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reconnecting families to locally grown, home cooked meals.

The Process Melinda Sekela Graphic Communication Design College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning University of Cincinnati Senior Capstone May 2015


Table of Contents

Part I

Research 08 Defining a Problem Space 18 Narrowing in on a Topic 28 Developing the Solution 32 Meeting a CSA Farmer

Part II

Firsthand User Experience 38 Joining a CSA 48 Survey of Current CSA Users 50 Meeting with the NYC CSA Coordinator

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Part III

Form Making 54

Initial Design Elements

66

Reframing after CSA Use

74

Identity and Visual Language

92

Printed Materials

124 Web Components 134 Poster

Part IV

Reflection and Final Designs 144 Reflection 148

Project Legacy

148

Final Designs

150

Acknowledgments

152 Sources

Refresh The Process

5


Part I Research

Refresh The Process

7


Defining a Problem Space Initial Inspiration

“Find something you’re passionate about and keep tremendously interested in it.” JULIA CHILD

While visiting a friend in Washington D.C. over the spring of 2014, I made sure to make a pilgrimage to Julia Child’s kitchen in the Smithsonian Museum of American History. I had been a fan of Julia’s for a while, and had just begun reading a book that chronicled her letters with pen pal Avis DeVoto. What fascinates me about her career was that while in France she was exposed to really traditional methods of cooking, and became part of a community that had a simple and passionate relationship with food. So when she returned to the U.S., she realized that the

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

mass industrialization of America was causing dramatic changes in the food industry. She took it upon herself to teach Americans the value of cooking at home. What I hadn’t expected was that her kitchen was within a larger exhibit called Food: Transforming the American Table 1950–2000; a detailed retrospective on the changes in the food industry for the last half of the century. This exhibit inspired me to pursue a capstone that would urge Americans to eat healthier and cook at home.


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Brainstorming

I began to brainstorm within the general problem space of food in America. What had I seen, interacted with? Who did I admire for their work within this space? What were trends in food today? What topics were in the news? After some mind-mapping I knew my focus would be about processed foods: why Americans are eating them, and how we can eat less.

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


a mindmap to help think of various topics and issues within the food problem space

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Reading

“The way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world. Daily, our eating turns nature into culture, transforming the body of the world into our bodies and minds.” MICHAEL POLLEN

To dig deeper into the problem space, I began reading some books on the topics I was interested in. Food Fight provided a really great overview of the obesity crisis in America and broke it down by user and space. The consequences of the obesity epidemic vary in scope, and the toxic environment we live in today greatly impacts our food choices. Salt Sugar Fat was an eye-opening look into the history and politics of the food industry, and shed light on how the way Americans eat today is influenced by the desires of the food industry. In Defense of Food discussed 12

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

America’s changing relationship with food, and described solutions for how we should be eating: real food (not chemicals) and of the real food, it should be mostly plants. He explains how America came to eat this way and what will happen if we don’t change. Cooked explored the importance of cooking at home historically, culturally, scientifically, and anthropologically. These books really impacted how I viewed the problem space and directed my attention to how these problems could be solved: by eating simple foods, and cooking at home.


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Selecting Specific Issues

All of my problems and questions surrounding the food industry and our relationship with it needed to be sorted. I categorized all of the issues I had found: Money, Nutrition/Health, Value/Knowledge, and Time. In order to determine which of these (one or several) to use for my capstone, I created a Venn Diagram to explore what a problem statement would look like for each possible combination.

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


VALUE + HEALTH + TIME + KNOWLEDGE Americans dont have time or know how to cook so they will buy foods that are unhealthy/ precooked/processed and lose values of cooking

VALUE + HEALTH + TIME

Americans dont have time so they eat fast foods even though they are unhealthy and they lose values of home cooking

MONEY + VALUE + HEALTH + TIME Americans dont have time to cook so they will buy cheap foods that are unhealthy/precooked/processed and lose values of cooking

VALUE + HEALTH + KNOWLEDGE

MONEY + HEALTH + TIME

Americans dont know how to cook or what is healthy for them and therefore lose value of homecooking

Americans dont have time to cook so they will buy cheap foods that are unhealthy/ precooked/processed.

HEALTH

TIME

VALUE

KNOWLEDGE MONEY KNOWLEDGE + MONEY + HEALTH + VALUE Americans dont know how to cook so they will buy cheap foods that are unhealthy/precooked/processed and lose values of cooking

TIME + MONEY + KNOWLEDDGE + VALUE Americans dont know how to cook and dont have time so they will buy cheap foods that are precooked/ processed and lose values of cooking KNOWLEDGE + MONEY + VALUE

Americans dont know how to cook so they will buy cheap foods but lose values of cooking.

TIME + MONEY + KNOWLEDDGE + HEALTH Americans dont know how to cook so they will buy cheap foods that are unhealthy/precooked/ processed and lose values of cooking

TIME + MONEY + KNOWLEDGE

Americans dont know how to cook so they will buy cheap foods that are quick to make and precooked/processed.

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Creating a Project Brief

Option 2: Time/ Value Focus

Project Brief

DRAFT

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to lead fulfilling lives, Americans need to understand what foods will keep them healthy and energized. However, many Americans do not have the time to cook for themselves using fresh ingredients, and are reliant on the everyday conveniences of processed, frozen and fast foods. Eating on the go and alone rather than with family and friends decreases the value of food as a social catalyst. My project aims to end this mentality of "food as fuel" by adding value to the meal so consumers to maintain healthy lives and reap the social benefits of non processed meals within their busy schedules. Working Title:

Audience/User Group: Americans is too broad focus on single adults? Head of family? Young children?

Project Description: In today's consumer society, we as Americans have become very busy. There is little free time left and most do not wish to spend it cooking food. Today in America, the average person spends 27 minutes cooking and 4 minutes cleaning up per day. This amount has fallen by half since the mid sixties. (Pollan, Cooked, 3) Many Americans do not cook at home at all, and rely on restaurants and fast food places to get their meals. Those who do cook at home will prepared frozen meals or use pre-prepared foods to cook with. There is a focus on just eating something quickly so you can get back to work instead of a focus on what you are eating and why. The goal of my project is to help Americans find time to cook meals and to also get them to see the value in cooking something for yourself. Cooking is beneficial in more ways than just fueling the body. Cooking gives us an occasion to sit down together at a specific time and place. Sharing meals, making eye contact, and socializing while sitting down together is what civilized us in the first place. Sharing meals is the foundation of family life, it encourages tradition and teaches children how to have a conversation and acquire good habits like sharing, listening, taking turns, even arguing. In today's society most people don't care what they eat or why they are eating it, but I've always had a passion for cooking and knowing the right ingredients and why we use them, and I think it's something that should be reintroduced into society. Desired Result: From this capstone I hope create a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use to create home cooked meals quickly and efficiently while at home. This asset will also promote the values of eating with family or friends in order for the user to gain the social aspects that shared meals provide. My end goal through this capstone is to create something that will ultimately change Americans behaviors and assumptions about food and eating, leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods while enjoying the social and cultural benefits of the home cooked meal.

From the many directions of problem statements I explored, I chose three that were widely different and then expanded each of them to create project briefs. The first was time/value focused, and the goal was to reconnect families to non processed, home cooked foods as a way to slow down their lifestyles and reap the social benefits of cooking and eating together.

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

The second was knowledge focused, and it was more about educating Americans on what we should be eating in order to cut through the confusion in today’s landscape as to what ‘healthy’ means. The third was health focused, and discussed the problems with obesity and other health problems in America that could be solved through simpler eating and cooking at home.


Option 3: Knowledge Focus

Project Brief

DRAFT

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to maintain healthy lives, Americans must be aware of the food they consume and the nutrients within those foods. However, many Americans do not have the knowledge to buy the appropriate foods and cook for themselves, often relying on fast food and processed food. The surplus of health trends and "buzz word" ingredients confuse consumers on what is appropriate to eat. My project aims to educate consumers on what is really beneficial to eat and teach them how to cook for themselves, relying less on processed food. Working Title:

Audience/User Group: Americans is too broad focus on single adults? Head of family? Young children?

Project Description: Many Americans do not cook at home because they don't have the knowledge to do so. They then rely on restaurants as well as prepared foods to sustain themselves. This problem will continue to get worse since this generation doesn't know how to cook, there is no one in the family to teach the next generation of the family how to cook, and cooking at home will eventually become obsolete. Many adults feel like it's too late for them to learn how to cook, or that it is an innate skill that can't be taught. In a time period where chefs are household names and are regarded as celebrities, where there are many TV reality and game shows featuring cooking, it's odd that people are more interested in cooking now than ever before but do not think they can do it themselves. There is also a lack of knowledge about what to eat and what to buy for most adults. Many people want to eat healthy but often do not know what is actually good for them, and will bounce around with different food trends. My goal for this project is to educate a specific audience so they will feel knowledgeable about what food they actually need to eat on a regular basis to stay healthy, perhaps based on their specific needs and interests, as well as teach them the basics of cooking at home so they can feel inspired to continue cooking and eating healthy on a regular basis. Desired Result: From this capstone I hope create a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use to learn what foods are required in healthy diet and how to prepare those foods at home. I want to focus on an audience that feels it is too late to learn to cook in their busy lives, and provide a way to easily learn to create food at home with basic tools and ingredients. My end goal through this capstone is to create something that will ultimately change Americans behaviors and assumptions about food and eating, leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods while teaching them invaluable tools to create for themselves what they used to rely on others for.

Option 1: Health Focus

Project Brief

DRAFT

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to lead healthy lives, Americans need to be aware of how and what they consume effects their body. However, many Americans do not know what food is actually important for them. By relying on frozen and processed foods with confusing labels, they cannot understand what nutrients they are actually consuming and whether they are beneficial or bad. Without home cooked fresh foods in their diet, many people will fall prey to the growing obesity epidemic and other health problems. My project aims to end the confusion of "nutritionalism" and allow consumers to focus on the core of what is healthy as they eat. Working Title:

Audience/User Group: Americans is too broad focus on single adults? Head of family? Young children?

Project Description: "Nutritionalism" is described as a reductionist way of thinking about food, an idea that we should "engage with food and our bodies in terms of their nutritional and chemical constituents and requirements—the assumption being that this is all we need to understand" (Pollan, In Defense of Food, 27). This means that food is essentially the sum of it's parts. This ideology promotes the focus on food being the nutritional value, which leads to food companies to focus on this in their advertising and creation of the food. By focusing on this consumers get confused by which foods you should actually eat, and are unintentionally avoiding foods because they have carbs or trans fats even if they have benefits and are indeed needed to be healthy. In my project I aim to shift the users focus away from nutritionalism and back to the foods themselves, away from a focus on calories and nutrition facts and just eating the right foods in the right amounts. If the consumer focuses on eating fresh foods and foods with simple ingredients, they will maintain a healthy lifestyle free from the confusion of nutritionalism. The shift away from nutrition and back to food is important because our nation's health depends on it. In a time of information overload where you have the world's collected knowledge at your fingertips, how can you know who is right? Or what to follow? I have always seen visual communication as a way to educate an audience, and my passion as a designer is to use my skills to educate others on important topics. Through this capstone I will develop a tool that visually educates consumers on how to eat properly and be healthy.

Desired Result: From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge of what is actually healthy for them to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices about eating habits. My capstone will provide a tool that is useful enough that people will want to use it and realize that it is improving their lives. My end goal through this capstone is to provide a tool that will ultimately change Americans behaviors and assumptions about food and eating, leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods.

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Narrowing in on a Topic Refining the Project Brief

As I began to develop an audience and define stakeholders, my project brief continued to be refined. I honed in on a statement that was ‘health’ focused, but with elements of ‘value’ as well. I added more specifics to the statement about the health issues I wanted to focus on. I had three main ideas for a solution: One was an in-store campaign focused on making healthy decisions within the grocery store, another was a pop-up exhibit near farmers 18

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

markets that convinces passerby the benefits of eating produce so they stop at the market. The third, which I ultimately went with; was an organization that helped get families involved with CSA programs, and a system to accompany the CSA box.


Project Brief

DRAFT V2

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to lead healthy lives, Americans need to be aware of what they consume and how effects their body. However, many Americans do not know what food is actually important for them. By relying on frozen and processed foods with confusing labels, they cannot understand what nutrients they are actually consuming and whether they are beneficial. Without fresh ingredients and home cooked meals in their diet, many people will fall prey to the growing obesity epidemic and other health problems. My project aims to end the confusion of "nutritionalism" and allow consumers to focus on the core of what is healthy as they eat. Working Title:

Audience/User Group: single adults Head of family Young children

Project Brief

"Nutritionalism" is described as a reductionist way of thinking about food, an idea that we should "engage with food and our bodies in terms of their nutritional and chemical constituents and requirements—the assumption being that this is all we need to understand" (Pollan, In Defense of Food, 27). This means that food is essentially the sum of it's parts. This ideology promotes the focus on food being the nutritional value, leading to food companies to focus on this in their advertising and creation of the food. With abundance of health claims surrounding food products, consumers get confused by which foods are actually beneficial to your health and can unintentionally avoid foods that are indeed needed to live a healthy lifestyle.

The shift away from nutrition and back to food is important because our nation's health depends on it. In a time of information overload where you have the world's collected knowledge at your fingertips, how can you know who is right? Or what to follow? I have always seen visual communication as a way to educate an audience, and my passion as a designer is to use my skills to educate others on important topics. Through this capstone I will develop a tool that visually educates consumers on how to eat properly and be healthy.

Desired Result:

Melinda Sekela

Today, more than half of American adults are considered overweight. In order to maintain healthy lives, Americans need to be aware of what they consume and how effects their body, but they may not know what foods are actually important for them. By relying on processed and prepared foods they cannot understand what nutrients they are actually consuming and whether they are beneficial. Without fresh ingredients in their diet, many people will fall prey to this growing obesity epidemic as well as other health problems. My project aims to provide easy ways for Americans to introduce fresh, simple foods into their routines, in order to slow the spread of obesity and other eating associated health problems.

Project Description:

In my project I aim to shift the users focus away from nutritionalism and back to the foods themselves, away from a focus on calories and nutrition facts and just eating the right foods in the right amounts. If the consumer focuses on eating fresh foods and foods with simple ingredients, they will maintain a healthy lifestyle free from the confusion of nutritionalism.

DRAFT V3

Project Statement:

Working Title:

Project Brief

Audience/User Group: 1. Recently Diagnosed adults/ children (of obesity, health disease, other health problems) 2. Head of family (the meal planner) 3. the shopper

Melinda Sekela

In order to maintain healthy and fulfilling lives, Americans should be aware of how the food they consume effects their body. However, more than half of American adults are considered overweight, in part due to the reliance on processed and prepared foods to fill their diet. Without consuming fresh foods, many people will fall prey to this growing obesity epidemic as well as other health problems. My project aims to provide easy ways for the head of the family to introduce fresh, simple foods into their family's routines in order to slow the spread of obesity and other eating associated health problems.

