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Digital Design - Module 02 Semester 1, 2018 Melissa Tan

912630 Xiaoran Huang (Studio 3)


Week Three

Reading: Kolerevic B. 2003. Architecture in the Digital Age

Kolerevic described three fundamental type of fabrication techniques in the reading. Outline the three techniques and discuss the potential of Computer Numeric Controlled fabrication with parametric modelling. (150 words max)

Fundamentally, fabrication techniques are categorised under digital fabrication wherein information can be translated by fabricators directly into the control data that operates the equipment. The most common of which is two-dimensional fabrication, particularly, Computer Numeric Controlled cutting (CNC Cutting). High pressure water jets, laser-beams, plasma-arcs and more hold the ability to be cost effective while being able to cut materials that are up to 38cm thick. Subtractive fabrication is another technique the requires chemically or mechanically reductive processes to remove a certain volume from a solid material. Lastly, additive fabrication incrementally forms a mass layer-by-layer allowing immense customisation. However, this process is rather limited in its application to building design and production as projects often requires lengthy production times, costly equipment and at a limited size. Instead, they are often used to create models with complex curvilinear components and geometries.

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Week Three

Surface Creation

Quad: Top Left - Basic ninja star panels, Top Right - Triangular half panels, Bottom Left - Twisted Square panels, Bottom Right - Square and Star panels. Although initially a challenge to navigate, Rhino proved to be a useful tool whilst customising the panelled surface through curve, point and random attractors. The process entailed a lengthy exploration of shapes through trial and error, furthermore, allowing me to experiment with different forms far quicker than as if drafting them in Rhino directly. I wanted to create a base shape that allowed for the 2D ‘panels’ to be gaps in the surface, allowing the 3D structure to stand out.

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Week Four Panels & Waffle

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Week Four

Laser Cutting

It was extrememly apparent that my model had many individual, thus having many similar looking parts. Not only does this cost more when laser cutting but it also takes up more time when assembling the structure. In order to minimise the time used to laser cut the material it probably would have been better to ensure that the etch lines were dotted or even perforated, still allowing the paper to be bent easily. In addition to this, mirroring the net so that the etching at cut lines are on the inside would make for a cleaner, finer model.

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Week Five

Quad: Top Left - Spheres, Top Right - Dodecahedrons and squares, Bottom Left - stellated octahedrons, Bottom Right - Rectangles. After become slightly more accustomed to Grasshopper I was able to make more intricate, complicated designs which I later booleaned from the 3 x 3 grid. This task allowed me to experiment more thoroughly with various 3D shapes and stellation to form interesting voids in the overall structure.

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Week Five

Isometric

My structure consists of stellated octahedrons and cubes intersected by a partial cylindrical figure. This form crafts a individualistic view from each cutout that displays the tessellated, geometric view of the octahedron’s interior. Although each stellated shape is similar in construct, they way in which they bisect one another creates entrances and apertures that grant distinctive views of the interior volume. These hollowwed depressions, however, proved to be problematic whilst 3D printing as a large amount of support material was needed. Furthermore, many of it’s geometric qualities were unable to print as they tapered off to less than 2mm.

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Week Six Task 01

Lofts

1.1

1.2

1.3

Key

1.4

{0,0,0}

{120, 150, 150}

{120, 150, 150}

{150, 150, 120}

{0, 0, 150}

Attractor / Control Points (X,Y,Z) Attractor / Control Curves Grid Points

{30, 150, 150} {0, 150, 120}

{30, 150, 150}

{150, 0, 120} {150, 0, 120} {0, 0, 150} {30, 150, 0} {0, 120, 0}

{0, 90, 0} {0, 90, 0}

{0, 30, 0} {0, 0, 0}

Paneling Grid & Attractor Point

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.4

{132, -248, 103}

1.3 Rotated by 90*

{132, -248, 103} {-70, 270, 5.7}

{-94, 213, 159}

Paneling

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Curve Location}

(Random Attractor)

{Index Selection}

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

Design Matrix 1:5

Surface extends past the waffle drawing the eye beyond the limitations of the structure.

Gaps within the mesh act as windows into the volume

Task 01 Matrix In order to create a surface I wanted the initial square to be undeterminable and for the 2D panels to integrate nicely into the 3D structure. My first iteration was very simple in nature, consisting of only a rotated square, however, it did not hold any 2D panels. The second and third iteration balanced both 2D and 3D elements, however didn’t connect overall as nicely as I had hoped. Thus, I arrived at my final design that combines the three preceding elements of squares, stars and gaping 2D panels.

