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The Loon Call

An Annual Newsletter for all Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Associates & Supporters SPRING 2020

ISSN# 1480-9583 Volume 61

Call of the Loon

Alison Myles

It may at times be mysterious, calming, welcoming, haunting, chilling or it may evoke a sense of solitude or invite laughter. This eerie concert is forever linked to our Ontario outdoors and to our beloved Lake, here lending its namesake to our newsletter. In honour of this 2020 edition, we wished to unravel a few of the mysteries, fun facts and details of these illustrious birds.

different for each loon and can be used to identify individual loons. The Hoot – is a one-note call that sounds more like “hot”, mainly used by family members to locate each other and check on their well-being.

I often lie awake, curious as to what they are going on about out there. I found a few fun facts from The Loon Preservation site. They categorize four call types. The Tremolo – also known as the “crazy laugh”, is used to signal alarm and sometimes at night to vocally advertise and defend territory. A slightly modified version of the tremolo is sometimes given by flying loons. The Wall – sounds much like a wolf’s howl, is used frequently during social interactions between loons and may be used to regain contact with a mate during night chorusing and in answering other loon tremolos. The Yodel – given only by the male, is a long, rising call with repetitive notes and can last up to six seconds. It is used by the male to defend his territory and can be stimulated by another male entering a loon’s territory. Studying recordings has shown the yodel to be Junior Loons Adventures in 2019 Page 17

Director’s Reports LWCA Happenings and Events

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Loon Trivia * The Cdn $1 “Loonie” coin was introduced in 1987, quickly coined ('scuse the pun) due to the loon featured on its tails side. The Canadian Mint officially secured the licensing naming rights to the term "Loonie" in 2006, this term now being used ‘officially’ in financial Global markets. * The name "loon" was given to this bird due to its onshore "loony" looking stumbling walk. They are far more graceful in water and in the air.

Memories Memories of our Lake Weslemkoon

Mosquitoes I really am delicious… Page 7

Calendar of Events See you at the lake!
 Back Page

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* Each male loon call is unique, with characteristics sharing specific information in regard to traits of strength, age and territory, to name a few. (Perhaps we should all adopt a unique call, what would yours be?) * Loons spend up to thirty minutes at a time preening and bathing to remove parasites, secreting an oil-like “hairspray” to ensure their feathers stay in place, acting as a barrier keeping water away from their skin. * Unlike other North American waterfowl, loons have solid bones, making them less buoyant and extremely powerful swimmers. They are able to dive to depths of up to 200 feet, for durations of up to five minutes, in search of food. * A loon’s lifespan may be up to 20 to 30 years in the wild. * Loons only sport their famous red eyes during the summer. In winter, they have grey eyes. One pondered reason is the red eyes may help loons to see underwater, filtering out blue and green light. It is also thought that perhaps the brilliant red helps them to attract other loons. Since the summer coincides with their mating season, the latter is a likely reason.

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The Loon Call* Step One: Hold your hands apart, each in shape of the letter C. Step Two: Bring them together. Making your hands airtight. Step Three: Blow gently between your thumb knuckles, now wiggle your fingers. Step Four: Practice, practice, practice * Please practice safe loon

calling. Do not try to call and respond as this may confuse real loons. Brooklin Lowes, Artist

* It was once thought loons mate for life, yet this fact has since come under question. However, loons can spend up to 20 years together. References Canadian Geographic canadiangeographic.ca Loon Preservation Committee loon.org/ American Expedition forum.americanexpedition.us

Weslemkoon Lake Morning The light— foil-ripples, blue skin, surface gladness, aqua and black shimmer. The white pines, their signature is wind. The sky so milky it must scald the corners when it warms.
 


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John Lane

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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President’s Address It was an eventful year on the lake, from record high water levels and flooding in the spring to record lows in the fall, with the West Bay microburst in between. Thank you to Barry and Ruth for rallying to host the LWCA annual meeting at Four Loons Marina in August! I have the privilege of talking over from Ken Senter as President and would like to welcome and thank Melissa Tervit for agreeing to act as Vice President. The LWCA has submitted a request to the MNR asking that the water level range in the Madawaska River

Management Plan be lowered 6” (150mm) to give the MNR more flexibility to deal with flooding. We are proceeding with increased water testing and the good news is that the oxygen levels seem to have stabilized. Phosphorus is trending upward but it is still well below target levels. Nitrogen is above target levels and has been throughout the 11 years of test data. We will be doing an information blitz in the spring on what we can all do to try to lower these levels to keep our lake healthy. Boat speeds on the lake have become a big concern with our membership and we have put in place a subLake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Patty Milne committee to address this issue. We will be requesting some signage from the township for installation at the north and south ends. In addition, we are preparing maps highlighting the slow speed areas on the lake. I personally witnessed an unfortunate incident near Weslemkoon Marina where fishermen were travelling so fast that they were ejected from their boat when they hit another wake. The boat kept on going but fortunately was pointed towards the marshland and no one was hurt. Please remember that speeds within 300 feet (100m) of shore are legally required to limited to 10 km/hr. Fast speeds near shore can wash out loon nests and cause significant property damage. Thank you so much to all of our board members and volunteers who have given so much of their time to help! Our goal for this year is to put together a Lake Handbook with all the information that we have been collecting over the years. I view the LWCA as a partnership with everyone using the lake (year-round residents, campers, anglers, businesses, cottagers) and I am looking forward to my stretch as President working with ALL the amazing people on our special lake!

List of Directors: Past President Ken Senter President Patty Milne Vice-President Melissa Tervit Secretary Carol Bell Treasurer Diane Morden Membership Carolyn Calhoun Legal & Municipal Affairs Paul Bottos Communications Janice Mackenzie Junior Loons Carrie Howe/ Laurie Bourne Kristen Humphries Lake Stewards
 Melissa Stout Shoal Markers & Lake Levels Custodial Visits Steve Latto Water Quality Ian Mackenzie Forestry & Trails Bruce Magee Septics Patty Milne The Loon Call Alison Myles Fun Fact:
 There are lots of ways to get involved. Check out the LWCA website for details. "3


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Paul Lavelle, Lake Weslemkoon Memories

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Lavelle Family

around the lake dropping in to visit friends along the way. Although his boat never won the sailing regatta, Paul enjoyed entering most years and we have happy memories of those races, cheering him on, helping him dock without capsizing. Paul lent his enthusiasm and encouragement to all the activities the lake offered - it was his happy place!

