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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents


Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents Note: The Childcare Approval Scheme is only available in England


This book is aimed at parents who are employing a carer looking after children in their own home (nanny) rather than those who are engaging the services of a self-employed, over-7s childminder. If you are unsure whether your childcarer needs to be employed by you or is self-employed for Tax and National Insurance purposes, you can refer to the Inland Revenue leaflet IR56 Employed or SelfEmployed? More detailed guidance is available at: www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/employment-status/ index.htm

The information in this booklet is correct at the time of going to press, but is subject to change.

Produced by NCMA in conjunction with SureStart Ref code: GFP1 ISBN: 1-84478-449-5 Š April 2005


Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Introduction 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Different types of home-based childcare The Childcare Approval Scheme Your responsibility as an employer Finding and selecting an approved nanny Working together Keeping your home safe Help with the cost of approved childcare Questions and concerns

Contents

Contents 4

5 9 11 17 23 27 31 33

9 Appendices Childcare qualifications Useful words Where next Parental permission forms

10 Index

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35 37 38 42

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Introduction

Introduction Employing an approved nanny is an important step. Choosing the right person to look after your children is hard enough, but put that together with all the challenges associated with employing someone and you have a big task ahead of you. Get it right, however, and you will be rewarded with a safe, happy environment for your children who could learn so much from another caring adult. Choosing a registered or approved childcarer means that you are eligible for tax and National Insurance contributions exemptions on employer-provided childcare vouchers and may be eligible to apply for the childcare element of Working Tax Credit. Find out more in Section 7: Help with the cost of approved childcare When you choose an approved nanny, you can be assured that some elements of selection have been carried out. An approved nanny will have a valid first-aid certificate, have done some training, and have had an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure. Find out more in Section 2: The Childcare Approval Scheme.

Employing an approved nanny checklist Are you ready to employ an approved nanny? Have you thought about: ■ public liability insurance? ■ employer’s liability insurance? ■ whether your home is safe for a nanny to work in? ■ how much you can pay your nanny? ■ devising a contract? ■ tax and National Insurance? ■ whether you want your nanny to live in or live out? ■ a job description for your nanny? ■ what happens when you no longer need your nanny? ■ what happens if your nanny is ill or becomes pregnant? ■ agreeing “ground rules” on visitors, use of the phone, car etc?

Notes

This guide takes you, step by step, through things you need to think about when employing a nanny: from finding and interviewing the right person, to their employment rights, and making your relationship with your nanny a success. There are checklists included throughout, and sample forms for risk assessments, interviews, medical checks and parental permissions – providing all you need to employ a professional nanny. There is a lot to think about. Have a look at our checklist to see if you’ve considered some of the issues that might come up. Make notes of any questions you’ve got and hopefully you’ll find the answers in this guide and, if not, a signpost to the right direction.

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1 Different types of home-based childcare

Choosing someone to look after your child is one of the most important, and often most difficult, decisions you will ever make. With such a wide range of options available now, deciding on the type of childcare you want is rarely straightforward. You will need to think about whether you want your child looked after in your home, or in the childcarer’s home; whether you want your child to be looked after with children from other families; and whether your childcare should be approved or registered.

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Whichever you choose, you will want your childcarer’s job to include caring for every aspect of your child’s well-being. For a full-time childcarer, this could include: planning and preparing play and educational activities; taking the children to school, nursery, appointments and activities; and preparing their meals. And you will want someone that you can trust absolutely, which is why the Government has introduced the Childcare Approval Scheme (see p9) to carry out some basic checks on your childcarer to reassure you that they are not unsuitable to care for children.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

1 Different types of home-based childcare

Here is a breakdown of the different types of home-based childcare: Registered childminder Registered childminders are generally selfemployed and usually work in their own homes caring for other people’s children. Childminders who care for children under the age of 8 are required, by law, to be registered and inspected by Ofsted. New childminders are required to undertake introductory training of at least 12 hours. All registered childminders should have public liability insurance, a health check, and an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosure, and they must have a valid paediatric first-aid certificate. Registered childminders’ work is governed by the Children Act 1989, and by national standards for childminding. They may only care for a maximum of three children under 5 and an additional three aged 5 to 8, including their own children at any one time.

The advantages of using a childminder are that: ■ they are registered with, and are regularly inspected by, Ofsted ■ they are usually self-employed ■ they have had a medical check ■ they have their own public liability insurance ■ they have a valid first-aid certificate ■ they can offer more flexible hours than some other forms of childcare

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■ your child will mix with children of different ages from other families ■ brothers and sisters of different ages can be looked after together ■ your child will be looked after in a homefrom-home environment ■ your child is cared for in their own community and can easily take part in local clubs and activities. Nanny A nanny works in a family’s home, caring for their child or children. Some nannies live in, others come to work daily, and others share their time between two or more families. Nannies do not have to be registered and inspected by Ofsted and are not governed by national standards. There are no legal requirements for training, the number of children they look after, or for a Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) check. However, they can be approved under the Government’s Childcare Approval Scheme (see p9). The advantages of employing a nanny are that: ■ they can be approved under the Government’s Childcare Approval Scheme ■ your child can form a close, one-to-one relationship with their carer in your own home ■ your child has their own toys, books, food and so on, close at hand ■ brothers and sisters of different ages can be looked after together ■ you have a high degree of control over your child’s routine, diet, activities and play environment ■ they can offer more flexible hours than some other forms of childcare ■ they can offer evening babysitting, take sole charge of your child when you’re away, or go with you on holiday ■ you and your child don’t have to travel to the childcare setting ■ your child is cared for in their own community and can easily take part in local clubs and activities ■ they can look after your children when they aren’t well.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

1 Different types of home-based childcare

Over-7s childminder Childminders who care solely for children aged 8 or over do not have to be registered or inspected by Ofsted and are not governed by national standards for childminding. However, they can be approved under the Government’s Childcare Approval Scheme (see p9). The advantages of using an over-7s childminder are that: ■ they can be approved under the Government’s Childcare Approval Scheme ■ your child will be looked after with children of a similar age group ■ your child is cared for in their own community and can easily take part in local clubs and activities. Home childcarer A home childcarer is a registered childminder who has been approved by Ofsted to work in a family’s home. They have also taken introductory training, a first-aid course specifically for people who work with children, a health check, and an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosure. The existing Home Childcarer Scheme has now ended and Ofsted are no longer accepting applications. Ofsted’s approval for existing home childcarers will continue until December 2005. So that parents can continue to claim financial support, after that time, home childcarers are being encouraged to apply for approval before December 2005.

Registered childcare Required by law, includes registered childminders, out-of-school clubs and nurseries. Registered childcarers will have had a minimum of: ■ an enhanced CRB disclosure ■ first-aid training specifically for people who work with children ■ introductory training ■ a workplace inspection ■ completed health declarations.

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Approved childcarers The Childcare Approval Scheme applies only to care provided in England, and is voluntary for childcarers who are not required by law to register, such as nannies and over-7s childminders. They will have undertaken a childcare qualification or introductory course, hold a valid paediatric first-aid certificate, and have had an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure. For more on the Childcare Approval Scheme, see p9.

Approved childcare Voluntary, includes nannies and over-7s childminders. Approved childcarers will have had a minimum of: ■ an enhanced CRB disclosure ■ first-aid training specifically for people who work with children ■ introductory training.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

1 Different types of home-based childcare

Under the terms of registration and approval the following categories apply Approved nanny

Nanny

Registered childminder

Approved over-7s childminder

Over-7s childminder

Registered with Ofsted

Has a Criminal Records Bureau check

Has a medical check

Has their home inspected

Works in their own home

Works in the family home

Has public liability insurance

Has first-aid training

Has a qualification or has attended an induction course

Allowed to look after a baby

Allowed to look after children over 7

Usually looks after children from one family

Usually looks after children from more than one family

Is usually employed

Is usually self-employed

KEY ● Applies to this category ● Could apply to this category

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2 The Childcare Approval Scheme

The Department for Education and Skills (DfES), through the SureStart Unit, has developed an approval scheme that will provide recognised national status for individuals providing childcare that is not otherwise required by law to be registered – for example, childcare that is provided in the child’s own home or, for children over 7, on other domestic premises. This will enable more parents to access tax credits and employer-supported childcare vouchers.