Blocks follow the twist of the structure, enhancing and emphasising the curvature

Square blocks create another facade that echoes the waffle structure

8 The Structure has an open top, creating a large volume within


Week Six Task 02

Grid Manipulation

1.1

1.2

1.3

1.4

{-201, 273, 0}

Key {-201, 273, 0}

{0,0,0}

Attractor / Control Points (X,Y,Z) Attractor / Control Curves Grid Points

{69, 369, 0}

{326, 137, 85}

{203, 137, 48}

{35, 110, 49}

Distribution

{Curve + Point Attractor}

{Point + Random Attractor}

{Random + Random Attractor}

2.1

2.2

2.3

{230, 109, 83}

{Random + Point + Curve Attractor}

2.4

{-151, 2, 85}

{-54, 26, 83} {-147, 46, -57}

Testing Shapes

{Basic}

{Point Attractor}

(Random Attractor)

{Random + Curve}

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

{Sphere}

{Dodecahedron}

{Stellated Octahedron}

{Stellated Octahedron}

Design Matrix 1:5

Task 02 Matrix Views of the geometric depressions are also afforded through holes on the other side

A thorough exploration of spatial volumes results in my final structure of a stellated octahedron and cubic volumes. This is a culmination of precedents that consists of octahedrons, dodecahedrons and spheres. Although the first iteration did create an interesting shape I wanted to explore more with geometric masses. The dodecahedron resulted in a great amount of positive space which I found not ideal for 3D printing. The stellated octahedron design, although complicated and unique, did not allow for navigational space, and was rather a monumental statue. Tessallated, geometric volumes within the structure cannot be traversed

Light is still able to permeate through small openings that are connected to the cubic volumes

9 Large gaping entry ways allows this structure to be navigated


1.1

1.2

Week Six

1.3

{120, 150, 150}

{120, 150, 150}

{150, 150, 120}

{30, 150, 150} {0, 150, 120}

{-54, 26, 83} {-147, 46, -57}

{0,0,0} {0, 0, 150}

{30, 150, 0}

Student Number

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

{Sphere}

{Dodecahedron}

{Stellated Octahedron}

{Stellated Octahedron}

Grid Points

{0, 0, 150}

{0, 90, 0}

{0, 90, 0}

{0, 30, 0}

{Random + Curve}

Attractor / Control Curves

{150, 0, 120}

{0, 120, 0}

(Random Attractor)

Attractor / Control Points (X,Y,Z)

{30, 150, 150}

{150, 0, 120}

Final Isometric Views

{Point Attractor}

{Basic}

Key

1.4

Testing Shapes

Melissa Tan - 912630

Lofts

{0, 0, 0}

{Index Selection}

Paneling Grid & Attractor Point

{Index Selection}

2.1

2.2

{Index Selection}

{Index Selection}

2.3

2.4

{132, -248, 103}

1.3 Rotated by 90*

{132, -248, 103} {-70, 270, 5.7}

Design Matrix 1:5

{-94, 213, 159}

{Attractor Point Location}

{Attractor Curve Location}

TASK 1 ISOMETRIC Paneling

Melissa Tan - 912630

mber

Module 02 - Task 01

ame

Student Name

3.1

3.2

(Random Attractor)

{Index Selection}

3.3

3.4

Design Matrix 1:5

TASK 2 ISOMETRIC Surface extends past the waffle drawing the eye beyond the limitations of the structure.

Views of the geometric depressions are also afforded through holes on the other side

Gaps within the mesh act as windows into the volume

Blocks follow the twist of the structure, enhancing and emphasising the curvature

Tessallated, geometric volumes within the structure cannot be traversed

Square blocks create another facade that echoes the waffle structure

Light is still able to permeate through small openings that are connected to the cubic volumes

The Structure has an open top, creating a large volume within

Star structure connects square details whilst still allowing light in

Large gaping entry ways allows this structure to be navigated

Exploded Axonometric 1:1 0

20

60mm

Exploded Axonometric 1:1 0

10

20

60mm


Appendix - Task 1 Process

Because this was my first experience with grasshopper I decided to trial a lot of surfaces to get myself used to the format of the program

I was able to cut the hexagon into a rectangular base, however when panelling this shape the top surface does not connect smoothly. From this I learnt that the edges must be on the ground plane in order for a surface to connect correctly

I Initially wanted to create a hexagonal design but found it difficult to panel it onto the grid. I was able to create hexagonal panels on the surface through grasshopper but was not able to transfer the 3D shape onto it

I began trying other simpler shapes such as triangles and squares to craft the 3D surface, drawing them onto a 3 x 3cm grid in order to visualise it.

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Appendix - Task 2 Process

At the beginning I was confused as to where to put the attractor points but soon found many possibilities through trial and error.

I experimented thoroughly when manipulating the grid, adding curve and point attractors upon random attractors. Although random attractors are hard to track, they do form very unique combinations.

I experimented with shapes such as the dodecahedron, furthermore, trying to stellate it. This, however, was unsuccessful as the shape itself became rather messy and would not boolean properly with the grid.

The final script contained curve and point attractors, as well as two independent shapes: the cube volumes and the stelatted octahedrons.

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Appendix - Model Making Process

Lisiting each component

Pegging components together

Pegging components together

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