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1986 - 2013

27

Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E

MARKETING Newspaper

Vol. 26 No. 283

Your Better-Than-Ever B2B Connection

Donnelley Acquires CG RR Donnelley & Sons Co. has signed an agreement to acquire Houston-based Consolidated Graphics Inc., owner of both Emerald City Graphics and Printing Control in Seattle. The transaction is valued at approximately $620 million, plus the assumption of Consolidated’s net debt. CG founder/chairman/CEO Joe R. Davis said customers will benefit from the flexibility of the two companies’ wide range of printing capabilities, as well as their combined geographic footprint, yet focus on local service. Chicago-based Donnelley, founded in 1864, has more than 55,000 employees worldwide, had sales of $10.2 billion in 2012 and ranks 249th on the Fortune 500 list of America’s largest corporations. Thomas J. Quinlan III is president/CEO. CG has 70 printing and fulfillment facilities in the U.S., Toronto, Prague and Asia and a strategic alliance with Japan. “Press” the Paperbutton below for local reaction to the CG acquisition. send share save

Story Behind Who Coined ‘Dawgfather’ In all the copious coverage of the death of coach Don James, there were frequent references to “Dawgfather”—but not a word about where the novel nickname originated. Until now. John Costacos, who gained fame and fortune with his striking sports posters in the late 80’s and 90’s, is the one who coined the name, in collaboration with a four-yearold! Here’s how John tells the story. “I started in the T-shirt business in 1984 by nicknaming the Husky defense the ‘Purple Reign.’ I went to Miami in late December for the Orange Bowl game against Oklahoma to sell T-shirts at the team hotel. “I was talking with Don and Carol James’ daughter, Jill, and her husband, Jeff Woodruff, about how I’d been going to Husky games on the bus since I was a kid. I told them I always had tickets because my dad and godfather were season-ticket holders. The Woodruff’s son, Jared, who was four Dawgfather • 16

PrintWest, winner of the Best Shop (21-50 employees) in PPI’s PrintROCKS! competition. was well represented at the awards banquet. From left are Phillip and Bethany Parrish, Tania Stiller, Leslie and Cory Wozow, Mike Popp, Carrie Rynne and Peter Marshall.

PrintROCKS! Winners Premier Press in Portland won Best of Show in the sixth annual PrintROCKS! Awards competition, sponsored by the PPI Association, for its Michael Jordan 50 Years book (see photo on Page 16). The company also won a Best of Division (101+ employees) as well as Best of Category for eight of its entries. Other division winners included B&B Print Source (51-100 employees) and PrintWest of Woodinville (21-50 employees).

A matrix of the 23 winners of First, Second, Third and Honorable Mention Awards is on Page 22. All winners will be entered in the 2014 Printing Industries of America International Premier Print Awards competition, the largest and most prestigious such competition in the world, with it’s coveted “Bennie” award bearing the likeness of Benjamin Franklin. More than 200 entries were assessed PPI • 16

Hear ye! The American Advertising Federation is rebranding its signature national creative competition as the American Advertising Awards (AAA) and instituting an earlier entry deadline. Seattle producer/director George Riddell, who chairs the national AAA committee, said the name of the award will remain the ADDY, but gave this explanation for the rebranding. “Our entrants and judges, from agencies large and small saw that our competition was uniquely American in a landscape that

had plenty of global awards shows,” said Riddell. “Few people will deny that American advertising is the gold standard. So by taking more ownership of our heritage and recognizing the great work being done market-to-market right here at home, we are truly awarding the best-of-the-best.” He also noted that the call for entries has ADDY • 16

ADDY-Award Change Alert

Nov./Dec. 2013

Academy Closes In 75th Year

“It’s time to retire,” said Terry Karis as we sat down for a breakfast meeting. His retirement also marks the end of the 75-year-old Academy Press, which he has owned since 1975. Karis, now 78, was born in Greece and came to Seattle in January of 1950 when he was 15. After passing his English proficiency test at Broadway High School in 1952 he enrolled at Lincoln High School. It was then he began working part-time at Academy Press, founded in 1938 by George and Mary Cotronis in the Maritime Building on the Seattle waterfront. It and the nearby National Building, were a literal “printer’s alley,” housing more than two dozen small print shops and typehouses. Academy • 17

Maylin Heading Successor To PSRBA: SARA Chuck Maylin, a veteran Seattle radio executive, has been appointed executive director of the Seattle Area Radio Association (SARA), the rebranded trade association representing radio stations in Seattle and the Puget Sound region. For more than 30 years, the organization was known as the Puget Sound Radio Broadcasters Association (PSRBA). Two years ago, the organization rebranded itself as SARA. Maylin has been in the radio industry for nearly 40 years, the majority in Seattle, where he was general manager of “Oldies” KBSG and KNDD “The End” from 1989 to 1996. From 1996 to 2002 he worked in Europe as director of international operations for NRJ-SA, France’s largest radio broadcast SARA • 16

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Friends As ‘Milestones’...

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My best friend from grade-school days, Richard (Porky) Moore, just spend a glorious week here, golfing and reminiscing with me about our boyhood years growing up in the housing project adjoining Aberdeen (MD) Proving Grounds in the early ’50s. We were teammates in football, basketball and baseball throughout high school, but after graduation we were out of touch for nearly 40 years. A decade or so ago we reconnected, and he’s come to visit me in Seattle three times, sandwiched around a high school reunion back in Aberdeen, where he still lives. His latest visit got me thinking... In the latter years, it’s only natural to look for measuring sticks—“milestones,” if you will—of one’s life. As the famous quote says, “A man is known by the company he keeps.” These are best friends who would drop everything in a heartbeat to come to your aid, if need be. And—at the risk of sounding maudlin—they’re the non-relatives you’d want as the pallbearers or speakers at your funeral or celebration of life. Each person’s journey will be different, of course, but think of your own cadre of close friends who have helped shape the person you are today. I’m privileged to count Porky as the first and foremost of that company. He’s a devoted father of four who—amazingly—has never touched a drop of alcohol or had a smoke or drug of any kind. He was an NFL-caliber football player whose career was cut short when he got his knee blown out his freshman year at Clemson, so he applied his athletic skills and knowledge to an exemplary career in physical education. Bob Lindes is another product of the project and a three-sport teammate. He had a highly successful career as an electrician, raised a large family, now splits his time between homes in Delaware and Florida and calls often to update me on the health of mutual friends. For the guys, there was likely the military interlude. In my case, it brought me into the company of a guy named Will Elias, today one of the top defense attorneys in El Paso, TX. We spent two memorable years as second looies and roommates in the 8th Cavalry in Mannheim, Germany, traveling the length and breadth of Europe in our free time. For many, there were the college years. Two guys were “milestone” men for me. Bill Kopper had a highly successful career with IBM and reached the rank of Captain (Colonel in Army terms) in the Navy Reserves. Nick Del Calzo ran one of the most successful PR firms in Denver before becoming famous for his coffee-table book of striking black-and-white photographs of living Medal of Honor recipients. The final chapter contains the friends from the career years—and up to the moment. I have at least a half-dozen people in mind, and I think you know who you are, but I’ll leave the completion of that chapter for another time. All are people whose company I’m proud to keep. Now, it’s your turn... —LC send share save

Art Of The Issue: In the great birthday-at-sea tradition of mermaids jumping out of cakes, Ivar’s celebrates its 75th “Clamiversary” this Fall with its “Surprise!” campaign, created by Heckler Associates. TV and radio headline the campaign, accompanied by social, online, print and in-store support. Each TV spot opens spoofing a stereotypical low-budget TV ad, such as the super-casual mattress salesman or litigation-crazed law firm. But with a cry of “Surprise!” Ivar’s characters from the last 75 years “photo-bomb in” from all corners, tearing down the spoof-ad sets, startling the hosts and dancing amid music, balloons and confetti (frame above right). Radio follows a similar recipe, with familiar genres, like ads for TV season openers and

weather alerts interrupted by Nordic fishermen, dancing clams, chowderheads, deep-sea divers, mermaids and the rest heard whooping and hollering, with a rallying cry of “Surprise! It’s Ivar’s 75th Clamiversary!” Local production companies Urban Legend and PureAudio brought the spots to life, with actual Ivar’s employees taking part wherever possible. Heckler has been Ivar’s advertising partner since the 1980s, masterminding iconic campaigns such as Dances with Clams and the Undersea Billboards. “Staying true to the Ivar’s brand, we tap into Ivar Haglund’s unique sense of humor,” says Heckler creative director Doug Brody. “75 years later, it’s a well-loved part of Seattle culture.” See ads at http://hecklerassociates.com/work/advertising/ tv-radio/. Also see Big R item on Page 10.