Paul and I bought our cottage on Rockwell Island in West Bay in 1988 when our children were four and seven years old. We met many of our close friends at the LWCA Junior Loons canoe races during our first couple of years on the lake. Paul was involved on several boards and always enjoyed making a contribution as a volunteer as well, so when he was asked to join the Lake Association executive he happily agreed. Paul served on the Lake Association board for many years as treasurer, Loon Call Editor and president and past president. Our friendships on the lake blossomed from those early years with all of the dedicated people who served the lake residents. Paul always said it was the people who made our time on Weslemkoon so special. Our family has happy

memories of Treasure Hunts, hikes to Mink Lake, Canoe Lake, Pikes Peak and picnics and parties with good friends. Paul enjoyed the close friendships and the great sense of relaxation and serenity he found at the cottage. He loved quiet mornings with his tea on the front dock, photography excursions in the natural beauty of West Bay and a spin " 4

With a demanding career and a need to keep in touch with the office, Â Paul wanted to be able to stay at the lake for vacations and pushed for Bell to provide phone service - I think it was around 1990 when the company agreed if enough people signed up. When Paul talked about it at the annual meeting there was plenty of push back many people liked things as they were with CB radios! However, when the list went around nearly everyone on the lake signed up and Bell ran cable underwater where necessary and hooked us all up. For years we kept the old CB radio in the cottage - we were both nostalgic about the old days but having phones and later internet

service enabled Paul and many others to spend more family time on Weslemkoon. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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In the last year of his life, Paul wasn’t able to be at Rockwell Island, but the cottage was never far from his heart. One of his last wishes was to spend more time with us all there. Paul passed away on April 26, 2019 and is dearly missed. We were so touched by the messages of support and friendship from the LWCA and our Weslemkoon community. Our family always enjoys anecdotes or memories of Paul through the website     www.rememberingpaul.ca.

Flag Raising 1998 Rockwell Island

Throughout his later years, Paul faced multiple debilitating illnesses. He inspired those around him with his perseverance, his courage and his trademark optimism. He was grateful for visits and emails from the Weslemkoon community during this time.

Learning about motors with Russ Massey 1990, and exploring nature

Frances and I have known the Lavelles for over 35 years. We first met at the “beach” on Weslemkoon for the Canoe Races. What followed were many good times together on the lake, including Thanksgivings, barbecues on Squaw Point, Treasure Hunts and all the wonderful experiences one enjoys being lucky enough to be on this lake. Our friendship extended well beyond the shores of Lake Weslemkoon to many get togethers at home in the city and trips overseas. Paul and Peter also spent time together in the NGO boardroom.  Throughout these many years we have counted Gill and Paul as closest friends. Paul was always generous with his time and genuinely interested in what others thought.  He had a creative side and a restless determination to solve any problem. He was also one of the kindest and bravest people we have met. For the last twenty years of his life, Paul suffered severe medical handicaps. Yet he was always positive, seeing the good side of an outcome as most likely. He didn’t slow down in this period until the last couple of years. He kept going to work each day, served in the boardroom and always had time to listen and to help. He never complained and simply marched on from day to day. Naturally though there was a strength behind Paul that made this possible. Gill was there through thick and thin looking out for him and caring for him.  So he was a fine man, a kind man, a brave man, and a lucky man. Frances and I miss him very much as do his many friends and we continue to cherish our friendship with Gill.  They have both been a huge part of our lives. Peter and Frances Chiddy

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Membership Report

Carolyn Calhoun

Thanks to all Weslemkoon and Otter Lake LWCA supporters— we had 223 members and 18 friends of the lake in 2019.

February 28: Deadline for submitting lake directory changes such as updated phone numbers. April 30: Deadline for registering for the early bird discounted membership fee of $55.

Membership Incentive: Our membership incentive program is still in effect to encourage more new members to sign-up. We offer a $10 discount on membership fees if a current member refers a new member to enroll. Similarly, if a current member refers a new friend of the lake to join the LWCA we can offer a $5 discount on their renewal fee.

October 1: Deadline for registering if you wish to be included on the custodian’s fall/winter cottage check list.

AGM: Thanks to all attendees of the 2019 Annual General Meeting held at Four Loons Marina.

I may be reached at calhoun8822@rogers.com concerning membership issues. Once again, thank you for your continued patronage of the LWCA enabling our various programs to thrive. As always, any assistance with recruiting new members and friends of the lake is deeply appreciated.

Key Dates: Please keep in mind a portion of your 2020 membership dues is applied towards the following year’s Loon Call & Lake directory, 2020 fall custodial check and 2021 winter check.

Lake Stewards

Melissa Stout

The summer of 2019 saw the launch of the “Lake Stewards” program. This program is aimed at youth ages 12 and over who are interested in learning about conservation, nature, and issues affecting our lakes, assisting with the maintenance of our shared resources, volunteering at social events and posting to our social media accounts. This program is a great way for High School students to earn volunteer hours and work references!
 Over the past summer the Lake Stewards painted new trail head signs for many of the hiking trails, checked to ensure the geocaches were stocked and in place, posted to

Instagram, assisted with water testing, helped at the AGM, and gave the Pike’s Peak cabin a much needed new roof.
 If you are interested in signing up to be a Lake Steward please fill in the volunteer form available on the website, contact us on Facebook (LWCA), or email info@weslemkoon.com.
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Alexis 
 Last summer, someone realized that some of the trailhead signs were hard to see and others were not there at all. As a result, we took it into our hands to make the trails creative, new signs. Using acrylic paints Dairinn, Thomas, Sophie and I designed around 3 signs each. We painted the signs and made them as colourful and noticeable as we could so that people would be able to see the trailheads without having to search for them. Each person decorated each sign differently, adding their own personal touches. For example, I added pine trees to the Green Lake sign to represent its name. Everyone had fun and put in lots of hard work. Next time you go on a hike, be sure to be on the lookout for the newly made trailhead signs!