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Nestor Primecare Services Ltd (Nestor), an independent provider of personnel and service solutions to the health and social care market, has been chosen to carry out the approval service on behalf of the Government. The scheme, which applies only to childcare provided in England, began in April 2005. For more information, a national helpline is available on 0845 767 8111. Or visit: www.childcareapprovalscheme.co.uk.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

2 The Childcare Approval Scheme

Approved childcarers have: ■ a childcare qualification, or have attended an appropriate induction course ■ first-aid training ■ an enhanced CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) disclosure, including a POCA (Protection of Children Act 1999) list check.

work, and know about the needs and development of young children. Childcare approval covers basic requirements – you might decide that the nanny you employ needs to have a higher level qualification.

The scheme does not: ■ verify whether the childcarer is eligible to work in the UK ■ clarify the age group that the childcarer is suited to work with ■ guarantee that parents using an approved childcarer are entitled to financial support, either through tax credits or employersupported childcare ■ inspect their workplace.

Approved childcarers must hold a current and valid paediatric first-aid certificate. This means that they should have completed first-aid training, specifically for people who work with children, with a recognised training provider, within three years prior to application. The training must be repeated, and the certificate renewed, every three years.

The benefits to you, as a parent, are that: ■ you know your approved childcarer has been checked and has met basic criteria ■ you know the childcarer is not unsuitable to care for children and has some understanding of their needs and what to do in an emergency ■ you may be able to access financial support through the childcare element of the Working Tax Credit or through employer-supported childcare. Approval is valid for one year and, to cover all the expenses involved, there is an annual fee, which includes the cost of the CRB disclosure. For 2005/06 this is £96.

Childcare qualifications Approved childcarers must have a childcare qualification or have attended an appropriate induction course. The list of courses and qualifications that are deemed appropriate is constantly being updated; visit: www.dfes.gov.uk/childrenswfqualifications Looking after children is a skilled and demanding job, and relevant training will give the nanny the skills and confidence to do it well. Knowing that your nanny has been trained can reassure you that they have a professional attitude, are committed to their

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First-aid training

The first-aid course needs to cover all the necessary aspects of dealing with emergencies including resuscitation, choking, shock and anaphylactic shock.

Criminal Records Bureau An approved childcarer will have had an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) disclosure carried out on them. This is the most comprehensive check currently available. The CRB undertakes screening of people working in roles with children or vulnerable people. All registered childminders, teachers and nurses, for example, have CRB disclosures as a condition of their registration. The CRB searches through police and other databases for any information relating to either the childcarer or the addresses they have supplied. It confirms their identity, and also investigates their background, highlighting any past incidents that may have a bearing on their suitability to be a childcarer. The childcarer provides details of their addresses for the past five years, and an authorised person countersigns a form to confirm that they have seen the identification documents – passport, driving licence, etc.

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3 Your responsibility as an employer

There is a lot to think about when employing a nanny. Not only do you have to be sure you’ve chosen the right person to look after your children, but you also have to think about your responsibilities as an employer. Employing a childcarer, such as an approved nanny, is different from engaging the services of a childminder, who is usually selfemployed. The childminder is responsible for setting their own hours of work, their own fees and conditions, whereas you are responsible for setting your approved nanny’s hours, wages and conditions. See the Inland

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Revenue leaflet IR56 Employed or SelfEmployed? if you need further clarification. More detailed guidance is available at: www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/employmentstatus/index.htm.

Your nanny’s employment rights Nannies cannot usually be classed as selfemployed. You, as an employer, are responsible for your nanny’s tax and National Insurance contributions.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

3 Your responsibility as an employer

You must provide your nanny with a P60 tax certificate after the end of each tax year (by 31 May) showing their tax and National Insurance contributions, and a P45 when they leave your employment. There are specialist payroll companies that can administer these aspects of employing an approved nanny on your behalf. Time off Your nanny has an annual leave entitlement under European law of at least four working weeks (which may include public/bank holidays). Annual leave is granted “pro-rata” (so if they work for five days a week, they are entitled to 20 days’ paid leave each year; if they work three days a week, they should be given at least 12 days’ leave). They are also entitled to at least one day (24 continuous hours) off each week. Sick pay You should state how much sick pay your nanny will be entitled to per year of employment. If your nanny pays National Insurance contributions, you are obliged to pay them Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) if they have been absent from work because of ill-health for at least four consecutive days. This SSP will usually be paid in place of, or as part of, their

usual pay. You may be able to claim the SSP portion of this pay back from the Inland Revenue. A payroll company can help with this. You and your nanny should agree a procedure for times when they are ill, including back-up childcare arrangements. Maternity entitlements If your nanny becomes pregnant while employed by you, she is entitled to certain statutory benefits, including 26 weeks’ maternity leave and reasonable time off for ante-natal appointments. If she has been in the job for at least six months at the 15th week before her expected due date, she is entitled to maternity pay of 90 per cent of her full-time pay for the first six weeks of maternity leave and 20 weeks of statutory maternity pay after this. Your nanny may not return to work until at least two weeks after the birth of her child. You can claim back in full the statutory maternity pay you give to your nanny. It is illegal for an employer to dismiss a woman because she is pregnant, and she is entitled to return to work on the same or similar terms as before. You should discuss with your nanny possible arrangements in this situation. Disability Discrimination Act 1995 Your nanny is covered by this act when looking for and accepting employment. It is your responsibility to make sure you don’t discriminate against an employee because of an impairment or medical condition. For more information, call the Disability Rights Commission helpline on 08457 622633. Pension arrangements It is unusual for a nanny to be offered a pension as part of their employment package, and at the moment employers with fewer than five employees are not required to make stakeholder pensions available to their employees.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Depending on the clauses in your contract, your nanny may also be entitled to redundancy pay if you and your family move to another part of the country and they are unable to go with you. You can find out more about redundancy at: www.dti.gov.uk/er/redundancy. Termination of employment Usually employers and employees each agree to give notice of one month before terminating the contract. If you have agreed that your nanny will work a trial period, the notice required may be reduced to one week on either side during this period. In the contract there should be a clear description of the dismissal procedure. This is usually a three-stage process – verbal warning, written warning and then termination of employment. Your nanny, as an employee, has the right to appeal to an independent third party. In the case of gross misconduct – examples of which should be clearly described in the contract – you can ask your nanny to leave immediately. Typical examples of gross misconduct would include harming or endangering a child, stealing from the family, or being under the influence of drugs or alcohol while working. Unfair dismissal If your nanny has been in their job for 12 months or more, they are protected against

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unfair dismissal. If they feel their employment has been terminated unfairly, and they have a signed, valid contract with you, they are entitled to take their case to a third party such as an employment tribunal.

3 Your responsibility as an employer

Redundancy You may decide that you no longer need a nanny and have to make them redundant. To qualify for redundancy payments, the nanny must have been working for the same employer, with no breaks in employment, for at least two years. If you decide to change the nature of your childcare – for example, moving from using a full-time nanny to a part-time one – you are required to offer them the position first, giving them first refusal. If they decide not to accept the offer of the new terms, they are entitled to redundancy pay, unless they are on a fixed-term contract that is ending.