‘Paperbuttons’ MARKETING The Paperbuttons in this issue allow you to save and send share save share the stories via Facebook or email. You also can get additional content on select articles. Simply download the free Paperbuttons app for iPhone and Android and scan or “press” the codes. Scans QR codes too!

Larry Coffman • Melissa Coffman Publisher Assoc. Publisher

MARKETING is a 1986 copyright© publication of MANE/MARKETING Inc., with offices at 13901 NE 175th St., Ste. M, Woodinville, WA, 98072. Phone 425-487-9111/FAX 425-487-3158/e-mail larrycoffman@frontier.com. Opinions of contributing writers are not necessarily those of the publication.


Flaherty

N E W S M A K E R S

Yglesias

Gross

Frause has promoted Callen Flaherty to creative services project manager and Maria Yglesias to creative services project coordinator. Both promotions are part of the move to expand the agency’s design department... The Fearey Group has hired Heather Fernandez as senior account executive and Anthony Cogswell as account coordinator. Fernandez comes from Waggener Edstrom Worldwide and Cogswell was a Fearey Group intern and is a Cen-

Fernandez

Cogswell

Bernauer

tral Washington University graduate... Wunderman in Seattle has promoted Mark Gross to VP/communications for North America... Revolution Public Relations has promoted Shauna Nuckles to account executive and hired Chelsea Poppe as an account coordinator... Susan Bernauer has joined Hemlock Printers as an account rep for the U.S. sales team of the Burnaby, B.C.-based company... Creature has promoted Tyson Flandreau to executive director of account management in Seattle. The agency also has hired Jason Gingold from Wieden+Kennedy NYC as director

of strategy, Kaylin FitzpatrickHorn from WDCW Seattle as senior integrated producer and Kelly Stephenson from Skype as strategy director. All four were previous employees of Creature.

Flandreau

Fitzpatrick-Horn

Gingold

“Sultan” Sparky Taft poses with award winners at his Turkish-themed Media Party of the Year Oct. 24 at McCormick & Schmick’s Harborside Restaurant, attended by more than 150 Northwest TV and radio execs, which Taft declared “a huge success.” From left are Dave Herald of KCSYFM in Wenatchee, Best Client Promotions, Crystal Fenswick of Cherry Creek Radio in Wenatchee, Radio Sales Rep of theYear, Rob Murphy of KIRO-TV, TV Sales Rep of theYear, ShawndellWilson of KVEW/KAPP-TV in the Tri-Cities/Yakima, TV Sales Manager of the Year, and Gary Greenberg, director of sales for Sinclair Radio accepting for Bryce Phillipy, Radio Sales Manager of theYear.

Projects & Plaudits EXCLAIM created the new Argosy Cruises website and developed a contest to promote the site through online, print and social media. More than 600 entered the “Find Jack the Dog” contest, Newsmakers • 20

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‘MARKETING IMMORTALS’ Inductees Rita Brogan

Jim Copacino

Rita Brogan is chief executive officer of PRR, Inc, one of the Northwest’s leading public affairs and communications consulting firms, established in 1981. Since taking over the leadership reins in 1989, Brogan has grown the agency to a staff of 53 with offices in Seattle, Washington, D.C., Austin, TX, and Norfolk, VA. As a woman of color, she had to address many prejudices and preconceptions during her life. She was born in Japan in the early ’50s, the child of a U.S. serviceman and a Japanese war bride. She got her start in social activism in the ’60s and ’70s fighting for civil rights, against the war in Vietnam and for local issues such as the future of the Chinatown/International District. She graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Washington School of Communications at the age of 20 and began graduate school in September, 1971. The story of the intervening years before Rita began work with PRR are contained in her commentary on the www.markettingimmortals website. As one of the largest independent public relations firms in the region, the 27th largest woman-owned business in the state and the 81st largest PR firm in the country, PRR has set an industry standard for social marketing, public involvement and collab-

Upon graduating from Ohio University, Jim Copacino headed to Manhattan to pursue a career in anything-havingto-do-with-the-written-word. He landed a job as a copywriter at the McGrawHill Book Company—the beginning of a 40-year love affair with advertising. After stints at DDB and Young & Rubicam, Jim moved to Seattle to work for the Chiat/Day office here. In 1985, he was hired at Cole & Weber as creative director, but returned to Chiat/ Day two years later when GM Roger Livingston bought the Seattle office, rebranding it as Livingston & Co. Over the next several years, Jim served as creative director and writer on one of advertising’s most recognized campaigns at the time, Alaska Airlines. The humorous commercials received nearly 100 awards, including a Cannes Gold Lion. In 1990, Livingston & Co. won the Seattle Mariners account, beginning a 23-year

THE PROCESS: Two new inductees will be added to the MARKETING IMMORTALS pantheon each issue. The Sept/Oct. 2013 through May/June 2014 inductees will be recognized at THE EVENT on May 21, where the 2013 MARKETING Award winners will be revealed. The inductees are introduced with a biography outlining the highlights of their careers in some aspect of the marketing communications realm. Their career commentaries, which are the heart of the IMMORTALS concept, appear on the marketing immortals.com website, along with those of the other 34 members already enshrined. Send nominations to larrycoffman@frontier.com. send share save

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association between Jim and the Mariners that continues to this day. In 1992, Copacino joined McCannErickson, helping to develop high-profile campaigns for Washington Mutual, Washington State Lottery and the Mariners. Five years later, he left to pursue his dream of starting an agency, partnering with Betti Fujikado. Copacino+Fujikado has enjoyed more than 15 years of success with a roster of regional and national brands that have included the Seattle Mariners, REI, Seattle Children’s, Visit Seattle, Premera Blue Cross and Symetra. In July, C+F was named Ad Age Small Agency of the Year for the Northwest region. Jim and his wife, Jacki, have been Copacino • 22

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orative planning. Clients have included the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Centers for Disease Control, Washington State Department of Health, Washington State Department of Transportation, Group Health, Skanska USA, Greenroads Foundation, Nikkel Concerns, Seattle University, Aegis Living, and Uwajimaya, among others. Brogan • 22


Rod Brooks: The Client View

The Ideal Agency...

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 6

There are five definitions of the word “ideal” in the online dictionary accessed by my browser. Near the top of the list was the definition that I expected: “A standard of perfection or excellence.” This, I thought, was how agency principals most likely view their firms. But what comes to mind when clients think of the ideal agency? Definition number five was one that we’d probably be drawn to:: “Something that exists only in the imagination: To achieve the ideal is almost hopeless.” It took a few minutes for the grin to leave my face. I’ve been a brand-based marketer for the last 33 years of my career. There’s seldom been a time, since 1980, when an agency partner wasn’t part of the equation—some more capable and better than others. Here are the standards I seek in the “ideal agency”—the one that may only exist in my imagination! 1. Consistency of quality. The people assigned to work on the account would be every bit as talented and capable as the people who pitch to win the business. The absence of this is why my focus has been on hiring firms that are able to make the commitment that the agency principals

will be highly engaged with our relationship and deliverables. 2. Informed and aware. The ideal agency is one that makes it their business to understand ours—observant, engaged and in motion. The brand is everything to us and we want it to be the same for you. Not just during occasional surges, but on an ongoing basis. Learn our industry. Purchase our products. Experience our service. Understand our challenges. The ideal agency knows our direction and proactively informs our decisions. As the client learns and stretches into new dimensions and opportunities, so should its agency partners. To do anything less will leave your agency behind, basking in yesterday’s success. 3. Know what you’re great at. Focus is a very good thing. Agency leaders need to remember their roots and rediscover their core competencies. By focusing on your strengths, you’ll consistently be able to bring value to the table. Trying to be all things to all clients is the kiss of death. It won’t serve the agency and it certainly doesn’t serve the client. There’s no such thing as a full-service agency. Unless mediocrity is what you consider ideal. 4. Treat our money like it was your money. How much agency cash goes out Brooks • 21