FUN FACT:
 The dog days of summer refer to weeks between July 3 and August 11. These are the hottest days of summer. It’s called dog days not because the temperature can make you pant like a dog. The days were named after the Dog Star (Sirius), which rises around this time.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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No, Really, I Do Get Bitten More! I am convinced I attract mosquitos more than others, so I set about proving this might in fact be true, and convincing my husband I am not making it up! According to an article, in Smithsonian magazine, it turns out an estimated 20% of people are especially delicious for mosquitoes and do get bitten more often on a consistent basis. (yes, scientific genius is on my side here, but I needed more to go on!). It turns out there are a number of theories and claimed factors which may make me (and my fellow scratchers!) more delicious: Blood Type Mosquitos bite us to harvest proteins from our blood, so just as we choose the yummiest bites research shows that mosquitoes may find certain blood types more appetizing than others. One study found that mosquitoes landed on people with Type O blood (yup - raising my hand here again!) nearly twice as often as those with Type A (note to self - must find out my husband’s blood type). People with Type B were found to fall somewhere in the middle of this itchy spectrum. Carbon Dioxide One of the key ways mosquitoes locate their target is by smelling the CO2 emitted in our breath. They use an organ called a maxillary palp to do this, and can detect CO2 from as far as 164 feet away (we don’t have a chance!). As a result, people who simply exhale more CO2, for a variety of reasons being size, pregnancy (geez, this hits both higher body temp and CO2 higher emissions) or exertion, have been shown to attract more mosquitoes than others. Exercise and Metabolism In addition to CO2, mosquitoes find victims at closer range by smelling lactic acid, uric acid, ammonia and other substances expelled via sweat, while also being attracted by higher body temperatures. Strenuous exercise increases the buildup of lactic acid and heat in your body, thus making you stand out. (mmm another excuse to skip my Sat run!) Genetic factors influence the amount of uric acid and other substances naturally emitted by each of us, making some people more easily found by mosquitos than others. (Once again I blame genetics!) Skin Bacteria Other research has suggested that particular types and volume of bacteria that naturally live on human skin affect our attractiveness to mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are especially prone to biting our ankles and feet, this may be due to these areas naturally having more robust bacteria colonies (gross!). Beer
 One study found just a single 12-ounce bottle of beer can make Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Alison Myles you more attractive to mozzies (switching it up here to the Australian name for fun!). But even though researchers had suspected this was the case, this affinity for drinkers is still something of a mystery. Clothing Colour This one might seem absurd, but mosquitoes use vision, along with scent, to locate humans, so wearing colors that stand out (black, dark blue or red) may make you easier to find. (yes Ralph I hear you, he is always letting me know to wear light colours!) Genetics As a whole, underlying genetic factors are estimated to account for 85% of the variability between people in their attractiveness to mosquitoes—regardless of whether it’s expressed through blood type, metabolism, or other factors. Unfortunately, we don’t yet have a way of modifying these genes, but… One day they may determine a natural repellant that could make it possible for even a Type O, exercising, pregnant woman donning a black shirt to ward off mosquitoes for good. So come and visit me sometime in late May, we’ll don our black t’s, grab a beer and head out to exercise – just stick with me, you might not feel a thing! 5 natural ways to relieve mosquito bites (myth or fact?):
 Tea bags
 Black tea tannins help reduce itching, moisten the bag and lay it on the bite.
 Ice
 Press a baggie full of ice on your bite for up to 10 minutes to numb the area and take down the swelling.
 Baking soda
 Mix a few drops of water with baking soda and apply directly to the bite.
 Peppermint
 Soothing for bites, mash leaves into a paste to apply directly to the bite, wait for it to dry.
 Aloe vera 
 Often used to treat sunburns, aloe vera can also help ease inflammation by rubbing the gel on irritating bites. Do you have a swear-by itch fix? Do tell! References: smithsonianmag.com, time.com, CottageLife.com

Fun Fact:
 "Mosquito" is a Spanish or Portuguese word meaning "little fly”. "7


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Water Quality Update Maintaining the high quality of Lake Weslemkoon water is the highest priority of the LWCA, supporting the values of safe swimming, water clarity, and healthy fish populations, particularly lake trout.

How Lake Weslemkoon works. Nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) originate from sources such as erosion, poor sewage treatment, fertilizer, detergents, or

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Ian Mackenzie & Lisa Thompson natural sources, and enter the lake in runoff. Nitrogen can also reach the lake from atmospheric deposition. Nutrients and light allow the growth of microscopic algae, which supports the food web, including small fish that are eaten by trout. When algae die they sink to the bottom of the lake where they decay (are broken down by bacteria). The decay process uses oxygen, which leads to low levels of dissolved oxygen in the bottom of the lake in summer and fall. If nutrient concentrations are too high, excessive growth of algae can occur, leading to the layer of low dissolved oxygen taking up more of the lower levels of the lake. Solar radiation and warm air warm the surface of the lake, while the deeper waters stay cool throughout the summer. If solar radiation levels and air temperatures are too high, more of the surface waters of the lake may become too warm for lake trout. Note that bass are more tolerant than trout of warm water temperatures and lower dissolved oxygen levels.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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LWCA Water Monitoring Program – Currently we do two types of tests:
 
 1. Deep water sampling of temperature and dissolved oxygen. Sampling has been expanded from two locations to five and now includes Elmardon, Lighthouse, Squaw Point, Bevis/Black Duck, and Otter Lake. 2. Chemistry and bacteria. We monitor 21 locations around the lake and we plan to do this sampling every two years (up from every three years in the past). We measure nitrogen and phosphorus (nutrients), E. coli, and total coliform bacteria. Historic Trends The deep water test results have been relatively stable from year to year. In all months, at all locations, there is a layer of the water column that is both cool enough and has sufficient dissolved oxygen for lake trout to be happy. By mid-summer the surface waters tend to be too hot for lake trout, and the deepest parts of the lake have dissolved oxygen concentrations that are too low for lake trout. It will be important to continue this monitoring to better understand trends over time, and to see whether the “sweet spot” of cool, welloxygenated water is decreasing, increasing or keeping steady. Water chemistry tests results show a generally worsening water quality trend particularly in the sampling locations at the south end of the lake.

No Poems About Loons in the Canadian Nature Anthology, so I Write One

Further findings and details may be found at lakeweslemkoon.ca FUN FACT:
 Ontario counts approx. 250,000 lakes, which means that about one fifth of the world’s fresh water is found here in our province! Even more reason for us to take care of our treasured lake!