Obesity has become an epidemic in America, increasing risk factors for various disease and negatively impacting the quality of life. We are at the point where American children may be the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Obesity is linked to more than 30 medical conditions including types of cancers, diabetes, and heart disorders. The food industry is one of many factors that causes obesity, and research has shown that a simple step away from processed foods and towards fresh foods can help lead to a healthier lifestyle. Many Americans remain obese because changing their diet and lifestyle can feel overwhelming. The information overload about the various nutritional aspects of certain foods and the continuously changing trends make it hard for the average consumer to understand what they need to eat to stay healthy. There exists a need for a visual communication device to cut through the clutter of food related suggestions in order for Americans to easily adopt small changes into their lifestyle.

Working Title:

My project aims to ease the transition for the consumer from processed and prepared foods to simpler meals using fresh ingredients, to begin their process into a healthery, more balanced food habits. Food is a constant in our lives, and it should be a point of joy and relaxation in our day, not something that can harm us. My secondary goal is to provide a mechanism that allows the user to become proud of the food they cook in order to bring back the value that food have in our lives.

From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge of what is actually healthy for them to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices about eating habits. My capstone will provide a tool that is useful enough that people will want to use it and realize that it is improving their lives. My end goal through this capstone is to provide a tool that will make choosing the right foods so easy that many Americans will want to adopt it into their lifestyle, ultimately changing their behaviors and assumptions about food and eating and leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods.

DRAFT V4

Project Statement:

Project Description:

Desired Result: From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge of what is actually healthy for them to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices about eating habits. My capstone will provide a tool that seems useful enough that people jump at the chance to incorporate it into their lives and over time realize the lasting impact it has on their relationship with food. My end goal through this capstone is to provide a tool that will make choosing the right foods so easy that many Americans will want to adopt it into their lifestyle, ultimately changing their behaviors and assumptions about food and eating and leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods.

Audience/User Group: A. Head of family (the meal planner and shopper) B. Single adults

Project Description: Obesity has become an epidemic in America, increasing risk factors for various diseases and negatively impacting the quality of life. We are at the point where American children may be the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Obesity is linked to more than 30 medical conditions including types of cancers, diabetes, and heart disorders. The food industry is one of many factors that causes obesity, and research has shown that a simple step away from processed foods and towards fresh foods can help lead to a healthier lifestyle. Many Americans do not pay attention to the food they are eating and it's effect on the body, putting them at risk for these health issues. The information overload about the various nutritional aspects of certain foods and the continuously changing trends make it hard for the average consumer to understand what they need to eat to stay healthy. There exists a need for a visual communication device to cut through the clutter of food related suggestions in order for Americans to easily adopt small changes into their lifestyle. My project aims to ease the transition for the consumer from processed and prepared foods to simpler meals using fresh ingredients, to begin their process into a healthier, more balanced food habits. Food is a constant in our lives, and it should be a point of joy and relaxation in our day, not something that can harm us. My secondary goal is to provide a mechanism that allows the user to become proud of the food they cook in order to bring back the value that food have in our lives. Desired Result: From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge of what is actually healthy for them to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a tool that consumers of a specific audience can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices about eating habits. My capstone will provide a tool that seems useful enough that people jump at the chance to incorporate it into their lives and over time realize the lasting impact it has on their relationship with food. My end goal through this capstone is to provide a tool that will make choosing the right foods so easy that many Americans will want to adopt it into their lifestyle, ultimately changing their behaviors and assumptions about food and eating and leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods.

Project Brief

Final

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to maintain healthy and fulfilling lives, Americans should be aware of how the food they consume effects their body. However, over 68.5% of American adults are considered overweight, in part due to the reliance on processed and prepared foods to fill their diet. Without consuming fresh foods, many people will fall prey to this growing obesity epidemic as well as other health problems. My project aims to prevent the spread of of obesity and other eating associated health problems by providing access and knowledge to the head of the family to easily introduce fresh, simple foods into their family's routines. Working Title: reFRESH

Audience/User Group: A. Head of family (the meal planner and shopper) B. Single adults

Project Description: Obesity has become an epidemic in America, increasing risk factors for various diseases and negatively impacting the quality of life. We are at the point where American children may be the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Obesity is linked to more than 30 medical conditions including types of cancers, diabetes, and heart disorders. The food industry is one of many factors that causes obesity, and research has shown that a simple step away from processed foods and towards fresh foods can help lead to a healthier lifestyle. Many Americans do not pay attention to the food they are eating and it's effect on the body, putting them at risk for these health issues. The information overload about the various nutritional aspects of certain foods and the continuously changing trends make it hard for the average consumer to understand what they need to eat to stay healthy. There exists a need for a visual communication device to cut through the clutter of food related suggestions in order for Americans to easily adopt small changes into their lifestyle. My project aims to ease the transition for the consumer from processed and prepared foods to Working Title: simpler meals using fresh ingredients, to begin their process into a healthier, more balanced food reFRESH habits. Food is a constant in our lives, and it should be a point of joy and relaxation in our day, not something that can harm us. My secondary goal is to provide a mechanism that allows the user to become proud of the food they cook in order to bring back the value that food have in our lives. Desired Result:

Audience/User Group: From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge of what isA. actually Head ofhealthy family for them to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a tool that consumers of aplanner specificand audience (the meal shopper) can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices B. Singleabout adultseating habits. My capstone will provide a tool that seems useful enough that people jump at the chance to incorporate it into their lives and over time realize the lasting impact it has on their relationship with food. My end goal through this capstone is to provide a tool that will make choosing the right foods so easy that many Americans will want to adopt it into their lifestyle, ultimately changing their behaviors and assumptions about food and eating and leading them to eat less processed food and food with unknown ingredients and focus on eating simple, clean foods.

Project Brief

Final V2

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to maintain healthy and fulfilling lives, Americans should be aware of how the food they consume effects their body. However, over 68.5% of American adults are considered overweight, in part due to the reliance on processed and prepared foods to fill their diet. Without consuming fresh foods, many people will fall prey to this growing obesity epidemic as well as other health problems. My project aims to prevent the spread of of obesity and other eating associated health problems by providing access and knowledge to the head of the family to easily introduce fresh, simple foods into their family's routines.

Project Brief

Project Description:

Final V3

Melinda Sekela

Project Statement:

In order to provide essential nutrients and set examples for healthy Obesity has become an epidemic in America, increasing risk factors for various diseases and development to their children, caregivers of young families must be aware negatively impacting the quality of life. We are at the point where American children may be the first generation to live shorter lives than their parents. Obesity is linked to more than 30 medicalof what their family chooses to eat. However, 68% of adults and 38% of children are considered overweight, in part due to a growing reliance on conditions including types of cancers, diabetes, and heart disorders. The food industry is one of many factors that causes obesity, and research has shown that a simple step away from processed high calorie foods. Caregivers in these families do not make healthy eating foods and towards fresh foods can help lead to a healthier lifestyle. a priority. reFRESH aims to prevent the spread of obesity and ease the burdens of shopping and cooking at home. By connecting these families Many Americans do not pay attention to the food they are eating and it's effect on the body, putting them at risk for these health issues. The information overload about the various nutritional aspects with Community Supported Agriculture programs and providing the tools of certain foods and the continuously changing trends make it hard for the average consumerto to create balanced meals, families can easily create enjoyable healthy understand what they need to eat to stay healthy. There exists a need for a visual communication meals at home. device to cut through the clutter of food related suggestions in order for Americans to easily adopt small changes into their lifestyle.

Working Title: Project Description: My project aims to ease the transition for the consumer from processed and prepared foods to reFRESH Obesity has become an epidemic in America, increasing risk factors for various diseases and simpler meals using fresh ingredients, to begin their process into a healthier, more balanced food habits. Food is a constant in our lives, and it should be a point of joy and relaxation in our day, notnegatively impacting the quality of life. Obesity is linked to more than 30 medical conditions including types of cancers, diabetes, and heart disorders. The food industry is one of many factors something that can harm us. My secondary goal is to provide a mechanism that allows the user to become proud of the food they cook in order to bring back the value that food have in our lives.that causes obesity, and research has shown that a simple step away from high calorie foods and towards nutrient dense foods can help lead to a healthier lifestyle. Many families do not pay Audience/User Group: attention to the food they are eating and it's effect on the body, putting them at risk for these health Desired Results: Caregiver for a middle class working issues. My goal is to create a partnership between local farms and these middle class families by familyofwith several young children From this capstone I hope that users will gain knowledge what is actually healthy for them refining and adding on to an existing mechanism: Community Supported Agriculture. to eat and what "healthy" means. I hope to develop a system that consumers, specifically the head CSAs allow families access to fresh, local, in season products. It allows them to develop a relationship of a young family, can use and integrate into their daily lives to help them make good choices about with the farmer who grows their food and learn more about how food is grown and become a part eating habits. of a community. However, many current CSA programs do not allow families to choose the type and Since my focus is increasing awareness and persuading my audience to make better choices, I can amount of the food they get each week, and finding the right farm for your family is difficult. Many go many routes with my final system. Some potential outcomes are: providing a web tool to show farms don't provide any information on how their CSA works without the family calling or emailing. them the benefits of healthy eating as they make choices, both in money savings and overall health, Products can be wasted if the family does not know how to properly cook or preserve them and can while also helping them plan and prepare meals; developing an ad campaign geared towards get bored easily with only a few recipes for each type of food. Creating a healthy eating pattern with spreading awareness and helping them make informed decisions while grocery shopping; creating CSA produce alone is not feasible. a temporary moving exhibit that corresponds to farmers markets, showing the benefits of healthy My project will create an 'organization' that can easily match a families needs to the best CSA farm eating and then persuading the user to also visit the farmers market; or creating a system to for them. Each week when the farm prepares the CSA box, the items will be input into the accompany CSA boxes and an organization to help facilitate the use of CSAs. 'organization's' system and it will use these items to create a healthy, balanced meal plan for the My goal is that it will make choosing the right foods so easy that many Americans will want to adopt it for the week. The 'organization' will provide a kit of supplementary items and instructions for family into their lifestyle, ultimately changing their behaviors and assumptions about food and eating and the family so they have everything they need to create healthy meals at home while saving time leading them to eat less processed food and focus on eating simple, clean foods. and money shopping less at the grocery store. The meal plans will include how to preserve extra ingredients as well. The goal is to facilitate an ongoing relationship between the farm and the family so they feel a deeper connection with what they consume. Desired Results: My goal for this capstone is to help the caregiver of a young family gain knowledge of healthy eating patterns. By developing a system that caregivers can use and integrate into their daily lives, they can create healthy meals for their family and develop a better relationship with food. My target audience has one primary obstacle when planning meals: time. They wish they could eat better but do not make choosing and shopping for the right foods a priority. By integrating CSAs with supplemental meal planing and preparation, all of the legwork of planning and preparing healthy meals is done for the user, giving them the confidence to know that their family is eating appropriately while developing a relationship to the food they consume.

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Benchmarking

examples of government initiatives

While I was refining the problem brief, I was also benchmarking relevant systems currently in place to impact the way Americans eat. First I looked at government initiatives that followed the USDA Dietary Guidelines, which I read thoroughly. Let’s Move was a campaign started by Michelle Obama that initially focused on exercise, but began to include workshops in school cafeterias. Choose My Plate was introduced in 2010 as the new ‘food pyramid’. By visualizing proportions, it helped users understand how to create balanced meals. 20

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

However, it wasn’t very accessible or inviting to use. I looked into recipe delivery services, with the idea that my system would include ingredient delivery too. These were easy to use but limiting with choice and unorganized. Finally, I benchmarked existing website services, such as CookSmarts and Plan To Eat. They provided subscription based access to cooking tips and meal planning tools. These were very helpful for developing my content but the amount of information on each could be overwhelming for the user.


examples of recipe delivery systems

examples of website cooking skill services

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Interviewing Young Families

“Sometimes I get stressed out, like ‘I don’t want to cook anymore! I’m sick of it!’. If I try to cook something and they won’t eat it, then I end up making them mac and cheese just to get it over with.” JESSICA AND CHRIS SAIT parents of two young children

I interviewed families to get a better sense of what my user needed. When I talked to a family with no kids, I learned that breakfast and lunch were never considered a vital part of the day. They rarely cooked, every dinner consisted of take-out food or quick processed food. They would only go grocery shopping once a month, but stop at the store 3–­4 times a week to pick up a quick dinner for that night. They never took a list to the store. She felt bad discussing it, like she hadn’t realized until now that their eating habits were bad. She was embarrassed to say how often they eat hot dogs and food like that.

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

I met with three families with kids, and there were a few consistencies throughout. The adults have opposite schedules and spend most of the week apart. Having picky children leads them to not want to cook new foods or vary their meals. Their kids enjoy fruits and vegetables, but the parents don’t try new things for themselves or kids. Cooking meals isn’t a priority for them, just one of many chores to accomplish each day. They use the same protein and starches for every meal. Time was their the biggest concern with cooking at home. Learning from these interviews helped refine my solution.


“Growing up, my mother cooked every night, and she worked, had two kids. I don’t know what changed. I guess it’s just so convenient now. Plus I can’t cook. I’ve tried to cook. I just suck at it.” JAMIE SWAIN AND WOLFGANG FINGER young couple

“Chris and I really love to cook, so we’re looking up new recipes all the time, we always try to experiment with something new, and Hunter eats anything.” RITA STRINGHAM parent of one young child

“Fast food is generally what happens for lunch. Even for dinner, most likely fast food again, cause we’re on the go, picking her up. With the little one, it’s so hard to watch her when you try to cook or vice versa.” DAWN AND DENNIS RESEK parents of two young children

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Interviewing Nutrition Professors “In the past, eating was learned through cultural transmission, we tried to eat what our parents ate, but that doesn’t work any more. The marketplace has changed so much that we can’t rely on cultural transmission.” GRACE FALCIGLIA Head of the Nutritional Sciences Department at the Univeristy of Cincinnati I also met with two nutrition professors at University of Cincinnati to discuss my project. They gave me their impressions of what are the biggest issues with how Americans eat today, and most of these issues are problems I was familiar with and already looking to solve. Issues discussed included how Americans aren’t cooking anymore, our portion sizes are huge, there is a growing dependence on processed food, we can’t see long term problems when making a food choice, and we are consuming more than we are burning. We also discussed the dramatic change in our food environment: cheap food is faster, easier, more available than ever, and we don’t know what is healthy to eat and what isn’t anymore. We also discussed current solutions to the problems, many of which are things I have already benchmarked, such as Choose My Plate and Let’s Move. They offered their opinions on how Americans should be eating, and what needs to change: we should eat closer to the natural state of food, so I could focus on a campaign on a

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segment of the market. Shopping behavior is where it starts, so how I can influence a person’s ability to compare nutritional value, cost and time would be beneficial. Eating in season is important, and emphasis on cooking at home is good, so I should encourage family meals, cooking together, etc. I should use the dietary guidelines, specifically daily recommended intake. Finally, they looked over my project brief and offered suggestions: Use better wording to describe good food vs bad food and wording for my audience (‘caregiver’). They thought that providing access to food outside supermarket is the key. The format of my solution will depend on the connection between strategies and audience. If I narrow my audience, they said to choose more specific problems and develop a solution that addresses all of my selected problems. It should be something that can be used at any time, an ongoing aspect in their life. Their final advice was to think broadly about the solution: whole day, whole family, long term.