And The Ideal Client... Agencies exist to help companies achieve what they can’t accomplish by themselves. Otherwise...who needs an agency? Agencies protect their people from corporate realities. At their best, they foster environments where ideas flow freely and nothing is out of bounds. In the process they create magnificent work that moves massive numbers of human beings. I’ll brag a bit about the team I work with as an illustration. They created a design concept for the Cosmopolitan Hotel of Las Vegas that turned the hotel into the most successful new concept in the city’s history. And for three straight years, the hotel has broken every measurable record of marketing success—on a relatively small investment. My team didn’t build the hotel. They didn’t invest the money. And while they consider the marketing success a good thing, that wasn’t the primary motivation as they developed the work. They wanted every single human being walking through the place to stop in their tracks and drool. And to tell everyone of their friends to hurry to the Cosmopolitan. While the client is rewarded by the highest occupancy rate in Las Vegas history, my team is much more interested in our win of the 2011

Cannes Grand Prix, Best of Show. It’s perfectly fine for clients and agencies to have different motivations as long as those motivations serve the same purpose. And this fundamental concept is what distinguishes great clients from others. Great clients understand the need for organizations that are not encumbered by corporate politics or business realities. And they encourage unusual solutions, knowing that breaking out of the mold is what agencies thrive upon. And just as these clients value their own people, they value their agency team members equally. I’m frankly tired of hearing that agencies’ pursuit of creativity for creativity’s sake is not in the clients’ interest. Baloney. There’s a tremendous body of evidence that work that touches the human heart is worth its weight in gold. With a vast congregation of younger consumers growing up skeptical of being “sold” things, it’s literally great storytelling and authentic creativity that will allow brands to thrive in the years to come. Read the Case for Creativity on Amazon. In today’s world of disconnected marketing channels, it’s creativity itself that will attract eyeballs and achieve heartfelt affinity. So, what makes a great client? Walt Disney spoke of the Four C’s when Fritsch • 21

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MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 7

Bill Fritsch: The Agency View


MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 8

You’ve done the hard work. On November 14th, go for your ADDY at aafseattle.com/addy


DRTV 101: Anatomy Of An Infomercial tial customer, but it’s important to know what the customer wants, how they want it, when they want it, how often they will use it and how much they potentially will pay for it! • The Call to Action: The ability to buy the product must be promoted through the “Call to Action.” This very important content must be illustrated early enough in the production in order for the consumer to know how to buy the product or service being promoted, but not so early that it inhibits the consumer from learning the value of the product/service, understands how it is used—and why it will add value to their life. The ability to buy the product must be endorsed through the “Call to Action.” This essential tactic sets up a framework that informs the consumer how to acquire the product/service being promoted. However, a “Call to Action” that occurs too early inhibits the consumer’s ability to learn and understand how it will add value and enhance his or her everyday life. In this respect, timing is everything. • Content is King! Explain all the nuances of the product or service. When developing your script—place yourself in the seat of your target audience. Do you know what the product/service does? Did you explain

all the information necessary to promote a relationship between your product/service and the consumer? Did you illustrate how it works? Will the consumer want to promote it to their friends and family. Does the content promote value? Finally, does the product/service do what you set out to illustrate? The content contained in your script is critical—for aside from the product presentation—the content will be an instrumental “tool” in gaining the trust and loyalty of your audience. • On the cutting room floor. It’s important to capture enough “footage” to allow the editing team the opportunity to assemble the BEST work possible to promote your product/service. Always be aware that the best infomercials were NOT produced during the first shoot! • Price points that add value. The production, the content, the visuals, the Call to Action are all very important. In order to illustrate the ultimate in value, the product/ service must be priced effectively. Working with experts—who have produced many shows before yours—can make the difference between a very nice infomercial with very few sales and an infomercial that is engaging, educational—and that sells! In addition, always be aware that product/service testing is a necessary and con-

sistent exercise that the smart Direct Response marketer must endure. Testing, testing and more testing—in the end— will yield a production that is not only effective, but profitable! • Rick Cesari is the founder and CEO of Cesari Direct (www.cesaridirect.com), a full-service direct response advertising agency based in Seattle. Cesari is a DRTV pioneer with a long track record of success. Rick and his team are responsible for many memorable infomercial campaigns, including those for the Juiceman Juicer, Sonicare Toothbrush, George Foreman Grill, OxiClean and Rug Doctor Mighty Pro. He can be reached at 206-281-7975 or rcesari@cesaridirect.com. send share save

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Direct Response TV By Rick Cesari You want to be a star—or you think your “latest, greatest” product has the potential to be the “Next Big Product”, but where do you begin? You’ve seen these products on television —the one’s that slice, they dice, they grind, they make your life better, faster, stronger —and maybe—with some assistance from those around you —easier. In the world of Direct Response marketing—the term infomercial refers to those half-hour programs that—with a viable product, a healthy mix of education and demonstration and a price that promotes value—can potentially make a difference in our otherwise everyday lives. There are several things to keep in mind when starting the process of developing a well-thought-out infomercial: • Know thy audience: Like any product or service that needs to be promoted, it’s critical that the marketer know the demographics of the target audience. Not only must the marketer know the poten-


NEED TO KNOW

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 10

By Larry Coffman • Remembering Rod: My valued print advisor, Rod Olzendam, died recently at the age of 91. Until he moved to an assisted-living facility in Everett last year, he lived nearby my office in Woodinville. On his daily walks he’d often stop by for a chat or to bring me a bit of news. I’ll always remember the day he came lugging the huge Advertising Golf Assn. trophy that he had won many years earlier and was looking to put to good use. I did, by donating it as the rotating trophy for the annual PPI golf tourney. I still have clippings and photos he gave me from his halcyon days in the local printing industry as a formi-

• Wexley Wingding: Wexley School for Girls celebrated it’s 10th anniversary recently with a party befitting it’s zany reputation. Here’s how headmaster Cal McCallister described the soiree at the Emerald City TrapezeArts building in SoDo: “It was a little like a wedding, where you see people from different tracks of your life talking over a cocktail in a room where you never imagined they’d be together. The Mayor talking to the Sounders, CEOs talking to band members from The Presidents of the United States of America... It doesn’t just sound like I’m name dropping. I am. But I want to paint a picture of an eclectic crowd. Some were dressed to the nines, some were cross-dressed, some were barely dressed at all. We saw a trapeze aerial show, Minotaur stilt walkers, an ice-skating performance on a six-foot-square rink... 500+ people laughing, toasting and living through an experience exactly concepted to do what we set out to do a decade ago—be the best part of someone’s day by creating opportunities for engagement where fans really want to participate...” dable salesman who rose to the presidency of Acme Press, which printed the official Seattle World’s Fair souvenir book in 1962. A native of Canada, he attended the UW and served in WWII. He also served two terms as president of PPI and was once named U.S. 3M Printer of the Year. His commentary on the MARKETING IMMORTALS website (see Graphic Arts) is a must-read history of the people and events that shaped the printing industry in the Seattle area. Rod is survived by his wife, Delores, four children and seven grandchildren... • Walsh Rewarded: Irrepressible Bob Walsh has received two well-deserved honors. The first was induction into the Washington State Sports Hall of Fame with former Husky great Steve Emtman. The two

were presented plaques before a Mariners game at Safeco Field in late August. The Hall was founded in 1960 to recognize people for their contributions to sports in Washington State. And on October 12, he was inducted into the Marietta (OH) College Hall of Honor at the Homecoming festivities of his alma mater. Both honors were the result of Bob’s remarkable career as a basketball exec with the Sonics, agent for the likes of Steve Largent and Jim Zorn and the man behind the 1984 NCAA Final Four in the Kingdome, the 1987 NBA All-Star Game and the 1990 Goodwill Games and multiple humanitarian efforts...

Besides its work for Ivar’s described on Page 2, Heckler Associates provided ads shown during the well-publicized reinstallation of the iconic Big R atop the former home of its long-time client, Rainier Brewery, alongside I-5. The new R is a replica of the original R now on permanent display at MOHAI on South Lake Union.