We saw three as we boated in from the marina. Ellen said usually there are young, but maybe this spring’s flood swamped all the nests.

I mistake the lake for common, like the loon. One creases Weslemkoon and calls several times, iconic, like a monk straight out of ritual. I could call this place a temple, and declare the sky too low to be heaven, but there is something holy about this bird’s thorny cry, its mammal howl.

I mourn for the lost loons and recite a vacation list of cataclysms: the voice with thorns, the cross of pines on Black Duck Island, the cave of silence between the calls.
 


Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Phosphorus levels are within the target range at all locations, but nitrogen levels are above the target range at all test locations. E. coli appears at significant levels only at the south end of the lake. However total coliforms are generally above the target level at all locations, and substantially higher at the most southerly location.

John Lane

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Trail Maintenance

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Bruce Magee

Key highly traveled trails were maintained last year. MacKenzie Lake Trail, Canoe Lake Trail, Green Lake Trail, Mink Lake Trail, Little Long Lake. If you have interest in maintaining a trail this year, please let me know when you might be able to complete it.

10 Year Forestry Management Plan MLFI and BMFC’s present 10 year FMP will be complete in 2021. They have both started the process of developing and writing their next 10 year FMP. The FMP will take approximately three years to write. During this time, five formal opportunities for public consultation and First Nation and Métis consultation will take place. We are presently at stage three and the LWCA will be reviewing the proposed plan this 
 summer and should be able to report back to members attending the 2020 LWCA AGM. Stage Three - Information Centre: Review of Proposed Operations March 2020 Stage Four - Information Centre: Review of Draft Forest Management Plan August 2020 Stage Five - Inspection of MNRF-Approved Forest Management Plan December 2020 We are monitoring this process with the General Managers of both forestry companies to determine if either of the next 10 year plans will encroach Lake Weslemkoon, Otter Lake, 
 or any of our 10 surrounding lakes.

Fun Fact:
 The Eastern white pine was named Ontario's official tree in 1984. The tree's beautiful silhouette was made famous by members of the Group of Seven artists.

The General Manager of MLFI is Matt Mertins, and the newly appointed General Manager 
 of BMFC is Svetlana Zeran. GB Construction - Guy Boudreau Serving Weslemkoon Lake for 30 years Cottages, cabins and boathouses Additions Sleeping cabins Docks, decks and landscaping Roofing Custom cabinetry and interior design Stonework

Cell: 613-334-6425 Home: 613-332-6019

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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THE WING AND THE PRAYER This means WAR I shouted. You pesky robins must be outed! You don't understand, this is my land. Your plans to build? Re-routed !

I would honestly like to be fair, but you don't have a wing or a prayer. So please move your grass, and your quite pregnant lass to a local, and leafier, lair.

There are maples and towering pine, and aspen and oak, so sublime. So why drop your masses of branches and grasses on the table at which I dine?

Such vainglorious effort to teach you; on ladders, with brooms, to reach you. I'm waving my arms. Won't succumb to your charms. Relocate to the woods, I beseech you.

I'm surrounded by such verdant bower. Take your damsel to some greener tower. Not right over my deck, and HEY, what the heck? I'm fed up with the bird poop shower!

Now the young'uns are learning and slurping and burping. Mother is always on the fly. Father, a constant, nearby. Such a TWEET, to hear the chirping!

Ways to Keep In Touch With The LWCA

Cindy O'Hearn Cabin 829

Janice Mackenzie

The LWCA continues to work hard to communicate with members in a timely manner through both communiques and Facebook. Our communiques are sent via email on an “as needed” basis. We send a communique if we believe that it’s important for all members to get specific information (e.g., lake levels, island naming, municipal elections). If you are not getting communiques, please let us know. We use our Facebook group regularly to post about interesting things happening on the lake, or to answer questions from members that others may also be interested in. If you’re on Facebook, please ask to join our group and add your voice to discussions there. The LWCA also maintains a website. The website provides general information about all aspects of the LWCA, from membership to the AGM, hiking trails to municipal affairs. The website is available for anyone to visit. Thanks to Melissa Stout-Tervit, our website has had a significant facelift. Please check it out, and let us know what you think! weslemkoon.com Lastly, the LWCA maintains an Instagram account that is open to anyone. 
 To find us search for @lwca_ontario If you are interested in writing a blog post or if you have any questions 
 or concerns about communications, please contact janicemackenzie@icloud.com

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Riddle Me This:
 Is a watermelon a fruit or a vegetable? Find the answer further on. I bet this will be a fun evening debate around the bon fire!

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Lake Levels and Markers and Visit Updates, Oh My… Lake Levels To say that we had an interesting spring of 2019 would be putting in mildly. With the combination of snow accumulation and April rains, the lake flooded as many have never seen it before. There was considerable property damage and many people incurred significant costs to repair their residences and businesses. This was not however isolated to our lake. The entire Province was overcome with excessively high waters. The lake levels did even out for the summer season and got a little low in the fall due to leakage in the dam. I have been in contact with the MNRF and they will be doing their dam repairs after the freshet. The work will take place sometime between the middle of May and the middle of June and will take less than one day. Most of us will not even notice it happening. As the fall approached the lake levels return to normal levels and by the time the late Fall drawdown was scheduled to occur, things were back to normal levels. Here is to hoping that by the time you read this addition of the Loon Call the lake levels will be perfect!



 Courtesy Markers
 There was considerable damage done to the courtesy markers throughout the lake due to the high water levels in the spring of 2019. Some were completely removed and others were damaged. With the help of the budget, and Mike Watson, repairs were made and by the time the summer season rolled around all of the markers were in place and operating property. Again, we appreciate anyone bringing to our attention markers that do not light or that have been swept off of their designated locations. Happy and safe boating to all! " 12

Steve Latto

Custodial Visits
 The custodial visits of the spring of 2019 went off with no visible problems. This past fall the custodial visits did not take place. Winter hit in early November and didn’t let up. While the visits are usually made around mid to late November by boat, there was already ice on the lake by the second week. A lot of people, including myself, were scrambling to get our boat out of the water. In the interest of safety for our custodian we decided to forego the autumn visits. 
 FUN FACT:
 The Eiffel Tower grows more than 6 inches in summer. It is said that this happens because the iron expands with the heat. Conversely, it shrinks by about 6 inches in winter. The Eiffel Tower located in Champs de Mars in Paris, France is one of the most visited attractions in the world.