Out-of-hours care You may need childcare outside your nanny’s usual working hours, especially if you employ a live-in nanny. When agreeing the contract, you and your nanny should decide whether occasional extra care is paid over and above the net wage and, if so, whether it is to be paid separately or in the usual wage packet. Either way, the payment should appear on the payslip. Many live-in nannies are expected to be available to babysit two or three evenings a week in addition to their daily hours. Insurance It’s essential that you and your nanny have adequate insurance cover for the work they will be doing. You should have: ■ employer’s liability insurance – to protect you against legal costs for any accident or injury that your nanny might suffer while working in your home ■ home contents insurance (with an “endorsement” to cover nannies working in your home) – so that if they accidentally break or damage any of your possessions, you can claim the cost of repairs or a replacement. Ideally, your household contents insurance policy should also cover your nanny’s personal belongings against damage and theft while in your home. ■ motor insurance, with your nanny as a named “business use” driver, if they will be driving your car in their work as a nanny. Your nanny should have: ■ public liability insurance – to protect them against legal costs for any accident or injury that a child might suffer while in their care, and to cover the costs of any damage that a child in their care might cause to another person’s property

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

3 Your responsibility as an employer

■ motor insurance, with “business use” cover, if your nanny will be using their own car in their work. What you’ll need to pay for Approved nannies are entitled to receive at least the national minimum wage if they live out or are provided with separate accommodation. Since October 2004, workers aged 22 or over can expect at least £4.85 an hour, and the rate for workers aged between 18 and 21 is £4.10 an hour. You should always agree a gross (pre-tax) wage with your nanny. When deciding how much to pay your nanny, you will need to bear in mind their experience and training, the number of children you need them to look after, the hours you want them to work and the area in which you live. Whether you need a live-in or live-out nanny will also determine the wages you pay. Some live-in nannies receive “benefits-in-kind” as part of their wages – for example private accommodation, or the use of a car. There is guidance governing the payments of benefits in kind, and employers should be aware of any special tax provision they need to make. The Inland Revenue website: www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk provides advice for employers.

Expenses Your contract should set out the process for your nanny to claim expenses incurred during their work. You should ask your nanny to keep all receipts and make a detailed claim at the end of an agreed period – usually weekly or monthly. Tax and National Insurance You have a duty to pay your nanny’s wages regularly and on time, and to give them a payslip showing how much you have paid and detailing any deductions made. All employers are responsible for paying tax and National Insurance contributions for their employees. For advice and guidance, call your local Inland Revenue tax office and ask to be put through to the new employer section. Explain that you are employing a nanny as you may be eligible to use the simplified deduction scheme, depending on the amount of money you intend paying your nanny. The new employer section will advise you about this. Tell the tax office how much you expect to pay your nanny – check that it’s above the “lower earnings limit”. You will be sent a tax office reference number and a New Employer’s Starter Pack. To work out National Insurance contributions, call the Employer’s Helpline on 08457 143143.

Each year, Nannytax compiles a survey of average nanny wages around the country which is published in Nursery World magazine’s Professional Nanny supplement.

Area

Live-in nanny

Live-out nanny

London

£19,956

£26,937

Outer London and home counties

£18,007

£22,514

Other cities and towns

£15,760

£19,335

Rural areas

£15,689

£18,939

Source: Nannytax/Professional Nanny annual survey of UK nanny wages January 2005.

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Payroll services There are specialist payroll services for parents who employ nannies to ensure that tax and National Insurance contributions are properly dealt with. Have a look on the internet, or in specialist magazines for

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Keeping records Once your nanny leaves and is no longer employed by you, you should keep their tax and insurance records for at least three years. The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development recommends six years. Interview notes of all applicants should be kept for a maximum of six months and then destroyed. This is in case of a claim against you for race or sex discrimination. Normally, an applicant can claim against you up to three months after the interview, but keep the records for six months just in case. Nannies from abroad If your nanny is a national of a country in the European Economic Area (EEA), they have the right to enter and work in the United Kingdom just like British citizens. The following are EEA countries: Austria Belgium Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Italy

Latvia Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Malta Netherlands Norway Poland Portugal Slovakia Slovenia Spain Sweden

For information on work permits for foreign nationals, call Work Permits UK on 0114 259 4074 or visit www.workpermits.gov.uk

3 Your responsibility as an employer

working families, for details of companies offering nanny payroll services.

If your nanny has lived continuously for six months or more in a country other than Great Britain, in the last five years prior to their application, they must produce evidence of their suitability to care for children covering the whole period they lived in that country, from an official source which the Approval Body can verify. Nestor will only accept originals of any records and documents and they must, where necessary, be translated by an accredited translation agency, embassy or high commission.

For more information on the rights of workers in this country and your responsibilities as an employer visit www.dti.gov.uk/er/index.htm. The Inland Revenue has a starter pack for new employers; download it from: www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/employers/ starter_pack.htm.

An international treaty means that Swiss nationals have a similar right to live in the UK as EEA nationals.

You should ask nationals from all EEA countries to produce a document, such as a passport, which confirms their nationality. If the nanny is from a country outside the EEA, they generally need to have a work permit. For more information on employing a foreign national call the employers' helpline on 0845 010 6677 or visit www.ind.homeoffice.gov.uk.

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4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

Before you start to find a nanny, decide what kind of person you want to look after your children and what tasks you’ll want them to do, then draw up a job description and person specification. You will want your children looked after in a safe and stimulating environment, but what does this mean? Are there any specific activities you’ll want them to do with the children? Will the school run be part of their job? How about preparing the children’s meals? Will they be carrying out nursery duties, for example the children’s laundry and cleaning their room?

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Think about what kind of person you want your nanny to be. What level of qualifications are important to you? What kind of experience would you like them to have had? Do they need to drive? And be a nonsmoker? Think about your own parenting style and whether you’d like someone to match or complement you.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

Finding an approved nanny It does take time to find the right nanny, so allow yourself plenty of time – even up to several months. There are several ways to find a nanny. Talk to other parents or parents’ organisations, such as the National Childbirth Trust, who have local branches; or advertise in your local paper or specialist working families magazines. Contact local colleges that offer childcare courses if you would like to employ someone newly trained. Mention that you are looking for an approved nanny, whether advertising or talking to people, and remember to check their approval letter at interview stage. Using a nanny agency Nanny agencies charge you a fee to find a shortlist of suitable nannies which match your specifications, but will take a lot of legwork out of the searching for you. A good nanny agency will carry out their own checks before adding a nanny to their lists. There are hundreds of nanny agencies across the country. A few big ones cover the whole country, but most are smaller and cover a specific area. Some nanny agencies specialise in a particular type of nanny work, for example maternity nursing, looking after disabled children, or positions overseas. Have a look at different nanny agencies on the internet or in specialist working families magazines, or look in the Yellow Pages. Ask

other parents and at local colleges running childcare courses which agencies in your area have a good reputation. A good nanny agency will talk you through your legal obligations when employing a nanny, for example on matters such as tax and National Insurance, payslips, employer’s liability insurance, employment rights and contracts. A good agency will also make sure that your nanny has settled in well and will help you and your nanny deal with any issues that arise. Even if you employ a nanny through an agency, it’s important that you take up the nanny’s references and request a medical check yourself. Interviewing your approved nanny You’ll have a good idea about the kind of person you want to look after your children, but even if the person you interview ticks all the boxes, and has the highest qualifications and recommendations, if it doesn’t feel right, keep looking. Trust your gut instinct as a parent and wait until you are happy with the person you’ve chosen and know that they’ll fit in with your family. Ask someone else to help you interview – your partner, or a friend or relative. They will help back up your opinion and also act as a witness to everything that is said. You may wish to consider inviting your nanny back for a second “working interview” to enable them to spend more time with your family in their potential work environment. Spending half a day or a day getting to know the family may help to make sure that both of you make the right decision. It is usual to agree a trial period with a nanny before they accept the job full time. This may be anything from one week to three months and is usually negotiated into your contract. You should pay your nanny for the time they spend with your family during this period and they should be able to claim any expenses.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Meeting the children It’s important that your nanny quickly establishes a rapport with your children, and you can often see this on their first meeting. It’s up to you when you first allow your prospective nanny to meet your children, but at second interview stage could be a good idea. By then you’ll have had time to make sure you’re happy with the candidate(s).

Ask your nanny for one or two referees from previous families they have worked with and also a personal referee. If the nanny has just left college, then their college tutor should provide a reference.

4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

A sample interview form is included on the next page. Feel free to photocopy this and use it when you’re interviewing nannies. Tick the box when you’re happy the candidate has answered the question appropriately and add your notes at the end of the section. The questions we’ve given are just examples and aren’t meant to be exhaustive. Add your own questions, but make sure that you ask each candidate the same ones to give everyone a fair chance.

