOM DETAIL

FACADE DETAIL


Notes 1

O M Ungers, IBA Block on Köthener Strasse, https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3095/2677096082_9acbe4b8ab_b.jpg.

2

Ungers, O. M. Oswald Mathias Ungers. Milano: Electa, 1991.

3

Lichthof der Galerie der Gegenwart, http://www.blindbild.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/kunsthalle-innenhof.jpg.

4

The Apthorp, http://mercedesberk.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/The-Apthorp-11M__13_resize.jpg

5

Perimeter Block, Google Earth.

6

Henry Hudson Parkway, http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c8/Henry_Hudson_Parkway_heading_towards_George_Washington_Bridge_November_2013.jpg.

7

Google Server Farm, https://abbyherbert.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/article-2219188-158ce5a2000005dc-378_964x525.jpg.

8

Rare Earth Mine, http://ifixit.org/files/2012/01/Mining-Operations1-12-23-11.jpg.

9

Mining for Rare Earth Minerals, http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2010/04/22/business/energy-environment/rare4.jpg.

10

Yan Morvan&Rex Features, Computers dumped on a landfill site, http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2011/sep/26/rare-earth-metals-technology-boom.

11

Reuters, China’s Rare-Earth Minerals Monopoly, http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2012/04/pictures/120403-china-rare-earth-mining-pictures.

12

China Daily, Rare Earth Refinery, http://www.china.org.cn/business/2012-12/20/content_27466696.html.

13

E-Scrap Destruction in Islandia, New York, http://www.nytimes.com/imagepages/2008/11/12/business/smallbusiness/13scrap.1.inline.ready.html.

14

Rare Earth, http://www.proactiveinvestors.com/genera//img/companies/news/rare_earth350_50cb298e5ce49.jpg.

15

Rare Earth Elements, http://www.wired.com/images_blogs/dangerroom/2009/08/800px-eu-block.jpg.

16

The Metals In Your Phone Aren’t Just Rare, http://media.gizmodo.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/198ke4rjwc211jpg.jpg.

17

Lucinda Keller, http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-9kdcvwL0kKs/VDbd_vEIj7I/AAAAAAAAPPQ/JDOn05IeHpY/s1600/IMG_1074. jpg.

18

CBS New York, Morgan Library, http://cbsnewyork.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/morgan-library.jpg.

19 http://www.wang.mymailer.com.tw/tn/%E6%9D%BF%E5%87%B3/tn__%E5%A1%91%E8%86%A0%E6%A4%85.jpg. 20 http://cdn23.us3.fansshare.com/photos/kimyu-na/wfsc-kim-yu-na-jpg-1450727809.jpg


Special Thanks to Eric Mader Ethan Levine Tom McKeogh All my critics, teammates, family and friends


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