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Flying Shorts—‘A Hoot!’ Pub. Note: When my good friend Gary Brose called to tell me about his new online venture, I was intrigued. After visiting flyingshorts.com, I insisted he tell us the back story of his latest entrepreneurial venture—which I found to be a real hoot!—and the source of lots of valuable advice. By Gary Brose I’ve spent my business life managing people in labor-intensive industries from Federal Express to Fleetfoot Messenger Service and from Seattle FunPlex back to the courier business again. In all that time, I’ve made thousands of people-management mistakes. But, along the way, through serendipitous accidents, I‘ve learned some incredibly valuable insights into what motivates people and turns the average worker into an engaged and inspired employee. I’m in the process of reinventing myself and seguing to a new career in consulting, speaking and book writing. I’ve attempted the usual marketing techniques to sell my books and get some speaking gigs and have failed miserably. Why? What happened? Well, the world changed quite a bit while

I was focusing on me, me, me. Traditional marketing doesn’t have the traction it used to. In today’s marketing climate and in this ever-changing world, video is beating up the written word; brevity has triumphed over detail and focused niches defeat general content every day. Attention spans are dwindling while demand for immediate answers increases. In order to reach your audience today, the brief video on niche issues is the right play, and YouTube is your stage. For me, the solution to “getting noticed” was to share my insights via dozens of 2-3-minute videos about my primary topic—employee management. But before I could do that, I needed to educate myself. I attended multiple seminars and training courses on the actual implementation process and I learned some amazing things. First of all, you don’t have to be rich to use YouTube effectively. But since you’re competing with umpty-billion other videos out there, you’d better have a built-in audience or slick vid to attract some attention. That’s where the cost comes in. On the comedy show “Last Man Standing,” Tim Allen Plays the “Outdoor Man” and creates videos for his business. They’re slick productions with visual and sound

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effects, great photography, funny scripted lines and an impressive appearance. Good luck with that. You won’t have the advantage of a Hollywood crew to write, film, edit and fine tune your video. And unless you hire a local pro to assist you, you’ll be filming alone (maybe your Mom can help) with a lower-quality camera, no lighting, a static background, no script writers and zero special effects. That’s OK. Ultimately, I’ve reached the point where I just want to be me. I’m not getting any younger here, and if I wait until I achieve video perfection with each presentation, I’ll never release a video. But what if they don’t like me. Ooh, so what? They don’t even know I exist right now, so not being liked is actually an improvement! Gallup has estimated that businesses in the U.S. lose a staggering $500 billion annually because of disengaged employees. I’d like to help change that! So I created my own channel and called it “Flying Shorts—Business Lessons In Brief” and busied myself uploading dozens of short videos all about what it takes to

create a truly motivated, inspired, engaged and empowered workforce. My low-cost freelance editor does the intros and adds some wacky credits and then I pretty much just point the camera at myself, talk off the top of my head and usually do it in one take. It’s just me, being my irreverent self. It’s cathartic. It’s liberating. And in my wildest fantasies, it makes me believe that I could help change the way business is done in this country and achieve my goal: Imagine an America with 200 million motivated employees! Is there anything we couldn’t do? • Gary Brose has owned more than a dozen companies in Seattle over the last 30+ years and still owns and operates Fleetfoot Messenger Service and Northwest Freight Forwarding. He’s also the author of two books about employee management and motivation. More information is available at www.smallbizsherpa.com and his YouTube Channel site: www.flyingshorts.com. send share save

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 11

Employee Management


Some Parting Suggestions...

S h o w yo u r t r u e co lo r S

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 12

Pub. Note: Because of a heavy workload, this will be Steve Lawson’s final column. In it, he offers some suggestions to MARKETING and its related products. Our thanks for those— and for his outstanding contributions over the past two-and-a-half years. Going forward, this space will be devoted to columns from a variety of experts in social media. By Steve Lawson Yes, indeed this will be my last “regular” column. Like the cobbler whose children have no shoes, I’m

the consultant who can’t seem to find time to listen to my own advice. I don’t regularly post to my Friendly Voice Facebook page or Twitter feed, nor do I blog nearly as often as I should. But that doesn’t give any of my advisees an excuse for not following my instructions explicitly. And that includes publisher Larry Coffman, his daughter Melissa and son-in-law Scott Book.

Lawson On Social Media We sat down recently to discuss how they can better incorporate social media into the fabric or their products to better serve their advertisers and subscribers and further grow their business and brand. Larry started MARKETING in 1986 in order to satisfy a need in the marketplace. In the ensuing years, the newspaper’s mission hasn’t changed, but information dissemination and how individuals receive their “news” has changed considerably. The 24-hour news cycle has increased opportunities and burdens for all news organizations, including MARKETING. Together we did a quick SWOT assessment (Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats), with a heavy focus on how we could increase opportunities by better capitalizing on their core strengths. Though MARKETING is strong in many areas, we focused on four. Their subscriber base, advertising base, range or products and ability to aggregate news from beyond the Seattle market that would be of interest to marketers here. Our discussion was frank and devoid of any sacred cows. Here are some of the resulting recommendations: 1. A new focus on the MARKETING website, which will serve as the nucleus around which any social media marketing will revolve (i.e., all roads lead to the site). 2. Continual assessment of customer needs (subscriber and advertiser) with an eye to providing content that will be indispensable, through traditional news gathering and aggregation. 3. Enable subscribers the oppor-

tunity to follow MARKETING on Facebook and Twitter for breaking news and daily summaries posted at marketingnw.com. 4. Create access to information for each MARKETNG discipline, so subscribers can easily keep up with what’s going on locally and nationally within their discipline. 5. Encourage dialog in social media and on the marketingnw.com website, with a tie-in to MARKETING by publishing the “best” comments in a new column in the newspaper. In addition to these initiatives, we also discussed some very-easy-toimplement action items to increase efficiency and move MARKETING toward its goals. Among those ideas are the addition of a “Submit News” button on the marketingnw.com homepage to make it easier for newsmakers to get their information to the MARKETING team, along with offering the ability to link back to the news submitters’ websites. I look forward to following the team’s progress and taking advantage of their new offerings. I promise to do the latter! Finally, thanks for actually reading these words over the past two-plus years. Now I look forward to seeing what others have to say, and maybe do better at heeding some of my own social media consulting advice. • Steve Lawson is the president of Friendly Voice, which helps companies large and small engage customers through social and traditional media. He can be reached at friendlyvoice.com or 425-649-9114. send share save

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By Linda McCune The first impacts from the sale of Fisher Broadcasting to the Baltimore-based Sinclair Broadcast Group have been felt with the reported layoff of 25 staffers at KOMO -TV and Radio. The original report in the Puget Sound Business Journal listed a total of 20, but a source close to the situation put the number of those dismissed at 25. TVSpy reported that it included editors, producers and reporters in both television and radio as well as satellite truck operators. When the sale was announced, it was predicted that upper-management would be hardest hit, with Sinclair management taking those jobs. And

true to predictions, Fisher Communications general manager Colleen Brown was fired immediately after shareholders approved the merger. Sinclair forbade local managers from talking to the media about the cuts. One blog speculated that Sinclair wanted to gut its new Fisher stations secretly in an effort to protect its reputation. The blogger noted that Sinclar has many transactions pending and is worried the massive firings will interfere with the approval process or government regulators or spook investors or employees at pending Sinclair stations. KING-TV was presented an Emmy Award for Outstanding Regional News Story/Investigative Reporting in New York City last month. The piece, Their Crime, Your Dime, investigated fraud in Washington’s welfare system. Reporter Chris Ingalls, photojournalist Steve Douglas and

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Belo announced in late September that its shareholders voted in a special meeting to approve a deal for acquisition by Gannett. The transaction is expected to close by the end of 2013. Once completed, Gannett’s TV station portfolio will jump from 23 to 43. The company, which owns USA TODAY, will become the fourth-largest owner of network TV affiliates in households reached, behind CBS, Fox Broadcasting and Sinclair Broadcast Group. Also, the FCC granted Hubbard Radio a license to the five Seattle Sandusky radio stations that it acquired in mid-July. And Nielsen Holdings acquired Arbitron in late September, culminating a negotiation that began last December. The rebranded Nielsen Audio measures eight hours a day per person of dynamic media consumption. Read the continuation of Linda McCune’s Broadcast World column at www. marketingnw.com.

