Page 1

a healing community for single mothers and their children


_table of contents thesis project goal aordability 5 points introduction history demographics the neighborhood the site resources & amenities zoning design principles program codes ada landscape daylighting sustainability solar energy the future

1 2 3, 4, 5 6 7,8 9, 10 11, 12 13, 14 15, 16 17, 18, 19 ,20 21, 22 23 24, 25, 26, 27 28, 29 30, 31 32 33, 34, 35 36 37, 38

Cover image: A shared street in Copenhagen, DK


_thesis Hailing from Denmark in the mid 1960s, the concept of cooperative and collaborative housing evolved under the need for community amidst existing Danish housing. "The Missing Link between Utopia and the Dated Single Family House", published in 1968 by Jan Gudmand Høyer, seen as one of the founders of cohousing, honed in on the typology as an antidote to the lack of interaction found throughout suburbia. The idea behind cohousing was simple; embrace and nurture community. Cohousing became a way in which groups of friends or neighbors could craft a strong sense of social, environmental, and economical sustainability. In Danish the word for this type of housing is called bofællesskaber, translated into English as “living communities”. Translated once again into design, cohousing becomes a vehicle for architecture to provide protection, comfort, and delight in and around the home. This type of living, however, has only been accessible to those with the adequate funding. High monthly or yearly dues, lack of rentable units, far from public transit, or strict guidelines strongly limits the type of person that can be apart of this type of living. Cohousing, benefitting numerous facets of healthful living, should be attainable despite income level. Most cohousing currently shows a vast majority of communities set in areas of high property value, be it college towns or the outskirts of major metropolitan cities. Although numerous people find value in knowing your neighbor as well as being apart of a greater entity, this specific collaborative housing would greatly benefit the a person without access to a healthy living environment. The focus of this project was aimed at aiding the single mother and her children and using cohousing as the healing environment for which this type of family would be able to thrive. The typology of cohousing would act as the foundation for motivated, low-income, single mother families to make the transition from public assistance to personal self-sufficiency through subsidized housing. Whether fleeing domestic abuse, on the verge of homelessness, or simply down on luck, this community has the capacity to form a supportive family through the guidelines of cohousing. A community that is safe, affordable, and empowering is a community that can transform the home and its reaches into a place of healing. It must be a place where kids can play freely, adults can support one another, and where they all together be heard and understood. Simply put, the cohousing community would be giving the power back to individuals that have felt powerless.

1


2

_project goal Social Support (cohousing m0del)

Transportation

WORK

Social Services

Healthy MeaLS

Many Mothers (cohousing Model)

Safety (courtyard Typology)

#1: transition, finding new direction #2: A Way to deal with stress, loss, isolation, and barriers #3: PROVIDE social support, the need for informational, emotional, and tangible support.


_what is affordable? IN10

children living

with a single mother are poor or low income, compared with less than a third of children living in other types of families.

The term “affordable” does not in fact mean what I can afford to pay. The US Census and other federal agencies, like the U.S Department of Housing and Urban Development define housing as affordable if the costs (rent and utilities or mortgage, taxes, insurance, and HOA dues) are no more than 35% of a household’s gross income. This 35% cap has risen from 25 percent over the past few of decades. Relatively few homes are built for those Americans on the downside of the national median. In response to this fact, an increasing number of cities and regions in higher income/high growth/expensive market areas now have what is referred to as inclusionary zoning. This type of zoning is aimed at ensuring that more housing supports greater income diversity. In some parts of the US, like California and New Mexico, 10, 20 up to as high as 30% of units in a development must be selling or renting below market rates. Thus, affordable housing has been subsidized in some way to make it available to a wider spread demographic. More specifically, for housing to be affordable, rent and sale prices must cost no more than a third of the household’s monthly income. Most inclusionary zoning requires that a one fifth of new units be affordable to families making 80 to 120% of median income for homeowners in a specific state. In the case of rental units, renters earn 30 to 80% of the median income.

