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MOLLY Herlong A Collection of Selected Works 2010-2013


MOLLY Herlong

873 Vedado Way NE • Atlanta, GA • 30308 • cell 704.651.6171 • email meherlong22@gmail.com


Education [August 2011-May 2013] Georgia Institute of Technology [Atlanta, GA] Masters of Architecture 3.72/4.0

[August 2007-May 2011] Clemson University [Clemson, SC] Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Spanish Minor Magna Cum Laude Graduate 3.84/4.0

Architectural Travels [January 2013] Mexico City, Mexico [Georgia Tech] Studio Site VIsit

[February 2011 Philadelphia, PA [Georgia of Tech]

Ed Bacon Competition Awards Ceremony

[September 2011 Philadelphia, PA [Georgia Tech] Ed Bacon Competition Site Visit

[October 2010] Chicago, IL [Clemson University] Organized Studio Trip

[January 2010-May 2010] Barcelona, Spain [Clemson University] Study Abroad

Experience [August 2012-May 2013] Graduate Teaching Assistant [Atlanta, GA]

Contribution as critic on review panels Assistance in preparation of design exercises Hold office hours to oversee program use, hand skills and design process Photography of first year design student process Archiving of student work Assembly of displays and university storefronts of student work

[May 2012-August 2012] Mack Scogin Merrill Elam Architects [Atlanta, GA] Contribution to and participation in design charrettes Preparation of architectural drawings and construction documents Participation in mock-up build and construction testing Assistance in and management of construction on behalf of the design team

[May 2011-August 2011] Postcard from Paris [Greenville, SC]

Preparation of architectural drawings Participations in and for client meetings Preparation of presentations

[October 2008] Birmingham, AL [Clemson University] Rural Studio Visit

Skill Highlights InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator, AutoCad, Revit, 3ds Max, Rhinoceros, V-Ray, Ecotect, 3D Printer, Laser Cutter, CNC Hand Modeling, Hand Drafting, Communications, Spanish Proficiency, Public Speaking

Honors [December 2011] 2011 Ed Bacon Competition Jury Prize Recipient in Infrastructure

National design competition run by Philadelphia Center for Architecture

[December 2010] 1 of 10 Winners of Clemson University Portfolio Competition

School of Architecture portfolio competition for graduating seniors

[August 2009-present] AIAS Member

Clemson University and Georgia Institute of Technology chapters

[January 2010-May 2011] Officer of Clemson University Women’s Club Soccer


Clemson University [August 2010-December 2010] Act. Adapt.

usitt ideal theatre competition

Georgia Institute of Technology

[August 2011-September 2010] Boundary City

ed bacon competition

[September 2011-December 2010] ATL Switching Station options I design studio

[January 2012-May 2012] research+education+practice portman prize competition studio

[August 2012-December 2012] Roswell Community Healthcare Campus options III design studio

[January 2013-May 2013] Synergy & Friction thesis studio

Outside Experience [May 2012-August 2012] Threshold

design build workshop

[August 2012-December 2012] L’Oreal Labs Environmental Analysis environmental systems review


01


Act. Adapt. [Clemson, SC] USITT Ideal Theater Competition [semester]

Fall 2010

[professor]

Robert Bruhns

[contributors]

Daniel Hutcherson Elizabeth Jones

[program] lobby, box office, flexible stage (proscenium and thrust stage configurations), theater, woodshop, classrooms, rehearsal space, office space, dressing rooms, educational multi-purpose rooms


ATTAE R ORTO

T

INSERTION

CONVERGE E X P A N D R O TAT E THRUST

E

D N A P X E

PARTE 01 flyhouse

PARTE 02

stage woodshop

PARTE 03

ActAdapt is a performing arts theater by and for the students acting upon the stage of Clemson University. The location of the student theater reflects the activity and excitement of the design. ActAdapt is situated at the intersection of Clemson University’s campus and downtown Clemson, and faces two of Clemson’s iconic landmarks: Bowman field and Tillman Hall.