Editor’s Corner I can hear frogs in evening song, I can hear the waves lapping and I can feel the wind in my face as I take a deep breath in. When I open my eyes I am here in isolation with my family, our world right now very different then we ever could have imagined, as the spring sunshine peeks through. This newsletter was completed prior to the world going upside down, with content I have left in place to keep our thoughts of Lake Wes and all being well in parallel. I look forward to the day soon we jump from the dock, humbled once again to be trusted with such memories. Alison Myles, Editor 2020 Thank you to Brooklin Lowes, for her creative talents, and to Ruari Milne, for her journalist talents in preparing this publication. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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2019 Municipal Affairs Report

Paul Bottos

I would like to take this opportunity to report to you regarding various matters which were dealt with by the L.W.C.A during 2019.


to prevent persons from falling in by accident and is adequate to warn them that the opening exists.

Accordingly, there appears to be two duties for persons who create such an opening: firstly to guard that opening to prevent people from falling in, and secondly, to adequately warn people of the opening. This is in addition to any civil liability that may attach as a consequence of such an act or omission. The L.W.C.A. advises that the above is not to be treated as being legal advice and is not to be relied upon as such and that people should consult with their own attorney for legal advice.

DEVELOPMENT ON THE LAKE
 The L.W.C.A continues to receive copies of development applications in and surrounding the lake. The L.W.C.A looks forward to the continued receipt of this information from the Township. 
 COTTAGE NUMBERS
 As you are aware the Township passed the new Civic Address By-law (you may obtain a copy directly from the Township on their website). The Township has indicated that, in collaboration with the County, they have almost completed the work required to “map” the cottages on the lake and that additional work was required to complete same, in particular with respect to naming islands on the lake. This was a challenge for the Township as only 14 islands have “official” names and until an island is “officially” named the address cannot be completed. During the past year the Township sought input from people on the lake and from the LWCA in regards to naming islands on the lake and also with respect to correcting existing island names. The LWCA provided considerable input to the Township and the Township has advised that it has submitted its list of names to the Province for confirmation and currently awaits same. The by-law stipulates that addresses for properties on an island will consist of both a number and the name of the island and as such an official name for an island is required. This issue has arisen due to inconsistencies identified by emergency responders as they attempted to respond to calls on the lake. Lake Weslemkoon is expected to be the first lake in the Township to have its numbering re-done. The Township has not yet determined how the new “cottage number plates” will be installed but are considering the possibility of retaining a contractor to install them for consistency purposes. Please feel free to contact the Township should you have any further questions.

BOATING SPEED AND WAKES At this year’s AGM concerns were raised about boat speeds on the lake and boats creating excessive wakes while travelling near shores and around populated areas. Councillor Miles, who was in attendance at the AGM, brought this matter before municipal council and the Township agreed to look further into the matter and possibly erect some form of signage to alert boaters. The LWCA has followed up with the Township this past winter in the hopes that signs will be erected this year and we are hopeful that same will happen. Ultimately, however, boating speeds are a policing enforcement matter and boater etiquette is everyone’s responsibility. Please feel free to contact the Township to further this issue. I trust the above keeps you informed as to the developments which have transpired in regards to municipal issues during the past year. Should anyone have any interest in the noted issues or have any other issues which may be of interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact the L.W.C.A in order that same may be raised and discussed.

LWCA Passings

Last Morning

WATER BUBBLERS Questions in regards to the use and operation of water bubblers during the winter months to keep an area free of ice was raised again at the AGM. This issue has been discussed previously at the AGM and in the Loon Call and the L.W.C.A. wishes to once again remind persons that the Criminal Code of Canada provides that:

Lake time is not city time. Lake time hears the clock of the loon’s call. Lake time is sun rises through a pyre of white pines and sun sets through purple clouds. You live within lake time like you swim—full immersion. And then you get out
 until you swim again.


263 (1) Every one who makes or causes to be made an opening in ice that is open to or frequented by the public is under a legal duty to guard it in a manner that is adequate Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

John Lane " 13


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As Shared By Vivian (Whitmore) Bloom, of Maynooth This little article is about the Whitmore family and their time living at the head of Lake Weslemkoon, and my memories. The little farm was just inside the lines of Effingham Township, the home on the little portion of the property sitting on the banks of the river, across the road from the waterfalls, and the main farm on the north side of the road. John “Dillman” Whitmore and his wife Illa Mildred (Loney) arrived with their four children in 1934 and set up farming the property. Dill and Millie as they were called, had sons, Roy and Walter, and daughters Olive and Marion. Later that year, their fifth child Lois was born there. Aunt Lois’s birth certificate says Place of Birth, “Effingham Ontario” Sadly, three years later, Ollie died at home of cancer. Both Ollie and Roy are buried at the little Weslemkoon Cemetery. The family left in 1942 and moved to Niagara as they were barely surviving on the little farm. Grandpa raised their own meat, both he and Roy made some money by cutting and selling ice from the lake, trees from their property, selling most of it to locals and folks on the lake for firewood. Uncle Roy was a trapper almost all his life, and he was able to get work locally with Alex and Vearl Gunter. He also brought the mail in from Gilmour I believe. When the family decided to move, Roy told his Dad that he had work with the Gunters for as long as he wanted, and “there was no way he was going to any city!” I don’t really even remember Uncle Roy ever coming to stay in Niagara Falls! Growing up, my favourite event was our “family trip to Weslemkoon” each July! We would usually rent all of Vearl’s cabins as some of Mom’s family would come along too. Two stops on the road to Weslemkoon, at cousin Thelma Cook’s store to say hello and pick up some fresh items, and Irene Sleeper’s for pies. Adults fished daily, and myself and the older cousins would get dropped off on the shore near " 14