3


_PUBLIC AFFORDABLE HOUSING SUBSIDIES AND FINANCING SOURCES (HUD) 1. Community Development Block Grant Program (CDBG) DESCRIPTION: A cohousing group may be able to utilize the C CDBG Program as a capital subsidy which would provide grant funding to municipalities to expand economic opportunities for the low and moderate income demographic. ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or housing rehabilitation loans or grants to organizations (*childcare) AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 50-80% of AMI (multifamily buildings, at least 51% of the units must be occupied by low or moderate income households) 2. Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) DESCRIPTION: Cohousing groups may be able to utilize this LIHTC program as a capital subsidy. The LIHTC program focus is to increase the supply of affordable housing by offering federal income tax credits to investors – provides equity to the owner of the project- lowers rent to residents ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental / multifamily, single-family housing, and new construction AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 50-60% of AMI( 20% or more of the units are rent restricted and occupied by persons at 50% of AMI or less (20/50 projects) OR 40% of the units are rent restricted and occupied by persons at 60% of area median or less (40/60 projects)) 3. HOME Investment Partnerships Program DESCRIPTION: Can be utilized as either a capital or operating subsidy. This program provides federal block grants (use the funds for a variety of rental and homeownership, offers down payment assistance) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or homeownership / grant or a loan to buy existing housing or vacant land for affordable housing AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 50-80% of AMI (At least 90% of the units must be occupied by households with incomes below 60% of AMI and 10% of the rental units can benefit those with incomes up to 80% of AMI) 4. Federal Private activity tax-exempt bonds for housing DESCRIPTION: Private activity bonds are issued by state and local governments to support the stated public purpose (private activity bond issuer must hold public hearings to demonstrate such public purposes) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or homeownership / 2 types of housing bonds: Mortgage Revenue Bonds (single-family home) multifamily housing bonds, which finance the acquisition, construction, and rehabilitation of multifamily developments AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 115% of AMI. (MRB mortgages are limited to first-time homebuyers)

4


5. Federal Housing Choice (Section 8) Vouchers DESCRIPTION: Section 8 Vouchers as an income supplement for residents (tenants typically pay 30% of their income toward rent) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or homeownership / Must meet HUD housing quality standards & enter into a Housing Assistance Payment contract with the local public housing authority AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 50% of AMI. A PHA must provide 75% of its voucher to applicants whose incomes do not exceed 30 percent of the AMI 6. Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) DESCRIPTION: Utilized as a resident income supplement (federal block grant program to help low income families meet the heating and cooling costs) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or homeownership / subsidizes the cost of residential heating or cooling fuels AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 60-75% of the statewide AMI. States are to target assistance to low income households with the lowest income and highest energy needs 7. Project-Based Rental Assistance (PB Section 8) DESCRIPTION: Utilized as an operating subsidy (component of public housing agencies ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Rental or homeownership (owners are required to make the units available to low and moderate income households with HUD approved rents throughout the mortgage or Section 8 contract term AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS: At or below 30-50% of AMI (preference in selection to households where one or more members have a special need) 8. Self-Help Homeownership Opportunity Program (SHOP) DESCRIPTION: Used as a capital subsidy (competitive grant program that provides funds to national and regional nonproďŹ ts that assist low income families in building their own homes) ELIGIBLE PROJECTS: Homeownership AFFORDABILITY REQUIREMENTS. At or below 80% of AMI / SHOP funds have been used to support the work of self-help housing organizations

5


_5 points SITE: 26th and Lawrence - 1 miles outside of Downtown Denver, Colorado, USA 5 Points Neighborhood

DENVER COLORADO

SITE

This specific neighoborhood was primarily chosen for its proximity to various resources. The site is surrounded by public transit stops currently and near the future extension of the lightrail which will become direct access to the downtown of Denver. The location is additionally near three elementary schools, a community college, medical center, and hospital. This area was secondly chosen for the high number of single mothers and children, especially those in poverty, nearly 50% (U.S. Census Bureau 2010). Although this project will aim to be as integrated as possible, the immediate need for more permanent housing for single mothers is very apparent in the Five Points region of northern Denver. Social services that currently aid Denver with this issue limit the stay of mothers and their children due to the high number of people seeking assistance. Some can only offer stays of 30-90 days. Without places to go after this time, women tend to resort back to abusive situation, move to another shelter, or back to unsafe and unhealthy environments and thus find themselves in a cyclical trap of hopelessness (Karaim 2002). Many of the in-home stabilization programs in Denver offer only temporary housing without guarantee of transition into more permanent housing. This area of Denver is additionally undergoing much infill planning, thus, the goal of the project is also to limit the gentrification of existing residents. Much of this infill has already begun and only two of the twenty-five projects include public housing options. 31.5% of people in the Five Points area are considered to be in poverty, compared to only 14.29% in the greater Denver area (U.S. Census Bureau). This project not only aims to assist those that would otherwise be forced out slowly from the area, but also strives to create an integrated, mixed-income neighborhood.

6


_history Five Points is one of Denver’s oldest historic neighborhoods adjacent to the downtown central business district. The neighborhood is located in the area of Northeast Denver where the original downtown street grid joins with the neighborhood street grid of the first Denver suburbs. Five Points came to significant historical prominence from the 1860s through the 1950s. The neighborhood was originally home to Denver's elite, housing mayors, governors, and prominent business people. Five Points was considered the "Harlem of the West" due to its long prominent jazz history. It was the first predominantly African-American neighborhood in Denver. Through the 1920s up until the 1950s, the community thrived with a rich mix of local business and commerce along the Welton Corridor. The neighborhood offering butchers, real estate companies, drug stores, religious organizations, tailors, restaurants, barbers and many other main street uses. Welton Street was also home to over fifty bars and clubs, where some of the greatest jazz musicians of the 20th century, such as Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Nat King Cole, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie and many other legends performed.