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Initial CSA Research

sketches developing the system components

I decided that the CSA concept was the strongest and aligned the closest to all of the research I had done and what the professor interviews had taught me. I began to look into CSAs in more detail to understand how one finds a CSA, how they work, and what the benefits and drawback are. I benchmarked CSA websites and databases, such as Local Harvest.

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

I started to brainstorm how an existing CSA mechanism could fit into the system I was exploring, and what components of my solution needed to be. I also redefined my audience and stakeholders based on this decision and rewrote my project brief.


screen from the CSA database Local Harvest

sketches developing a new problem statement Refresh The Process

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Developing the Solution Objectives and Goals

an example of a typical CSA share

I developed performance criteria for my project by creating goals and objectives. My objectives were to connect families to the right CSA for them and supply them with the tools to make the most out of their CSA. I wanted to provide families with the tools to cook on their own with healthy ingredients and help them develop healthy eating patterns through meal planning.

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My goals were to get families to foster a deeper appreciation with where their food comes from and the importance of healthy eating for the family. I also aim to promote cooking more at home as a family by easing the emotional burdens of planning and shopping for the family.


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Solution Components

urney FARMS

ongoing

Farmer decides to join refresh to gain new members

creates profile about farm and inputs important CSA information

farmer gains new members through website

once the growing season starts, each week the farmer updates which crops are included in CSA box.

creates profile with schedule, budget, and preferences

website suggests best CSA for her family using collected farm data.

caregiver buys CSA through the website

caregiver is notified when CSA crop is updated and logs on to view her weekly plan

caregiver makes any changes to the schedule and recipes then selects “accept”

caregiver receives refresh package along with the CSA box.

FAMILIES getting started

caregiver of family learns of refresh and decides to join

weekly

website gathers crop data from farmer and designs a meal plan based on her families needs.

website uses this data to adapt future meal plans.

ekela

caregiver has option to log into website and rate her family’s enjoyment of the recipe and the ease to create

Refresh

I built out a time line (above) to describe how a farm and a family could work together to accomplish these goals through my solution. My initial solution components were tools (both digital and physical) to accompany a CSA box. A website would help the family plan meals using the CSA, and then a physical box would be delivered to their house that would include recipes and supplies needed to make the meals selected in their plan. I knew this system seemed a little lofty, so the next logical step was to dig deeper into a CSA program to learn if my solution could exist within it. 30

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

caregiver makes meals with her family using the kit and recipe tools.

Final Capstone Presentation

08.07.


verview

ela

refresh

local farm

CSA box

solution diagram depicting how the various elements Refresh of Refresh combine with a CSA to help families cook.

plan

recipes

supplies

Final Capstone Presentation

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Meeting a CSA Farmer

“Look around: sun and seeds, water, that’s what makes food. Not a factory. I’m trying to teach people to eat simply and become connected to their food.” BARB LIPHARDT Head farmer and CSA Coordinator at Gorman Heritage Farm

I met with a farmer to gain an understanding of the process of running a CSA program and get more insight into what joining a CSA entails. We had a great discussion about this as well as many other things as we walked around the farm. She told me of her philosophy on food and life and her distrust of the food industry. Barb was passionate about doing as much as she can to make a difference in the way people eat.

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She disclosed to me the problems she saw within her CSA program, such as member involvement and scale of her farm. We talked about the vegetables they grow, the history of the program, the typical structure and time line of the program, and what information she tried to give out to her members to help them make the most of their CSA. It was great to be exposed to the farm and her growing process, and get an inside look at how a farm works. It inspired me to join a CSA myself to fully understand the user experience.


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Part II Firsthand User Experience

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Joining a CSA observations and insights

Joining a CSA was a life changing experience. I developed an understanding of seasonality, and how eating local food can make an impact on your lifestyle and health. I was excited to be a part of a community, to get to know people who shared similar values and had similar experiences to me. I participated in events such as a CSA Smackdown cooking competition, cooking demos, and volunteer work through unloading shipments. I was excited to come home from work each day and cook, to plan new meals and try new things. I became a much better cook than when I started and I found a confidence in the kitchen that I never had before. As far as my 38

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

project goes, I found that my users will eat healthier just by experiencing the program, so the complex meal planning aspect I had included before was not necessary. I confirmed that vegetables are a simple way to get started with learning to cook if you don’t have much experience. Right now CSAs are currently only used by people with interest and skill in local produce and healthy cooking, so if I can get a new audience involved it will expand the reach of the mechanism. I also realized that it’s a lot of work, and there’s no way around that. It can be overwhelming, and I had to look up a lot of things. It became apparent that graphic communication could assist in a first time CSA user’s journey.


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Surveying Current CSA Users

“CSAs aren’t convenient, they just aren’t. They can’t be made to be. But there is value to them, and new members need to be given tricks to feel organized and successful.” PAULA LUKATS CSA Program Manager in NYC

I sent out a survey to the members in Washington Square CSA to get their opinion on what it’s like to be a member, both what they enjoy and what they struggle with. I wanted to know how they manage the food and what tips they had. I compiled a lot of data and found interesting things about their experiences (left). Comments I received were that they loved the freshness, the surprises, and learning new vegetables. It feels more human than just going to a store. Some were very overwhelming amount of food each week. It was so much work to cook and clean it all.

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Comments on meal planning with a CSA included doing meal planning and supplemental shopping the day after the CSA was picked up. They usually tried to eat whichever items will spoil quickly first, and then plan meals around the remaining items. It was important to see what is available in the share and then plan later meals that week around produce, if possible. Some said that they don’t do a good job of planning and frequently waste food as a result.


63%

of members used their share for themselves and their partner

80%

learned about CSA programs by word of mouth

47%

of members joined the CSA for personal health and nutrition reasons

1. Google Searching (11) 2. Epicurious (7) 3. Smitten Kitchen (4)

9%

used their share for their family

MOST COMMON TOOLS FOR RECIPES/PLANNING

4. Martha Stewart (4) 5. NY Times (4) MOST COMMON COMPLAINTS

6. How to Cook Everything/ Mark Bittman (4)

no electronic payment options

7. Bon Appetit (3)

not enough interaction with the farm

8. Food Network (3)

DESIRED MORE INTERACTION THROUGH

27% farm visits

Majority of respondents frequently use multiple types of technology.

18% newsletter articles

MOST COMMON

41% letters and emails from the farm

Smartphones (40%) MOST STRESSFUL ASPECTS

#1 Eating food before it goes bad #2 Too much food/ too often  #3 Too similar/same goods each week #4 Running out of ideas for how to cook

Laptops (31%)

5 hours

The average time spent planning meals each week

$50+

#5 Knowing how to cook/ store something new

spent on supplementary grocery items

#6 Commitment to picking up each week

39%

30–60 min prepping and storing produce each week

55%

look up how to properly store at least once or twice a week.

shopping twice a week for additional items.

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Meeting with the NYC CSA Coordinator

“Recipes are helpful, but maybe it doesn’t matter what specific vegetable it is, maybe it’s just a class of vegetable and a strategy for that class [would be] more helpful than specifics.” PAULA LUKATS CSA Program Manager in NYC

I learned a lot from talking to Paula Lukats about Just Food and their involvement with CSA programs in NYC. We discussed why people join them: to receive high quality, amazing food, to support a farm, and to promote a healthy lifestyle for them and their families. Most choose a CSA for their convenience: whatever is closest, or what day of the week pick-up is. We discussed the reactions she got from new members. They are excited by the quality of the food, that it tastes better or different, they were impressed by its freshness, and that you get different varieties than in a grocery store. The learning curve 50

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around seasonality can be overwhelming. They are often challenged by things they haven’t cooked with before. She explained that after a while you find certain strategies that work for you. A big issue is getting bored with things you get a lot of, especially if you only know one way to cook them. We talked about the relationship between a member and the farmer. If people don’t know the farmer, they wont care as much if something goes wrong. They won’t understand it if there’s no personal connection. It’s important to prioritize that connection because it makes the program so much more meaningful.


THREE THINGS THAT MAKE A SUCCESSFUL CSA MEMBER

1.

Get to pickup consistently. If not, its not a good value.

2.

You have to be willing to cook because you’re getting raw food. You don’t have to know how to cook, but have to be willing to learn.

3.

You have to be adventurous; be able to try new things and not be afraid.

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Part III Form making

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Initial Design Elements Before joining the CSA

sketch to demonstrate how the farm and family work within the system

Before my personal use in the CSA, I began to develop the initial designs, including website wireframes, logo sketches, and tone boards. My concept for the system was that refresh would provide a meal plan for each week with recipes using the CSA, and then would send a box to the family all of the ingredients needed for the recipes. The diagram above describes how both the farm and the family interact through the refresh program throughout the time line of use. 54

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This concept was kind of a reach in terms of feasibility, it had a lot of moving pieces that would have to happen perfectly, on both the farm and family perspectives, in order to be successful. It wasn’t until after I joined the CSA that I arrived at a better solution. The following pages illustrate my initial concepts before I redefined my solution.


verview

la

refresh

local farm

CSA box

diagram to demonstrate how my system Refresh works alongside a CSA

plan

recipes

supplies

Final Capstone Presentation

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Tone Boards

modern, vibrant, geometric, iconic tone board

My initial tone boards from before the CSA had two options. The first was a geometric, brightly colored tone with simple shapes and icons to show vegetables and cooking. Thick sanserif fonts are used to match with the round forms of the icons. The second tone board focused on a hand crafted feel, with hand drawn vegetables using fluid watercolors and more earthy tones. The tone also features hand lettering.

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warm, inviting, sensible, handmade tone board

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Task Flow Diagram

This task flow diagram breaks down exactly what features and tools are available for both the farmer and the family’s versions of the website.

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detail of the task flow

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Wireframes

Initial wireframes focused on both how the farmer and how the family interacted with the website. The farmer can update their profile and each week would submit the CSA list. The family could browse their farm’s page, plan meals based on the CSA list using the schedule, and could also track each family member’s health based on which meals they were eating. 60

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farm POV: homepage, updating info, and posting a pick-up

family POV: farm search and selection,homepage with calendar Refresh The Process

61


Wireframes

These wireframes refine and elaborate on the scheduling aspect of the website. The user can fill in the times they are free to cook, and let the website fill in those areas with meals that could potentially use CSA vegetables. The user could change specific meals before approving the list. By approving the list, that alerts the program to send the family the required ingredients for the batch of meals chosen.

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Identity Sketches

My first round of sketches for the identity focused mostly on wordmarks using the word ‘refresh’, as well as combining symbols of vegetables, cooking, and/or a ‘refresh’ icon with the title.

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Reframing after CSA Use New Solution Diagram

IDEATION

refresh

local farm

CSA box

+

printable checklist email

“veggie” cards

Choosing a CSA

Updates from the CSA

Veggie Knowledge

Updates from the CSA

Veggie Knowledge

website

“strategy” booklets

=

Cooking Vegetables “Strategies”

a refined diagram to depict how my system components work with the CSA Melinda Sekela

Capstone Recap

After using the CSA, I decided to eliminate the meal planning aspect of the project, since it became apparent that it was not possible for the website to plan the meals around a CSA, there’s just too many variables at play to make it work. It also seemed extraneous to deliver the additional ingredients.

to store, where to store, how long they last, etc. I needed to develop a system that organized all of this information for the user to lessen the stress of using a CSA. My next step was to write out all of the strategies I used and all the things I looked up while using a CSA onto some note cards.

The biggest impact to my project was the idea of strategies. Paula suggested in the interview that anyone can tackle a CSA if they have a set of strategies to use with the vegetables, something that they can rely on no matter what comes in the box. I knew I had to refocus to provide strategies. The second impact was the sheer amount of information that I had to look up while using the CSA, such as recipes, how

I took these cards and organized them into different categories and then thought about the best way to deliver this information. I settled on a website to help you choose and stay in touch with the CSA, a printable checklist each week to track what you get in the box, cards full of info on each vegetable in the box, and a series of booklets that provide cooking strategies.

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creating cards for each type of information needed in my system organized by topic

organizing the cards based on the order and medium the information is conveyed.

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Storyboard

In order to understand how this new system would function for the user, I created a visual storyboard to describe the process of joining and participating in Refresh. 1.

When a caregiver decides that their family is eating unhealthy, they will sign up for Refresh.

7. Their vegetables are now properly stored so they don’t go bad.

2. The Refresh website suggests the best CSA program for the family’s needs.

8. The user can plan meals using the strategy booklet and will plan to buy any other ingredients needed.

3. The user selects a farm and pays for the CSA through the website.

9. The user cooks with the strategy provided all week.

4. The user receives an email before each pickup that can be printed. It details what is coming in the box that week, including quantity and how to choose.

10. They can keep all cards and booklets safe and organized in a holder.

5. With each week’s box of vegetables, the user receives vegetable cards and a strategy booklet (that increases in difficulty each week) 6. The user can use the vegetable cards to properly store their share. 68

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11. They can also access the checklists, vegetable info, and strategies on the Refresh website. 12. The user is also emailed updates from the farm on a regular basis.


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Refined Tone Boards

Color Block Knockout

After developing a new system for Refresh, I went back to refine the look and feel by creating four tone boards. The first tone board; Color Block Knockout (above), focused on a series of bright, full bleed colors with illustrations that were knocked out of the color. The colors were pulled from vibrant vegetable imagery.

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The second: Watercolor Stamps (right) included circular watercolor ‘stamps’ as a design element that differentiated the strategies. The stamps could be abstract or a representation of vegetables. The illustrations had an airy light quality from a thin pen, and the photography is realistic to depict “just from the farm” and the messy “middle of a recipe” aspects of cooking.