Follow the references up on the phone; you’ll get an immediate idea of what their relationship with the referee was like through an informal chat. Even if your nanny provides letters of recommendation or open references, these should still be followed up, as there may be things the referee would tell you that they haven’t written down. Ask questions about why the nanny left, what their relationship with the children was like, whether they had any problems and how they were sorted out. During the interview, make notes of questions you’d like to follow up with the referees.

Medical checks Medical checks are standard for registered childminders but aren’t required under the Childcare Approval Scheme. So when employing an approved nanny, you should ask them for a medical certificate from their GP. You could also ask your nanny at interview stage to fill in a medical questionnaire which you will need to keep confidential. Include questions about their general health, how many days sick they’ve had in the past 12 months and, whether they have any impairments or conditions which may have an impact on their ability to perform their duties. Ask them how they will manage their condition when looking after children, and if you have any further concerns, discuss them with your GP. The form supplied on p22 is an example – you can use your own or photocopy this one to use. References It’s easy to gloss over this stage if you are really happy with the candidate you have chosen, but the Childcare Approval Scheme doesn’t check references so it’s vital that you follow these up thoroughly. Also, you’ll need to take up and retain two references to validate your public liability insurance.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

Interviewing an approved nanny Sample form Candidate’s personal details Name Address Postcode

Phone number Mobile number Email address

Details of ID supplied (eg. passport, driving licence, birth certificate – one with a photo)

Before you start ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Approval certificate (includes a CRB disclosure, first-aid certificate, qualification or course attendance) Full clean driving licence Medical check form completed Non-smoker References supplied

Training and qualifications ■ Valid first-aid certificate ■ Relevant childcare qualification

■ Other courses attended

■ Are you a member of any professional organisations? ■ Do you belong to any childcare groups or networks?

Skills and experience Tick for an acceptable answer and add your notes below. ■ Why did you decide to become a nanny? ■ What do you enjoy most about the job? ■ What are your future career plans?

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Tell me about the children you have looked after before. What kind of activities would you do with my children? What kinds of meals and snacks do you enjoy preparing for the children? What do you consider to be unacceptable behaviour and how do you deal with this? What would you do in an emergency involving yourself or one of the children? Where do you like to take the children out?

4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Notes

Personal qualities ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

What do you enjoy most about looking after children? What do you find challenging about looking after children? Tell me about your biggest achievement since being a nanny. Tell me about a difficult situation you have had to deal with at work. How do you communicate with the parents that you work with? What do you feel are the most important qualities in a good nanny?

Notes

Discussion checklist ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Behaviour management Hours and duties Salary Payment method Child safety Ground rules Use of the car Accommodation (if live-in nanny)

■ Invited for second interview ■ References followed up

This form is the copyright property of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES), but may be photocopied or otherwise reproduced for not-for-profit purposes.

©SureStart 2005

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

4 Finding and selecting an approved nanny

CONFIDENTIAL

Interviewing an approved nanny Sample medical form Approved nanny medical form This medical form is intended to check whether you have any impairments or conditions which might have an impact on your ability to perform your duties as a nanny. The information you give here will be kept in the strictest confidence and, if you are not successful in gaining a position with our family, the form will be kept for a maximum of six months. Full name GP medical certificate shown ■ How many days off sick have you had in the past 12 months? _________________________ Do you have any other impairments or conditions which may have an impact on your ability to perform your duties as a nanny? Yes ■ No ■ If you answered “yes” to the above question, please give more details.

This form is the copyright property of the Department for Education and Skills (DfES), but may be photocopied or otherwise reproduced for not-for-profit purposes.

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5 Working together

Settling a new nanny into their role is likely to take some time, and some forward planning. Think about how they will spend their first week, what you need to talk about, and how you can help the children get used to their new carer. The more you can talk about and get down in writing in the first few days the better, because then everyone will know what the boundaries are and what to expect. Have a review meeting away from the children after the first few days to see how your nanny is settling in and discuss any

Š SureStart 2005

issues that have come up. A lot of concerns that happen tend to occur in the early days and if they are not dealt with straight away, resentment can build. Plan regular review meetings away from the children after this. It may seem obvious, but ask your children how they are settling in with their new nanny and acknowledge their feelings. Work out ways in which the transition can be made easier for everyone.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

5 Working together

Behaviour management It’s important to discuss with your nanny and come to an agreement about what you think are acceptable and appropriate ways for them to manage the behaviour of your children. Think about and discuss what you find acceptable and unacceptable behaviour. It can be helpful to have a written policy about managing behaviour to reduce the chances of misunderstandings between you and your nanny. You may both have different attitudes, values and practices – work together carefully to ensure consistency and continuity for your child. A policy can just be a simple statement about basic expectations for children’s behaviour and the strategies you would like used in response to unwanted behaviour depending on the stage of development of your children. The children Share detailed information about the children’s routines – sleeping and feeding; school; any extra-curricular activities; bathtime and bedtime. It would be helpful to provide a typical daily and weekly timetable. Talk about: ■ the children’s likes and dislikes ■ favourite toys, songs, games, and activities ■ what they like and don’t like to eat ■ any people that are important to them like friends or grandparents ■ special words that they use ■ any comforters ■ tips on how to respond when your child has a tantrum, or is tired or upset ■ whether they have any additional needs or medical conditions and how these should be managed. Day-to-day communication Depending on what time you have when you arrive home or before you leave in the morning, you will need to decide whether you have time for a chat with your nanny or whether you would like them to keep a diary.

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The daily diary could contain information about any activities the children have done during the day, and also things like how they’ve eaten and slept. It could stay in one place with both of you filling it in with information you need to pass on. The diary will become an important record of communication with less opportunity for misunderstandings, and also a keepsake documenting how your children have developed. Make sure your nanny also keeps a record of any medication given and any accidents or incidents that have happened during the day. You should sign the record of these. House rules Make sure you have clear “house rules” from the start. For example, whether you will allow your nanny to smoke in your home at all – maybe you’ll decide it’s fine if they are off duty; whether they are allowed friends round during the day or overnight guests if your nanny is live-in; and how much they can use the phone. Confidentiality During the first few days of your nanny starting work, discuss the issue of confidentiality and privacy. It is inevitable that when they are working in your home, they will find out information that they should keep confidential, for example, about family members’ health, business affairs or personal relationships. You may want to include a confidentiality clause in the contract you draw up. Think of instances when it would be appropriate for your nanny to share information, for example, when they are talking to your child’s doctor or teacher. All childcare professionals have a responsibility, if they suspect that a child is being abused, to share their concerns with an appropriate professional. Think about areas in your home where you would rather the nanny didn’t go, and what they should do about answering the telephone when you’re not home. If your nanny is living in, they are entitled to their

©SureStart 2005


Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

You will have a lot of personal information about your nanny, such as their medical records and bank details. Keep these safe and confidential. See p14 for more on keeping records. Supporting and motivating your nanny Your approved nanny is a professional and needs to be supported and developed in their role. They will have done some training in order to be approved, but they may wish to continue with their professional development. Work out ways to help and support them with this, whether it’s part-funding a course or allowing them time off to go to classes or complete coursework. If your nanny is looking for more challenges, think of ways you can help with this. Maybe they could take a more active role in supporting your children with their homework or learning a new skill such as riding a bike or cooking. Talk to them about what they’d like to achieve and how they think they could also help your children with their development. A nanny that keeps up to date with their skills and learning will feel motivated and your children will benefit in the long run.

Have you discussed: ■ behaviour management? ■ a daily handover period? ■ hours of work? ■ daily responsibilities? ■ household tasks? ■ confidentiality? ■ a daily diary? ■ risk assessments? ■ pets?

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5 Working together

privacy too. Give them clearly defined, uninterrupted time off and talk about house rules regarding, for example, personal space, house-guests and telephone calls.