7


8 The Five Points community suffered, as many urban areas did, in the late 1950s through the late 1990s due to the influx of drugs and crime. Numerous properties were abandoned, the local economy collapsed, and the larger market was turned off by the happenings of the neighborhood. Through that time there were many starts and stops to redevelopment, but none suceeded. Five Points, simply put, became a ghetto in need of a larger vision and new generation of leadership and investment. Five Points has been a community in change from the beginning of its existence. It has always been a neighborhood with a diverse economic mix of residents which is evident by the large variety of housing typologies that exist, mansions, rowhousing, low-income housing to elite condos. In the late 19th Century, however, the wealth began to move out of Five Points, choosing to make their home in the much more popular Capital Hill Neighborhood. Five Points was also home to a large Jewish population and is still home to a former synagogue, Temple Emanuel, on the corner of 24th and Curtis. After WWII many Japanese-Americans called Five Points home. In fact, what is now Agape Church on the corner of 25th and California was once a Japanese Methodist Church. Attempts to build a strong business base along the once thriving Welton began again in 2009 with the formation of the Five Points Business District. Resistance to development and the refusal of some long-time property owners to sell or develop their properties is a major hindrance in this effort.


9

_demographics

% Households with Income less than 100% of Denver's Median Income

% Single Mothers with Children in Poverty % Persons in poverty

% Persons in poverty Number of persons in families with total cash incomes less than federal poverty levels for same size families and number of unrelated individuals with incomes below federal poverty levels for a household of one as a percent of all persons. Both numerator and denominator exclude institutionalized persons, persons living in military group quarters and in college dormitories, and unrelated individuals under 15 years old. Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (2000: STF3A Table P87) % Single Mothers with Children in Poverty Number of single mothers with children in poverty as a percentage of all single mothers with children. Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (STF3A - Table P90) % Households with Income less than 100% of Denver's Median Income Number of households with income <100% of Denver's median income as a percentage of all households Source: U.S. Census Bureau. (STF3A - Table P52)

TOTALPOPULATIONOFFIVEPOINTS: 12,710 %OFCHILDRENLIVINGWITHASINGLEMOTHER: 9.5% 1,207 %OFPOPULATIONOFSINGLEMOTHERSWITH CHILDRENLIVINGINPOVERTY: 48.53% TARGETDEMOGRAPHICFORPROJECTREACHES: 586Singlemothers


10


_the neighborhood WHAT DETRACTS FROM THE 5 POINTS NEIGHBORHOOD?

denvergov.org -5PointsCommunityActionPlan

11


_what would attract you? WHAT DETRACTS FROM THE 5 POINTS NEIGHBORHOOD? CLEANER / SAFER ENVIRONMENT

PEDESTRIAN FRIENDLY STREETS

MORE / DIFFERENT RESTAURANTS

BETTER SERVING NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPS

12


_the site

13


Potential link to creek path

14

STRUGGLING BUSINESS DISTRICT PARKING LOT

ALLEY SYSTEM POTENTIAL LINK TO FUTURE LIGHTRAIL

VACANT LOT

VACANT LOT NEW MULTI-FAMILY UNITS Part of city of Denver infill planning

SUSTAINABILITY PARK

VACANT LOT -

Potential link to existing lightrail


15

_resources DENVER SUSTAINABLE CITIES BIKE KIOSK

RTD BUS STATION

MEDIUM TO FAST TRAFFIC LIGHT TRAFFIC

CURRENT MODES OF TRANSPORT CAR CARPOOL BUS

WALKING

OTHER WORKAT HOME

BIKE

4’-0” SIDEWALK 6’-0” PLANTER

TYPICAL NEIGHBORHOOD STREET - 38’-0” MAX


16


10

8

31

12

32

15

27

20

1

26

16

28

22

23

25 24

21

19

7

5

11 29

10 11 12

28

9

27

61 272 63

24

14

23

15

21

16

5

22

20 19 18 17

31 30

PA

29

2

16

R

4

1

1

23

29

K

AV E

19

192 63 9

27

28

29

30

20

16

15

31

14 20 21

22

23

24

16

5

10

13 25

14 22

5

4

3

2

1

26

27

17

18

19

20

11 10

9

8

7

6

5

4

28 29

27

14

13

9

26

12

18 17

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2 31

32

27

25

13

23

24

2

1

16 15

14

13

12

11

9

3 5

6

11

24

25

27

ST

E

28

32

8

15 1

ST 17

13 15

12

C-MX-8 UO-1, UO-2

27 26

23

19

20

21

22

24

25

BROADWAY

500 Feet

23

18

19

C-MX-5 UO-1, UO-2

16

32

29

11

14

16

17 18

31

400

25

22

15

11

12

30

300

24

21

14

2

7

200

28 27 26

11

18 17

1

4

100

20

C-MX-3 UO-1, UO-2

9

1

12

6

20

18

30

27

4

7

14

226 63

5

21 19

E

HO

PA RA A 13 15

26

0

5

8

16

24

1

3

9

10

25 23

When printed at 17"x22"

