Issuu on Google+

SCHOOL COUNSELOR (152)

.t

Presented Bonnie Hinkle,

by:

Ed.D, LPC

Dallas Baptist University 2143336838 bonnie@dbu.edu


c i

DISCLAIMER TExES INSTRITCTOR~S MANIJAL THIS PACKET HAS BEEN PREPARED EDUCATOR STANDARDS

FOR THE TEXAS EXAMINATIONS

IN TEXAS (TEXES •. THOSE WHO PREPARED

OF THIS

PACKET DO NOT CLAIM TO HAVE EXPERT KNOWLEDGE REGARDING THE CONTENTS OF THE TExES; THEREFORE.

THIS PACKET IS SIMPLY THE

ACCUMULATION OF SUGGESTED IDEAS AND RECOMMENDATIONS.

THERE

IS ABSOLUTELY NO GUARANTEE THAT THE CONTENTS OF THIS PACKET WILL TOTALLY PREPARE ON THE TExES.

A STIJDENT FOR ALL THE QUESTIONS ASKED

THE STUDENT IS RESPONSIBLE

FOR BACKGROUND

KNOWLEDGE ASSUMED FOR MASTERY OF THIS CERTIFICATION

EXAM.

ITEMS IN THIS PACKET ARE SUGGESTIONS FOR FURTHER STUDY AND ARE NOT GUARANTEED

TO BE PRESENTED

ON THE EXAM. THIS PACKET

COVERS ONLY MATERIAL ON THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR TExES EXAMINATION.

ACKNOWLEDGMENT All the materials in this workbook have been gathered from a variety of basic texts by author's expert in their respective fields. The presenters acknowledge these and wish to thank the contributors for the information.

These documents were compiled by Dr. Bonnie Hinkle for use in the School Counselor TExES review sessions presented at Dallas Baptist University It is recommended that students download and review the School Counselor Preparation Manual(152) vvww.sbec.state. tx. us


TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.

OVERVIEW A. Test Development B. Helpful Reminders C. Skills and Strategies D. Buzz Words E. Termino logy F. Standards, Domains, & Competencies

II.

DOMAIN I-UNDERSTANDING STUDENTS A. Human Development and Learning Process B. Diversity C. Factors Affecting Students

III.

DOMAIN II - PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING THE DEVELOPMENTAL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING PROGRAM A. Program Management/Structure/Counselor's Role B. Developmental Guidance Program C. Counseling {individual & group counseling & assessment,路 D. Career Development Sequence (educational planning, career testing, career development) E. Assessment: Measurement and Evaluation (types of tests, student appraisal)

IV.

DOMAIN III - COLLABORATION, CONSULTATION, and PROFESSIONALISM (Professional Standards) A. Collaboration with Families B. Collaboration with others in the school and community C. Professionalism D. Ethical, Legal, and Professional Standards

V.

Practice Ouestions


WHAT IS MEANT BY

LEARNER-CENTERED SCHOOLS DEFINITION: "Learner-centered"

is defined as any activity thatfocuses

on the success of the individual.

TWO THEMES: 1. The first theme is ANY ACTIVITY, WHICH IMPLIES INSTRUCTIONAL AND NONINSTRUCTIONAL ACTIVITIES. •

Texas is consumed w/student testing, however, student learning occurs outside the stateprescribed curriculum and outside the confines of the classroom. 2. the second theme is the definition is the SUCCESS OF THE INDIVIDUAL • each student, regardless of learning ability, ethnicity, or gender will be given opportunity to learn. • Learner-centered issues address student needs • Schools moving from setting conditions for success to ENSURING student success are setting the stage for "LEARNER-CENTERED" environment.

• EFFECTIVE SCHOOLS INCLUDE: '~

• safe and orderly environment • climate of high expectations for success • instructional leadership • clear and focused mission • opportunity to learn and student time on task • frequent monitoring of student progress • home-school relations


SKILLS AND STRATEGIES

.:. Choose the BEST answer, not just the RIGHT answer .:. Watch out for NEGATORS .... All of the following EXCEPT ... All but the ... Which one is NOT a ... The most INEFFECTIVE strategy ... •:. Watch out for ALL INCLUSIVE WORDS (ask yourself if there could ever be and exception) HINT: words that all inclusive are seldom true statements, while words with qualifiers are more likely to be correct QUALIFIERS: likely, generally, most, usually, etc.(suggest statement is true most of the time but could have exceptions) .:. CIRCLE KEY WORDS - what are you looking for?