Watercolor Stamps

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Refined Tone Boards

Note Taking

The third tone board, Note Taking, has the premise that all photography is show with aerial views with handwritten notes written on the ‘surface’ of the photo. Arrows and doodles can be implemented to add whimsy. The last tone board was an exploration on different formats for the various elements of the project. I looked at binding techniques, folding or accordion techniques, how to navigate content such as tabs or shingled 72

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pages, how a holder could function, etc. This board influenced my sketches for the format of the different components.


format inspiration

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Identity and Visual Language Logo

Through many earlier explorations, I settled on three types of logos based on the tones I had created. The first (above) was ultimately chosen: a simple wordmark that combined a sanserif ‘re’ and a handwritten ‘fresh’, to reflect the change from processed to home cooked food and emphasize the ‘fresh’ aspect of being in a CSA. The alternate options included a refresh icon made from utensils or vegetables, or a handwritten refresh with an alternating “f” made from different vegetables.

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I chose to go with the first option because it was simple, easy to implement into many different formats, and has the emphasis needed to explain my project. I could see the others getting clunky or too detailed easily.


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Logo

Next, I developed a series of studies to choose the proper sanserif and the proper type of handwriting. I also studied the right combination of the two: which is handwritten and which is type and are the letter forms uppercase or lowercase.

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Logo

To match the logo to the Color Block Knockout tone I was pursuing, I decided that the logo should always be white (or green if on a white background), and a component of it could be transparent to play with the knockout color behind it, so that the logo ‘updates’ automatically to emphasize the color behind it. I refined the top three options to reflect this idea and ultimately chose the logo on the adjacent page.

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Illustration Style

Refining an illustration style was a lengthy process. It took some time to get a balance between whimsy and clarity. For the first attempt I took video of a vegetable being prepared, pulled stills from the photo to create 3–4 steps, and then traced the photo with a marker. I took the tracing into Photoshop to make it white so it could be placed on a colored background. This however, had too much variation and was too grounded in reality to be clear what action was taking place.

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Illustration Style

drawn with pen tool from illustration two line weights hands

drawn with stylus from hand drawn illustration two line weights no hands

drawn with stylus from hand drawn illustration line weights 2 colors hands

drawn with stylus from photo reference two line weights no hands

‘live trace’ of hand drawn illustration 1 line weight hands

drawn with stylus from hand drawn illustration line weights 2 colors new BG color hands

I studied different techniques to get a clearer illustration: was it using a stylus straight in illustrator? Creating curved lines using the pen tool? Was color the issue? Were the hands too obstructive? How many weights can I use?

The final illustrations use the pen tool with a slight variance in line weight to achieve a good balance between hand written and mechanical. I used two weights, the thicker to emphasize the main point of the step. I used arrows when necessary to show direction and pulled the action apart so the user could see all of the elements clearly. 84

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drawn with stylus from hand drawn illustration two line weights hands


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Typography

For typography I wanted to use a friendly slab serif for the display face (for use in titles and numbers) and then paired it with a open sanserif that is easy to read quickly. This combination of faces creates a friendly, slightly whimsical approach. The display face, Museo Slab, is chosen for its square proportions and open counters. To match these attributes, Proxima Nova is used as the main typeface. This family has a large selection of weights and highly legible thin fonts, which works well with the tone of the project. 86

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ABOUT US

VIEW MORE

PREFERENCES

AVAILABILITY

PICKUP

BEST MATCH

PURCHASE CSA

Gorman Heritage Farm bibb lettuce red bell pepper green cabbage kohlrabi Gorman Heritage Farm is a 122-acre working farm and outdoor education center, which invites its visitors to explore and learn the history, methods and values of a working family farm in a natural setting. We are located on Reading Road in Evendale, Ohio. The Farm is one-half mile south of Glendale-Milford Road. The Farm consists of 30 tillable acres, a farmyard with a variety of animals, a garden, 40 acres of wooded hillside, and a natural pond. We enjoy visits from members, casual visitors, school

groups and many others during the course of the year. The paid staff includes both farming and administrative professionals, supported by a strong cadre of volunteers. Gorman Heritage Farm is a 122-acre working farm and outdoor education center, which invites its visitors to explore and learn the history, methods and values of a working family farm in a natural setting. We are located on Reading Road in Evendale, Ohio. The Farm is one-half mile south of Glendale-Milford Road. The Farm consists.

DICE MINCE JULIENNE Community Supported Agriculture Gorman Heritage Farm is a 122-acre working farm and outdoor education center, which invites its visitors to explore and learn the history, methods and values of a working family farm in a natural setting. We are located on Reading Road in Evendale, Ohio. The Farm is one-half mile south of Glendale-Milford Road. The Farm consists of 30 tillable acres, a farmyard with a variety of animals, a garden, 40 acres of wooded hillside, and a natural pond. We enjoy visits from members.

SAUTÉING BOILING ROASTING BAKING PURÉEING SOUPS

DISH TOWEL SMALL WHISK CHEF’S KNIFE

olive oil salt & pepper lemon juice paprika

roasting at high heat makes anything taste good.

1

2

3

4

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Color

COLOR PALETTE

Summer

bell pepper

Fall

kolhrabi

summer squash

carrot

garlic/ginger

I looked toward the vegetables I received in my CSA as the basis for the color scheme. I knew I would have ten strategies and that I wanted each to have it’s own color in order to create the color blocking look depicted in my tone board. I wanted the colors to progress to mimic the progression in difficulty, so I started with lighter hues and moved to darker hues. The colors match up with summer vegetables and transition into autumn/winter vegetables. After prototyping my printed materials and creating style frames, I decided I needed a main brand color as well. I chose a fresh

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tomato

sweet potato eggplant

kale

red cabbage

looking green since this color was present throughout the entire vegetable growing season, and was thus appropriate to be featured at all times. Since the first and last strategies are different than the middle group, the final color scheme was refined to have the first and last strategies ‘bookend’ the group. I used a tint of the green for the first strategy to show where to begin and the full brand green for the last strategy since it is the culmination of all the strategies.


cmyk Main Brand Color 54 4 100 0

Strategies Using Your Knife

Boiling

Sauteing

Pureeing

Roasting

Frying

4

00

60% tint

Roasting

6 95 95 13

33 2 Frying 55 0

19

6 36 Baking 98 0

27

80color palette for Refresh 93 final 87 34

62 37

0 18 Making Soups 96 6

6 0 64 95 Pairing with Grain Putting it all Together 100 95 19 13

59 96 37 39

79 51 79 47

19 80 87 34

54 4 100 0

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Photography Style

Although I began with a vibrant approach to the photography, I decided that a more natural tone with subtle wood textures worked better with the system. I also used mostly aerial shots, both of the vegetables and the recipe photography. Look and feel inspiration for the recipe imagery (right) feautes wood, white, and gray tones, a subtle messiness, and the POV of the cook. I used these images when planning the recipe photoshoot.

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Printed Materials Box

I knew that the various printed materials needed to go into a holder of some sort to keep in the kitchen on the counter. I wanted the user to be able to access these as needed while cooking and be able to keep things organized. I sketched on three concepts, the first was a vertical box with an open face and the lid doubling as a stand. The second was a horizontal durable stand that materials were rubberbanded to. The third was a ringed binder with a back that popped out to form a stand.

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I paper prototyped these three concepts with chip board, all for a 5x7� printed material. After a critique, I settled on combining the back pop-out stand of the binder with the design of the vertical box. I created a paper and wooden prototype of these but decided that It would be too hard to construct in wood and there were unnecessary elements. The wood could stand on its own and didn’t need the pop up stand anymore. So I refined the design to have a simple cover with a magnetic closure that flipped back and stood on its own.


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Vegetable Cards

The vegetable cards act as collectors cards: each week the user will get a card for each new vegetable they received in the CSA share. The card serves as a way for the user to identify any unknown vegetable in their share, and learn important information about it. The most important feature of the cards is how to store the vegetable (both location and the procedure). Illustrating the storage procedure is an opportunity to use the color block knockout design elements.

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The other important feature is the card’s ability to point the user to which strategies work best with each vegetable. I explored many options for the layout of these cards to see how to best organize and prioritize the information and through user testing was able to narrow it down to a refined design.


Curly Kale

Store it Properly

top shelf of fridge

cut off stems

pat dry with paper towel

rinse under cold water

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

Long Term? 10–12 MONTHS

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Cook it Easily

Benefits

1 KNIFE SKILLS

ROAST

salads

kale chips

7

Store it Properly

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

5

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity.

8

BAKED DISHES

SOUPS

kale and potato gratin

corn and kale chowder

Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

Store it Properly

KNIFE SKILLS

Cook it Easily

salads

top shelf of fridge

ROAST

cut off stems

1

5

KNIFE SKILLS

ROAST

salads

kale chips

kale chips

7 cut off stems

BAKED DISHES

rinse under cold water

rinse under cold water

kale and potato gratin

8

BAKED DISHES

SOUPS

kale and potato gratin

corn and kale chowder

Benefits pat dry with paper towel

pat dry with paper towel

SOUPS

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

corn and kale chowder

Long Term?

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

top shelf of fridge

Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

Long Term?

10–12 MONTHS

10–12 MONTHS

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

KNIFE SKILLS

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

ROAST

SOUPS

Store it Properly

BAKED DISHES

top shelf of fridge

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K. It has a potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity.

Benefits

KNIFE SKILLS

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

ROAST

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity.

SOUPS BAKED DISHES

Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium. cut off stems

pat dry with paper towel

How to Store:

rinse under cold water

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

cut off stems

Benefits

Long Term?

pat dry with paper towel

Long Term? 10–12 MONTHS

10–12 MONTHS It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

rinse under cold water

single layers between paper towels in bag

top shelf of fridge

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Refresh The Process

99


Store it Properly

top shelf of fridge

Store it Properly

rinse under cold water

cut off stems

top shelf of fridge

2 pat dry with paper towel

Got Leftovers?

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

FREEZE FOR 10–12 MONTHS

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Best Uses

Why it’s Good for You

1

5

KNIFE SKILLS

ROAST

salads

kale chips

7

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity.

SOUPS

kale and potato gratin

corn and kale chowder

Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

cut off stems

dry with 3 pat paper towel

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

8

BAKED DISHES

1

Got Leftovers? 10–12 MONTHS

Best Uses

1

ROAST

salads

kale chips

Why it’s Good for You It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

8 SOUPS

kale and potato gratin

corn and kale chowder

Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

7 BAKED DISHES 8 SOUPS

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

Got Letovers? 10–12 MONTHS

1 KNIFE SKILLS 5 ROAST 7 BAKED DISHES

top shelf of fridge

1

8 SOUPS

dry with 3 pat paper towel

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Why it’s Good for You Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

2

rinse under cold water

4

layer with paper towels in storage bag

cut off stems

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

100

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity.

BAKED DISHES

Store it Properly

pat dry with paper towel

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

5

5 ROAST

rinse under cold water

layer with paper towels in storage bag

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

1 KNIFE SKILLS

top shelf of fridge

cut off stems

4

Why it’s Good for You

KNIFE SKILLS

7

Store it Properly

rinse under cold water

Got Letovers? 10–12 MONTHS blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.


Store it Properly

KNIFE SKILLS ROAST

top shelf of fridge

SOUPS BAKED DISHES

Store it Properly cut off stems

KNIFE SKILLS

rinse under cold water

ROAST

top shelf of fridge

SOUPS

2 pat dry with paper towel

1

cut off stems

Got Letovers?

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

10–12 MONTHS dry with 3 pat paper towel

blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Why it’s Good for You It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

Store it Properly

4

Got Letovers? 10–12 MONTHS blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

5 ROAST 7 BAKED DISHES 8 SOUPS

2

rinse under cold water

Store it Properly

1 5 7 8

top shelf of fridge

cut off stems

dry with 3 pat paper towel

4

Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

KNIFE SKILLS ROAST BAKED DISHES SOUPS

2

rinse under cold water

4

layer with paper towels in storage bag

layer with paper towels in storage bag

1

It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision.

layer with paper towels in storage bag

1 KNIFE SKILLS

top shelf of fridge

Why it’s Good for You

BAKED DISHES

single layers between paper towels in storage bag

Why it’s Good for You

1

rinse under cold water

Got Letovers?

cut off stems

dry with 3 pat paper towel

10–12 MONTHS blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Why it’s Good for You It is very rich in vitamin A, which is required for maintaining healthy mucus membranes and skin and is essential for vision. Kale is one of the excellent vegetable sources for vitamin-K; Vitamin K has potential role bone health by promoting osteotrophic activity. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps controlling heart rate and blood pressure by countering effects of sodium.

Got Letovers? 10–12 MONTHS blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for 2 minutes, followed by 1 minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Refresh The Process

101


Curly Kale

Store it Properly

KNIFE SKILLS

TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

BAKED DISHES

ROAST SOUPS

2

rinse each leaf under cold water

4

place in storage bag in single layers with paper towels between.

off the bottom of 1 cut stems up to where the leaf begins

dry with 3 pat paper towels

Why it’s Good for You Got Leftovers? Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system. Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

102

FREEZE UP TO 10–12 MONTHS Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


KNIFE SKILLS

Store it Properly

ROAST BAKED DISHES

top shelf of fridge

SOUPS

2

rinse each leaf under cold water

4

place in storage bag in single layers with paper towels between.

off the bottom of 1 cut stems up to where the leaf begins

dry with 3 pat paper towels

WhyKNIFE it’sSKILLS Good for You Got Leftovers? Vitamin A protects you from infections by ROAST keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

BAKED DISHES

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps SOUPS your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

Store it Properly 2

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, rinse each leaf and stroke.

FREEZE UP TO 10–12 MONTHS Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

under cold water

off the bottom of 1 cut stems up to where the leaf begins

dry with 3 pat paper towels

4

place in storage bag in single layers with paper towels between.

TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

Why it’s Good for You Got Leftovers? Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system. Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

FREEZE UP TO 10–12 MONTHS Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Refresh The Process

103


104

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

105


Vegetable Cards

Curly Kale

Store it Properly TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

Curly Kale KNIFE SKILLS ROAST BAKED DISHES SOUPS

off the bottom of stems up 1 cut to where the leaf begins

2 rinse each leaf under cold water

3 pat dry with paper towels

in storage bag in single layers 4 place with paper towels between.