2

6

32

31

G-MU-3 UO-1, UO-2

22

U-MX-2 UO-1, UO-2 26

21

4

15 0

14

17

23

17

7 8 10

4 5

25

Scale 1" = 200'

15 16

3

28 27

19

18

2

32

31

7

23

22

10

5

6 8 10

LA W R

16

4

21 20

OS-A UO-1, UO-2

24

1

2

69

29

26

20

12

30

69

15

13

3

EN C

34

31 30

9

15

32 32 31

3

4

5

21

18

17

13

1

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2, CO-2

22 19

23

19

16

28

14

26

32

29

12 0

32

25 24

18

6

7

27

25

22

31 30

7

8

8 9

10

2 3

12

28

24

21

20

20

QUARTER SECTION: NE_023

19

1

9 4

5

6

8 7

11

29

26

23 20

19

28 27

24 23

27

26 24

18

19 9

26 25

City and County of Denver Zoning Map

22

25 23

17

4

15

17

11

13

14

15

16

22

U-RH-2.5 4 UO-1, 1 5 UO-2

7

8

9

10

12

32 31

30

29

21

11

2

10

6

U-MX-2 UO-1, 119 UO-2

1

11

30

12

16

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2

G-MU-3 UO-1, UO-2

26

25

6

19

28

11

12

13

14

3 4 5

18

17

8

15

16

7

U-MX-2 3 4 UO-1, 5 UO-2

1

23

21

U-MX-2

1 2

9 8 7 6

U-RH-2.5 UO-3, CO-2

5

6

10

25

22

21

14

13

11

26 24

4 7

Surrounding Mapsheets 15 12

23

1

2

3

17

4 5

7

20

24

23

NE_021

3

5

6

7

8

13

14

15

1

23

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2

25

16

30

29

24

15

20

22

31 29

22

U-RH-2.5 28

16

24

21

30 28

23 21

20

G-RO-3 UO-1, UO-2

26

11 4

19

32

31

11 6

7

12

32

12

19

32

5

11 7

27

17

9

27

25

13

14

6

7 8 5

U-MX-3 UO-1, UO-2

1 2 3

4

6 8

29

15

18

U-MX-3

19

30

26

452 56

28

6

5 4

3

2

489 03

11

28

11

1 14 13

4

32

9 14

25 26

12

24

21

C

32

31

17

3

7

15

30

24

15

18

20

29

16

2

25

17

8

10

13

25 23

18

26

27

29 27

3

4

7

C-MX-8

32

28

5

22

D-AS 5

6

13

15

20

14

31

30

9

10

11

1

16

21

88

26

1

31

30

28

U-MX-2 242 63 ST UO-1, S TI UO-2 R U

20

26

89

16

2

6

31

7

14

581 02

25

27

5

7

8

9

12 13

13

25

28

11

216 63

32

29

7

8

18 17

19

10

2

4

9

16

U-RH-2.5

18

2

3

30

21

NE_022

19 18

1

3

12

U-RH-2.5

29

NW_014 20

1 26

32

31

28

U-RH-2.5 U-RH-2.5 UO-1, 449 70 8 UO-2 UO-3109

1 4

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2, CO-2

24

23

22

19

25

27

26

25

22

6

21

NE_024

11

2

19

17

5

13

5

18

NE_023

13 14

15 16

11

15

16

24

22

19

1

5

8

6

7

8

9 10

12

90

3

8

30

27

8

17

21

4

6

18

ST 32

R-MU-30 WVRS* 26

24

20

24

31 28

9

22

TH

2

83

6

10

15

23

20

2

3

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, UO-2 15

U-MX-2 17 UO-1, 18 UO-2 19

A B

25

22

19

17

RD 29

28

21

8 12 13

OS-A

32

5

15

C-MX-8 UO-1, UO-2

7

27

4

21

6

7

8

9

4

5

18

17

13 12

6

2

3

14

30

28

12

14

NW_015

10 12

24 22

21

20

16 15

16

11

12

25 23 20

14

222 97

32

26

13

16

25

31 29

31

6 7 8 9

23

59

20

10

27

15

29

22

30

26

16

24

24

28 27

30

29

13

14

15 13

1

17

3

9

10

26

23

21

20

32

14

30

19

31

12

31

8

11

12

32

28

27

26

12

22

18

2 4

5

20

19

U-RH-2.5 UO-1, 7 6 UO-2

17

10

11

25

21