“The Battlegrounds” The small children kept in the boats. What fun to roam, swim and my brothers used to hunt for more arrowheads and odd shaped stones, and getting awesome sunburns. Days to rough for fishing mean a trip to the fire tower where Dad would visit his old school friend Percy, I have home movies taken of chats in the tower and us all climbing up and down. We would also go and bring Great Grandma Whitmore in to be with us for a few days, then perhaps stay for a night in Detlor with her when our lake time was up. Blueberry picking was our last day or two at the lake, and we all had to do that !! Some days I was allowed to stay at Vearl’s and shadow Uncle Roy in his daily tasks. Loved going into the ice house on hot days. I would do puzzles with Vearl and she would take me fishing in the evenings to her Bass spot across the bay. I was so excited one trip with Uncle Roy to open a cabin, he stopped and took me up the Lighthouse! In 1960, our cabin time ended at Weslemkoon. My dad lost his job and to start over at his age, he said he was moving us “back home.” Well, Grandpa and Grandma said they were coming too then, so we all ended up in Maynooth, north of Bancroft. Of course, a good Sunday outing was a visit with Uncle Roy and Vearl. Sadly, we lost Mom in 1970 and Grandma and Grandpa Whitmore moved into the Manor in Bancroft. In 1985, Dad passed away and my family by then was reduced to just Uncle Roy here, Aunt Marian in Niagara, Lois in California. I would take my girls to Weslemkoon to see Uncle Roy, and then when he also went to live at the home in town, we would bring him to my home each Sunday, which was so much fun. He so missed the people and the lake badly, but he never lost his sense of humour or his love of teasing, my girls loved every minute of it. I do the drive to Weslemkoon once a summer these last few years. Love to sit and have an ice cream at the Marina, remembering my walk to the old hotel and then Smith’s years ago to get my treats. I think back now of the wonderful freedom and the times spent at Weslemkoon. Uncle Roy would give me an old bamboo pole, I would get my own dew worms and off I would trudge alone back to the creek on the farm or the top of the falls and fish off alone. Nowadays, no one would let a little red-headed 8 year old head out on their own like that. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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I was as free as a bird, safe and happy wandering back and forth, or sitting in the big old boathouse fishing and trying to fill a pail with the rock bass that were fun to catch. I spent a few days this past week visiting the only one of the “Weslemkoon Whitmore’s” left, my Aunt Lois. We shared some stories of our times there, and what it was like for her as a small girl walking to the tiny school in winter, and listening to her memories of life at the lake. Then I was asked to do this little story, I guess that is some kind of “Karma” for it all to be so timely. So folks, most that will read this little reminisce of a “family time” on Weslemkoon, are those who are fortunate enough to be living or spending your holiday and weekend times there. You are all so blessed to be enjoying this wonderful paradise and hopefully making your own family memories. Thank you for making space to let me share some little pieces of mine.

Photos 1) Lois Whitmore Pilato with daughter Shelley Low at the old Whitmore home beside the river 1970 2) Marion Whitmore Rushton and Lois Whitmore Pilato sisters of Roy Whitmore circa 2014
 3) Vivian Whitmore and brother Jim Whitmore at Weslemkoon near waterfalls about 1958 4) Roy Whitmore taken at the lake as everyone knew him 5) Roy Whitmore with nephew Bill Whitmore, Great nephew Brian Whitmore and Gr-Great nephew Brett Whitmore taken when he was at the residence in Bancroft in 1992. 6) Roy Whitmore at Weslemkoon with his mother father and Grandmother 1961. Millie and Dill Whitmore and Mary Whitmore.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Top 10 Growing Up Weslemkoon Memories

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Michèle Smith-Calambakas

Otter Lake for the regatta for the paddleboat races. Since my Dad makes a party of any event, tying the two big barges together and going all the way to Otter Lake turned into a big deal. 


On Our Way to Otter Lake

1. Hanging Out at Burke’s Marina. I have so many memories of hanging out at Burke’s Marina when I was a kid. Mike and Honor had several grandchildren that we hung out with ALL summer. We ate french fries or ice cream while chatting with the ‘old folks’ we loved listening to their stories about the lake! And, of course, about my Dad when he was younger! Listening to Van Halen’s “Jump” on the jukebox. We loved setting it to repeat so we could see how many times we could jump into the lake when David Lee Roth sang the word JUMP. 


2. Summertime Treats. Since the marinas were only open during the summer, it was a big deal to get our daily $1 bill, then run to get a pop or chocolate bar plus 15 penny candies. As we got a bit older, we figured out that on Friday and Saturday evenings, when mom and dad had company - and a few drinks in them - we got a $2 bill to spend! Back in those days, you thought you’d hit the lottery when you got two whole dollars to spend on junk food! I always loved that, no matter how many friends we had in tow, Dad always gave every single kid the exact same amount of money to spend on junk food. 3. Friday Nights: The Winter Once the ice was in, it meant the regular Friday night crew coming through on their way to their cottages. It was tradition that certain people would drop in on my parents for a drink and to get their snowmobiling gear on. As kids, we loved these visits: it was the highlight of our week to see our lake friends after the long, cold days when no one was around!

6. Carefree Adventures When you have all of Weslemkoon to roam as a kid, it is massive. So, we spent every moment we could roaming around. Whether it was on our bikes, on foot, on GT snow racers, on snowmobiles, on golf Me, Mum and Dad carts, or on four wheelers, we explored every single inch of the lake and land around home. We built more forts and bridges than I could ever count. We snuck out at night to go roam around the trailer parks and check out the parties. We took off on hikes into the bush to see if we could “find our way home” without a compass. We spent hours playing Hide & Seek in the dark on McCrae Island with Alan and Shelley! And then there was that time I almost beheaded myself with a clothesline during a game of Hide & Seek… My Mom would often toss us in the van to go on little adventures up the road, usually to find plants. One time, we saw a bike laying in the ditch. We got so excited – we found a BIKE! Jumping out of the van, we were just about to claim our prize when we looked up. There was a man in the trees taking a poop! Well, we turned around, got back into that van, and drove off as fast as we could! 7. BINGO and Euchre Nights During the summer, there were regular BINGO and Euchre nights on the lake. I used to love hanging out and helping my Mom and Grandmother with the organization and hosting of these evenings. The same lovely people always came out. My favourite moment, every time, was when Hoarse called HORSE!