Got Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

106

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


1 Rinse under water

scrub potato under cold water with brush

1

pat dry with a towel

Separate leaves from each other

3 pat dry with paper towel

3 store in plastic bag

place in storage bag in single 4 layers with paper towels in between

Why it’s Good for You

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

FREEZE 9–12 MONTHS

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

Store it Properly

Store it Properly

LOCATION

1 wipe off any dirt with a moist towel

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

ROAST

SAUTE

Spaghetti Squash

PUREE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

BAKE

SOUPS

FRY

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

veg name

Store it Properly

ON COUNTER

2 pat dry with a towel

Spaghetti Squash KNIFE

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

ROAST

PUREE

SAUTE

BOIL

Eggplant

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

veg name

KNIFE

Eggplant

B Vitamins work together to help your body metabolize energy, which is the process of properly using the energy you get from food. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Calcium around nerve cells helps control the flow of sodium throughout the nerves to produces signals that communicate with the body.

TOGETHER

GRAIN

BAKE

SOUPS

FRY

ROAST

SAUTE

PUREE

BOIL

Vitamin K strengthens your bones cells and helps your body process the proteins in our bones correctly for proper growth and to prevent fractures and osteoporosis.

KNIFE

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

Dice carrots into 1 in cubes and boil for 2 minutes, then move to bowl of ice water. Drain and pat dry, then freeze in a airtight container or storage bag.

BOIL

Chop larger leaves into bite size pieces (smaller leaves can remain whole) and boil for 2 minutes until tender, move into ice water to cool quickly, then transfer into airtight container or storage bag and freeze.

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

ROAST

PUREE

SAUTE

BOIL

GRAIN

TOGETHER

BAKE

SOUPS

KNIFE

2 rinse and scrub with brush

Have Leftovers?

Store it Properly

LOCATION

COOL, DRY CABINET

2 Keep in bowl

1 wipe off exterior with a damp cloth

store in plastic bag or container

Why it’s Good for You

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You

Vitamin K strengthens your bones cells and helps your body process the proteins in our bones correctly for proper growth and to prevent fractures and osteoporosis.

FREEZE 6–8 MONTHS

Iron is essential for red blood cells to properly transport oxygen to all of the tissues in your body in an exact and targeted way.

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

Store it Properly

cut off tops of celery

3 chop into 2–3 inch sticks

2

rinse under cold water

in covered cup or container 4 ofplace water

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system. Vitamin K strengthens your bones cells and helps your body process the proteins in our bones correctly for proper growth and to prevent fractures and osteoporosis. Folic Acid is important for making blood and building cells and is especially important during pregnancy for proper fetal development. It assists in the process of cell division.

Store it Properly

1

cut off the bottom of stems up to where the leaf begins

3 pat dry with paper towels

2

rinse each leaf under cold water

place in storage bag in single layers 4 with paper towels between.

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system. Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

ROAST

PUREE

SAUTE

KNIFE

Tomatillo

BOIL

GRAIN

TOGETHER

BAKE

SOUPS

FRY

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

KNIFE

veg name LOCATION

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Tomatillo Store it Properly

TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Calcium around nerve cells helps control the flow of sodium throughout the nerves to produces signals that communicate with the body

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

ROAST

Rainbow Chard

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

PUREE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

KNIFE

veg name LOCATION

FREEZE 12–18 MONTHS Dice celery into ½ in – ¼ in pieces and spread onto baking sheet. Place celery in freezer until hard. Remove pieces from sheet and place in airtight container or storage bag.

Rainbow Chard Store it Properly

SHELF OF FRIDGE

bake squash until soft, scoop from rind and mash. After cooling, place in airtight container or storage bag and freeze.

B Vitamins work together to help your body metabolize energy, which is the process of properly using the energy you get from food.

SAUTE

Peel and cut into slices, blanch for 4 minutes in boiling water with a splash of lemon juice. Remove and chill quickly in ice water. Drain extra moisture and store in airtight container or storage bag

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

ROAST

FRY

SAUTE

PUREE

BOIL

Celery

1

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

ROAST

SAUTE

PUREE

KNIFE

BOIL

GRAIN

TOGETHER

BAKE

SOUPS

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

KNIFE

FRY FRY

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

1 Cut off tops and roots (if any)

FREEZE 8–10 MONTHS

Celery Root

TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

ROAST

SAUTE

PUREE

BOIL

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

BAKE

SOUPS

FRY

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

KNIFE

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

FRY

TOGETHER TOGETHER

GRAIN

SOUPS

BAKE

ROAST

FRY

SAUTE

PUREE

KNIFE

FRIDGE DRAWER

rinse leaves under cold water

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

2

Carrot

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Why it’s Good for You

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

SAUTE

KNIFE

BOIL

FRY FRY

BAKE

veg name

Have Leftovers?

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

PUREE

Carrot

Store it Properly

TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

ROAST

Iron is essential for red blood cells to properly transport oxygen to all of the tissues in your body in an exact and targeted way.

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

3

SAUTE

BOIL

Bok Choi

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

veg name

SAUTE

Bok Choi Store it Properly

2

Chop cabbage into bite size pieces and boil for 2 minutes until tender, move into ice water to cool quickly, then transfer into airtight container or storage bag and freeze.

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. B Vitamins work together to help your body metabolize energy, which is the process of properly using the energy you get from food.

KNIFE

TOGETHER

GRAIN

BAKE

SOUPS

FRY

ROAST

PUREE

SAUTE

BOIL

Purple Sweet Potato

FRIDGE DRAWER

KNIFE

TOGETHER

Vitamin K strengthens your bones cells and helps your body process the proteins in our bones correctly for proper growth and to prevent fractures and osteoporosis.

Store it Properly

BOIL

GRAIN

Why it’s Good for You

Have Leftovers?

LOCATION

SOUPS

and stay clean.

Have Leftovers? FREEZE 12–18 MONTHS

Celery Root does not freeze well, but lasts 3-4 weeks in the fridge.

Store it Properly

remove and discard any outer wilted 2 or broken leaves before using

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

1 scrub under cold water with brush

veg name

in storage bag until ready 1 toplace use

any outer leaves you use, 3 rinse inner leaves should be protected

Why it’s Good for You

Dice peppers, spread out onto cookie sheet and freeze. After frozen, scrape off of sheet and into storage bag or airtight container.

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Celery

2 Pat dry

Have Leftovers?

3 store in basket or container

LOCATION

FRIDGE DRAWER

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

COOL, DRY CABINET

Store it Properly

Red Cabbage

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Sweet potatoes can be diced and boiled until tender. You can either freeze them diced or mash them first before moving to a storage bag or container.

veg name

Store it Properly

Why it’s Good for You

1

Celery Root

veg name

Have Leftovers?

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Red Cabbage

3 Store in plastic bag

4 store bulb in plastic bag

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth. Iron is essential for red blood cells to properly transport oxygen to all of the tissues in your body in an exact and targeted way.

FRIDGE DRAWER

pull fronds from tops and store in bag 2 (can freeze)

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

SAUTE

KNIFE

BOIL

Store it Properly

BAKE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

Bell Pepper

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Folic Acid is important for making blood and building cells and is especially important during pregnancy for proper fetal development. It assists in the process of cell division.

veg name

ROAST

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

blanch in boiling water for four minutes, then chill quickly in ice water. Drain excess moisture and place in airtight container or storage bag and freeze.

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS Slice fennel into bite size pieces and blanch in boiling water for 30 seconds. Transfer to an ice bath to stop the cooking process. Pat dry and transfer into a storage bag or container.

Purple Sweet Potato

PUREE

Why it’s Good for You

FREEZE 12–18 MONTHS

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

TOGETHER

3 rinse and dry bulb

veg name

Store it Properly

FRIDGE DRAWER

cut off the tops from the bulb at 1 the base

Bell Pepper

KNIFE

TOGETHER

GRAIN

BAKE

SOUPS

ROAST

FRY

SAUTE

PUREE

BOIL

Fennel

Store it Properly

LOCATION

Have Leftovers?

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

BOIL

Store it Properly

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

SAUTE

KNIFE

BOIL

veg name

remove ends and loose leaves 4 before using

Why it’s Good for You

ROAST

Vitamin C creates connective tissue that keeps your teeth strong and your gums healthy. It strengthens your immune system to lower bacteria levels in your mouth.

3 place in storage bags or container

Have Leftovers? Blanch tomatoes in boiling water for 30 seconds and remove. Once cool, use your fingers to easily remove the skins. Leave whole or dice into desired size. Move into airtight container or storage bag and freeze.

Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

Fennel

SAUTE

3 Keep in bowl

rinse in colander under cold water and 2 pat dry with towel

FREEZE 2 MONTHS

FRY

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

FRIDGE DRAWER

Remove from stem by popping off 1 with fingers using twisting action

PUREE

Why it’s Good for You

Brussels Sprouts

Store it Properly

2 pat dry

SAUTE

place in storage bag in single layers 4 with paper towels between.

Have Leftovers? FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

veg name LOCATION

BOIL

3 pat dry with paper towels

1 rinse tomatoes

Brussels Sprouts Store it Properly

COUNTER

KNIFE

2 rinse each leaf under cold water

BOIL

Store it Properly

LOCATION

off the bottom of stems up 1 tocutwhere the leaf begins

Tomato

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

BOIL

SAUTE

veg name

Store it Properly

TOP SHELF OF FRIDGE

Blanch kale by dropping into boiling water for two minutes, followed by one minute in a bowl of ice water. Drain well. Move to storage bag and place in freezer. Good for soups and stews.

Tomato

KNIFE

TOGETHER

GRAIN

BAKE

SOUPS

ROAST

FRY

SAUTE

PUREE

BOIL

Curly Kale

Store it Properly

LOCATION

KNIFE

Store it Properly

KNIFE

GRAIN

TOGETHER

SOUPS

FRY

BAKE

PUREE

ROAST

SAUTE

KNIFE

BOIL

Curly Kale

veg name

Store it Properly COUNTER

tomatillos in husks until ready 2 When ready to cook, remove husks 1 keep to use

3 Rinse under cold water

4 pat dry (may be sticky, this is normal)

Have Leftovers?

Why it’s Good for You

FREEZE 10–12 MONTHS

Vitamin A protects you from infections by keeping skin and tissues in your body healthy. It also helps to regulate your immune system.

Remove husks and place tomatillos in an airtight storage bag or container to freeze.

Iron is essential for red blood cells to properly transport oxygen to all of the tissues in your body in an exact and targeted way. Potassium improves blood pressure by maintaining kidney function and reducing blood clots to help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, and stroke.

laying out all of the cards with the final design

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Booklets

By taking a look at all of the ways I cooked vegetable and through research I was able to develop ten cooking strategies that could apply to any vegetable. The focus of these booklets was to explain each strategy and provide example recipes. I tested different techniques for format of the booklet before settling on a vertical booklet with shingled pages to help the user choose one section at a time. From there I was able to refine the layouts and content for three of the booklets, just designing covers for the rest. 108

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

Although the illustrations were nice for simple preparation techniques, I knew that the more complex strategies should be depicted with photography. I planned, storyboarded, and shot the series of photographs over the course of a weekend.


Refresh The Process

109


Booklets

essential cutting techniques MID SEASON EARLY SEASON preparing the workspace HOW TO: LATE SEASON Will Need: Autumn Salad You HOW TO:

Corn SpicySalsa ColeslawTOOLS HOW TO: 10 20 MINUTES MINUTES 15 MINUTES

INGREDIENTS

cutting board

olive oil

chef’s knife

balsamic vinager

dish towel

salt and pepper

1 11 Knife Skills

Counter space for whole vegetables, cutting board, storage for CSA after cut POTENTIAL CUBE

POTENTIAL CSA About 1 inch, recipe might specify, Slice top and VEGGIES TOlengthwise, INCLUDE: POTENTIAL CSA bottom, Cut in half VEGGIES TO holding theINCLUDE: knifeLay flat part down and cut into thick slices (now cubes) VEGGIES TO INCLUDE: corn

Microwave corn tolimes cookand andlemons cut off storageStabilize containers board with towel underneath or bags the cob by holidng it upright in a cilantro DICE Tear lettuce into bite size pieces bowl and slicing downward. Smaller cubes, about ½ inch. With onions and Julienne CSA vegetables and place inallbowl greekallyogurt shallots, helpful to not cut through the way with first slice (leave attached at root).

hot sauce

kale red cabbage tomatoes romaine lettuce green cabbage tomatillos bell peppers bellkohlrabi peppers carrots carrotspeppers jalepeno celery celery spring onion Pinch the blade of the knife where it meets the handletomato between your thumb and first finger, then

BEGINNER

2 22

Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate CSA vegetables

Curl the fingers of your opposite hand into a "claw", rest tips your fingers on top. Tuck thumb As you Whisk together lemon juice, Cube CSA vegetables and addin.plain to wrap the rest of your fingers around the handle. slice, move fingers back, keeping claw formation. red onion hot sauce, and salt thegreek bowlyogurt, with lettuce. radish MINCE SLICE JULIENNE and pepper until it reaches desired SUGGESTED Smaller than a dice, RockPAIRINGS: your Slice in half lengthwise, then lay Cut into long thin sticks knife back over the cut pieces on flat side and thinly slicetaste and consistency of dressing. lean burgers whole several times to makeon it finer. SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: Bestgrain for garlic buns

Serve tacos heating top withwith grilled or by roasted black beans in a saucepan chicken grilled chicken with with cumin and chili powder. lemon marinade Prepare with corn tortillas, serve alongside a pasta rice or and CSAgrain lettuce. dish other grilled sausages with whole grain buns save dressing in separete container, split salad into daily lunches for the week

PREPARATION

3 33

TECHNIQUE

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper

Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, and pepper a Tosssalt, vegetables with into dressing and vinaigrette salad let sit for and up totoss 30 with minutes to absorb flavors.