11

24

23

1

23

21

4

G-MU-3 UO-3

10

11

12

10

8

U-MX-2

26

4

14

7

84

16

19

18

30

84

10

15

IV AT E

29

14

26 25

4

24 22

13

14

15

29

8

9

19 18

8

9 10

11

26

654 81

17

7

17

25

23

21

5

6

19

18

24 22

2

NE_043

28

70

13

13

G-MU-3 UO-1, UO-2

2

PR

5

6 8

9

4 6

3

1

7

17

3

8

9

30

29

14

18

2

25 24

9 12 13

31

27

26

WVRS13 14 970 03

29

28

60

10

11

R-MU-30

C-MX-8 UO-2

2

28

18

7

18 17

32

6

7

9

2 3 30

4

5

19

3 5

6

32 31

25

9

4

5

6

10

30

20

21

20

ST

21

17 18

23

19

4

5

27

15

1

19

1

12

3

NE_044

30

29 27

68

I-MX-3 UO-2

22

20

C-MX-5 UO-2 1

1

2

3

18 17 2 1

3

86

16

24

22

16

26

TH

55

16

29 28 27

23

S T

11

28

13

14

6

1

2

3

9

10

12

27

25 26

E

12

13

R-3 UO-3

29

59

R-MU-30 14 WVRS 15

LA W

14

9

10

12

13

694 07

25

15

11 32

31 30

11

31

30

7

8

17 32

47 4

5

6

2 3

5

6

21

20

25

23 24

21 2

3

U-RH-2.5 UO-3, CO-2

23

13

1

24

22

20

25

22

20

14

NW_028

31

58

10

20

25 23

16

15

16

28

32

6

7

8

9 11

27

26

14

15

654 81

29

49

U-RH-2.5 CO-2

ST

55

8

7

8

19

18

58

22

18

1

4

24

23

22

21

20

19

E

5 6

7

I-MX-3 UO-2

428 03

19

30

27

26

24

21

28

29

28

R-3 UO-3

16

27

15

46

13

14

15

9

10

32

31 30

9

10

12

13

1 2

3

4

5

NI A

17

R-MU-30 WVRS* 9

25

22

21

20

4

892 00

21 20 19

23 24

R-MU-30 WVRS*

31

11

7 8 11

32

19

18

16

25

21

60

713 00

23

12

13

14

15 16

30

18 17

31

17

1

2 4

5 6

27

Quarter Section Index

15

28

23

22 20

11 12 13

OS-A UO-3

32

30

R

32

31

28

16

RE NC

30

29

27

26

25 24

14

2

24

15

3

22

20

4

5

313 99 32 29

25 24

23 21

6

7

8

12

C-MU-30 WVRS UO-1

15

16 28 17

26 27

30

7

8

9

10

12

13

14

19

16

26

13

14

29 28 27

26

31 29

12

32

31

30

45

15

1

3

22

17

ST

R-MU-30 WVRS*

7 8

19

18

17

16

3 4

7

10

11 12

13

16

17

18 20

0

9

10

8

19

3

U-RH-2.5 5

18

11

8

9

24

23

5

16

18

5

6

11

15

14

24 13

10

11

18 17

20

9

10

1

2

3

4

21

29

17

5

6

7

8

4

13

12

15

UO-3 1 2

20

4

7

11

26

14

U-RH-2.5

25 24

23

6

22 21

6

17

20

19

1

20

G-MU-3 UO-3

26

19

2

3

18

T

32

28

27 25

21 1

2

S

30

31

16

25

23

22

ST

29

28 27

24

20

8

9 11

13

14

15

26

11

19

29

8

968 01

10

279 06

12

31

10 12

30

TH

21 20

19

1

2 3

6

7

17

4

5

17 16

TH

13

TH

19

4

27

1

3

3 4

20

19

PUD

23 22

26

23

21

4

5 6 7

14 15

16

1 2

3

32

31

28

9

28

22

21

29

28

27

25

24

27

26

R-3 UO-3 16

23

22

29

5

23

28

12

13

14

15

30

283 70

21

5

6

7

4

WVRS 28

27

C-MX-5 UO-2

22

8

1

26

24

22

21

19

5

6 7

8

C-MU-20

29

3

2

3

597 04

91 98

25

24

9 10

2

23

I-MX-3 UO-2

26

44

4

U-RH-2.5 UO-3, CO-2

32

31

3

FO

5

6 7 8 1

22 21

20

19 18 17

1

ST

4

2

23

20 18

2

LA RI

3

15 16

1

24

ER

16

PUD

WVRS

25

26

25

R-M U-20

AR

I-MX-8 UO-2

29 28 27

12

13

14

16

28

32

29

28

25

24

15

29 27

13

10

30

COLFAX AVE.