08

SELECTED WORKS


Project Title 01


10

SELECTED WORKS


1. workshop 2. classroom 3. rehearsal space 4. lobby 5. office 6. control room

7. green room 8. stage 9. back of stage 10. loading bay 11. box office 12 dressing room

la na zo a rg caing bay deload

10

2

2

back of stage area

8

9

il óv m araroom messing cále dr la mobi

12

o ari enstage esc el

1

la area del escenario de atrás

lobby

5 11

7

4

el vestíbulo

6

el boletería

la oficina uno office one

o añoom el bbathr

2

5

ño ba room el bath

GROUND plan

box office

4 6

5 3

3 la

da trae entranc en

Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts acts as a living performing arts laboratory for Clemson theatre students. However, performing arts classes, students, and clubs take back seat to productions and travelling shows resulting in a deficit of space during setup, rehearsal, and production of these events. ActAdapt is designed to relieve this deficit by providing a space meant for education and practice of theater as well as space for rehearsal and student retreat. In this sense, Act Adapt is a living and breathing machine that houses the performance of student life on the campus of Clemson University.

Act.Adapt. 11


+828'

+780' +770' +760' +750'

Cuts and angles in the topography add interest to the site and allow for unique and interesting surfaces and planes for sports, rest, and leisure. These programmatic capabilities allow the topography of the site to act as an extension of the iconic Bowman field. This extension allows for a synergy between the natural and built environments. The transition between the two is blurred by the topography.

12

SELECTED WORKS


Act.Adapt. 13


Boundary City [Philadelphia, PA] Ed Bacon Competition- Infrastructure Award Recipient [semester]

Fall 2011

[professor]

Fred Pearsall

[contributors]

Dana McClure Claire Pardo Dave Duncan [program] raised highway, park, pedestrian-centered avenue, bioswales, green space, waterfront real estate


As a boundary, the 1-95/CSX corridor separates Philadelphia from its founding boundary, the Delaware River; and disconnects essential natural and human ecologies, yet the best solution may not be to make it disappear. Boundary City is a strategy for re-connecting and re-vitalizing these systems with memorable, in-between conditions--material and immaterial--that invite boundary -appropriation, -inhabitation, and -crossing in everyday life. 16

SELECTED WORKS


existing emotions of the derive

controlled water runoff

existing planal, visual corridors

increased planal, visual corridors

existing latent spatial boundaries

modified latent spatial boundaries

As it currently exists, the 1-95/CSX corridor allows for a series of imperfect conditions. It’s current states defines itself as a harsh boundary. Re-imagining the contributions that this boundary is making to Philadelphia allows for its new role as a perspectival machine of the city. Raising the highway lengthens visual corridors, strengthens the connection between city and river, and provides a more sensible environmental strategy.

Boundary City 17


initial conditions

intervention

boundary city

existing boundaries

public space

engaging “in between� space

shortened perspective

elevated highway

inviting perspectives

By raising the highway, clearing it from the ground plane, and by introducing a broad avenue in its place that accommodates local traffic, pedestrian walkways, and bioswales, the boundaries are broken down as well as reversed so that the avenue becomes a public amenity rather than a nuisance. Rebuilding the highway with a delicate structure and separated directions of travel creates a lighter, more pleasant space underneath that dissolves the previous boundary condition and draws people towards it. As the divisive condition becomes an integrating one, green space and public parks are built along the waterfront and feathered across the corridor; uniting the city with the river.

18

SELECTED WORKS


Boundary City 19


ATL Swiching Station [Atlanta, GA] Optons I Design Studio [semester]

Fall 2011

[professor]