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executive producer of investigations Kellie Cheadle were the recipients of the award. In the wake of the recent KUOW-FM reorganization, longtime host and producer Dave Beck (at right) has departed after 28 years to join KINGFM. Beck, no stranger to classical music, will host weekdays 1-5pm. He’ll also be the voice of KING’s Symphonic Favorites program stream, available online and locally via HD Radio. PD Brian Lowe said he’s excited to have Beck join his broadcast team. As Lowe describes it, Beck already was doing so much high-visibility work in the classical-music community that it made sense for KING to make Beck an official ambassador of sorts for the station.

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MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 13

KOMO Lays Off 25 Staffers


Six Ways To Evaluate Latest Thing New Technology

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 14

By Mike Hayward New technology, products and platforms seem to be launching almost daily. And the truth is, we don’t absolutely know what will completely change the marketing landscape. When Vine first came out, our agency saw an immediate opportunity to leverage it for Visit Seattle on the www.2DaysinSeattle.com site, where we curate photos and Tweets from hand-selected social media influencers visiting other cities. Vine is the free mobile app that enables users to record and share an unlimited number of short, looping video clips with a maximum length of six seconds. We quickly created a Vine gallery showcasing Seattle attractions, viewable at www.2DaysinSeattle.com/ vine. Based on that, I was supposed to write about Vine as a marketing tool. Instead, I’m going to go off-script to talk about how we evaluate and apply new technology and social platforms to

our clients’ businesses. That’s because Vine is just one in a long line of current and future innovations marketers will have to assess and implement. Here are six questions we ask ourselves at Copacino + Fujikado when considering new technology: 1. The gut check: Is there obvious potential? Big data and analytics are all the rage, but there’s still something highly intuitive about this business. So we collect our experts and review the

OK too. New technology is rarely the same thing to all clients. 3. Does being first trump being perfect? We could have spent months refining and perfecting our Vine gallery before launch, but we knew part of the story involved being one of the first to utilize it. 4. Can we jump in...with one foot? When Responsive Design came out, we were one of the earliest agencies to fully embrace it. We saw the obvious

All of which leads to the one question that never changes... technology. Is there something there that gets us all excited? Does it feel like a novelty or does it seem like it’ll have long-term staying power? 2. Is it a toy, tactic, strategy or game changer? There’s no wrong answer, and no reason why a new toy can’t be used effectively in short-term marketing efforts—just not as a platform going forward. For us, Vine is a tactical tool that we felt we could ladder up to an overall strategy. Some brands are simply using Vine videos to supplement everyday Tweets, which is

potential. But with new technology, ROI still matters. In the case of Vine, we worked with our client to determine the right way to implement it at a budget level we were all comfortable with. We thought Vine had potential but we weren’t betting the farm on a new video product that had been out only four weeks. 5. Can we ensure quality? We don’t ever want to leave quality to chance. To populate our Seattle Vine gallery, we could have curated user-generated video but we felt that wouldn’t provide

reliable content. We went looking for a Vineographer instead. The only problem? Vineographers didn’t exist. So we created a new occupation, tapping a Seattle art director and photographer who had jumped on Vine early and produced a collection of high-quality six-second videos. 6. Is it a PR opportunity as well? With the new technology comes buzzworthy stories. Which is why we wrapped in a PR push with our Vine gallery launch, leading to a featured story in AdAge about our Vine project entitled, Will the Next Hot Agency Title Be “Professional Vineographer”? Of course, in this ever-evolving landscape, those are a mere six questions in a long list that agencies ask and answer on a daily basis. All of which leads to the one question that never changes: How will you break through? • Mike Hayward is the creative director at Copacino + Fujikado, where he’s worked on local and national brands like the Seattle Mariners, REI, West Marine, 14 Hands and MOHAI. You can reach him at mhayward@ copacino.com. send share save


Three Years—And Rolling Strong! By Andrea Lieberman You may have noticed disruptive, engaging crews of bikes rolling through the Northwest. Three years and growing, Biking Billboards and our brand ambassadors are having the rides of our lives delivering targeted messages and attracting crowds in the downtown areas of cities and at festivals, sporting events and more. Along the way, we’ve had the opportunity to work with an array of clients, from Seattle to Portland and from Austin, TX to Park City, UT and beyond. Our ability to “get your message rolling” is unique in this era of social media because our medium is truly social. Take Sprague, a pest solution company. Sprague needed to advertise its pestmanagement services near the Seattle waterfront, specifically to businesses in the path of the SR-99 tunnel-digging project. In the past, Sprague employed traditional advertising, including trade journals and print media. Using these traditional channels, they found it difficult to microtarget and even harder to measure the results of their campaign. Enter Biking

Billboards. Our design team collaborated with Sprague to craft a route that specifically targeted business and residential complexes in the area near the tunnel-digging project. In addition, our creative services team designed billboards that captivated the street audience and sparked conversations with our biking ambassadors. The results exceeded expectations. The campaign’s call to action increased Sprague’s website traffic, with definite spikes when Biking Billboards was active on the street. To Sprague’s delight, our unique medium amplified its campaign by catching the attention of local and national media and generating more than $1 million in earned PR. A.J. Trevelen, national account representative at Sprague, told us that “Biking Billboards bolstered our brand in more ways than we ever thought possible,” Sprague’s initial campaign was such a success that they renewed their contract and added a new campaign that ran late this Summer. And how does all this apply beyond the Sprague example? We: 1. Work with your team to set clear goals for your campaign. It’s the best way to make a real difference. 2. Plan customized routes and schedules to get your message in front of your target audience. 3. Work with an existing campaign to help you create a great, new ad. It can make

Biking Billboards ambassador Patrick Duffy with Sprague signs the difference between recall and action. brand messages, your ad is unforgettable. 4. Have excellent brand ambassadors in • the person of our smart, friendly riders, who Andrea Lieberman is the founder and are experts in getting your message in front president of Biking Billboard. You can conof your audience. tact her at info@bikingbillboards.com or 5. Provide you a Ride Report after each 206-257-2017. ride, which details the route, estimated Postlogue: Andrea Lieberman started views, collateral counts and valuable cus- Biking Billboards with her son, Jace, in an tomer verbatim. For larger campaigns, effort to advertise a real estate project that you’ll receive Campaign Wrap reports con- was just coming onto the very weak condo taining metrics to help you analyze the market three years ago. effectiveness of your campaign. When they noticed the thousands of The takeaway: when your ad rolls people on their way to a popular summer through a crowd behind a bike, it’s unique concert series near the development, they and disruptive. When our ambassadors figured putting a message on a bicycle directly engage with hundreds of people would be a perfect way to get people talkhanding out samples, flyers, coupons and ing about the new building.

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 15

Biking Billboards


Dawgfather PPI Continued from Page 1

at the time, must have liked the sound of the word because he kept repeating ‘godfather,’ but didn’t quite say it right. He said ‘dogfather’ and I just remembered it. “I didn’t think of it in reference to coach James at the time. I’ve always liked playing around with mispronunciations, so I began referring to my godfather as my dogfather, just for fun. “A couple years later I found myself in the poster business and sometime after that it hit me. Don James IS ‘The Dawgfather!’ “I guess I was a little slow on that one, but the credit goes to little Jared Woodruff, Dawgfather • 23

Continued from Page 1 this year by a panel of three judges, who were very impressed with the quality of the work submitted, according to PPI executive director Jules Van Sant. The judges were Abe Hayhurst of Fujifilm USA, Sandy Hubbard of Cross Media & Publishing and Teri LeVine of MC2 Marketing. “Once more we’ve shown that Print ROCKS! and is alive and well in the West. Everyone involved should be very proud,” Van Sant said. For the second year, the PrintROCKS! competition included a student poster design category. First place went to Amy Meyer of Pacific Northwest College of Art, second to Karla Ramaila and third to Emily Irwin, both from Admiral Arthur W. Radford High School in Honolulu. More than 130 attended the twoday PRINTLANDIA conference at the Woodmark Hotel in Kirkland.

Premier Press’ Best Of Show Piece

ADDY

Continued from Page 1 been moved up to Nov. 14, coincident with the annual AAF Art Bash benefit auction. The deadline for submission of entries is Jan. 10 and the Seattle awards show will be held in mid-March. Work is entered in the AAA through one of the AAF’s network of more than 170 local ad clubs, like AAF Seattle. The competition annually draws nearly 50,000 entries nationwide. Competiton begins on the local club level and winners progress to the regional and national competition. Last year’s Seattle ADDY competition saw a record number of entrants and entries, Riddell said. Five Seattle entrants took home national ADDY honors. They were Cole & Weber United, Creature, GreenRubino, Rally and Wong, Doody, Crandall, Wiener. Besides Riddell’s service, the Seattle ad community is playing a major role in the marketing of the AAA. Hydrogen Advertising is once again developing the creative for the AAF’s national advertising campaign, which will appear, beginning in December, in Creativity and Ad Age. Also, Seattle Admosis has been tapped to handle the national social media advertising for the awards. Hydrogen’s creative team also is behind the ads for the AAF Seattle competition. (See example on Page 8).