2

LI

2

31

14

27

26

17

7

8 9

1

30

C A

9

10

13

14

15

30

27

11

12

32

M

B LA K

11

PUD

9

10

4

32

31

30

12

3

4

571 85

19

18

2

6

18

G-RO-3

32

10

11

17

UO-3

21

20

5

20

19

ST

27

24

ST

E

7

8

5

6

AP AH O

DWAY

15

8

23

22 21

TH

31

7 8

9

WVRS*

1

11

6

C-MU-20

496 00

7

2

3

4

5

19

18

17

1

2 3

4

5

6

546 03

2

14 16

25

23

21

20

17

3

ST

12

R-MU-30 WVRS

19

G-MU-3 UO-3

16

29

1

23

22

21

20

15

25

24

26

24

22

18

ST

N BROA

13

16

10

11

R-MU-30 WVRS

15

1

7 8

28

30

27

26

13 14

15 16

29

434 08 193 82

24

571 85

G-MU-3

25 23

18

32

28

22

PA

3 4

5 6

15 9

27

11

12

32

31 30

29 28

3

14

1

2

26

13

26

13

14

15

16

31

30 29

R-MU-30 WVRS

32

17

20

19

6

7

8

9

28

27

26

25

G-MU-3 UO-3

T

17

10

11

S

4

5

A M

5

7

8

9

14

18

29

12

31

17

31 ST 1

2 3

19

ST

31

30

33

10

23

12

7

8 9 11

7

TH

6

19

21

20

4

5

32

8

10

18

30

1

2

3

I-MX-3 UO-2

17

1 2

3

4

5 6

4

9

10

11

12

13

17

6

WVRS* 485 02

27

22

H

R-MU-30

14

15

23

23

22

21

20

26

24

22

21

25 24

16

28

G-RH-3 UO-3

C

3

18

20

27

26

30 31

29

28

27

26

25

24

14

16

ST

11

12

13

1

2

19

14

15

13

9 8

10

11

12

13 15

29

28

T

9

10

30 29

I-MX-5 UO-2 25

16

6

8

16

5

14 15

4

14

I-B UO-2

9

12

W A

2

3

4

5

13

17 32

31 30

9

12

32

31

ST

10 11

1

7

7

8

3 2

4

5

6

7

8 10 11

25

16

TRACT G

22 23

21

20

19

18

17

3

5

LN U T

_zoning 15

1

2

4

6

U

16

6 5

12

13 14

ST O

10

11

7

8

9

5

PUD

TRACT H

28

7

13

E

26

15

14

T H AV E

1 2

34

3

33 32

4

31

May 31, 2011 City and County of Denver Community Planning and Development Geographic Information Systems Disclaimer: The City and County of Denver shall not be liable for damages of any kind arising out of the use of this information. The information is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind, express or implied, including, but not limited to, the fitness for a particular use. This map is a representation of the proposed official zoning map for the City and County of Denver, filed with the Denver City Clerk on May 20, 2010.


Multi-Unit 3 (G-MU-3) G-MU-3 is a multi unit district allowing urban house, duplex, tandem house, row house, gar¬den court, courtyard apartment and apartment building forms. The tallest building form has a maximum height of three stories. _Proposed to this zoning requirment is a commercial aspect of the project that will provide the adequate resources for the single mother family. This aspect is necessary on site to provide immediate availability and access to residents. It additionally would provide a means of employment, communal income, and a connection to the greater community to aviod isolation. 6.3.1.1 Urban Design and Building Form Standards – All Districts (Article 6. General Urban Neighborhood Context Division 6.3 Design Standards) The Intent of Urban Design and Building Form Standards in all Districts are to: A. Implement the Denver Comprehensive Plan. B. To continue Denver’s physical character, including access to parks and parkways, tree lined streets, detached sidewalks, interconnected street networks, and convenient access to parks, open space, and transit. C. Improve compatibility with and respect for the existing character and context of Denver and its neighborhoods. D. Arrange building density, uses, heights, and scaling devices to reinforce the public transit cen¬ters and corridors, and to transition to adjoining areas. E. Give prominence to pedestrian realm as a defining element of neighborhood character. F. Spatially define public streets and their associated open space as positive, usable features around which to organize and orient buildings in a manner that promotes pedestrian activity, a sense of security and community. G. Provide human scale in buildings