.:. READ THE QUESTION CAREFULLY AND DO NOT READ ANYTHING INTO THE QUESTION. DO NOT LOOK FOR MEANING AND IMPLICATIONS THAT ARE NOT THERE .

•:. DON'T TURN DOWN A GOOD OPTION BECAUSE YOU DON'T THINK IT WOULD BE AVAILABLE IN YOUR SETTING .

•:. READ ALL CHOICES BEFORE DECIDING ON THE CORRECT ANSWER. SOME ANSWERS MAY HAVE PARTS THAT ARE CORRECT; IF ALL THE PARTS TO THE ANSWER ARE NOT CORRECT, IT IS NOT THE CORRECT ANSWER. .:. YOU MAYBE ABLE TO RULE OUT ONE OR TWO OF THE DISTRACTERS (HOWEVER, THIS IS A WELL-WRITTEN TEST AND YOU CANNOT COUNT ON THAT)


KEY CONCEPTS

./ Student-centered

learning experience

./ Students as active learners ./ Counselors in various roles-instructor,

facilitator, coach

./ Counselor roles in various learning communities (campus, district, community, etc)

COLLABORATIVE LEARNING AND PLANNING BETWEEN STUDENTS AND BETWEEN TEACHERS AND STUDENTS ./ Meaningful learning based on prior knowledge ./ Celebration of likenesses and differences ./ Developmentally-appropriate

instruction

./ Use of technology as an instruction tool ./ Outcome-oriented instruction ./ Student assessment and teacher self-reflection as on-going Instructional process ./ Think idealistic. This is the theory vs. practice bias of the test.


BIASES IN THE EXCET

DEVELOPMENTAL

ISSUES ARE EMBEDDED IN THE QUESTIONS

THE QUESTIONS FAVOR WHOLE LANGUAGE/INTEGRATED/INTERACTIVE APPROACHES

THE TEST IS BIASED TOWARD COOPERATIVE, COLLABORATIVE, PEER GROUP TEACHING

IN MOST QUESTIONS HIGHER ORDER LEVEL THINKING SKILLS ARE MORE IMPORTANT THAN CONCEPTS

THE QUESTIONS WILL CENTER AROUND STUDENTS MANIPULATING ITEMS IN THEIR ENVIRONMENT

INTRINSIC MOTIVATION


-- ---- - -- --------------------------------

----~-

-

j

B

(Brainstorm following)

-- - ----

- -

with your group

- -

U ZZZZZZZ

for one minute

YHOTS- higher

- -

---------

--

WORDS

all you know about

each of the

order thinking

skills

Y Discover/Inquiry Y Diversity

Y Educationally

disadvantaged

Y Collaboration Y Age Appropriate

Y Community

Y Teacher as Facilitator Y Instructional

Objective

Y Problem Solver

Y Safe

&

---

order enviromnent

----------


COMMON DISTRACTORS

• The answer mi ht be true but it has nothin

to do with the

• The answer is mostly true, but a portion of it is false • Strictly limited words are used; "always" or "never"

I.

DISMISS IMMEDIATELY • Sarcasm

Prejudiced or ethnocentric answers

,

II.

~~---?==-

• Making an example of a problem child

j;'0_0--

--

-

.-

-

._

.-

••

- - _ .. _ .. - -_ .. o.

-

..•. :.f---

-- -_ .._ ..- - -- - -- -- _.- --

_.-

_

- .-.. .. -

- - - - ._--_ .. - --' _ .._ ..- ----_ .._._--------.-; i

.- - -

-

-

!.,l>QJ.i·t<;EtE;gO'iXQN:A:i,i,YliiYQLVE;IJ::'::::::

:' !

--

- - -

~.-..-..

---- - -----------

__

-.. -.. -..-..-..-..--.- ..-

_.

"_0

---_._-----.-

_0

__

0.

_._-_._ .. _ .._._-

0._0

-"-"-"-"-

_0

__

••

••

_ .._---.-----------

• __

••

- -.- - - -- - - -

-- -- - --

- ..- -.- - -

-.-

--_ .. -

1

:'

-- .- -- -- -- -- -- --

WHAT ABOUT EXPERIENCE _________

0._.

J

.__ ..


COMMON DISTRACTORS

• The answer might be true, but it has nothing to do with the passage • The answer is mostly true, but a portion of it is false • Strictly limited words are used; "always" or "never"

I.