First days checklist Have you provided the following: ■ clear details of hours and duties? ■ good working conditions and a well thought-out job description? ■ a written contract of employment? ■ a safe, clean home with plenty of equipment for fun activities. ■ information about local parks, playgrounds, nanny groups and dropin sessions? ■ contact numbers for you, your partner, and a relation or other responsible adult who knows the family well? ■ details of the family doctor? ■ contact numbers for the child’s school, nursery or playgroup ■ clear guidance on your child’s health (including allergies and intolerances, medicines, diet and sleep preferences), behaviour management, special routines, favourite toys and games, and so on? ■ written permission to administer medication to your child and to seek medical advice when necessary? ■ written permission for photographing children, routine outings, transporting in a vehicle, bathing, water-based activities, sun-protection cream application, observations? ■ a regular time to talk with and listen to your nanny? ■ employer and public liability insurance (you can get this from your house insurers)? ■ clear guidance on what your nanny can make decisions on regarding your children’s school or doctor? ■ a tour of the house, including how to use household equipment such as the oven, washing machine, door locks and alarm system? ■ guidelines on what to do in an emergency, for example, your house fire drill, where torches are in case of a power cut, and how to stop the gas, water etc?

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

5 Working together

The contract Discuss the job thoroughly with your nanny and make time to go through and agree a contract. By law, as an employer, you must provide your employee with a written statement of terms, or a contract, within the first eight weeks of their employment. However, it is good practice to agree a contract before your nanny starts work – it can always be reviewed at a later date. The contract will clearly set out all aspects of the job and forms a legally binding agreement between you and your nanny. It should cover: ■ names of employer and nanny ■ names and dates of birth of children to be cared for ■ place of work – and whether or not the nanny will be expected to work anywhere else, for example at the family’s second home ■ duties expected of the nanny ■ start date, hours of work and dates of any trial period ■ salary details, including gross annual wage, how payments will be made and how frequently. The contract should also give details of whether you will be using a payroll company to pay your nanny. ■ date of salary review and appraisal ■ holiday and leave allowances for both the nanny and the family ■ overtime and time off in lieu (TOIL) arrangements. This includes babysitting, caring for other children (for example, relatives or friends of the family) and expectations of overnight duties. ■ sick leave entitlements, including what arrangements should be made if your nanny is sick and unable to work; or you are sick ■ responsibilities of the nanny and parent if a child is ill ■ any perks, for example, use of a mobile phone, family car, or gym membership ■ pension arrangements, if any ■ details of what constitutes gross misconduct

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■ use of the family car for childcare duties ■ for a live-in nanny, details of accommodation ■ house rules, including use of the telephone and other household equipment (for example, home computer, stereo, washing machine) ■ visiting arrangements for childcare colleagues, partners, friends, and so on ■ payment of expenses, such as petrol, outings, snacks and materials for use in the nanny’s work ■ confidentiality agreements ■ behaviour management agreements, including clearly stating what punishments are allowed ■ arrangements for administering children’s medication ■ permission for outings, bathing children, applying sun block, taking photographs, and so on* ■ whether any extra household duties are expected of your nanny ■ the notice period required by the nanny and the parents if either party wants to end the contract. *It is important to agree clear guidelines about this aspect of your nanny’s work, so that the children are kept safe, and the nanny understands what you consider are appropriate “professional boundaries”. On pages 42 and 43 of this book you’ll find consent forms that you can sign to give your nanny permission to take the children on outings, apply their sun cream, bathe them, and photograph or film them. You and your nanny should each sign and keep a copy of the contract in a safe place. If any changes are then made to the contract, you and your nanny should again both sign both copies and keep them safe. The most recent contract is the valid one and overrides any previous arrangements. If there are any changes to your nanny’s duties or working conditions, always make sure they are written down in a new or revised contract. Agreeing changes only verbally will put you in a difficult position if you and your nanny have a contract dispute in the future.

©SureStart 2005


6 Keeping your home safe

You may be aware of some of the dangers that exist in your home with children around, but it’s important when employing a nanny for you both to carry out a thorough risk assessment at the start of the contract and every six to 12 months after that. Your home isn’t inspected in the same way as a registered childminder’s, and it is your responsibility to create a safe environment for your nanny to work in.

© SureStart 2005

A daily visual check of their workplace (your home) should be part of your nanny’s practice and you can discuss that with them. They may have suggestions or concerns about safety which you can work together to resolve. It could be something as simple as asking you to move a poisonous houseplant to a high shelf, fitting a smoke alarm or covering a garden pond.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

6 Keeping your home safe

Risk Assessment Checklist for nannies On the following pages is an example of a risk assessment checklist that you and your nanny could use to monitor safety in your home. It covers many of the most common safety hazards found in family homes. It is not exhaustive, and together you may identify other risks which you can add to the list. For each risk, write down what action is to be taken, by whom and (if appropriate) by when. When you and your nanny have completed the checklist, both of you should sign and date it. Remember to review the checklist regularly to make sure that any action points have been completed, and to take into account children’s changing needs and any alterations to the home.

In living, sleeping and play areas, risks to look out for include: ■ banisters or railings that wobble, or with spaces where children could trap their heads or hands ■ blocked fire exits ■ cracked, broken or dirty toys and equipment ■ dangerous items (alcohol, matches, medication, cigarettes, plastic bags, etc) accessible to children ■ electrical sockets not covered ■ low level glass (e.g. in windows, doors and coffee tables) that isn’t safety glass ■ no stairgates (if caring for babies or toddlers) Risks identified?

Action to be taken?

■ open fires and portable heaters with no fireguards ■ poisonous houseplants within children’s reach ■ slippery rugs and loose carpets ■ radiators hot enough to burn a child ■ safety catches not fitted on windows ■ smoke alarms not fitted or not working ■ signs of infestation by vermin ■ toys and other items that don’t meet current safety standards ■ trailing tablecloths, blind pulls, curtain cords, etc, that could cause someone to trip. By whom?

When to be completed?

In bathrooms and cloakrooms, risks to look out for include: ■ dangerous items (cleaning fluids, razor blades, toiletries, etc) accessible to children ■ electrical switches (should be pull-cords) Risks identified?

Action to be taken?

■ slippery baths, shower trays and floors ■ unhygienic flannels, sponges, towels or nappy-changing arrangements. By whom?

When to be completed?

This risk assessment checklist may be photocopied for non-commercial use only.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

■ dangerous items (sharp knives, cleaning fluids, matches, etc) accessible to children ■ flexes trailing from kettles, irons, etc ■ harnesses on highchairs broken or missing ■ nappies being disposed of in kitchen bin ■ no fire blanket or fire extinguisher Risks identified?

Action to be taken?

6 Keeping your home safe

In kitchens, eating areas and utility rooms, risks to look out for include: ■ pets allowed on tables and work surfaces ■ pets’ food and/or litter trays accessible to children ■ unhygienic dish cloths, mops and tea towels ■ unhygienic food preparation or storage arrangements. By whom?

When to be completed?

In gardens, risks to look out for include: ■ animal mess ■ broken gates, walls and fences ■ climbing frames, slides or swings broken, not securely fixed to ground, or positioned on a hard surface ■ dangerous equipment (tools, garden machinery, chemicals, fishing tackle, etc) accessible to children ■ garden toys and furniture dirty or broken Risks identified?

Action to be taken?

■ loose paving stones, steps or manhole covers ■ points where children could escape from the garden ■ poisonous plants accessible to children ■ ponds, fountains, streams, pools, wells or water butts accessible to children ■ sheds, outbuildings, greenhouses, garages and cellars accessible to children ■ signs of infestation by vermin. By whom?

When to be completed?

In vehicles, risks to check for include: ■ children’s car seats broken, wrong size or not provided at all ■ inappropriate or invalid motor insurance

■ no child locks on rear doors ■ no MOT.

Risks identified?

By whom?

Action to be taken?

When to be completed?

This risk assessment checklist may be photocopied for non-commercial use only.

©SureStart 2005

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

6 Keeping your home safe

Any other risks: Risks identified?

Action to be taken?

By whom?

Signature of nanny:

Date:

Signature(s) of parent(s):

Date:

When to be completed?