4. Friday Nights: Then There Was Summer. As in winter, our house always had a revolving door on Friday nights. Some stayed for one drink; some stayed for many! There was nothing like greeting lake friends at the end of that drive to Weslemkoon. We all know that feeling: when you first hit the lake road... then you arrive at the landing. The best feeling! It doesn’t matter that you still need to unload your car, load your boat, drive your boat, unload your boat, and unpack at the cottage. The moment you hit the landing where your boat is, you have ARRIVED! 5. Junior Loons & Otter Lake Regatta The summer baseball team and canoe races! As kids who lived in Weslemkoon year-round, winter could feel pretty isolated. When summer came, along with these large group activities to join, a new level of excitement was added into our lives. It was also a big adventure to go all the way to " 16

the Baseball Team Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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8. Ice Fishing It was definitely a highlight every year to go ice fishing. There would be day adventures with others when we would go into Long Lake or Green Lake and spend the day fishing. The most memorable time was a brilliantly warm, sunny day - a whole crew of us went to fish by the Lighthouse. Well, it got really warm. And slushy. Getting home was quite the adventure! I spent a week hiding in the dark because of the worst facial sunburn I have ever experienced! 9. Ice Skating Every year, my Dad made us a rink in front of the boat house. We took it very seriously and would flood it every night until we had the perfect ice. We spent Moody Teenager on a Walk with Tara hours out there. If the lake froze right, we could skate out past Weslemkoon Marina and back. If we got freezing rain, we would skate up and down the road for fun. 10. Generations on the Lake As an adult with my own cottage on Lake Weslemkoon, I often think about the older generations. There are so many stories and so many people I could mention, but then this would go on forever. Most are no longer with us, but many are still! Terry & Denise O’Hearn and Reg & Mary Smith have been in my life since I was a kid - it still is a great honour to see them at least once every summer!

Junior Loons

Carrie Howes, Otter Lake

Pot Holes & Cookout Our hike to the potholes was our first activity for the summer of 2019. The junior loons of all ages met at Otter Lake and hiked to the pot holes to check out the incredible geological formations that exist on our lake. When we finished we had a fun all ages scavenger hunt for nature.  This was a hit! After a well-deserved swim, some water games and fun we had a hotdog & marshmallow roast over an open fire and enjoyed the sunny afternoon.  What a fun day!

Water Day The Jr Loons found relief from the hot August weather by spending a fun filled day at the Bell’s beach.   On August 4th, 35 kids with boats and crazy floats turned up for a day of races, snacks, prizes and fun.  The races began with Duck Duck Splash, and we continued with water races and team chants and excitement.  We are sure the cheers could be heard right across the lake!  After the excitement of the races we enjoyed snacks and prizes.  Prizes were awarded for effort and speed in each age category.     Thank you very much to the Bells for allowing us to play upon their beach and join in with us, and to all older children who helped volunteer to ensure that our junior loons were safe! We look forward to welcoming the junior loons again for summer 2020! Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Fun Fact:
 Hey High Schoolers - earn volunteer hours while at the lake! Contact the LWCA for further details! " 18

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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NEW STOVES & CHIMNEYS

WE ARE FULLY INSURED WE ARE FULLY TRAINED WE ARE WETT CERTIFIED

OUR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INCLUDE: DUCT CLEANING CHIMNEY CLEANING

! M O O R W O H NEW S 27 428 HWY 1 MAYNOOTH, ON

(including emergency service)

NEW WOOD & GAS STOVE SALES COMPLETE WOODSTOVE INSTALLS NEW CHIMNEY BUILDS CHIMNEY REPAIRS CHIMNEY RELINES MASONRY WORK WETT INSPECTIONS BUILD OUTDOOR STOVES & ENTERTAINMENT AREAS

WE SELL & INSTALL:

CONTACT INFORMATION: Jason Reynolds Top Hat & Tales p. 613 338.2878 w.tophatandtales.ca e.jason@tophatandtales.ca Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Changes In Net Assets


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Catherine Rathbun Memorial Environmental Fund

Unrestricted

Total 2018

Total 2017

BALANCE, Beginning of Year

19,273

30,685

49,958

48,466

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenue Over Expenditures

(1,058)

1,412

354

672

1,470

820

51,782

49,958

for the year ended December 31, 2019
 (unaudited)


 Contributions

1,470

19,685

BALANCE, End of Year

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Financial Position


Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Revenues & Expenditures
 for the year ended December 31, 2019 
 (unaudited)

REVENUES Annual Fees Loon Call Revenues Interest Income Miscellaneous Sales Total Revenue EXPENDITURES Annual Meeting Bank Charges Administrative & Promotional Cost of Miscellaneous Sales Custodial Visits FOCA Insurance Loon Call New Shoal Markers Shoal Marker Maintenance Lake Activities Social Map Inventory Write Down Miscellaneous Web Site Development Costs Amortization of Water Testing Equip. Total Expenditures EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES

32,097

as at December 31, 2019
 (unaudited)

2019

2018

13,135 1,925 403 336

13,268 2,525 265 60

15,799

16,118

1,980 357 286 110 1,828 1,140 1,649 2,650 653 2,960 584 190

1,339 223 157 40 3,520 917 1,617 2,574 653 1,648 422 975 35 1,299 190

14,387

15,609

1,412

509

ASSETS Current Assets Cash Bank G.I.C.s Inventory Fixed Assets Water Testing Equipment - net

LIABILITIES & RESTRICTED FUNDS & NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities Restricted Funds Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund Net Assets Unrestricted

2019 Treasurer’s Report

2019

2018

13,710 38,840 513 53,063

12,839 38,189 527 51,555

569 53,632

759 52,314

1,850

2,356

19,685

19,273

32,097 52,632

30,685 52,314

Diane Morden

(Expenditures over Revenues)

Your board continues to be very active as indicated by the diverse nature of expenditures reflected in the Statement of Revenues & Expenditures. Actual expenditures are in line with Board approved budgeted amounts for the year.
 


Fun Fact:
 The Canadian Shield extends for 8 million square km, centered on the Hudson Bay and is estimated to be two billion years old. " 20

Surplus funds are invested in two bank GIC’s of $18,292 and $20,420 which will mature December 2021 and November 2020 respectively. Interest is 1.9% on both 
 Cont’d on page 21…. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Yarr Mateys, It Was A Fine Treasure Hunt 2019 Aye, On Saturday, August 31 came one came all, dressed in their pirate finest! They painted beards, they swabbed the deck, wrote pirate ballads, taste tested eyeballs, walked the plank, solved the riddles and found treasures. Once again our shared feast took place, we thank Ralph and Marianne for hosting and to all volunteers, we couldn’t have done it without you!