DISMISS IMMEDIATELY • Sarcasm •

Prejudiced or ethnocentric answers

II. • Making an example of a problem child

r----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------.--------------------------~ I

REMEMBER .... REMEMBER ... REMEMBER .....

,

,----------------------------------------------------1iiE-ALIS-iIE-\jioRLi:)-----------------------------------------------------i I

---------------------------------------------------~--.--..-.--.-- ..- ..-----.-.---.--.--.-

!

_.

-

-

- -

- - -

-

- -

-

- -

_ _ _

_

I

----------------------------------------------------

..--.- .. - .. - .. ----_._ ..---_ .. ..---------_ .. _-----_ .. .. .. ..--._ ..-.----_ .. _-----_

.. _-----_

_-----_ .._ .. _._----

.. -------.'-; i i - _ .. _ .. - - - _. - -.. - _. --- .. .. .. -- - .. - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - -- - -- - - - - -- - -- - -- - -- - - - - - - - -- - -- - -- - - - - -- - _. - - - - -- - ---- - - -- - -- - - -- -- - _ .. _ .. -- - -- - _. - - - - -- - -_. .. _---.-_ ..

_ _ _ _ ~ DON'T GET EMOTIONALLY INVOLVED - -- - -- - - - - -- - - -. - -. -- - - - - -- - - - - -- - - - - _. - - - - --- _ ..-- - -- - _. - -- - -- - _ .. - - - - _. _ .. _ ..-- - --. _ .. - _. -- - - - - -- - _. - _ ..-- - _. - -- - - - - -- - - _. - - - -- - _ ..-- - -- - - -- _ ..- ---_. - _. -- - -' - _. - -_. -- - ----

.. _. - -- - _. -- - - _. -_.-

'

- -

!

t._.__.__..__._0.

00

.0_. __ .__ .. __

+

_

••

_

••

_0._'. _ .. _.

+

_

••

__

_

+.

_

••

_.0 __ •

... __ . _ .. _ .. _ .• _. -- _._. -_ .. - _._. -- _. _ .. - _._ .. _. __ .• - __- _._ .• - o._ o. __ . __ •_ o.__ . _.

..

..

.. _. __ .. - .. _ .. _ --- .. _.

. _ .. _ .. __ . __ . _ .. __ ._ .. _ .. __ .

..

.. __ .

..

..

..

..

..

.. __ .

i

WHAT ABOUT EXPERIENCE L

..

..

.

..

. _.

.. _.

._. __ ..

..

..

.__ . __ .

.__ . __ . __ ..

.

. __ .. __ . _. __ . __ ..

.

. __ . __ .. __

.:


DOMAmN ! (!O'le

oUest)

UNDERSTANDING STUDENTS COMPETENCY 1 - Human Development COMPETENCY 2 - Student Diversity COMPETENCY 3 - Factors Affecting Students

DOMAIN

n

(41o'!'ooUesQ)

PLANNING AND IMPLEMENTING THE DEVELOPMENTAL GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING PROGRAM COMPETENCY 4 - Program Management COMPETENCY 5 - Developmental

Guidance Program

COMPETENCY 6 - Counseling COMPETENCY 7 - Assessment

DONIA N (SO,*,oUelt) I COLLABORATION,

CON IILIAIION, En

COMPETENCY 8 - Collaboration with Families COMPETENCY 9 - Collaboration with Others in the School and Community COMPETENCY 10 - Professionalism

CODE OF ETHICS AND STANDARD PRACTICES FOR TEXAS EDUCATORS


DOMAIN I UNDERSTANDING LEARNERS


IH !j~l'lJ{ ,

Stages of Development

Sensori-Motor Period (Birth through 2 years) At the beginning, a child is unable to differentiate between self and the world of objects. The basic task in this stage is to coordinate incoming sensations with motor capabilities. Stage ends when the child has acquired the ability to use symbols. (Key phrases: egocentrism, object permanence) -Begins to understand cause & effect -Imitation -Memory & thought re..{

yV

Preoperational Period (2 to 7 years) S<~路 -6 There are two primary substages. The first (2-4) is characterized by egocentric use of language and heavy dependence of perception in problem solving. The second (4-7) is characterized by more communicate speech and greater dependence on intuitive thinking. (Key phrases: animism, conservation, irreversibility) -Teaching: Hands on, brief instructions, demonstrate, physically -Pre- reasoning -Uses symbols & language -Self-centered thought n

."

i1

Concrete Operational Period (7 - 11 years) Thought is decentered, dynamic and reversible. Child organizes actions and representations into a coherent system. Problem-solving techniques are unsystematic and inefficient, but given materials and time, children can reach a solution. -Use visual aids -Write plays & costumes -Introduce Bloom's higher order skills in games & brain teasers Formal Operational Period (11 - adult) Child is no longer bound by reality, but able to operate in the realm of possibility. Child operates from a formal, reasonable base. Child believes in his own ideals to the point that he believes he can change the world.