Fred Pearsall

[program] bicycle workshop, locker rooms, cafe, information center, bike depot, bike track


marta w peachtree street marta

tree t nw ng s

generation

ion ransmiss nsmission transmissiontransmission ssion t ission tra nsmi ransm transm transmi n trma ission t mission transmission ission tr trans

ssion trantsramnission transmiss smission tran ion tra n transmi missio smis nsm traniosn transm sion transissio im ss ission

sio ission transmis tnrantrsamnissmsioisnsion transm n transm ission o i s is trans n on transm ssi ansmission transmission transmissi o r t n sion

spri

parking

generati

sion transmission transmis n transmis sion tr missio nsm trans ransmission tra ission transmission ansmissi ssion smission t transmission transmi o an transm is

cafĂŠ

generation

on

bike storage/depot

info context vectors

22

SELECTED WORKS

applied context vectors


The revitalization of this site is done through the promotion of a healthy lifestyle and a sustainable form of transportation. Existing conditions allow for the set up of the site as a living switching station. Programmatically, a bike hub allows for the pull of the activity to the site and the push of energy into the urban fabric of the city of Atlanta. This push and pull is situated within a site of residual space created by highway and rapid transit infrastructure. The site allows for a sense of context and orientation to the city before dispersion. The connection of the site to past, present, and future via the implementation of various grids allows for the cohesive flow of orientation on site. All of this provides a re-energized and re-activated urban space. The driving design moves of the site originate from a grid composite derived from the make up of context vectors regulating the structural grid, a thirty foot tree grid superimposed on and through the mesh of the bikeable surface, and Atlanta’s historic Vincent’s Plan of 1856 forming the bikeable paths at ground level. The interplay of Atlanta’s history, information, and transportation allow for the site to act as a switching station in the city’s downtown.

30’ tree grid + structural grid

vincent’s plan of 1856

grid composite

ATL Switching Station 23


rgia geo pu cam tech

exit to s p

s 21

ring

77' 1'

106 8'

39

par nial

en cent

96'

k 16

2586'

2390'

2742'

396'

arium

ia aqu georg

685'

652

'

1183

'

2070'

0' 112

site relationship to destinations

24

SELECTED WORKS

only entr ance

exit o

nly

context bike lanes difficulty

stre

et


ATL Switching Station 25


1886

1911

1955

1978

1931

2011

The site design addresses three major propositions. The first is the extension of the thirty foot grid of tree canopy. This tree grid promotes the ecological urbanism and downtown Atlanta that is currently lacking. The second proposition addressed is the reworking of on site edges and boundaries. A natural built anchor exists on the site due to the Marta station and hospital/residential parking garage. This allows for the juxtaposition of two L-shaped built moments; an anchored, programmatic, and functional L and an open, high energy and movement L. The third of these propositions is the gesture towards the history of the site. The implementation and superimposition of a variety of grids allows the project to speak to the history of the site and the history of the city of Atlanta. 26

SELECTED WORKS


ATL Switching Station 27


research+education+practice [Atlanta, GA] Portman Competition Studio [semester]

Spring 2012

[professor]

David Green

[program] cafe, pharmacy, clinic (exam rooms, check in/out, charting and citation alcoves, equipment storage, clean supply, soiled holding, break rooms, blood draw, consult rooms), conference rooms, offices, classrooms, research labs, support and core labs, study rooms


30

SELECTED WORKS

CUT

WRAP

PIERCE

SHIFT

S TA C K


1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

6

1

2

3

4

5

1

6

A

A

A

A

B

B

B

B

C

C

C

C

D

D

D

D

E

E

E

E

2

3

4

5

6

The proposed project is a center of health care collaboration between Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University, and Georgia State University. This collaboration allows for a fusion between practice, education, and research in the health care profession. While there exists a health care relationship between the three universities (in the form of groups, institutes, and labs), implementing a center or hub for this relationship provides a catalyst for a state of collaboration between users therefore benefiting output of practice, education, research.