This risk assessment checklist may be photocopied for non-commercial use only.

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ŠSureStart 2005


7 Help with the cost of approved childcare

In April 2005, the Government made the Working Tax Credit available to more parents under its Childcare Approval Scheme. Also, parents using registered or approved childcare whose employers provide childcare vouchers are now eligible to receive the first ÂŁ50 of vouchers each week free of tax and National Insurance contributions. This means that parents using unregistered childcare, such as nannies or over-7s childminders, who were previously unable to claim the childcare element of the Working

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

7 Help with the cost of approved childcare

Tax Credit, will now be able to do so – provided the childcare is approved under the new scheme and depending on their earnings and the cost of the childcare. If you are using relatives for childcare, you will not be able to claim the childcare element of the Working Tax Credit and you will have to pay tax on your childcare vouchers. The only exception is if your relation is a registered childminder, or an approved childminder caring solely for children aged over 7, and is looking after other children who are not related, and you do not live in their home.

For more about childcare vouchers To find out more about the use of employersupported childcare vouchers and the companies who run the schemes, you could either search the internet or contact the Daycare Trust on 020 7840 3350, www.daycaretrust.org.uk

For more about tax credits Call the Tax Credits helpline on 0845 300 3900 or visit: www.taxcredits.inlandrevenue.gov.uk

For more about tax and childcare vouchers See Inland Revenue leaflet IR115 Childcare Provided by Employers or visit: www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk/childcare – see guidance for employees.

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©SureStart 2005


8 Questions and concerns

When problems come up If anything is worrying you, you should speak to your nanny straight away as worries can sometimes grow out of proportion. Encourage your nanny to do the same. Most difficulties can be settled through a friendly chat, or by referring back to the contract together. Consider whether your complaint is about the nanny, or the quality of their work. If your complaint is a contractual one then you can ask your nanny to leave. However, if

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

8 Questions and concerns

you suspect child abuse then you should inform your local police and or social services as well as notifying the Approval Body. If the police or social services believe there are grounds for investigation then the Approval Body will withdraw approval and notify the Inland Revenue. The Inland Revenue will then check their records and notify all the parents, on their records, who are using that carer that approval has been withdrawn. Should the investigation clear the nanny then she or he will have to re-apply to become an approved carer. Note: if you make an unfounded or malicious complaint, your nanny is entitled to take legal action.

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9 Appendices

Childcare qualifications The range of childcare qualifications and induction courses that are considered suitable for a childcarer to be approved are constantly under review. For an up-to-date list visit www.dfes.gov.uk/childrenswfqualifications or call the Childcare Approval helpline on 0845 767 8111. Many nanny agencies will only accept a nanny who has a minimum of a level 3 qualification (for example, an NVQ level 3

© SureStart 2005

or CACHE diploma). Level 3 qualifications are aimed at people who may work alone, without supervision, so they are ideal for a home-based childcarer. The main awarding bodies for childcare qualifications are the Council for Awards in Education (CACHE), Edexcel, City and Guilds, and the Open University. Childcare students study at different levels (usually level 2 – certificate, or level 3 – diploma) according to their needs, experience and academic ability.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

9 Appendices

Current level 3 childcare qualifications include: ■ CACHE Diploma in Childcare and Education (DCE – formerly NNEB or Diploma in Nursery Nursing). This is a two-year, fulltime course totalling 1650 hours of study, 750 hours of which are practical training. Students learn about children at different stages of growth and development, how to care for and educate them, and how to work with parents, carers and other childcare professionals. ■ BTEC National Diploma in Early Years is a practical, work-related course which requires student to complete projects and assignments based on workplace situations. It is made up of 18 units and is a level 3 qualification equivalent to two A levels. It is awarded by Edexcel. ■ NVQ level 3 in Early Years Care and Education – a candidate may undertake an NVQ without having gained any previous qualifications. NVQ candidates are normally already employed in an early years setting, and are assessed on their performance in their work against a set of national standards. To achieve an NVQ level 3, a candidate must be assessed competent in a range of mandatory units and optional units. They are also required to show that they have the “underpinning knowledge” and understanding of early years care and education to complete the award. CACHE, Edexcel, City and Guilds, and the Open University are among the awarding bodies for the NVQ level 3 in Early Years Care and Education. ■ The Certificate in Childminding Practice (CCP) is a level 3 qualification that was developed by the National Childminding Association (NCMA) in association with the Council for Awards in Childcare and Education (CACHE). The certificate is made up of three units: Introducing Childminding Practice (ICP – 12 hours), Developing Childminding Practice (DCP – 60 hours) and Extending Childminding Practice (ECP – 60 hours). Candidates must

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complete assignments to pass each unit, but there are no minimum entry requirements. CCP is tailored to the needs of home-based childcarers and provides much of the “underpinning knowledge” for the NVQ level 3 in Early Years Care and Education. Introductory courses Level 3 qualifications are aimed at people who may work alone, without supervision. Your childcarer may, however, have started their training at a more basic level – especially if they have been working under supervision. Courses include: ■ CACHE Foundation Award in Caring for Children – a one-year, full-time, level 1 course ■ CACHE Certificate in Child Care and Education – a one-year, full-time, level 2 course ■ City and Guilds Progression Award in Early Years Care and Education – a level 2 course involving 120 hours of practical childcare work to complete assignments ■ Introducing Childminding Practice (ICP) is the first unit of the Certificate in Childminding Practice (see previous column). This 12-hour course forms an ideal introduction to childcare in a home setting. Issues covered include establishing routines, using positive methods to manage children’s behaviour, equal opportunities and child protection. There is an end-of-unit assessment. ICP is the introductory course that the vast majority of newly registered childminders in England undertake before starting work. ICP can be studied in Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, Gujarati, Punjabi, Somali, Turkish, Urdu and Welsh, as well as in English. It is also available as a distance learning course through the National Extension College (NEC). NB: Level 3 courses are at advanced level, equivalent to A levels. Level 2 courses are at intermediate level, equivalent to GCSEs. Level 1 courses are at foundation level.

©SureStart 2005


Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Approved childcarer A childcarer who is not required by law to register (such as a nanny or over-7s childminder) and has been approved by the Approval Body. This means they are aged 18 or over, have a relevant qualification or attended training, have a valid first-aid certificate, and have an enhanced Criminal Records Bureau disclosure. Childcare vouchers Vouchers given as a benefit to employees by employers to pay for childcare. If the childcare used is registered or approved, there are tax and National Insurance incentives. Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) The CRB provides a regulated “one stop” service for England and Wales offering access to records held by the police, together with those held by the Department of Health (DH) and the Department for Education and Skills (DfES). The disclosure service enables organisations to make more thorough checks, particularly for positions that involve regular contact with children and vulnerable adults. Department for Education and Skills (DfES) One of two government departments (the other is the Department for Work and Pensions) that has responsibility for childcare. Enhanced CRB disclosure An enhanced disclosure includes a check on local police records. Where local police records contain additional information which

might be relevant to the post the applicant is being considered for, the Chief Officer of police may release information for inclusion in an enhanced disclosure. Exceptionally, and in a very small number of circumstances (typically to protect the integrity of current police investigations), additional information may be sent under separate cover to the countersignatory. This information should not be revealed to the applicant.