1"..--....

BLOOM'S HIGHER ORDER THINKING SKILLS KNOWLEDGE Description: ability to recall previously learned material Student A~tivity: R~me~bering, me~<:rizi!2_~'rec<?gnizing, defi~e, i~:.n!ifY

COMPREHENSION Description: Ability to grasp meaning, explain, restate ideas Student Activity: Interpreting, translate, describing, identify, retell, express, discuss

APPLICATION Description: Ability to use learned material in new situations Student Activity: Exhibit, problem solving, demonstrate, calculate, experiment, interview, employ, use

ANALYSIS Description: Ability to separate material into component parts and show relationships between parts Student Activity: Identifying motives, making inferences, finding evidence to support, comparing, survey, inspect, probe

SYNTHESIS Description: Ability to put together the separate ideas to form new whole, establish new relationships. Student Activity: Creating something new, problem solving, making predictions, invent, hypothesize, originate, propose, produce, reconstruct, design

EVALUATION Description: Ability to judge the worth of material against stated criteria. Student Activity: Resolving differences of opinions, making value judgments, assess, measure, infer, deduce, recommend, critique, test

*KNOWLEDGEABLE ALWAYS ATTEMPT SOME EVALUATION*

COMRADES


Psychosocial Development

Erikson developed a psychosocial developmental perspective of human growth that allows for continued growth through all of life, and contains the influence of society and history on development. Stage/Crisis: Trust vs. Mistrust Human Relationships: Parents/Caregiver Desired Outcome: Hope

Age: 0-1

Stage/Crisis: Autonomy vs. Doubt Human Relationships: Parents/Caregiver Desired Outcome: Will

Age: 1-3

Stage/Crisis: Initiative vs. Guilt Human Relationships: Family Desired Outcome: Purpose

Age: 3-5

Stage/Crisis: Industry vs. Inferiority Human Relationships : Neighborhood/School Desired Outcome: Competence

Age: 6-11

Carkhuff and Traux were the first to systematically explore the qualities that make up a successful therapist-client relationship. Their research measured the extent that the therapist's response to the client added to, subtracted from, or was neutral in the process of helping the client. (See Egan model, which is a later version of Carkhuff's work) I. Establish rapport - problem exploration and clarification II. Establish workable goals III. Establish and implement programs for action


Six Stages of Moral Development: Development of the reasoning process by which individuals determine what is right or fair for resolving moral conflicts: I.

Orientation to obedience and punishment Rules of conduct derive from the power of those who impose them

II.

Orientation to instrumental hedonism Rules of conduct derive from selfish, pragmatic objectives

III.

Orientation to interpersonal concordance Rules of conduct derive from the role demands implicit in being a "good" person

IV.

Orientation to an established social order Rules of conduct derive from laws and from one's duty to maintain the social order

V.

Orientation to the "social contract" Rules of conduct derive from the reciprocal rights and responsibilities of individuals and government

VI.

Orientation to ethical principles Rules of conduct derive from principles that transcend authority oflaw

Stages I and II are similar to Piaget's stages of moral development that develop in childhood between 3 and 12. Moral realism, for Piaget, means that the child accepts rules as dictated from authority. During the development of moral independence the child devises and modifies rules to fit particular situations. Stage's III through VI is developed from adolescence through adulthood. Most adults remain in the second, third, and fourth stages. According to Kohlberg, a person must proceed through all the preceding stages in order to arrive at one stage. Preconventional - Stages I and II Conventional -- Stages III and IV Post-Conventional -- Stages V, VI


HIERARCHY OF NEEDS MASLOW

Aesthetic Needs

Knowledge Needs

Self-Esteem Needs

Group Belonging/Love

Safety

Physical

HOWARD GARDNER'S MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES Body/Kinesthetic Visual/Spatial Verbal/Linguistic Musical/Rhythmic Interpersonal Intrapersonal Logical/Mathematical