Research+Education+Practice 31


A

D

C

B

E Catalyst

70' - 0"

Roof

60' - 0"

CATALYST

circulation collaboration gathering

Level 4

45' - 0"

Level 3

user to user institute to institute

30' - 0"

Level 2 15' - 0"

Level 1 0' - 0"

Level 0

-12' - 0"

A

PLATES

research education study user institute

E

D

C

B

REE

Catalyst

TH NE

70' - 0"

ZO

Roof

60' - 0"

Level 4

EE

R E TH

ZON

45' - 0"

Level 3 30' - 0"

Level 2

O

TW NE

15' - 0"

ZO

Level 1 0' - 0"

NE

EO

ZON

SKIN

practice urban pull

user to city institute to city

6

5

4

3

2

1

Catalyst

70' - 0"

Roof

60' - 0"

Level 4

45' - 0"

Level 3

30' - 0"

Level 2 15' - 0"

The organization of zones into layered or stacked plates allows for the zones to act independently. The insertion of a catalyst through these plates results in a collaborative core. This collaborative core promotes the movement and circulation of users and information throughout the building. 32

SELECTED WORKS

Level 1 0' - 0"


34

SELECTED WORKS


extrusion of catalyst ENTRANCES visitors

CAFE ENTRANCE teachers students researchers patients

PHARMACY ENTRANCES

CATALYST

visitors

CLINIC LOADING DOCK

entrance of site STRONG URBAN EDGE

SOFT SHIFTING EDGE

shifting of plates

Research+Education+Practice 35


SKIN DENSITY ONE

opacity level one

SKIN DENSITY TWO

opacity level two

SKIN DENSITY THREE

opacity level three

SKIN DENSITY FOUR

opacity level four

The envelope that wraps the building is composed of a light gauge steel geometry that was derived from the notion of the trilogy of education, research and practice. Voids, cuts, and openings pierce the envelope allowing for entrance points, open public spaces, and increased daylighting. The density of this skin varies across the surface of the building based on programmatic and environmental needs. This mapping allows for a variety of five levels of opacity. 36

SELECTED WORKS

SKIN DENSITY FIVE

opacity level five


Research+Education+Practice 37


ROSWELL

KENNESAW

MARIETTA Wellstar East Cobb Wellstar Kennestone

SANDY SPRINGS

Peachford Hospital

SYMRNA

Wellstar Windy Hill

Wellstar Cobb Emory Adventist

Northside Hospital


Gwinnet Medical Center Duluth

DULUTH

Gwinnet Medical Center Lawrenceville

Roswell Healthcare Campus [Roswell, GA] GWINNET

Options III Design Studio [semester]

Fall 2012

[professor]

Bob Farrow

[contributors]

Sara Damiani Erin West

[program] hospital (radiology, emergency department, lab, pacu, or suite, pre-op/ recovery, icu, inpatient units, cardiac center, womens’ center), cafe/ cafeteria, medical office building, retail, market, education and prevention center, child development agency, gym


A fully integrated mixed-use health care campus centered on patient care and community engagement while promoting a healthy lifestyle. This health care facility works as a campus to promote community engagement and interest. The campus is a center of activity, energy, and health, touching on the four programmatic neighborhoods that surround the site, therefore reaching out and engaging all patrons of the town. The green corridor extending north to south helps to achieve a balance between the function of a hospital and the engagement of the surrounding community to further strengthen the campus as a heart of Roswell, GA.

40

SELECTED WORKS


RADIOLOGY EMERGENCY LAB

PULL main lobby threshold

PULL inpatient lobby

threshold

RADIOLOGY EMERGENCY

DEPARTMENT CAFE

LAB

MAIN LOBBY

PUSH PULL

LAB

MAIN LOBBY

CAFETERIA

DEPARTMENT CAFE IN-PATIENT

MEDICAL

MEDICAL OFFICE

BUILDING

AND

WOMEN’S SERVICES

CARDIAC CENTER LOBBY

CARDIAC CENTER LOBBY

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL RETAIL RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

SERVICE

CHILD

DEVELOPMENT

RETAIL

AGENCY

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

WELCOME CENTER

addition of plates

RETAIL

RETAIL

icon buildings

PREVENTION SERVICES

LOBBY

RETAIL FRESH MARKET

RETAIL

EDUCATION AND

WOMEN’S

RETAIL RETAIL

LOBBY

RETAIL RETAIL

RETAIL

BUILDING

PREVENTION SERVICES

RETAIL RETAIL

OFFICE

EDUCATION AND

WOMEN’S

RETAIL RETAIL

LOBBY

reaction of buildings

LOBBY

LOBBY

PULL PUSH

node

CAFETERIA

IN-PATIENT

PULL “green lobby”