9 Appendices

Useful words

Nanny A childcarer that looks after children in their own family home. As the childcare takes place in a family home, nannies are not required to be registered by Ofsted, but can apply for approval. Nestor Primecare Services Ltd (referred to as Nestor) An independent provider of personnel and service solutions to the health and social care market, which has been chosen to carry out the childcare approval service on behalf of the Government. Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) Ofsted is responsible for the registration and regulation of childminders, nurseries, créches and out-of-school clubs in England. Over-7s childminder A childminder that solely looks after children aged 8 or over. As children over 7 are not covered by the Children Act 1989, these childminders are not required to be registered by Ofsted but can apply for approval. Registered childminder Registered childminders work in their own homes to provide care and learning opportunities for other people’s children in a family setting. They are required, by law, to be registered with Ofsted. SureStart, Early Years and Childcare Unit The Government unit responsible for childcare in England. This unit works to both the DfES and the DWP.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

9 Appendices

Where next NCMA 8 Masons Hill Bromley Kent BR2 9EY Information line: 0800 169 4486 Membership application pack: 020 8290 8999 www.ncma.org.uk

Cross and Red Crescent Movement – working with people from all countries, regardless of their background or beliefs. Child Accident Prevention Trust 22–26 Farringdon Lane London EC1R 3AJ 020 7608 3828 www.capt.org.uk

The National Childminding Association of England and Wales (NCMA) is a national charity and membership organisation for registered childminders, approved and nonapproved nannies and approved and nonapproved over-7s childminders, working in partnership with government, local authorities and other childcare organisations.

Child Accident Prevention Trust is a national charity in the United Kingdom committed to reducing the number of children and young people killed, disabled and seriously injured as a result of accidents.

Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (ACAS) 08457 474747 www.acas.org.uk

DfES scheme which provides recognised status for individuals providing childcare in England where there is no requirement to register and where the childcare is provided in the child’s own home or, solely for children aged over 7, on other domestic premises.

Acas aims to improve organisations and working life through better employment relations, providing up-to-date information, independent advice and training, and working with employers and employees to solve problems and improve performance. Barnardo’s Childcare Publications Barnardo’s Trading, Ltd PO Box 1947 Linney House Ilford IG1 9AE 020 8550 8822 www.barnardos.org.uk Barnardo’s aim is to help vulnerable children and young people transform their lives and fulfil their potential. It campaigns for better care for children and champions children’s rights. British Red Cross Society 44 Moorfields London EC2Y 9AL 020 7235 5454 www.redcross.org.uk

Childcare Approval Scheme 0845 767 8111 www.childcareapprovalscheme.co.uk

Childcare Link 0800 096 0296 www.childcarelink.gov.uk The Childcare Link helpline and website is part of the Government’s National Childcare Strategy to help people back into the workplace by removing the childcare barrier. Childline Freepost NATN 1111 London E1 6BR 0800 1111 www.childline.org.uk ChildLine is the free 24-hour helpline for children and young people in the UK. Children and young people can call the helpline on 0800 1111 about any problem, at any time – day or night.

The British Red Cross is a leading member of the largest independent humanitarian network in the world – the International Red

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

An alliance of more than 350 organisations and projects, including professional and religious bodies, which campaigns for children to have the same legal protection against being hit as adults and promotes positive, non-violent discipline Commission for Racial Equality (CRE) St Dunstan’s House 201–211 Borough High Street London SE1 1GZ 020 7939 0000 www.cre.gov.uk The Commission for Racial Equality is a publicly funded, non-governmental body set up under the Race Relations Act 1976 to tackle racial discrimination and promote racial equality, working to promote equal opportunities for everyone, regardless of their race, colour, nationality, or national or ethnic origin. Criminal Records Bureau Customer Services CRB PO Box 110 Liverpool L69 3EF 0870 90 90 811 www.disclosure.gov.uk The CRB is an executive agency of the Home Office and helps employers in the public, private and voluntary sectors identify candidates who may be unsuitable for certain work, especially that involving contact with children or other vulnerable members of society. Daycare Trust 21 St George’s Road London SE1 6ES 020 7840 3350 www.daycaretrust.org.uk The Daycare Trust works to promote high quality, affordable childcare for all, advising parents, carers, providers, employers, trade unions and policymakers on childcare issues.

©SureStart 2005

Department for Education and Skills (DfES) Public Enquiry Unit Sanctuary Buildings Great Smith Street London SW1P 3BT 0870 000 2288 www.dfes.gov.uk

9 Appendices

Children are Unbeatable! Alliance 94 White Lion Street London N1 9PF 020 7713 0569 www.childrenareunbeatable.org.uk

The Department for Education and Skills is the main government organisation concerned with education and training. It aims to create opportunity, release potential and achieve excellence for all: children, young people and adults. Department for Trade and Industry DTI Response Centre 1 Victoria Street London SW1H 0ET 020 7215 5000 www.dti.gov.uk The DTI works to create the best environment for business success in the UK, helping people and companies become more productive by promoting enterprise, innovation and creativity and championing UK business at home and abroad. Disability Rights Commission (DRC) DRC Helpline FREEPOST MID02164 Stratford upon Avon CV37 9BR 08457 622 633 www.drc-gb.org An independent body established in April 2000 by Act of Parliament to stop discrimination and promote equality of opportunity for disabled people. Equal Opportunities Commission Arndale House Arndale Centre Manchester M4 3EQ 08456 015901 www.eoc.org.uk The Equal Opportunities Commission is the leading agency working to eliminate sex discrimination. It is an independent, nondepartmental public body funded primarily by the Government.

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

9 Appendices

Inland Revenue www.inlandrevenue.gov.uk Inland Revenue publication IR115 – Childcare provided by Employers Inland Revenue publication IR56 – Employed or Self-Employed? Tax credits helpline: 0845 300 3900 The Inland Revenue is the main government organisation responsible for taxation. It aims to ensure that everyone understands and receives what they are entitled to and understands and pays what they owe. National Association of Citizens Advice Bureaux Myddelton House 115–123 Pentonville Road London N1 9LZ 0207 833 2181 www.citizensadvice.org.uk The Citizens Advice service helps people resolve their legal, money and other problems by providing free information and advice from over 3200 locations, and by influencing policymakers. National Association of Toy and Leisure Libraries 68 Church Way London NW1 1LT 020 7255 4600 www.natll.org.uk The National Association of Toy and Leisure Libraries (NATLL) is the national body for toy and leisure libraries in the UK. It has used the campaign title Play Matters since 1983. National Childbirth Trust Alexandra House Oldham Terrace London W3 6NH 0870 444 8707 (helpline) www.nctpregnancyandbabycare.com The Trust aims to help all parents enjoy the experience of pregnancy, birth and early parenthood through a range of antenatal classes, helplines and social and educational events.

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National Children’s Bureau 8 Wakley Street London EC1V 7QE 020 7843 6000 www.ncb.org.uk NCB promotes the well-being of all children and young people and undertakes research, evaluation and development projects to influence policy and develop best practice. National Day Nurseries Association Oak House Woodvale Road Brighouse West Yorkshire HD6 4AB 01484 723322/0870 774 4244 www.ndna.org.uk The national membership association of day nurseries in the UK, dedicated to the provision, support and promotion of highquality care and education for the benefit of children, families and communities. National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) National Centre Weston House 42 Curtain Road London EC2A 3NH 020 7825 2500 0808 800500 (helpline) www.nspcc.org.uk The NSPCC (National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children) is a charity specialising in child protection and the prevention of cruelty to children, directly involved in protecting children and campaigning on their behalf since 1884. NHS Direct 0845 4647 www.nhsdirect.nhs.uk NHS Direct operates a 24-hour advice and health information service which you can contact by phone or internet.

©SureStart 2005


Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) Edgbaston Park 353 Bristol Road Edgbaston Birmingham B5 7ST 0121 248 2000 www.rospa.org.uk

Ofsted is a non-ministerial government department established under the Education (Schools) Act 1992 to take responsibility for the inspection of all schools in England, whether state or independent, and also the inspection of local education authorities, teacher training institutions, youth work and childcare providers including registered childminders and nurseries.

RoSPA is actively involved in the promotion of safety in all areas of life – at work, in the home, and on the roads, in schools, at leisure and on (or near) water.

Pre-School Learning Alliance 69 Kings Cross Road London WC1X 9LL 020 7833 0991 www.pre-school.org.uk The Pre-School Learning Alliance is an educational charity which represents and supports 15,000 community pre-schools in England. Professional Association of Nursery Nurses (PANN) 2 St James’ Court Friar Gate Derby DE1 1BT 01332 372337 www.pat.org.uk

9 Appendices

Ofsted (Office for Standards in Education) Alexandra House 33 Kingsway London WC2B 6SE 020 7421 6800 www.ofsted.gov.uk Early Years Department 0845 601 4771

St John Ambulance Association 27 St John’s Lane London EC1M 4BU 020 7324 4000 www.sja.org.uk St John Ambulance provides first-aid training and services, and operates care services and ambulance fleets in the UK. Working Families www.workingfamilies.co.uk Working Families helps children, working parents and carers and their employers find a better balance between responsibilities at home and work.