E.ARL Y INTER'lE.NTIQN

FOR INFANTS

AND TODDLERS

/'

"the most Irnno .â&#x20AC;˘ rtant legislation "" developmentally variable children'; ,

~PL 99-457

The law covers any child guidelines:

1. Needs

o

under

ever enacted

age 3 who meets the following

early intervention services because of developmental delays one or more of areas of cognitive development, physical develop m e n t, social or emotional development; or adaptive development

that D::l5 a high deb)'

(established conditions include children with a diagnosed physical or medical con diri o n that almost a lwa ys results in developmental delay or disabilHy)**ex: Down syndrome; fragile-X syndrome, brain or spinal cord damage; sensory irnp a ir rn enrs , fetal alcohol syndrome; p.JDS**

3. Each state, at its discretion, rn ay se rve infants and toddlers at risk of experiencing a s ub s t a n tia l developmental delay intervention s er vic es are not provided 'ill

in

(includes children with significant delays or atypical patterns of developmenrjv vch il dr en do not need to be classified or label acco rriins~ to those categories to receive ear lv. intervention services** ~

2. Has a diagnosed p h ys ic al or rn e d ica l condition probability of resulting in developmental e

for

vvh o are if early"

(children considered b io lo gica llv at risk h ave a greater than usual probability of developmental d el ay or d isab ility because of their pediatric h isto ries or current biological co-nditions (p r e mn t ur e birth, low birth vve ig h r) may be considered en vir o nrne n ta lly at risk for developmental delay due to (extreme poverty, p ar en ta l sub s r a nc e ab us e, homelessness, p a r en ta l int ellec ru a l impairment)


FAMILY

PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

PEERS

SCHOOL

AGE

LANGUAGE USE

8

-:

THINKING LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

SELF DEVELOPMENT

1----0

LU

EMOTIONS

DEVELOPMENTAL

CHARACTERISTICS

OF CHILDREN AND YOUTH

:


Psychoanalytic Sigmund Freud Neo-Freudians or Psychodynamic Carl Jung Alfred Adler Erich Fromm Harry Sullivan Erik Erikson

Analysts

Behavior Modification Therapies Wolpe B. F. Skinner Bandura and Walters Rotter Selye Client-Centered Carl Rogers Existential-H umanistic Abraham Maslow Rollo May Gestalt Fritz Perls Rational-Emotive Therapy William Glasser Transactional Analysis Eric Berne Electic Theorists Allport Carkhuff Thorne


DIVERSITY Classroom diversity - whether in the form of GENDER, RACE, ETHNICITY, or ABILITY =is something to be VALUED. Diversity provides a more exciting, dynamic classroom and the opportunityfor students to learn that all people are not the same. Diversity provides opportunities for students to understand, respect, and value others for their differences. Diversity provides the opportunity for you to use all of your imagination, skills, and resources, to be the best teacher you can be.

OTHER INSTANCES OF CLASSROOM DIVERSITY There are other sources of classroom diversity, not associated with disabilities, that we need to consider when planning and implementing classroom instruction:

>-

CULTURALLY AND LINGUISICALLY DIVERSE GROUPS

>-

AT-RISK (may include "slow learners" not served by IDEA categories and individuals who have sociocultural disadvantages ..

>-

GIFTED AND TALENTED

20


DIVERSITY IN THE CLASSROOM Every individual is a member of a different group and is influenced by more or less strongly by each of the groups to which they belong: Race, Nationality, Gender, Ethic background, Socio-economic status, Values, etc. I.

Social Manifestations

of Diversity

Positive Manifestations Curiosity about differences Celebration of different holidays and customs Acculturation and assimilation Differences seen as worthy of respect Negative Social Manifestations of Diversity Distrust of, or rebellion against, school authority Acutely felt cultural biases Emotional withdrawal from class and teacher Hostility toward class and teacher Withdrawal or dropping-out before completion II.

Accommodating

and Celebrating Diversity (Stainback, 1989)

â&#x20AC;˘ Recognize students according to interests, needs, abilities â&#x20AC;˘

Foster student interdependence: allows students to function in heterogeneous groups (teacher guidance/natural network of support development) -buddy systems, tutoring programs, natural and informal friendships, groups compatible by learning style preferences or strengths o Integrate support services into the classroom (inclusion) "keep pull-out sessions to a minimum (bring experts in-not students out) *ask support personnel into classroom at appropriate times (create a class within a class) reading specialists during reading; physical therapist during physical education; speech therapist during oral communication activities.