The winning team was the McGrath family. They sailed the 7 seas, solved pirate mysteries and totally dressed the part! Treasurer’s Report Cont’d from page 20….

Get Pumped

GIC’s and is recognized on an accrual basis. The GIC interest is shared on a weighted average basis between the general fund and the Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. The Catherine Rathbun Environmental fund grew by individual contributions of $1,470 ($820 in 2018) and allocated interest of $247 ($163 in 2018). Expenditures from this fund were for water quality testing in the amount of $1,305 ($0 in 2018) and was approved at the 2018 annual general meeting as required.


The pumper was not on the lake this year. Kawartha Utilities (KUC) will be putting together a list of cottages that would like to be pumped. Once they reach 13 cottages they will schedule the pumper to come to the lake. Please check the website for updates on the pumping schedule. To book a pumping, please contact KUC directly: telephone 1-705-654-4000 or 
 email: kus@nexicom.net


 The remaining unrestricted surplus of $32,097 is available for the general purposes of the association. Riddle Answer:
 Watermelons can be considered both a fruit and a vegetable. Those in the “it’s a vegetable” camp say so because watermelons belong to the cucumber family (also the pumpkin and squash family). However, botanists consider it a fruit because it grows from a seed.

In the meantime, we encourage everyone to have their systems checked, the LWCA website has instructions under the septic tab on how to do this yourself or you can contact Geoff at Citadel Home Inspections: telephone 1-613-334-9050 or email: citadelhomeinspections.ca 
 Please check your system, a healthy septic keeps our lake clean, the lake trout depend on it!

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Alice Mary Bould, B.A. (nee Doyle)
 September 21, 1928 – April 20, 2019 With sadness, on April 20, 2019, Alice Mary Bould died at the age of 90. She was a wonderful friend and engaged member of the community. With her generous nature she gave willingly of her time and her resources to many community organizations to care for those in need. Mary loved life and lived it well. She travelled to all parts of the world when it wasn’t as easy as it is today. She also enjoyed gardening, crosswords and bridge, the arts, particularly the opera, theatre and music of all kinds.

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* Way back when women wore bathing caps so as not to spoil their “doo” she always had the most fancy. * Whenever she was at the cottage she would launch into a jigsaw puzzle. Soon it would become a group effort with everybody taking a turn here and there. It was very zen. Last summer no jigsaw puzzle was started. * Mary had been going to the Lake since the late 50s. * Mary loved life and lived it well. She travelled to all parts of the world – way before the current tourism explosion. * Cribbage. Stuart Inglis

In 1958 Mary bought a share in the Lighthouse and had spent time on the Lake ever since. She loved summers at the cottage swimming, canoeing and reading. Since she lived in Belleville she would come and go throughout the summer. Back in the days before the internet it was her job to show up with latest newspapers and a stack of library books for the rest of the crew to hungrily devour. Mary loved to play cribbage and was a formidable player. You had to be good or you would likely lose. She also enjoyed jigsaw puzzles. It wasn’t long after her arrival that the card table would be set up to get one going. Soon, others would join in and become jigsaw converts, obsessively trying to find the next piece to fit. Missed most of all will be the lively dinner time conversations. She liked to stir the pot but was always open to new ideas and took them in stride. Lots of laughter and good times were had by all. Always kind. Always generous. Mary was young at heart. She will be lovingly remembered and missed by all her family and friends. Mary Bould was my;
 * She was open to new ideas and had a willingness and curiosity to learn what the young generation was up to. She was young at heart. " 22

Photo: Mary on the right with her niece, Kitty, in the middle and her cousin, Carol, on the left, circa pre-internet era.

“May you forever hear our waves of Weslemkoon…” Paul Lavelle
 Catherine Nash
 Chris Murray
 Nancy Dickinson
 Cliff Noble
 Alice Mary Bould
 Gregory Forbes

Neil Coulman Dennis Bush Fred Goerke Bud Fischer John William Nesbitt Honor Burke Paul MacLellan Patty Wesler Kate Smith James Stewart Robertson Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Weslemkoon
 WORD SEARCH

FUN FACT:
 Did you know Canada did not experience summer in 1816? Imagine having snow and cold in the middle of July. This was what many in the Northern Hemisphere, not only in Canada, experienced that year. Many worried about food shortages as crops need the warm weather to grow. Later studies found this anomaly was caused by the eruption of Mount Tambora in the Dutch East Indies. Volcanic ash and gas blanketed the atmosphere partially blotting out the sun and affecting many cities around the world.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Photo Credit - Left Field Pictures

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Calendar 2020 SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

28

29

30

5

6

12

19

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

JULY 1

2

3

4

7

8

9

10

11

13

14

15

16

17

20

21

22

23

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30

31 LWCA AGM
 AUGUST 1

Canada Day!

Full Moon

27

26

2

28

FUN FACT! Alex Trebek was born July 22, 1940 near Sudbury.

29

FUN FACT! A new rover is heading to the planet Mars!

6

July 18
 is National Ice Cream Day - wait, isn’t this everyday?!

10am - check the LWCA website for 7 details

18

25

3

4

5

8

August 10
 10 is National Smore’s Day - grab your marshmallow 17 sticks!

11

12

13

14

15

18

19

20

21

22

29

Full Moon 9

16

23

24

25

26

27

28

30

31

SEPTEMBER 1

2

3

4

6

7

8

9

10

11

Treasure Hunt 2pm Tanglewood Marina

5

12

Labour Day!

Please check the LWCA Website www.weslemkoon.com closer to date for updates or rain dates for all events!

The Canadian Shield Weslemkoon Lake pads it— a blue blouse the land wears loosely. The cottage people blast it— blow it, up or down, until something apparently perks. The water weathers it— rain, run-off, snowmelt, over time, but deep time, not the shallow human slip we vacation in.

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The plants plug it— penetrate, clutch— blueberries, bracken, and pines with rugs of roots that strong wind often reveals. The insects thrum it— ants crawl the coarse granite, horse flies gun throttles and rise as our hands fly.

John Lane is a poet from Spartanburg SC. He and his wife Betsy spent a week on the lake summer ’19, at the Goldey cottage, where he wrote this selection of poems. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Profile for Melissa Stout

2020 Loon Call  

2020 Loon Call  

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