Professional Association of Nursery Nurses (PANN) is affiliated to the Professional Association of Teachers, an independent trade union and professional association for teachers and nannies.

©SureStart 2005

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

9 Appendices

Photo and video permission form Dear Parent/Guardian While caring for your child(ren) I may sometimes wish to take photographs or video footage to share with you, use in promotional materials, accompany coursework, or keep for my own records. I would like your permission to do this. Name(s) of child(ren)

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

I am/we are the parent(s)/legal guardian(s) of the child(ren) named above and I/we give permission for my/our child(ren) to be photographed and/or filmed by the nanny named below, for the following reasons (please tick all that apply): ■ ■ ■ ■

the nanny’s own album/records the family’s album/records NCMA publications, such as Who Minds? other publications

■ ■ ■ ■

the nanny’s coursework the nanny’s website NCMA website other organisations’ websites

■ other ■ other I/we understand that there will be no payment for my/our child(ren)'s participation. Parent(s)/guardian(s)’ names

Address

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Telephone

(including area code)

Signature(s) of parent(s)/guardian(s)

Nanny’s name

42

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

9 Appendices

Parental permission form Nanny’s name

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Name(s) of child(ren)

Routine outings with the nanny

Sun-protection cream application

I/we agree for the above-named child(ren) to go on routine outings with the above-named nanny.

I/we agree for sun-protection cream to be applied to the above-named child(ren) by the above-named nanny.

Parent/guardian’s name

Parent/guardian’s name

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed

Date

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed

Date

Transporting in a vehicle

Water-based activities

I/we agree for the above-named child(ren) to be transported in a private vehicle with the above-named nanny.

I/we agree for the above-named child(ren) to go swimming and take part in other water-based activities with the above-named nanny.

Parent/guardian’s name

Parent/guardian’s name

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed

Date

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Signed

Date

Observations

Bathing

I/we understand that ongoing observations may be undertaken on the above-named child(ren), to follow and assess their development, in order to support the nanny in working towards professional qualifications. These may be in the form of written statements, photographs, videos or tape recordings.

I/we agree for the above-named child(ren) to be bathed by the above-named nanny.

Parent/guardian’s name

Parent/guardian’s name

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Signed

©SureStart 2005

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Date

Signed Parent/guardian’s name

Signed

(BLOCK CAPITALS)

Date (BLOCK CAPITALS)

Date

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10 Index

Š SureStart 2005

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

10 Index

Index accidents accommodation approved childcarers

13, 24 14, 26 5, 7, 8, 10, 37

babysitting behaviour management

13, 26 24, 25

child abuse 24, 33 Childcare Approval Scheme 5, 6, 7, 9–10, 19, 31 childcare approved 5, 7, 8, 10, 37 childminders 6, 7, 8, 11, 37 courses 18 employer-supported 9, 10, 31–32, 37 home-based 5, 6, 7 nannies 6, 7, 17–22, 24, 26, 31–32 nurseries 7 out-of-hours 13 out-of-school 7 over-7s 7, 8, 37 qualifications 10 registered 5, 7, 8 vouchers 9, 10, 31–32, 37 childminders advantages of 6, 7 Criminal Records Bureau 6, 7 first-aid certificate 6, 7 health checks 6, 7 home childcarers 5, 6, 7 national standards 6 Ofsted 6 over-7s 7, 8, 37 public liability insurance 6 registered 6, 37 self-employed 11 training 6, 7 Children Act 1989 6, 37 complaints 32–33 confidentiality 24–25, 26 contract of employment 25, 26 Criminal Records Bureau 6, 10, 37 damage to property Disability Discrimination Act 1995

46

13 12

Disability Rights Commission

12

Early Years and Childcare Unit 37 Education and Skills, Department for (DfES) 9, 37 emergencies 10, 25 employer’s responsibilities accommodation 14 annual leave 12, 26 contract of employment 26 disability 12 employment rights 11, 18 expenses 14, 18, 26 foreign nationals 15 hours of work 11 house rules 24–25, 26 insurance 13, 18, 25 maternity entitlements 12 National Insurance 14, 18 notice period 13, 26 out-of-hours care 13, 26 P45 12 P60 12 payroll companies 12, 14, 26 payslip 14, 18 pensions 12, 26 professional development 25 record-keeping 14 redundancy 13 sick leave 12, 26 tax 14 termination of employment 13 unfair dismissal 13 wages 11, 14 work conditions 11 employer’s liability insurance 13, 18, 25 employer-supported childcare 9, 10, 31–32, 37 employment rights 11, 18 employment tribunal 13 European Economic Area 15 expenses 14, 18, 26 first-aid training fixed-term contract

6, 10 13

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

10 Index

gross misconduct health checks Health, Department of home childcarers home contents insurance house rules injury Inland Revenue insurance employer’s liability home contents motor public liability interviews job description legal action maternity entitlements medical checks medication motor insurance

13, 26 6 37 5, 6, 7 13 24–25, 26 13 11, 14, 32, 33 13, 18, 25 13 13 6, 13, 19, 25 14, 18–19, 20–22 17, 25 32 12 18, 19, 25 24, 26 13

nannies accommodation 14, 26 advantages of 6, 7 annual leave 12, 26 babysitting 13, 26 benefits-in-kind 14, 26 Childcare Approval Scheme 6 complaints about 33–34 Disability Discrimination Act 1995 12 expenses 14, 18, 26 fixed-term contract 13 foreign nationals 15 gross misconduct 13, 26 house rules 24–25, 26 insurance 13 interviews 14, 18–19, 20–22 keeping records 14 live-in 13, 14, 24, 26 live-out 14

©SureStart 2005

maternity entitlements 12 medical checks 18, 19 National Insurance 14, 18 notice period 13, 26 Ofsted 6 out-of-hours care 13, 26 pensions 12 professional development 25 redundancy 13 references 18, 19 review meeting 23 selecting 17–22 settling in 23 sick leave 12, 26 tax 14, 18 termination of employment 13 trial period 18 unfair dismissal 13 verbal warnings 13 wages 11, 14 work permits 15 written warnings 13 nanny agencies 18, 35 Nannytax 14 National Childminding Association (NCMA) 36 National Insurance 11, 12, 14, 18, 31 Nestor Primecare Services Ltd 9, 15, 37 notice period 13, 26 nurseries 7 Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) 6, 7, out-of-hours care 13, out-of-school clubs over-7s childminders 7, 8,

37 26 7 37

payroll companies 12, 14, pensions 12, professional development Protection of Children Act (POCA) 1999 public liability insurance 6, 13, 19,

26 26 25 10 25

qualifications

10, 17, 35-36

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Employing an Approved Childcarer A guide for parents

10 Index record-keeping redundancy references registered childcare registered childminder risk assessment

14 13 18, 19 7, 8 6, 37 27–30

safety in the home sick leave Statutory Sick Pay SureStart Unit

27–30 12, 26 12 9, 37

tax childcare vouchers 31 credits 9, 10 deductions 11, 14, 18 Inland Revenue 11, 14, 32, 33 National Insurance contributions 11, 12, 14, 18 P45 12 P60 12 payroll companies 12, 14 termination of employment 13 theft 13 training 6, 7, 35–36 trial period 18, 26 unfair dismissal verbal warnings vouchers – childcare

13 13 9, 31–32, 37

wages 11, 14 Work and Pensions, Department of 37 work permits 15 Working Tax Credit 10, 31–32 workplace inspection 7 written permission 25, 26, 42, 43 written warnings 13

48

©SureStart 2005


Produced by NCMA in conjunction with SureStart

Ref code: GFP1 ISBN: 1-84478-449-5 Š April 2005

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