18


6.3.5.3 Pedestrian Access A. Entrance Where required in General Urban Neighborhood Context Zone Districts, an Entrance shall provide a clear, obvious, publicly accessible connection between the Primary Street and the pri¬mary uses within the building. An entrance shall be located either on the Primary Street facing facade or located on a facade other than a Primary Street facing facade but within 15 feet of the zone lot line abutting the Primary Street. An entrance shall be one of the following three types: 1. Door - An entrance on the same plane as the building facade. 2. Recessed Entrance - An entrance inset behind the plane of the building facade by no more than 15 feet. 3. Corner Entrance - An angled street-facing entrance located on the corner of a building at approximately 45 degrees to the intersecting streets. B. Entry Feature Where required in General Urban Neighborhood Context Zone Districts, an Entry Feature shall signal the connection between the Primary Street and the primary uses within the building. An entry feature shall be located either on the Primary Street facing facade or be visible from the Primary Street. An entry feature shall be one of the following: 1. Door 2. Gates 3. Front Porch 4. Front Stoop 5. Front Terrace 6. Canopy 7. Arcade C. Pedestrian Connection Where required in the General Urban Neighborhood Context Zone Districts, a Pedestrian Con¬nection shall provide a clear, obvious, publicly accessible connection between the Primary Street and the primary uses within the building. The Pedestrian Connection shall comply with the following: 1. Fully paved and maintained surface not less than 5’ in width. 2. Unit pavers or concrete distinct from the surrounding parking and drive lane surface. 3. Located either within a raised median or between wheel stops to protect pedestrians from vehicle overhangs where parking is adjacent. 4. The portions of pedestrian

19


6.3.2.3 Design Elements A. Configuration 1. Promote variation in building form that enhances access to daylight, air and views from within and around new structures. 2. Encourage variation in building form that provides opportunities for architectural scale relationships in large building contexts. 3. Main Street setback: Reinforce the proportional scale of buildings to street width in order to establish a strong edge to Main Streets and other urban street corridors.. 4. Arrange building heights, and scaling devices to provide transitions to adjoining areas. B. Transparency 1. Maximize transparency of windows at street level to activate the street. 2. Utilize doors and windows to establish scale, variation,and patterns on building facades that provide visual interest and reflect the uses within the building. 3. Limit the use of highly reflective glass to avoid reflected glare onto neighboring streets and properties. C. Entrances 1. Give prominence to pedestrian realm as a defining element of neighborhood character. 2. Provide convenient access to buildings and pedestrian active uses from the street. 3. Articulate and create a visual hierarchy of building entrances as an aid in way-finding. 4. Provide a positive relationship to the street through access, orientation and placement consistent with the context. 5. Create visually interesting and human-scaled facades.

20

“Good fences make good neighbors”


_design principles

21


22


_program

23 courtyard cohousing 33 total units 3 - 3bdr apartments, ADA accessible (1080 sq ft) 4 - 1 bdr expecting mother apartment (540 sq ft) 13 - 2 bdr townhomes (1060 sq ft) 13- 3 bdr townhomes (1110 sq ft) Child care facility (5250 sq ft) Social services (3150 sq ft) Community kitchen & dining (4980 sq ft) Cafe (3000 sq ft) Laundry (1980 sq ft) Community meeting rms & lounge (6750 sq ft) Community computer hub (2400 sq ft) denver, colorado (urban) du/a: 33 units


_code

FIREBLOKCING MATERIALS -Nominal 2-inch lumber or two layers of 1-inch lumber -23/32- inch wood structural panels or 3/4 -inch particaleboard lapped at seams -1/2-inch gypsum -Mineral wool or fiberglass ins

DRAFT STOPPING -1/2-inch gyp board - 3/8-inch wood structural panels or particle board -1-inch dimension lumber - Fiberglass ins, cement fiberboard 17.5 SQ FT OPENING (MIN 5.7 SQ FT)

136 SQ FT

36” (24” MIN NET CLEAR OPENING HEIGHT)

140 SQ FT (MIN 70 SQ FT)

10’ -6” (7’-0” MIN)

SMOKE DECTECTORS 1 in each bedroom, plus one outside the sleeping areas

44” (MIN 44”)

24


“Type V” construction (i.e. the type of construction in which the structural elements, exterior walls and interior walls are of any combustible or noncombustible materials permitted within the Code) which permits a firewall to be constructed of any materials, including combustible materials.

EXITS

SIPS PARTY WALL

3’-6” (MIN 3’-0”)

50mm x 25mm TILING BATTENS NON COMBUSTABLE BOARD

2 LAYERS 5/8” TYPE X GYP WALL-

PROPRIETARY FLEXIBLE CAVITY FIRE STOP

60 MINUTE RATED ASSEMBLY 2x FLOOR JOIST RESIDUAL CAVITY

8’-0” (MIN 7’-0”)

25


26

_code

firewalls

MAIN MEANS OF EGRESS

2 HR RATED 2 layers of 5/8â&#x20AC;? Type X Gyp Board OR 5/16" (8 mm) thick laminated glazing material


classrooms Groups of seats are not required to be fastened to the floor in places of assembly or portions thereof: • with 14 or fewer seats per group, and • with an actual net area per occupant greater than or equal to 7 sq. ft., and • without ramped or tiered floors for seating, and • groups are separated from other seating by railings, guards, partial height walls or similar barriers.

loads

27 SNOW LOADS (lb/sq ft)

MAX OBSERVED ANNUAL PROBABILITY

22

entry lobby

All doors opening into elevator lobby refuge areas shall be 20minute fire-protection rated assemblies as required by DBC Section 403.9.1.