SARA

Continued from Page 1 company. And for the past 16 years he has been co-principal of the Bizop LLC marketing firm with his wife, Marcee. The SARA board of directors is composed of radio station market managers. The current SARA president is Stan Mak, market manager for CRISTA Media. Maylin (at left) said the number one priority of the organization is work with the business community to better utilize local radio as a powerful advertising medium in the digital age. “Local radio, with its deep roots in building relatioships with listeners, is the original player in social media,” Maylin said. “Radio is a time-tested, proven medium in delivering results for advertisers, especially at a time when there’s confusion over how to monetize and track the value of new digital media.” The former PSRBA is most remembered for its Soundie and Crystal Soundie Awards for career achievement in the broadcast industry. The annual show was suspended in 2010 after a 25-year run. Maylin succeeds Melissa Kunde, who is now an executive with two marketing agencies in Portland.

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 16

Twice as

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Terry, Nick seated, and Tony tion to the expense of the move, it came in the midst of the recession and the downturn in the printing industry in general. Over the years he did work for a variety of clients including Holland-America, Vacation International and the City of Seattle. He sold his client list to his neighbor on West Commodore Way, Security Press. And he still has a five-color Heidelberg press with a UV coater for sale. Four of the eight Academy employees at the time the doors closed also have gone to work for Security Press, including son Nick. And he sold the building, too, at a slight profit. “I still wish I’d stayed at Dravus, but all-in-all, it was a good run,” Terry said. —LC

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MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 17

Continued from Page 1 It was there that Terry learned to run the letterpress—and later offset—presses. (That’s 16-year-old apprentice Terry below, prepping for a press run.) He did a two-year stint in the Army in the mid-’50s before returning to work at Academy. When Terry purchased the shop from Cotronis in 1975 there were five employees. By 1981 he had outgrown the Maritime Building space and located larger quarters in a building on Dravus Street in the Interbay area, which he purchased for $375,000. By the early 2000’s, Academy was working a full two shifts and was up to 20 employees, including Terry’s two sons, Nick and Tony. Academy hit a high annual revenue of $4.6 million in 2008. By 2009, Terry needed more space, but when a neighbor refused to sell, he sold the Dravus building at a good profit and moved nearby to 2400 W. Commodore Way. “That was a mistake,” Terry said with his usual candor, and with the slight accent that betrays his proud Greek heritage. In addi-


Tips On Negotiation Sponsorship By William Boucher Just about everyone who works in marketing has either been pitched a corporate sponsorship or has sought one to support a marketing plan, market entry or product launch. But long gone are the days when marketing budgets were so flush with cash that the sole objective of a sponsorship was to see your company’s name on a banner or brochure. Today, we expect sponsorships to deliver accountability and revenue. I have the enviable position of assessing and managing several sponsorships, which range in value from a few thousand dollars to the high-six figures, including some major league sports sponsorships. My approach to sponsorship management is to segment activities into discrete stages: 1. Justification and Alignment 2. RFPs, Searches and Assessment 3. Negotiation 4. Activation Plan and Integration 5. Metrics/KPIs 6. Extensions and Exiting In my experience, it’s the “negotiation” stage that is often overlooked. Negotiating a Sponsorship Before you begin to negotiate a

mon mistake is to allow the sponsor to shoulder all of the activation and accountabilities. When reviewing a list of benefits, I focus on revenue-generating opportunities over brand awareness—although both can be situationally important. I negotiate to keep only those benefits that closely align to my marketing objectives and deliver tangible value, and I ask for more when I see a void. A good sponsorship entity will want to design the sponsorship to meet your unique needs. One tip: be mindful of the number of moving parts in a sponsorship; the more benefits, the more time is necessary to manage the sponsorship. If the price is too high relative to the value of the benefits, ask for a reduction as well as a better mix of benefits. If you’re not comfortable with an annual fee escalation in a multi-year deal, ask for it to be waived. A stable multi-year deal is more valuable to a sponsorship entity than an annual escalation clause. Every sponsor venue I’ve worked with eventually met both my budget and benefit requirements. It’s also possible to change benefits mid-stream if you find that a benefit fails to deliver. A good sponsorship entity will want to make the sponsorship successful and, therefore, be flexible. Just discuss and document this possibility before you sign the contract. Finally, if the sponsorship includes media assets (and most do), this should receive a critical eye. If you have a media buyer or advertising agency, allow

MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 18

If the sponsorship includes media... this should receive a critical eye sponsorship, you should have identified your objectives carefully during the Justification stage. If a sponsorship doesn’t align with them, stop the process! Sponsorships should be treated as a pragmatic business decision, rather than as a way to maintain a relationship with a vendor or someone else with whom you do business. Each sponsorship document typically has two sections: the legalese defining roles, fees and accountabilities; and the list of benefits to your organization. The latter will drive your fee. If you have a procurement or compliance officer, make sure to bring him or her in on the contract portion, especially if the sponsorship is complex. If you work in a regulated industry, it’s particularly important to have another set of eyes review the contract language. If you’re sole, slowly wade through the contract language to ensure the right accountabilities are assigned to both parties. Success is a function of having both the sponsor and sponsorship entity having skin in the game. A com-

them to review the media component to ensure it’s not over-valued. For instance, if television spots run at 3am, this won’t drive value to your brand. And if your logo is on a website with several other corporate logos, the impact is highly diluted. Importantly, there is currently no way to value social media mentions, so any sponsorship that puts a price tage on them is doing so without the benefit of underlying science. Sponsorships can be a mutually beneficial way to raise your brand’s profile. They can position your company as an engaged corporate citizen while driving sales and revenue. But, before you part with your money, make sure that you’ve negotiated sufficiently to ensure a strategic win for your bottom line. • William Boucher is the senior vice president of marketing for KeyBank Northwest. He can be reached at william_ boucher@keybank.com. send share save


MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 19


MORE NEWSMAKERS Continued from Page 3

where they were guided throughout the site as they searched for clues. The last clue took them to a landing page where they entered the contest to win prizes. EXCLAIM also is working to help Seattle Goodwill brand its new three-story headquarters building that is expected to receive LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) designation... Frause received honorable mention in the community relations category in the PR News’ PR Agency Elite Awards competition. The award was for the agency’s work on Sound Transit’s Be Smart. Be Safe Campaign. Chairman/CEO Bob Frause attended the awards show in New York City. A highlight of the campaign was the “Zoomin’ Through the Sound” video that had more than 133,500 views on YouTube and won a 2012 Big M Award in the PSA Category... PRR and the Washington, D.C. District Department of Transportation won the TransComm

Skills Contest for its joint work on the DC Streetcar Website. PRR led the redesign and redevelopment of the site to educate riders and residents about construction progress and public meetings and better enabling them to manage the travel experience once service begins. Credits to PRR web/graphics staffers Joe Martin and Alex Sobie in Seattle and Keri Shoemaker and Cherie Gibson in Washington, D.C... JayRay created and executed a campaign for the Boys & Girls Clubs of South Puget Sound that resulted in a 50% increase in awareness of the club’s services, in comparison with a similar study two years earlier. The pro bono campaign included billboard, transit, social and print advertising and came during a recessionary time when many other organizations retreated, according to JayRay president Kathleen Deakins. The online studies by GMA Research included 350 confidential responses from adults in Pierce, Kitsap and Mason Counties.

Copacino+Fujikado launched a multi-media campaign for client Premera Blue Cross that includes TV (above), radio, online, print, social and PR. As the country deals with the debut of Obamacare, the campaign positions Premera as a reliable brand and trusted source during a time of radical change in the marketplace. It encourages healthcare shoppers to “Go with the one you know.” The entire campaign— featuring real people and not actors— was completed in two months, including the TV shoot.