RECIPE 1

RECIPE 2

RECIPE 3

110

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

Knife Skills BEGINNER


essential cutting techniques MID SEASON EARLY SEASON preparing the workspace HOW TO: LATE SEASON Will Need: Autumn Salad You HOW TO:

Corn SpicySalsa ColeslawTOOLS HOW TO: 10 20 MINUTES MINUTES 15 MINUTES

Counter space for whole vegetables, cutting board, storage for CSA after cut POTENTIAL CUBE

POTENTIAL CSA About 1 inch, recipe might specify, Slice top and VEGGIES TOlengthwise, INCLUDE: POTENTIAL CSA bottom, Cut in half VEGGIES TO holding theINCLUDE: knifeLay flat part down and cut into thick slices (now cubes) VEGGIES TO INCLUDE: corn

INGREDIENTS

cutting board

olive oil

chef’s knife

balsamic vinager

dish towel

salt and pepper

1 11

Microwave corn tolimes cookand andlemons cut off storageStabilize containers board with towel underneath or bags the cob by holidng it upright in a cilantro DICE Tear lettuce into bite size pieces bowl and slicing downward. Smaller cubes, about ½ inch. With onions and Julienne CSA vegetables and place inallbowl greekallyogurt shallots, helpful to not cut through the way with first slice (leave attached at root).

hot sauce

kale red cabbage tomatoes romaine lettuce green cabbage tomatillos bell peppers bellkohlrabi peppers carrots carrotspeppers jalepeno celery celery spring onion Pinch the blade of the knife where it meets the handletomato between your thumb and first finger, then

2 22

Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate CSA vegetables

Curl the fingers of your opposite hand into a "claw", rest tips your fingers on top. Tuck thumb As you Whisk together lemon juice, Cube CSA vegetables and addin.plain to wrap the rest of your fingers around the handle. slice, move fingers back, keeping claw formation. red onion hot sauce, and salt thegreek bowlyogurt, with lettuce. radish MINCE SLICE JULIENNE and pepper until it reaches desired SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: Smaller than a dice, Rock your Slice in half lengthwise, then lay Cut into long thin sticks knife back over the cut pieces on flat side and thinly slicetaste and consistency of dressing. lean burgers whole several times to makeon it finer. SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: Bestgrain for garlic buns

Serve tacos heating top withwith grilled or by roasted black beans in a saucepan chicken grilled chicken with with cumin and chili powder. lemon marinade Prepare with corn tortillas, serve alongside a pasta rice or and CSAgrain lettuce. dish other grilled sausages with whole grain buns save dressing in separete container, split salad into daily lunches for the week

essential cutting techniques

PREPARATION

3 33

TECHNIQUE

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper

CUBE

Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, and pepper a Tosssalt, vegetables with into dressing and vinaigrette salad let sit for and up totoss 30 with minutes to absorb flavors.

RECIPE 1

About 1 inch, recipe might specify, Slice top and bottom, Cut in half lengthwise, Lay flat part down and cut into thick slices (now cubes)

DICE

Smaller cubes, about ½ inch. With onions and shallots, helpful to not cut through all the way with first slice (leave attached at root).

RECIPE 2

RECIPE 3 MINCE

Smaller than a dice, Rock your knife back over the cut pieces several times to make it finer. Best for garlic

EARLY SEASON

SLICE

Slice in half lengthwise, then lay on flat side and thinly slice

JULIENNE Cut into long thin sticks

TECHNIQUE

HOW TO:

Corn Salsa 20 MINUTES POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE:

1

Microwave corn to cook and cut off the cob by holidng it upright in a bowl and slicing downward.

2

Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate CSA vegetables

corn tomatoes tomatillos bell peppers jalepeno peppers spring onion red onion

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: Serve with tacos by heating black beans in a saucepan with cumin and chili powder. Prepare with corn tortillas, rice and CSA lettuce.

3

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper

RECIPE 1 Refresh The Process

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112

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

113


Booklets

Learning different techniques allows the unique attributes and textures of each vegetable to shine, and gives your food visual appeal.

Learning different techniques allows the unique attributes and textures of each vegetable to shine, and gives your food visual appeal.

You Will Need:

You Will Need:

cutting board

cutting board

chef’s knife

chef’s knife

dish towel

dish towel

storage containers or bags

storage containers or bags

MID SEASON EARLY SEASON preparing the LATE SEASON

LATE SEASON

Spicy Coleslaw

workspace

HOW TO:

20MINUTES MINUTES 10 15 MINUTES

15 MINUTES

Keep your workspace organized: whole

YOU WILL NEED: lemon plain greek yogurt

1

HOW TO:

essential cutting techniques Autumn Salad HOW TO: Corn Salsa HOW TO: Spicy Coleslaw

Julienne all CSA vegetables

POTENTIAL CSA vegetables on the right, cutting board in the POTENTIAL CSAfor cut vegetables. middle,WILL and storage YOU NEED: VEGGIES TO INCLUDE: CUBE VEGGIES TO INCLUDE:

1 11

Microwave corn to cook and cut off the cob by holidng it upright bowl and Stabilize the cutting board in byaplacing a dish slicing downward. towel underneath Tear lettuce into bite size pieces and place in bowl all CSA vegetables Julienne

Slice top andthe bottom, Cut in half lengthwise, holding knife lemon corn Lay flat part down and cut into thick slices

kale

plain (nowgreek cubes).yogurt tomatoes hot sauce romaine lettuce tomatillos salt and pepper

hot sauce salt and pepper

DICE

Smaller cubes, about ½ inch. With onions and shallots, helpful to not cut through all the way with first slice (leave attached at root).

bell peppers

bell peppers

carrots

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE: red cabbage green cabbage kolhrabi

2

Whisk together lemon juice, plain greek yogurt, hot sauce, and salt and pepper until it reaches desired taste and consistency of dressing.

2 2

jalepeno peppers POTENTIAL CSA celery VEGGIES TO Pinchspring the blade ofINCLUDE: the knife where it meets onion the handle tomatobetween your thumb and first red cabbage finger, then wrap the rest of your fingers red onion around the handle. radish green cabbage MINCE

kolhrabi Smaller than a dice, Rock

SLICE

Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate CSA vegetables Curl the fingers of your opposite hand into a "claw", tips your fingers top.greek Tuck Whisk rest together lemon juice,on plain Cube CSA vegetables and add to the bowl thumb Assauce, you slice, fingers back, yogurt,in.hot andmove salt and pepper until with lettuce. keeping claw formation. it reaches desired taste and consistency of dressing. JULIENNE

Slice in half lengthwise, then

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: SUGGESTED your knife back over the cut lay on flat side and thinly slice carrots

carrots celery

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS: lean burgers on whole grain buns grilled chicken with lemon marinade grilled sausages with whole grain buns

3

Toss vegetables with dressing and let sit for up to 30 minutes to absorb flavors.

black beans in a saucepan with chicken cumin and chili powder. Prepare with corn tortillas, serve alongside a pasta dishrice SUGGESTED and CSAgrain lettuce. PAIRINGS: or other lean burgers on whole grain bunsdressing in separete save container, split salad into grilled chicken with lemon daily lunches for the week marinade grilled sausages with whole grain buns

Cut into long thin sticks

PREPARATION

pieces several times to make Serve tacos heating top withwith grilled or by roasted celery it finer. Best for garlic.

3 3 3

TECHNIQUE

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper

Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, Toss vegetables and and let sit for salt, and pepper with into dressing a vinaigrette toss up tosalad 30 minutes to absorb flavors. with

RECIPE 1

RECIPE 2 RECIPE 3

114

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

RECIPE 3


EARLY SEASON

Essential Cutting Techniques

HOW TO

Corn Salsa 35 MINUTES YOU WILL NEED lime cilantro salt and pepper

Using Your Knife BEGINNER

Learning different techniques allows the unique attributes and textures of each vegetable to shine, and gives your food visual appeal. You Will Need:

CUBE

DICE

Slice top and bottom, then cut in half lengthwise. Lay flat part down and cut into thick slices (now cubes).

Same as cubes but smaller, about ½ inch. With onions and shallots, it’s helpful to leave cuts attached at the root.

Start with a dice and then make the pieces finer by rocking your knife back over several times.

SLICE Cut in half lengthwise, then lay on flat side and thinly slice into pieces.

JULIENNE Cut a flat piece then slice into long thin sticks.

TECHNIQUE

TOOLS Cutting Board

Microwave corn to cook and cut off the cob by holding it upright in a bowl and slicing downward.

Learning different techniques allows the unique attributes and textures of each vegetable to shine, and gives Diceappeal. tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate your food visual CSA vegetables. corn tomatoes red onion tomatillos bell peppers jalepeno peppers spring onion SUGGESTED

MINCE

1

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE

2

PAIRINGS You Will Need:

Serve with tacos by TOOLS heating black beans in a saucepan Cutting Board with cumin and chili powder. Chef’s Knife Prepare with corn Dish Twelrice and CSA tortillas, lettuce. Containers or Bags Storage

3

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper.

Chef’s Knife

RECIPE 1

Dish Twel Storage Containers or Bags MID SEASON

HOW TO

Autumn Salad

LATE SEASON

LATE EARLYSEASON SEASON MID SEASON

YOU WILL NEED olive oil balsamic vinager garlic salt and pepper

HOW TO TO HOW

TO Essential Cutting HOW Techniques Spicy Corn Salsa Autumn Salad Coleslaw 35 MINUTES 10 MINUTES 15 MINUTES

YOU WILL NEED YOU WILL NEED Keep your workspace organized: whole Stabilize the cutting board by placing a lime WILL YOU olive oil NEED vegetables on the right, cutting board in the dish towel underneath cilantro lemon balsamic vinager Microwave corn tovegetables. cook and cut off the cob by middle, storage for cut vegetables. salt andand pepper Julienne all CSA plain greek yogurt garlic holding itDICE upright a bowl slicing Tear lettuce intoinbite size and pieces and downward. place in CUBE hot saltsauce and pepper bowl. Same as cubes but smaller, about ½ inch. Slice toppepper andCSA bottom, then cut in half salt and POTENTIAL lengthwise. flat part down and cut into With onions and shallots, it’s helpful to VEGGIES TOLay INCLUDE POTENTIAL CSAcubes). leave cuts attached at the root. thick slices (now corn POTENTIAL VEGGIES TOCSA INCLUDE VEGGIES tomatoes TO INCLUDE kaleonion red red cabbage romaine lettuce tomatillos green cabbage bell peppers pepper bell kolhrabi carrot jalepeno peppers carrots Pinch Curl the fingers of your opposite hand into celerythe blade of the knife where it Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate spring onion Whisk atogether lemon juice, plain greek yogurt, celery meets “claw”, rest tipsand youradd fingers onbowl top. Tuck tomatothe handle between your thumb Cube CSA vegetables to the with CSA hotvegetables. sauce, and salt and pepper until it reaches and first finger, then wrap the rest of your radish lettuce.thumb in. As you slice, move fingers back, desiredkeeping taste and consistency SUGGESTED fingers around the handle. claw formation. of dressing. SUGGESTED PAIRINGS SLICE JULIENNE MINCE PAIRINGS SUGGESTED PAIRINGS Serve with tacos by Cut in half lengthwise, then lean burgers on whole Cut a flat piece then slice Start with a dice and then top withblack grilledbeans or roasted heating lay on flat side and thinly grain into long thin sticks. makebuns the pieces finer by chicken in a saucepan with slice into pieces. rocking your knife back grilled chicken cumin and chiliwith powder. serve alongside a pasta over several times. lemon marinade Prepare with corn dish or other grain tortillas, rice and with CSA grilled sausages save dressing in separete Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, lettuce. whole grain buns container, split salad into cilantro, salt and pepper. daily lunches for the week Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt, Toss vegetables with dressing and let sit forand up pepper into a vinaigrette and toss with salad. to 30 minutes to absorb flavors.

11

22

15 MINUTES

1

Tear lettuce into bite size pieces and place in bowl.

2

Cube CSA vegetables and add to the bowl with lettuce.

top with grilled or roasted chicken

red cabbage green cabbage kolhrabi carrots celery

2

Whisk together lemon juice, plain greek yogurt, hot sauce, and salt and pepper until it reaches desired taste and consistency of dressing.

3

Toss vegetables with dressing and let sit for up to 30 minutes to absorb flavors.

lean burgers on whole grain buns

3

grilled chicken with lemon marinade Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt, and pepper into a vinaigrette and toss with salad.

grilled sausages with whole grain buns

RECIPE 2

TECHNIQUE

3 33

Julienne all CSA vegetables.

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS

serve alongside a pasta dish or other grain

PREPARATION

1

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS

save dressing in separete container, split salad into daily lunches for the week

YOU WILL NEED lemon plain greek yogurt hot sauce salt and pepper

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE kale romaine lettuce bell pepper carrot celery tomato radish

HOW TO

Spicy Coleslaw

10 MINUTES

Preparing The Workspace

RECIPE 1

RECIPE 3

RECIPE 2

RECIPE 3

EARLY SEASON

Essential Cutting Techniques

HOW TO

Corn Salsa 35 MINUTES = required ingredients

YOU WILL NEED

Using Your Knife

Learning different ways to cut vegetables allows the unique attributes and textures of each to shine, and gives your food visual appeal.

DIFFICULTY

You Will Need:

• lime • cilantro • salt and pepper

CUBE

DICE

Slice top and bottom, then cut in half lengthwise. Lay flat part down and cut into thick slices (now cubes).

Same as cubes but smaller, about ½ inch. With onions and shallots, it’s helpful to leave cuts attached at the root.

1

Microwave corn to cook and cut off the cob by holding it upright in a bowl and slicing downward.

POTENTIAL CSA Learning VEGGIES TO INCLUDEdifferent ways to cut • corn vegetables allows the unique • tomatoes • red onion attributes and textures of each tomatillos bell peppers to shine, and gives your food jalapeño peppers Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate visual spring onion appeal. CSA vegetables. 2 SUGGESTED

MINCE Start with a dice and then make the pieces finer by rocking your knife back over several times.

SLICE Cut in half lengthwise, then lay on flat side and thinly slice into pieces.

JULIENNE Cut a flat piece then slice into long thin sticks.

TECHNIQUE

TOOLS

PAIRINGS You Will Need: Serve with tacos by TOOLS heating black beans cutting board with in a saucepan cuminknife and chili powder. chef’s Prepare with corn dish towelrice and CSA tortillas, lettuce.containers or bags storage

cutting board

3

Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, cilantro, salt and pepper.

RECIPE 1

chef’s knife dish towel storage containers or bags MID SEASON

HOW TO

Autumn Salad

LATE SEASON

YOU WILL NEED • olive oil • balsamic vinegar • garlic • salt and pepper

TO HOW TO Essential Cutting HOW Techniques Corn Salsa Spicy Autumn Salad Coleslaw EARLYSEASON SEASON LATE MID SEASON

35 MINUTES 10 MINUTES 15 MINUTES = required ingredients

15 MINUTES

1

Tear lettuce into bite size pieces and place in bowl.

111

2 2 2

PREPARATION

3 33

TECHNIQUE RECIPE 1

• kale romaine lettuce bell pepper carrot celery tomato radish

1

Julienne all CSA vegetables.

2

Whisk together lemon juice, plain greek yogurt, hot sauce, and salt and pepper until it reaches desired taste and consistency of dressing.

3

Toss vegetables with dressing and let sit for up to 30 minutes to absorb flavors.

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE

2

Cube CSA vegetables and add to the bowl with lettuce.