18

25 PSF ROOF LOAD 35 PSF GROUND LOAD

WIND SPEED 90mph


28

_ada COMMON HOUSE COUNTERS

ENTRY ACCESS

MINIMUM CLEARANCES

2 SPACES REQUIRED Signage Van Accessability: 1 spot for every six accessable spaces

DESKS COUNTERS TABLES

CLASSROOM DESKS

SINGLE STALL PUBLIC RESTROOMS 5’-0” MINUMUM

96”

(If access aisle is also 96”) or must accommodate vans at a width of 122”

60”

Access aisle must run length of parking spot

96”

The community building is 100% ADA accessible


29 Reinforced walls for grab bars

30”x48” clear floor space outside of door swing / doubles as access to bathtub

Fixed cabinets okay as long as parallel space is cleared

ada accessible apartment

Outlet required at accessable location

accessible apartment bathroom

32”

30” x 48” clear floor

fully accessible bathroom elevation


_landscape The landscape was designed to make seasons present. For residents to grow vegetables, picks apples, and have bonďŹ res that everyone can roast marshmellows around. It is to act as a giant living room, a place that is for everyone.

30


31


_daylighting model

32

The model was made of the units in order to determine the natural daylight available throughout the seasons. The left most photos show the lighting in the stairwell/lightwell. The right most photos reveal the interior kitchen lighting. The study, furthermore, revealed a need for shading from the intense afternoon summer sun. This allowed the development of plantings and exterior fences to act as a shading device.


33

_sustainability GROW GARDENS

UTILIZE NATURE, MAKE SEASONS PRESENT

ADAPT EXISTING FORMS COMPACT, PEDESTRIAN ORIENTED


34 No filtration necessary No pumping necessary No surge tank necessary Little pipe is needed Little or no required maintenance Low economic and ecological cost It can be built by anyone Low failure rate

BRANCHED DRAIN GREYWATER SYS LAUNDRY TO LANDSCAPE FRUIT ORCHARD

CLOTHES WASHING MACHINE TOP LOADER 30 GAL/LOAD @2 LOADS per week x 34 HOUSING UNITS 2,040 GAL/WK 291 GAL/DAY

OUTLET CHAMBER ALLOWS SOLIDS OUT INTO MULCH FOR BIODEGRADATION SO CLOGGING DOES NOT OCcur. Inlet pipe 2” or larger

FLOW SPLITTER REGISTER

ACCESS COVER MULCH BASIN

8” MIN LEgal depth

PIPE SLOPE 1/4” PER FT MINIMUM

OVERFLOW TO SEWER SYS


35

where does the water go?

PERMEABLE PAVING

REDUCING FLOW OF POLLUTANTS OFF SITE

OUTFALL TO STORM DRAINING SYS

2’6” FILTER FABRIC

2’0”

4” DRAIN PIPE (PERFORATED PCV PIPE) TO STORM DRAIN

CLEANSED WATER RETURNS TO LOCAL ECOSYSTEM


_solar energy

The results of a quick solar energy study displayed a high cost for a small oďŹ&#x20AC;set of the total energy consumption. Because this is an aďŹ&#x20AC;ordable housing project, the money was instead put into the thermal mass of the units as oppose to an external energy source. The possibility for solar energy remains a viable option in the future with further development of the technology- the roof form is perfectly angled for this use.

36


_the future

37

The ultimate goal of the site is to inďŹ&#x201A;uence the surrounding neighborhood to embrace its history and grow to become the vibrant district is once was. It pushes the city to consider viable and aďŹ&#x20AC;ordable options for current residents that are just as unique and beautiful as the market rate housing currently available. The development, though, is designed to sustain itself independently as well. With community kitchens, greywater irrigated apple orchards, vegetable gardens, interactive technology hubs, bike paths, and a welcoming cafe, the option to eat local, buy local, and utilize public transportation options make living a sustainable lifestyle more commonplace and available to the people that need it the most. It is not only a housing project, but a way of life that presents itself to the residents. It is the chance to know your neighbor, be apart of the larger community, and utilize, but not deplete, the natural world around you.


38 local & Unique business district NEIGHBORHOOD GROCERY

SHARED STREET ALLEY SYSTEM

Market-rate & Affordable DEVELOPMENT Accessory Dwelling units NEW MULTI-FAMILY UNITS Part of city of Denver infill planning

SUSTAINABILITY PARK

WEEKLY 5 POINTS FARMERS MARKET

PEDESTRIAN PATH TO LIGHTRAIL & CREEK PATH


Keystone: A healing community  

A community to support single mothes and their children through the cohousing model

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you