Craters of the Moon created this unique “Come Ski With Us” campaign for the Summit at Snoqualmie to help bolster the declining ski and snowboard industry. It seeks to reach out to the diverse cultural communities in the Northwest and encourage them to learn to ski and snowboard. According to Craters principal Kevin Nolan, “This is something that no other national resort has done. We knew that a lot of these people and their families were coming up to visit, touching and playing in the snow, because many had never seen snow. The Summit staff also has staffed it’s Summit Learning Center with multi-lingual instructors in order to accommodate the endeavor. Besides transit (above), the campaign includes TV, radio, digital and online content. Credits to creative directors Nolan and Alan Yamamoto, writer Yamamoto, photographer Jeff Caven and Summit execs Guy Lawrence and Karter Riach. Tyler Cartier was creative director and copywriter for the new Ebbets Field Flannels website and viral videos (see frame at left). He also is working on a naming assignment for Taco Time and recently won a Communicator Award for his concepts and co-branding of the joint marketing initiative between the Space Needle and the Chihuly Museum + Glass.

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MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 20

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Continued from Page 6 the door to market the agency brand? Generally speaking, not much! So why is it so easy to create proposals and invoices that stretch budgets, incur exorbitant costs and mark up operating expenses? Ideally, an agency partner understands the meaning and importance of resource constraints and still is able to bring breakthrough thinking and deliverables to the table. 5. Trust and loyalty matter. Ideal agency partners would trust and respect their clients. Trust that the client is in touch with its brands, its industry and knows what’s worked and what hasn’t. Respect that the client understands what will resonate with the internal culture and employees who live the brand from the inside out. In summary, the ideal agency is one whose talent pool is skilled and passionate from top to bottom, stays focused on the work they do best and collaborates exceptionally well, without concern for who gets the credit. Most important of all, the ideal agency trusts and respects the decisions of the brand and wouldn’t think of “cheating” on that relationship by courting bigger, richer clients at the first opportunity. Rod Brooks if the VP/chief marketing officer of PEMCO Insurance. You can reach him at rod.brooks@pemco.com. send share save

Fritsch

Continued from Page 7 talking about the kind of people he wanted in his organization. Clients with these attributes would be terrific indeed: Creativity: Founded in research and understanding of people. Put ideas together in unusual ways. Look for the unexpected, the exceptional. Never stop exploring. Always innovate. Courage: Stand for something. Personally. And fight for good ideas. Stand tall. Don’t let committees kill good ideas. Be a driver. Take ownership. Constancy: Don’t waver in the face of obstacles or opposition. Stick to your guns and have a backbone. Find ways to dig under, climb over, walk around or blast through every single thing in the way of exceptional work. Consistency: Mean what you say and say what you mean. Don’t waver from person-to-person or moment-tomoment. When you begin a program, do your homework, know what you want, be clear in your leadership. Evaluate work on the basis of a consistent set of criteria that don’t vary based on the reaction of others. Most of all... live by the golden rule. Bill Fritsch is the CEO of Digital Kitchen. You can reach him at bfritsch@thisisdk.com. send share save

we’ll make you so happy, we’ll wish we were you. marketing :: branding :: design

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MARKETINGnw.com • November/December 2013 • Page 21

Brooks


Copacino: Proudest Moment?

Continued from Page 9 for 40 years. They have a daughter, Allyson, who is an educator in Portland. Son, Chris, is an account supervisor at C+F. (Four-year-old granddaughter, Charlotte, shows promise as an art director.) Jim serves on the board of the Seattle Repertory Theatre nd the advisory board of the Seattle Children’s Research Institute. Three years ago, he was awarded the AAF Silver Medal for his contribu-

Brogan:

tions to the advertising industry. His proudest career moment? Probably the “Mariners Classic Commercials DVD Night” giveaway at Safeco Field. “Several hundred fans were there early, waiting for the gates to open,” Jim recalls. “It was quite possibly the only time in human history tht people actually stood in line to watch commercials.” send share save

A Host Of Honors UW Foster School of Business API Business Leadership Award, 2006 UW Communication Hall of Fame, 2006, Finalist for Nellie Cashman Woman Business Owner of the Year, 2006 Asian American Entrepreneur of the Year Legacy Award, 2004 MarCom Creative Award. 2004 Telly Award for Government Relations, 2002 PSRC Vision 2020 Award, 2002 National Environmental Professionals’ President’s Award for Excellence, 2001 PRSA Award of Excellence in the Video category, 2001 PRSA Totem Award for Best Public Relations Campaign, 2001 Summit Creative Bronze Award. 1993 Who‘s Who In America, 1991 and 1992 Who’s Who of Emerging Leaders, and 1989, 1990, 1993 Who’s Who of American Women.

Continued from Page 5 Brogan’s commitment to community has translated from her professional endeavors to her personal life in her 40-year history of public service. She currently serves on the boards of the Downtown Seattle Association, Crosscut, the Seattle Chinatown/International District Preservation Development Authority and the Associates in Cultural Exchange International Advisory Council. At UW, she earned a Master’s degree in communications theory and methodology and a Bachelor’s degree in editorial journalism. Her numerous honors include the Port of Seattle 2013 Small Business Champion, 2012 Distinguished Alumna from the UW Department of Communications, 2011 King County Woman-Owned Small Business of the Year, 2010 Women of Color Empowered, 2008

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Eben Design...............................14/16 Edelman...........................................7 Effective Design Studio..................16 Elaimy Golf.......................................7 Electric Pen.....................................16 Emerald City Graphics....................37 Encore Media Group.......................44 EXCLAIM..................................7/34 The Fearey Group.............................8 Ferreira Creative.............................16 Fleetfoot Messenger Service..........21 Frause...............................................8

Hacker Group....................................8 Hammerquist Studio.......................17 Heckler Associates............................8 Hemlock Printers............................38 Hey...................................................9 Hodgson/Meyers..............................9 HopOne Internet.............................17 Hornall Anderson...........................17 Horsfall (aka alkisurfshop.com).....17 Hunt Marketing Group....................21 Hydrogen.........................................9 Identity Lab.....................................17

KUOW-FM....................................45 Labels West.....................................38 Lion Digital Media..........................17 Litho Craft.......................................39 Lithtex NW......................................39 marketingnw.com..........................45 MARKETING Awards Winners...23-31 Marketry.........................................22 McKnight & Company.....................9 McNamara Signs.................22/35/39 Media Place.....................................10 Media Plus+.......Inside Front Cover/10

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You Can’t Tell The ‘Players’ 7 Lucky Dogs..................................15 206...................................................5 AAA Printing..................................36 A&A Printing..................................36 AAF Seattle.......................................4 Academy Press................................36 Ad Mark............................................5 Adpro Litho.....................................36 AdServices.....................................36 AllegraMarketingPrintMail.....21/36 Alliance Media................................43 AllOver Media................................43 American Marketing Assn................4 American Printing & Publishing.......36 Apps...............................................34 Association Services Inc.................21 ATLAS Masthead...........................41 Beale Communication Planning......5 Bell Harbor Int’l Conf. Center........21 Belo (KING/KONG/NWCN)........43 Bendix Marketing.............................5 Big Bang Electrical...........................5 Biking Billboards............................43 BizOp...............................................5 Blankslate Creative.........................15 Blend Creates..................................15 Book Publishers Network...............43 BrandQuery......................................5 Bright Spectrum..............................15 Bullseye Creative............................15 Business Examiner.........................43 Capitol City Press...........................36 Casey Communications....................5 CBS Outdoor...................................43 CBS Radio......................................43 CCS Printing...................................37 Cenveo...........................................21 Chatter Creative..............................15 City Arts Magazine.........................44 CKA Creative..................................15 Clatter & Din.............................32/33 Clear Channel Outdoor...................44 Clear Channel Radio......................44 Cole & Weber United........................6 Colehour + Cohen.............................6 ColorGraphics.............Back Cover/37 Comcast Spotlight......................23/44 Consolidated Press..........................37 Copacino+Fujikado....................6/34 CraftNet Seattle...............................38 Craters of the Moon..........................6 The Creative Group.........................15 CreativeLee......................................6 Creature............................................6 Curator.............................................6 The Daily Herald.............................44 Daily Journal of Commerce...........44 Datavision......................................37 DeLaunay Communications............6 DF Hobbs..........................................7 Digital Kitchen..................................7 DirectConnectGroupWest.............37 DNA.................................................7 Don McCune Library......................33 Doug & Di Creative Partners...........7 Draftfcb Seattle.................................7 Dubs Inc..........................................33