SUGGESTED PAIRINGS top with grilled or roasted chicken

• red cabbage • carrots celery green cabbage kohlrabi SUGGESTED PAIRINGS

serve alongside a pasta dish or other grain save dressing in separate container, split salad into daily lunches for the week

= required ingredients

YOU WILL NEED • lemon • plain greek yogurt • hot sauce • salt and pepper

POTENTIAL CSA VEGGIES TO INCLUDE

= required ingredients

= required ingredients YOU WILL NEED Keep organized: whole Stabilize the cutting board by placing a YOU your WILLworkspace NEED vegetables on the right, cutting board in the dish towel underneath • limeWILL NEED YOU • olive oil Microwave corn to cook and cut off the cob by middle, and storage for cut vegetables. • cilantro Julienne all CSA vegetables. •CUBE •lemon balsamic vinegar holding itDICE upright in a bowl and slicing downward. • salt and pepper Tear lettuce into bite size pieces and place in ••plain garlicgreek yogurt top and bottom, then cut in half bowl. Same as cubes but smaller, about ½ inch. •Slice •hot saltsauce and pepper lengthwise. Lay flat part down and cut into With onions and shallots, it’s helpful to CSA •POTENTIAL salt and pepper thick slicesTO (now cubes). leave cuts attached at the root. VEGGIES INCLUDE POTENTIAL CSA POTENTIAL CSA •VEGGIES corn TO INCLUDE VEGGIES • tomatoesTO INCLUDE • kale •• red red cabbage onion romaine lettuce • tomatillos carrots bell pepper celery bell peppers carrot Pinch the blade of the knife where it Curl the fingers of your opposite hand into green cabbage jalapeño peppers Dice tomatoes, peppers and any other appropriate celery meets handle between your thumbWhisk atogether “claw”, rest tipsjuice, your plain fingers on top. Tuck lemon greek yogurt, kohlrabi springthe onion CSA vegetables. Cube CSA vegetables and add to the bowl with tomato and first finger, then wrap the rest of your thumb in.salt As you move back, hot sauce, and and slice, pepper untilfingers it reaches lettuce. radish fingers around the handle. claw formation. of dressing. desiredkeeping taste and consistency SUGGESTED SUGGESTED PAIRINGS MINCE SLICE JULIENNE PAIRINGS SUGGESTED PAIRINGS Cut in half lengthwise, then Serve withatacos by then Startburgers with dice and Cut a flat piece then slice lean on whole lay on flat side and thinly top with grilled orfiner roasted heating black beans make the pieces by into long thin sticks. grain buns slice into pieces. chicken in a saucepan withback rocking your knife grilled chicken with cumin and chili powder. over times. serveseveral alongside a pasta lemon marinade Prepare with corn dish or other grain tortillas, rice and with CSA grilled sausages save dressing in separate Toss vegetables to combine with lime juice, lettuce.grain buns whole container, split salad into cilantro, salt and pepper. daily lunches for the week Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt, and Toss vegetables with dressing and let sit for up pepper into a vinaigrette and toss with salad. to 30 minutes to absorb flavors.

HOW TO

Spicy Coleslaw

10 MINUTES = required ingredients

Preparing The Workspace

lean burgers on whole grain buns grilled chicken with lemon marinade

3

Whisk olive oil, balsamic vinegar, garlic, salt, and pepper into a vinaigrette and toss with salad.

RECIPE 2

grilled sausages with whole grain buns

RECIPE 3

RECIPE 2

RECIPE 3

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Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

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CSA Checklist

While participating in the CSA, it was helpful for me to keep a running list of the vegetables I had so I could cross them off as I ate them. I knew that a checklist component needed to be developed to help families track what they had eaten. I included the perishability of the vegetable to help the family prioritize which to eat first.

118

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

This aspect took many revisions before I settled on a time line version that helps you compare perishability, with an optional check box next to each vegetable.


GORMAN HERITAGE FARM

CSA Checklist Week #3 September 26, 2015

listed in order of most perishable to least perishable

Curly Kale 1 HEAD Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Bell Pepper 3 LBS Look for thick, firm, and bright peppers with glossy skin, avoid any with soft spots or dark mark.

Tomatillo .5 LB Choose firm, dry, hard tomatillos with the husks still firmly attached, avoid sticky soft or yellowing tomatillos. The larger the size the more flavorful it will be.

Tomato 2 LB

Look for tomatoes with bright colors and smooth skin. Yellow and orange are less acidic tasting than red. When ripe they will give with gentle pressuer. The larger the tomoato, the more juicy it will be.

Celery 1 HEAD Choose a head with straight, rigid stalks with fresh green leaves.

G O R MA N H E R I TAG E FA R M

Eggplant

CSA Checklist Week #3

1

September 26, 2015

Look for eggplants with smooth, shiny skin that are uniform in color and heavy for their size. Ripe eggplants will give when squeezed. Smaller eggplants are sweeter and have fewer seeds. Avoid blemishes, wrinkles or tan spots.

Fennel 1 LB

Choose firm, greenish-white fennel bulbs with no soft or brown spots. If the fronds are still attached to the bulb, they should be bright green with no signs of wilting.

Corn 3 EARS Look for ears with green husks, fresh silk and tight rows of kernels. Avoid ears with brown spots or dry stems, gaps between kernels or brittle silks.

Perishability by Week

1 2 3 4+

S H O P P I N G LI ST

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Bell Pepper 3 LBS

Look for thick, firm, and bright peppers with glossy skin, avoid any with soft spots or dark mark.

Korean Purple Sweet Potato

Tomatillo

1 LB

.5 LB

Look for potatoes that are firm and free of cracks and bruises. Avoid ones that have sprouted "eyes" or have green-tinged skin. The larger and rounder the potato, the easier it will be to clean and peel.

Choose firm, dry, hard tomatillos with the husks still firmly attached, avoid sticky soft or yellowing tomatillos. The larger the size the more flavorful it will be.

Spaghetti Squash

Tomato

2 LB Look for squash with frim, dry rinds free of soft spots or cracks. It should feel heavy for it’s size wih a firm, dry stem.

2 LB

Look for tomatoes with bright colors and smooth skin. Yellow and orange are less acidic tasting than red. When ripe they will give with gentle pressure. The larger the tomato, the more juicy it will be.

Celery 1 HEAD

Choose a head with straight, rigid stalks with fresh green leaves.

Eggplant 1

Look for eggplants with smooth, shiny skin, uniform color and heavy for their size. Smaller eggplants are sweeter and have fewer seeds. Avoid blemishes, wrinkles or tan spots.

Fennel 1 LB

Choose firm, greenish-white fennel bulbs with no soft or brown spots. If the fronds are still attached to the bulb, they should be bright green with no signs of wilting.

Brussels Sprouts 1 STALK

Choose a stalk with bright, firm, contact heads and no oder or brown spots.

Korean Purple Sweet Potato 1 LB

Look for potatoes that are firm and free of cracks and bruises. Avoid ones that have sprouted “eyes” or have green-tinged skin. The larger and rounder the potato, the easier it will be to clean and peel.

Spaghetti Squash 2 LB

Look for squash with firm, dry rinds free of soft spots or cracks. It should feel heavy for it’s size with a firm, dry stem.

Refresh The Process

119


CSA Checklist

GORMAN HERITAG E FAR M

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015

Perishability by Week

1

SH OP P I NG LIST

2

3

4+

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

G O R M A N H E R I TAG E FA R M

1 HEAD

CSA List Week #3

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Perishability by Week

Curly Kale

1

2

3

September 26, 2015 4+

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

Choose leaves that are closely curled together, deep green in color with no brown, wilted, or broken leaves.

SH OP P I N G LI ST

120

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


GORMAN HERITAGE FARM

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Perishability by Week

1

2

3

4+

NOTES

N OT E S

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

GORMAN HERITAGE FARM

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Perishability by Week

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

1

2

3

4+

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

1 HEAD

GORMAN HERITAGE FARM

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Perishability by Week

1

2

3

4+

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

SHOPPING LIST

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

Curly Kale

1 HEAD

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121


CSA Checklist

GO R M A N HER I TAG E FA R M

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Eat by:

1 week

2 weeks

3 weeks 4+ weeks

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Bell Pepper

Tomatillo

3 LBS

.5 LB

Celery

Eggplant

1 HEAD

1 EGGPLANT

Purple Sweet Potato

Spaghetti Squash

1 LB

1 SQUASH

Tomato 2 LB

Fennel 1 LB

Brussels Sprouts 1 STALK

SHOPPING LIST

G OR M AN H E R ITAG E FAR M

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Fresh

Eat Soon

Freeze Now

1 week

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Bell Pepper 3 LBS

Tomatillo .5 LB

Tomato 2 LB

Celery 1 HEAD

Eggplant 1 EGGPLANT

Fennel 1 LB

Brussels Sprouts 1 STALK

Purple Sweet Potato 1 LB

Spaghetti Squash 1 SQUASH

122

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

2 weeks

3 weeks

4+ weeks


GORMAN HERITAGE FARM

CSA List Week #3 September 26, 2015 Fresh

Eat Soon

Freeze Now

1 week

2 weeks

3 weeks

4+ weeks

Curly Kale 1 HEAD

Bell Pepper 3 LBS

Tomatillo .5 LB

Tomato 2 LB

Celery 1 HEAD

Eggplant 1 EGGPLANT

Fennel 1 LB

Brussels Sprouts 1 STALK

Purple Sweet Potato 1 LB

Spaghetti Squash 1 SQUASH

Refresh The Process

123


Web Components Wireframes

The website’s main focus is to demonstrate how the family connects with a CSA farm through Refresh. Currently, each farm runs its CSA differently and has different ways of marketing their CSA. Refresh creates one database of all CSAs with the ability to purchase through Refresh so that the family can easily compare. The user can input all important information based on their family’s needs and Refresh will suggest the best CSA for them.

124

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

Refresh also keeps the family connected to the farm throughout the growing season, since being in a CSA is more than just eating vegetables, its about being part of a community. The website also gives the user access to all of their refresh information also provided in printed materials, with additional in depth videos to accompany each strategy.


Refresh The Process

125


Wireframes

126

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

127


Styleframes

128

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

129


Email

Email is an easy way to stay up to date with a CSA program. Refresh sends weekly newsletters to keep the family active in the farm’s community. It also sends weekly pickup lists that show which vegetables they are receiving this week, to help them prepare for pick-up and plan their weekly meals. I wanted the email design to be simple, consistent, and give the immediate presence of the Refresh brand.

130

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

131


Video Walkthrough

To explain the multiple features of the website and email system, I developed a walk through with pop-ups to exhibit at the DAAPworks show. The walkthrough shows how a user finds a CSA through Refresh, stays connected through email, and can access in-depth videos.

132

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

133


Poster Sketches

I began to develop the poster by looking at how to explain my system, and what research was needed to explain the project. I explored many options for the poster, such as time lines, charts, and diagrams to explain the system. I needed an attention grabbing feature of the poster, so I tried kitchen photography, farm imagery, and oversized aerial vegetables, which I concluded would work best in the context of the exhibit.

134

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

135


Sketches

136

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone


Refresh The Process

137


Digital Sketches

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA) IS THE KEY

2 Million

farms in the USA

6,500

estimated CSA programs in operation

AMERICA’S FOOD LANDSCAPE

68%

of adults considered overweight

30

medical conditions linked to obesity

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

AMERICA’S FOOD LANDSCAPE

68%

of adults considered overweight

30

medical conditions linked to obesity

The increased amount of processed foods in America and ease of use means less Americans are cooking meals at home with simple ingredients. This is leading to a dramatic increase in obesity and other diet related health issues.

WHY EATING LOCAL MATTERS Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

farm connection

AMERICA’S FOOD LANDSCAPE

68%

of adults considered overweight

WHY EATING LOCAL MATTERS

medical conditions linked to obesity

Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

tracking consumption

vegetable knowledge

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA) IS THE KEY

2 Million

farms in the USA

6,500

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA farm programs for your lifestyle.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce you receive, and perishability is often an issue.

The website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh emails you each week with a printable CSA pickup list that allows you to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

email

estimated CSA programs in operation

estimated CSA programs in operation

WHY EATING LOCAL MATTERS Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

website

PDF

email

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share, explain where and how to properly store each vegetable, and provides you with important nutritional information.

website

cards

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking produce successfully. These strategies can be applied to any vegetable. The booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes using that technique organized by seasonality. The recipes are designed so that you are learning to cook comes naturally, without the stress of exact measurements or timing.

website

farm connection

tracking consumption

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA farm programs for your lifestyle.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce you receive, and perishability is often an issue.

The website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh emails you each week with a printable CSA pickup list that allows you to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

vegetable knowledge Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share, explain where and how to properly store each vegetable, and provides you with important nutritional information.

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

cooking strategies

tracking consumption

vegetable knowledge

cooking strategies

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce you receive, and perishability is often an issue.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share, explain where and how to properly store each vegetable, and provides you with important nutritional information.

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking produce successfully. These strategies can be applied to any vegetable.

cooking strategies Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking produce successfully. These strategies can be applied to any vegetable. The booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes using that technique organized by seasonality. The recipes are designed so that you are learning to cook comes naturally, without the stress of exact measurements or timing.

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA farm programs for your lifestyle. The website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh emails you each week with a printable CSA pickup list that allows you to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

The booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes using that technique organized by seasonality. The recipes are designed so that you are learning to cook comes naturally, without the stress of exact measurements or timing.

booklets website website

email

website

PDF

I chose to go with a chart of explaining the four components of my solution and which parts of my system they corresponded to, with ‘blurbs’ of my research scattered throughout the poster. I refined this layout and shot real photography of the vegetables. After multiple refinements and critiques, I added a diagram of my solution components, and used icons to match these components to the four elements in the chart.

138

6,500

2 Million

The increased amount of processed foods in America and ease of use means less Americans are cooking meals at home with simple ingredients. This is leading to a dramatic increase in obesity and other diet related health issues.

farm connection

website

COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE (CSA) IS THE KEY

30

farms in the USA

The increased amount of processed foods in America and ease of use means less Americans are cooking meals at home with simple ingredients. This is leading to a dramatic increase in obesity and other diet related health issues.

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

email

website

cards

website

booklets

email

website

PDF

email

website

cards

website

booklets


WHY EAT LOCAL?

2M

WHY COOK AT HOME?

farms in the USA

68% of adults overweight

reconnecting families to locally grown, homecooked meals.

WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE?

6,500 estimated CSA programs in operation

reconnecting families to locally grown, homecooked meals.

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

68% of adults overweight

farm connection

consumption tracking

vegetable knowledge

farms in the USA

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

A website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA programs for your lifestyle.

WHY COOK AT HOME? A website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

The increased amount and ease of use of processed foods in America are causing many health problems among consumers. Cooking at home reduces intake of bad ingredients.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

cooking strategies

2M Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA farm programs for your lifestyle.

consumption tracking

farm connection

WHY EAT LOCAL?

6,500 estimated CSA programs in operation

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better.

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully. These strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

cooking strategies

vegetable knowledge

Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE ?

Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

These strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

reconnecting families to locally grown, homecooked meals.

