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Some of the exhibitions promoted by the museum have recently been developed in cooperation with other history and city museums around Europe and worldwide, and sometimes also with multidisciplinary teams. Why cooperate? What are the benefits of such a working strategy?

In view of the sophisticated commercial products that are on today’s market, curators of history museums are often not confident enough in developing digital products themselves. The result is that either they won’t contemplate the idea for want of money or, should funds not be an issue, they entrust the development of digital products entirely to commercial companies. The risk then is that the end product clearly bears the hallmarks of the enlisted production company. Alternatives are national and transnational co-productions between history museums and interdisciplinary partnerships with educational establishments. These bring about not only an added value in terms of content of the products and a reduction in costs, but also significantly enhance the external image of the participating houses. The individual museums are able to position themselves on an international stage. Furthermore, cooperation projects give curators the chance to further their professional development through exchange with colleagues. Since its opening, the Luxembourg City History Museum has amassed a wealth of experience in transnational cooperation projects, in terms of both “real” travelling exhibitions and web-based projects. Could you talk to us about some of these experiences?

The first digital product that the Luxembourg Museum launched together with the Helsinki City Museum and the DASA Working World Exhibition between 2003 and 2006 tackled the question of what makes a good European citizen, namely “The Real Citizen.” The participating curators set themselves the challenge of developing a product that would address the questions of young people. An additional technical challenge was also to make the product suitable for the visually impaired. This resulted in a range of technical constraints that led to the product being rather static in design.

img. 5.28 — “Explore Poverty,” a on-line exhibition conceived by the Luxembourg City History Museum in collaboration with the Minnesota Historical Society, the Helsinki City Museum, the DASA Arbeitswelt Ausstellung, and implemented by the Koln International School of Design. http://www. explore-poverty.org.

Profile for POLITECNICO DI MILANO-DPA

European Museums in the 21st Century: Setting the Framework - Vol. 2  

This book grew out of the earliest work of the MeLa Research Field 6, “Envisioning 21st Century Museums,” aimed at exploring current trends...

European Museums in the 21st Century: Setting the Framework - Vol. 2  

This book grew out of the earliest work of the MeLa Research Field 6, “Envisioning 21st Century Museums,” aimed at exploring current trends...

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