21


Alphabet Soup &

"Often-Asked" Questions 1.

Identify as many ofthefollowing

IEP

I

Yl

d

IV \

d \A (A \

E" ',),C

"1>'

Special Education acronyms as you can: o,n

IDEA

ARD

OT

ED

SBOEjsbec

LRE \ ('QS+

n

'R~ ~'IZ

<:'_n.''-/\/,

_i<l\

ADDjADHD

J~

>

e. t TEA

LD

2.

Are students in Special Education allowed modifications during assessment of academic skills (i.e. TAAS)? Explain.

3. How often are students tested to maintain eligibilityfor Education services? 4. liVhois responsiblefor

1\ yl)

COr>

Special

developing the IEP?

rv . 4-~'~

5. Are all students in Special Education automatically exempted fromfollowing the school's student code of conduct? h()

6. Who should be involved in the Admission Review and Dismissal meeting? e.. n ~ ,_ .:?.1 ~"', _' [ - Sy::. '2 C \ o \ E d -+ ""'J, c '( .) e ;

-1

- p C\ '(CA. J

'2. '(""l /"11'

I

\

.

-e-,

(

-

~

••.

-"c,

-

"S

+:): ciR- 'n "

Co",--{ \~.I"-.l\('-

7. Who must decide whether or not a student will receive extended year services? 8. What role does the general education teacher play in the ARD?

22


9. Would it be okayfor a teacher to call parents to inform them that their child has been referred.for special education and testing will begin tomorrow? Explain

10.

Howfrequently

11.

How is the student's educational placement determined?

12.

is theIEPupdated?

What question do you have?

23


'<:/>1 N

~L SIX IVIAJOR PRINCIPLES

qL{-fL/:L

OF IDEA

J. Zero reject Schools must educate all children with disabilities. The principle applies rcg~\l"Cile~;t: or the nature or severity of the disability; 110 child may be excluded from a public education. 2. Nondiscr-iminato ry identiflcatiu n and evaluation Schools must use nonbiased, multifactored methods of evaluation to determ ine whether a child has a disability and, if so, whether special education is needed. 3. Free, appropriate puhlic cducaiio u (Fi\PE) All children with disabilities must be provided an appropriate education at public expense. An individualized education program (IE?) must be developed and implemented for each student with a disability. 4. Least restrictive cnviro nrucu r (LRE) Students with disabi lilies must be educated wi th children w ith out disabi lities to the maxim um extent appropriate. 5. Due process safeguards and thei r parents.

Schools must provide safeguards

to protect the rights ofchildren

6. Parent a n d student participation n ud sliared dl.'cisillil Illal\i!lg Schools must collaborate students with disabilities in the design and implementation of speciaJ education services.

W. L. Heward, Exceptional

(

Children, 6e, Š 2000 by Prentice-Hall,

Inc. All rights reserved.

(

with disabilities

with parents and

Tl.S

(


·~I

I Child-Centered

Timelines

Educational Process

three years

one year Within 90 calendar days Within 30 calendar days [011 or before first day of school for summer referral}

Wit".in 60 calendar days TEC§29.004

Initial Referral §300.125 §89.1011

Notice and Consent for Evaluation

Full Individual Evaluation Completed §300.320

§300.S03 §300.50S §89.1015

ARDIIEP Meeting Notice otARD

SecondARD on Transfers

§300.343

Annual ARD/IEP Review'" §300.343(c)(1

Three-Year

Reevaluation' )

§300.536(b)

Dismissall

Graduation §89.1070

§300.345 §300.503

..

5 school days Notice of Procedural Safeguards (on 0< before evaluation datel

Within 30 school days

~

before evaluation, must be signed

._ .._ .. _ ...•.. 5 school days before meeting. less lime with waiver

Initiation of Services

§300.S04 A Guide to the ARD Process [as soon as possible after referral or at least 5 school days before the initial ARD rneefinq] TEe §26.0081

Nole'

Early Childhood Intervenlion (ECI} transitioning requires a meeting be held 120 days prior to the child's third birthday

TEA! Division of Special Education

\(

~ Review and reevaluation limelines may occur earlier when appropriate 10 meet the student's need and continue until the student is dismissed from services. Evaluation must occur prior to qraduauon under §89. 1070(e).

t, Itp:lh'VWw.lea.stale.lx.us/special.edl

(

January 2003

xlf

Ie



TExES Study Materials