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home with simple ingredients with a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

reconnecting families to locally grown, homecooked meals.

68% WHY COOK AT HOME?

68%

1

The increased amount and ease of use of processed foods in America are causing many health problems among consumers. Cooking at home reduces intake of bad ingredients.

of adults overweight

Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

estimated CSA programs in operation

of adults overweight

30+ medical conditions linked to diet

WHY COOK AT HOME? The increased amount of processed foods in America and ease of use means less Americans are cooking meals at home with simple ingredients. This is leading to a dramatic increase in obesity and other diet related health issues.

2M

6,500

farms in the USA

estimated CSA programs in operation

WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE? By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

WHY EAT LOCAL? Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that that has been severed by the food industry. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition and being exposed to the growing process helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

2 consumption tracking

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

farm connection

consumption tracking

vegetable knowledge

cooking strategies

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

3

vegetable knowledge

4

cooking strategies

WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE?

6,500

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA programs for your lifestyle. A website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

WHY EAT LOCAL?

2M

farms in the USA

farm connection

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop, and receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully.

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA farm programs for your lifestyle.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

A website and email service keeps you updated on all farm events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better. Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully. These strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

These strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

Refresh The Process

139


Refinements

an organization that reconnects families to locally grown, home cooked meals.

an organization that reconnects families to locally grown, home cooked meals.

Fewer Americans are Cooking at Home Fewer Americans are Cooking at Home Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home to a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

How we Refresh Your Family’s Eating Habits farm connection Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA programs for your lifestyle.

consumption tracking The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

How we Refresh Your Family’s Eating Habits

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home to a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm. WHY COOK AT HOME?

WHY COOK AT HOME?

68%

adults overweight

38%

children overweight

DIRECT TO CONSUMER SALES

144,530 farms $1.3 billion in sales

The increased amount and ease of use of processed foods in America are causing many health problems among consumers. The amount of time spent preparing meals at home has fallen by half since the 1960’s, yet we are consuming five-hundred more calories a day. Cooking at home reduces the intake of processed ingredients, therefore promoting healthier diets.

WHY EAT LOCAL? Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that was severed by the food industry. Buying food direct from farms promotes seasonal eating, which diversifies your diet and costs less. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition also exposes your family to the growing process and helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

A website and email service keeps you updated on all of your farm’s events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

68%

adults overweight

38%

children overweight

DIRECT TO CONSUMER SALES

vegetable knowledge Getting to know your produce will help you cook better.

cooking strategies Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully.

144,530 farms $1.3 billion in sales

The increased amount and ease of use of processed foods in America are causing many health problems among consumers. The amount of time spent preparing meals at home has fallen by half since the 1960’s, yet we are consuming five-hundred more calories a day. Cooking at home reduces the intake of processed ingredients, therefore promoting healthier diets.

farm connection

consumption tracking

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA programs for your lifestyle.

WHY EAT LOCAL? Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that was severed by the food industry. Buying food direct from farms promotes seasonal eating, which diversifies your diet and costs less. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition also exposes your family to the growing process and helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

A website and email service keeps you updated on all of your farm’s events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

vegetable knowledge WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE? By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop and then receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm and gain access to the freshest, most nutrient rich food in your area on a regular basis.

Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

P

A series of strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

WHY COMMUNITY SUPPORTED AGRICULTURE?

K P S B L S A D S U A C A X K P S B L S A L M L C H R U H R N L X B N L X H R U M B Y T E M J E X H R E S T A C E Y N G X H R U M E H R U A O L N E M E K U R Z H A L S N E R U M E X H B V staceykurzhalsdesign.com O L staceykdesign@gmail.com F R E N O I

140

Melinda Sekela Senior Capstone

H Z L K M I Y V

L O V E O F E O

C E Z V L R N I

H Z L K M I Y V

R P Z M E O N D

cooking strategies Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully.

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better.

By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop and then receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm and gain access to the freshest, most nutrient rich food in your area on a regular basis.

Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

U I E A L Z C P

M C J K J M R Z

E R W E B L I O

X E N S L Y O L

H A P R K M D S

R T E X A R N M

Q I V J D E S E

S V S P L I N G

E I A B O F E O

E T I R Y M N I

K Y U Y N G X D

P I Z E L M C N

W R O W Z J O H

Z P O Q W E L Y

L G M K R Q I U

E F M T L A O M

A S B X U B E E

D A A P L V S H

H I J S Z M N B

A series of strategy booklets range in difficulty and provide step-by-step techniques, as well as sample recipes for each. The recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

D B E K L X R J

H J S D R W Q O

N P O I H T R S

T B J Y C X Y Y

M I H A V E N D

Z Y J K R W G I

X R T Q S I P P

C Z I F L A I O

V P N I U M C A

L I S N S J S J

Z Y P D R W G I

X R I Q S I P P

C Z R P L A I O

V P A N U M C A

F H T J K G D

X O I C L R I N M P

I T Y R P C E V E

A O N C V D B N W

V B R P I O

H N E O Y U


an organization that reconnects families to locally grown, home cooked meals.

FEWER AMERICANS COOK AT HOME

REFRESHING FAMILY EATING HABITS

Refresh aims to connect families who do not typically cook at home to a CSA in order to develop a better relationship with food and learn how to cook through the use of local, seasonal produce direct from a farm.

Why Cook at Home?

68%

38%

The increased amount and ease of use of processed foods in America are causing many health problems among consumers. The amount of time spent preparing meals at home has fallen by half since the 1960’s, yet we are consuming five-hundred more calories a day. Cooking at home reduces the intake of processed ingredients, therefore promoting healthier diets.

children overweight

adults overweight

farm connection

Why Eat Local?

DIRECT TO CONSUMER SALES

144,530 farms $1.3 billion in sales

consumption tracking

Refresh takes your family’s preferences and suggests the best CSA programs for your lifestyle.

Eating locally grown food helps to foster a connection between food and consumer that was severed by the food industry. Buying food direct from farms promotes seasonal eating, which diversifies your diet and costs less. Relying on a farmer for a source of nutrition also exposes your family to the growing process and helps rebuild a lasting relationship with food.

The hardest part of joining a CSA is keeping up with all the produce received without any going bad.

A website and email service keeps you updated on all of your farm’s events and news, fostering a connection and building a community among the CSA members.

Refresh provides you with a printable pickup list with your share to track the produce as you eat it, and keeps perishability at the forefront of your mind to help you plan your meals better.

vegetable knowledge Why Community Supported Agriculture? By joining a CSA program, you are participating in a mutual support structure. A CSA member purchases a ‘share’ of the farmer’s crop and then receives produce each week throughout the growing season. By paying up front, you are ensuring financial stability for the farm and gain access to the freshest, most nutrient rich food in your area on a regular basis.

4,000+ CSA programs in the United States

K H X L

P R H N

S B L S A U E H R M E M R E U M E

D N E J

S U A C A L X B N L L I N D A S E K E L

X X G A

K H X S

www.melindasekela.com melindasekela@gmail.com

P R H N

S U R E

B M U R

L B M U

S Y E M

A T H E

L E R X

M D U H

L J A B O F E O

O E O V L R N I

R Z L K M I Y V

E O V E O F E O

F A N V L R N I

R Z E K M I Y V

E P W M E O N D

S I Y A L Z C P

H C O K J M R Z

E R R E B L I O

J E K S L Y O L

H A P R K M D S

R T E X A R N M

cooking strategies

Getting to know your produce will help you cook better.

Refresh provides you with ten building blocks to cooking any vegetable successfully.

Cards handed out with your share each week allow you to identity the vegetables in your share and explains how to properly store each vegetable.

A series of booklets range in difficulty and provide step-bystep techniques for each strategy, as well as sample recipes. These recipes are designed without exact measurements or timing, so learning to cook becomes stress free.

Q I V J D E S E

S V C P L I N G

E I G B O F E O

E T P R Y M N I

K Y U Y N G X D

P I Z E L M C N

W R O W Z J O H

Z P O Q W E L Y

L G M K R Q I U

E F H T L A O M

A S B X U B E E

D A A P L V S H

H I J S Z M N B

C S A K L X R J

H J S D R W Q O

N P O I H T R S

T B J Y C X Y Y

M I H A V E N D

Z Y J K R W G I

X R T Q S I P P

E Z I F L A I O

A P N I U M C A

T I S N S J S J

L Y P D R W G I

O R I Q S I P P

C Z R P L A I O

A P A N U M C A

L H T J K G D

X O I C L R I T N N P

I T O R P C E V E

A O N C V D B N W

Refresh The Process

V B R P I O

H N E O Y U

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Part IV Reflection and Final Designs

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Reflection

When we were first prompted to begin our capstone, our professor’s advice was to choose something you’re passionate about, because you’ll get bored if you don’t. I was hesitant to do a capstone on food because I know they had been done before, and not always successfully, but I am so glad I went with my gut and pursued this topic. Not only did my interest in food keep me passionate about my project, but my project actually made me more passionate about food. I found a love for local eating that I hadn’t had before, and I’m more involved in the local food landscape and in cooking at home than I ever was before. Doing this capstone not only solidified my skills as a designer and gave me an outlet to showcase what I’ve learned, it fundamentally changed my beliefs and practices for how I live my life. Every day I woke up excited to work on this project. It was addicting. The more I worked on it, the more I found could be added or improved. If I could I would continue to work on this for the rest of my career, because I believe that this can be implemented to become an actual product. More than anything, I want to share the lessons I learned through this with my audience. The most important part of this whole project was joining the CSA. It really turned my project around and forced me to rethink what I had 144

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been pursuing to make it more practical. Having firsthand user experience allowed me to infuse this project with my involvement with a CSA. Joining the CSA proved to me that my project could work. It can absolutely change your eating habits and help to form a better relationship with food. It really improved my skills as a cook. I feel more confident in the kitchen. I tried a lot of new recipes and new vegetables that I never knew existed before. Making dinner was an exciting part of my day that I had fun planning for and executing. I can now make up recipes on my own using skills I’ve learned. I felt better, and healthier, eating all of those veggies. I felt connected to something bigger than just the normal food to table nonsense. I was part of a community, I was connected to a local farm, and I was proud of the food I was cooking and eating. It kept me on my toes, for sure. And it was hard. I was relieved when it ended. Will I do it again? Maybe. Was it worth it? Definitely. It changed my outlook on food and my relationship with it, and with the city I lived in. It gave me the confidence to push forward with this project because I knew it would be a success. For the first time, I was confident that my designs could make a difference, and I can leave undergraduate study at DAAP as a confident, successful designer.


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Project Legacy

I hope that my project can inspire others for several reasons. First, it was an intense study in systems based design. I had a large amount of information that needed to be communicated and many problems that needed to be solved surrounding the practice of participating in a CSA program. Rather than just focus on one of these issues in great detail, I wanted to think broadly to create a cohesive system that spanned multiple components in various mediums such as web, print, and motion. I want others to view my project as an example of how media can come together to become one tool that integrates into a user’s lifestyle. I also hope that my project convinces people to think differently about their eating habits and opens their eyes to the options available for eating locally. Many people don’t know what a CSA program is, so if my project can inform others and intrigue them into looking into it further, I will consider it a success. Community Supported Agriculture is a fast growing mechanism for purchasing local food, and it benefits both the consumer and the grower in numerous ways. I think it deserves to be noticed as part of this changing culture. As Americans, we are starting to realize that the

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way we are eating is not right, it’s not good for us nutritionally or socially, and i think we are ready to start making a commitment to eating better. We see these changes starting to ripple throughout our food landscape, a shift away from fast food and processed food, a better understanding of organic food and natural food. But it is up to the individual to make significant strides in how their family chooses to eat, and by choosing a CSA program, you are taking part in a community that supports a better relationship with food.


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Final Designs Box and Printed Materials

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Acknowledgments

Barb Liphardt, Head Farmer and CSA Coordinator at Gorman Heritage Farm for her tour of the farm, breakdown of how CSAs function from the inside, and insights on how CSAs can change eating habits. Emily Van Walleghen, Assistant Professor of Nutritional Sciences at UC and Grace Falciglia, Depatment Head of Nutritional Sciences at UC for their expert information on America’s food landscape and issues with eating and cooking at home.

Ed and Linda Ponikwia, relatives. Ed for his generous assistance with photography using his professional lighting and camera equipment, Linda for her patience and professionalism as a hand model, and to the both of them, for letting me take over their kitchen for a weekend. Jessica Sait, Jamie Swain, Rita Stringham, Dawn Resek, relatives for their insights on family activities and eating habits while interviewed as potential users.

Molly Pam and Natalie Greaves-Peters, Washington Square CSA Core Committee Members for their friendly advice and guidance throughout my first CSA, as well as assistance procuring a survey from the CSA members.

Special thanks to the other Graphic Communication Design faculty, especially Renee Seward for her feedback on poster design, and Emily Verba for her extra time given for feedback meetings.

Paula Lukats, CSA in NYC Program Manager for Just Food for her wonderful insights on the CSA program landscape, common issues while using a CSA, and how information could be designed to make the CSA process easier.

Additional acknowledgment to my great friends, for their unending support and inspiration, as well as their patience while user testing (they prepared a lot of my vegetables for me): Megan Gilbert, Amy Untch, Brittany Newell, Kevin Spencer, and Megan Mudman.

Todd Timney, Design Methodology Professor for his direction and feedback throughout the entire capstone process. Bill and Barb Sekela, parents for all of their advice, honest feedback, and emotional support. Extra kudos to Bill for his help finalizing the design and assembly of the recipe box.

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Sources

Website and Email Components

Poster

Gorman Heritage Farm http://gormanfarm.org/

Local Harvest, CSA Program Database http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

Local Harvest, CSA Program Database http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

Dietary Guidelines for Americans: 2010, by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Seasonal Produce Recipe Guide, by Martha Stewart http://www.marthastewart.com/276955/ seasonal-produce-recipe-guide

Cooked by Michael Pollen

Vegetable Cards Still Tasty: Your Ultimate Shelf Life Guide www.stilltasty.com Nutrition and You www.nutrition-and-you.com

Strategy Booklets The Kitchn Cookbook: Recipes, Kitchens & Tips to Inspire Your Cooking by Sara Kate Gillingham The Kitchn’s Cooking School http://www.thekitchn.com/collection/ cooking-school-373 Cook Smarts http://www.cooksmarts.com/

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2012 Census of Agriculture: Family Farms, by the U.S. Department of Agriculture

Selected recipes, preparation techniques and cooking strategies were learned and adapted throughout my personal use of a CSA. For a comprehensive list of all sources, visit my blog at www.melinda-capstone.tumblr.com.


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Melinda Sekela DAAP Capstone May 2015

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Melinda Sekela DAAP Capstone May 2015

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