Friendly Voice..............................8/33 GA Creative....................................16 Gage Design....................................16 GC Direct........................................21 Girvin.............................................16 GMA Research.................................8 Gogerty Marriott...............................8 Golden Pacific Embossing.............37 Graphic Advertising Services.........37 Graphic Solutions...........................38 Gravity............................................16 GreenRubino....................................8

Ilium..........................................9/17 lluminate Research..........................9 International Media Partners............9 Jones Advertising..............................9 K&L Media.....................................44 Kaye-Smith..........................20/21/38 KD Productions...............................33 Ken Shafer Design...........................17 KOMO-TV................................42/45 Kostov Productions.........................33 KRKO Radio...................................45 KUNS-TV......................................45

Merlino Bauer Media......................10 Michael Courtney Design...............18 Monlux Illustration.........................18 NATAS...........................................45 New Path Marketing........................10 nikkomedia.....................................39 Northwest Publishing Center..........39 Northwest Trophy & Awards.........22 Olympus Press................................39 Outsource Marketing......................11 Paperbuttons...................................34 Paradigm Communications............45

Parks Creative Photography............18 Pat Hackett Artist Rep.....................18 phinneybischoff..............................18 Plume21.........................................18 Popich Sign Company....................22 PPI..................................................40 Printing Control..............................39 Print NW.........................................39 PrintWest........................................40 Producciones Pino..........................11 Production Partners.........................33 PRR.................................................1 1 Publicis Seattle............................11 PublicRelationsSocietyofAmerica....10 Puget Bindery..................................40 Puget Sound Business Journal.......45 Purdie Rogers..................................11 Pure Audio......................................33 Quesinberry and Associates...........11 The Quincy Group..........................40 Rainier Industries............................22 Ray Vincenzo..................................11 remerinc....................................11/34 Rich Marketing...............................12 RocketDog Communications.........18 Rusty George Creative....................18 School of Visual Concepts.........19/34 Seattle Envelope..............................22 Seattle Magazine.............................46 TheSeattleTimes....InsideBackCover/46 Seattle Weekly.................................46 Skyline Pacific Northwest...........46/47 SmithWalker Design.......................19 Snohomish Publishing....................40 Social Marketing Services..............12 SOS Finishing.................................41 Sound Binding................................41 Sound Publishing.........................1/46 Sparky Taft......................................12 Spin Creative...................................12 Stanton & Everybody...................3/12 Star Printing....................................41 Stella Color.....................................22 Stevenson Advertising....................12 Strategic Marketing Alignment......12 Strikeplate......................................19 Swifty Printing................................41 Tabs To Go......................................41 The Tacher Company......................12 Team Guilliatt.................................19 Team Soapbox.................................13 Ted Leonhardt.................................19 Titan Outdoor..................................46 Total Outdoor..................................46 Urban Influence...............................19 Walsh Design..................................19 Warren Wilkins...............................19 Washington Graphics......................22 WA State Assn. of Broadcasters....46 WCP Solutions................................41 WDCW...........................................13 Weber Marketing Group.................13 Wexley School for Girls..................13 Williams•Helde..............................13 WorkerBees....................................13 WOW Promotion.com....................13 Wunderman....................................13

To Reserve Your Space In The 2014 Edition, Call 425-487-9111

Improving Airport Visitor Experience By Michael Courtney Projects and professional commitments have taken me through many different airports in the past few months. These airports have undergone major renovations with new architecture, lots of glass walls and even improved food choices. So why is the visitor experience less than desirable? With the TSA early flight arrival requirements and layovers waiting for flight, we’ve had our share of long lines and mindnumbing waits in airport terminals. I’ve always wondered why airports don’t use the opportunity to do something interesting, memorable and engaging to connect with travelers. We are a captive audience and they have anywhere from a few minutes to several hours to capture our attention. Plus, we often have choices of airports for our flights. Imagine a visitor experience so good that you said, “I want to fly through (airport name here) and I don’t even mind if I have a layover.” Is it crazy to think airportsl could cultivate brand loyalty? I don’t think so. Naturally, I think of using environmental graphics to create a positive memorable visitor experience. Here are two airports that go the extra mile for their visitors and use well designed, thought-provoking

ways to create a positive visitor experience. One shining example is the Tom Bradley Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). These graphic treatments by Seattle-based Digital Kitchen are lovely, compelling and memorable. I’m signing up for a three-hour layover to watch them all. (See sample at left above and visit http://vimeo.com/69239313). Another is the San Jose International Airport Parking Garage. Parking garages generally get no respect. They often look like an after thought and do little to welcome travelers. You may be leaving your vehicle in one, or they’re the location of your rental car. Either way, the garage is a key part of the user experience for many travelers. San Jose treats its garage differently. (See sample at right above and http://www. christianmoeller.com/Hands-1). Placed on a major approach to the garage, these hands are made of 400,000 vinyl pucks attached to a chain-line fence. • Michael Courtney is the principal of Michael Courtney Design. You can reach him at info@michaelcourtneydesign.com. send share save

See story and photos on Pages 1 and 16.


Calendar

Nov. 7—American Marketing Association, Annual Pulse Awards Banquet, 6:30-10, Bell Harbor International Conference Center, www.psama.org or 206-623-8632. Nov. 12—American Marketing Association, Panel on Bootstrap Marketing and Earning Attention Without a Budget, 11:30-1:30, Washington Athletic Club, www.psama.org or 206-6238632. Nov. 14, Public Relations Society of America, Michael Smart on Media Pitching. Half-day workshop from 8:30am to 12:30pm, Weber Shandwick Conference Room, 818 Stewart St., 2nd

Dawgfather

Continued from Page 16 coach James’ grandson.” In a recent daily poll on Page 2 of The Seattle Times sports page, Dawgfather was the most popular Seattle sports nickname by a wide margin, getting 65% of the vote over “Reign Man,” (another Costacos Brothers coinage),” which was second with 14%. But the Costacos brothers’ (John and Tock) fame extends far beyond Seattle. In 2011, an exhibit of 37 of their posters was held for five weeks at Salon 94 in New York City. Dana White, president of UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship), bought the entire show opening night, at an average price price of

Floor, Seattle, www.prsapugetsound.org or 206-623-8632. Dec. 4—Public Relations Society of America, Annual Holiday Gala and Awards Program, 6-9pm, Melrose Market Studios,1532 Minor Ave, Seattle. wwwprsapugetsound.org or 206-6238632. Dec. 11—American Marketing Association, Ross Whitman of Ratio on Mobile Is Eating Our World; Perspectives on the Next Chapter in mobile, 11:30am, Washington Athletic Club, www.psama.org or 206-623-8632. send share save

$2,500 per poster. A-Rod and Cameron Diaz came in just after White bought the show. “He wanted to know the story behind each poster,” John said. “I believe he bought 28.” A second show was held in Los Angeles in January 2012 and future ones are planned in Tokyo, Chicago, San Francisco and Seattle. The Costacos Brothers turned out nearly 1,000 titles over a 10-year period before selling the company to Day Dream Publishing in 1996. “Press” the Paperbutton below to view SB Nation’s Poster Boys video, with appearances by Charles Barkley, Sean Kemp, Jim McMahon, Andre Dawson and several other sports stars. —LC send share save

Here are John Costacos’ recollections of the classic Dawgfather poster on Page 16 and the initial group poster, above. “I wasn’t sure I could get coach James to do this third one,” John said. “He didn’t like to draw attention to himself and he made it clear that it was important to him to pay tribute to the seniors each year. So he agreed to do the one of him if we did one of his seniors. It was shot by Seahawks’photographer Corky Trewin, who’s also known at ‘The Pope.’The great thing about shooting coach James was that when he gave you his serious look, every take was perfect. We did get some outtakes where he was laughing and smiling though. The poster above was the first of the three Dawgfather shoots. The photographer was Trewin and it was shot in coach James’office in the Tubby Graves Building. As John said in the conclusion of the SB Nation interview, “I think Tock and I probably feel really good to have been really, really good at something... I think we both feel really, really lucky to have happened to find something we were really, really good at —and maybe the best for awhile. That’s a pretty good feeling.” send share save

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