threshold + push/pull condition

RADIOLOGY EMERGENCY

DEPARTMENT

RETAIL

CARDIAC CENTER LOBBY RETAIL RETAIL SERVICE CHILD DEVELOPMENT

RETAIL

AGENCY

RETAIL

WELCOME CENTER

entrances + vertical cores

node

RETAIL

WELCOME CENTER

green corridor

Roswell Healthcare Campus 41


R

O IC F F

L CA E

SURGEON END

C AF ETER

inpatient

IA

A -P BB

LO

IN

ED PATIENT

IO AT UCAND

END END END

N

LO C IA CARD Y B

ME S WOERVICEBY S B

PREN’S

AIL

ED

2END SURGERY OUTPATIENT

IN PATIENT VISITOR

C Y

OUT PATIENT VISITOR

CY

DIN

GEN NT MER TME IA GY E EPAR ETER IOLO D RAD LAB CAFE CAF

Y

I

L CACE

F

L BUI

F O

G

B

T EN TI PA B

LO

N

NTIO

E VE

A UCAND

ED

’S MEN S WOERVICEBY S B

LO C IA CACREDNTER Y B LOB

A

CDEVEGE

IL V ETA L ER DNT AI S IL E Y RET HLOPNM C

ICE

START IN PATIENT VISITOR START ROSWELL VISITOR START

OUT PATIENT VISITOR

START

SURGERY SERVICE

START ED PATIENT START ED PATIENT 1END

ED FAMILY WALK UP

discharge

END START ROSWELL RESIDENT START SURGEON START ED FAMILY WALK UP

SURGERY OUTPATIENT

0’

35

surgery suite emergency department central sterile A RET IL

C

E MR CO E EL ENT

W

0’

42

65

END ROSWELL VISITOR END

ROSWELL RESIDENT

SELECTED WORKS

END

SURGERY SERVICE

inpatient units inpatient units food services

inpatient lobby


design process

education prevention

women’s center lobby

women’s services cardiac center & gym cardiac center & gym lobby

retail

retail

child development center

Roswell Healthcare Campus 43


The Roswell Community Health Care Campus is a center for advancement of the health care industry. Through evidence-based design research, the hospital is not only a destination for top-quality medical care, but the building itself functions to increase the health and safety of its patrons and the surrounding neighborhoods. Through research in the areas of flexibility, efficiency, expansion, circulation, exterior views, daylighting and process improvement, the new operating room suite in the hospital pushes the envelope of patient care.

imaging

efficiency in the or suite

comprehensive platform allows for efficient use of hybrid or 44

SELECTED WORKS

flexibility in the or suite

flexible use of pre-op, pacu, and recovery dependent on flow of traffic on daily basis

separation of traffic in the or suite

separation of patient and administrative paths

exterior views in the or suite

exterior views at the termination of long corridors with hopes of increasing staff morale


1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

A

B

C

RADIOLOGY EMERGENCY ADMIN

TO DIAGNOSTICS

TO STERILE PROCESSING

UP

D

PACU

E

OR SUITE

DEPARTMENT LAB CAFE TO ICU

G

RECOVERY

PRE-OP

TO ED TO INPATIENT

H

F

MAIN WAITING

TO LOBBY

WAITING

Roswell Healthcare Campus 45


Synergy & Friction [Mexico City, Mexico D.F] Thesis Studio [semester]

Spring 2013

[professor]

Marc Simmons, Charles Rudolph

[contributors]

Patrick Deveau Cynthia Smith

Claire Pardo Melissa Ting

Ian Fralick Justin Wallace

Shota Vashakmadze

[program] bus depot & terminal, metro station, retail, public park, green space, lobby, office space, hotel, rooftop amenities


01

SELECTED WORKS


Bus Terminal + Circulation

Pedestrian Circulation

Metro Platform + Trajectory

Pedestrian Circulation

Service Circulation

Public Park + Softscape

Ascending Occupiable Ground

Descending Towards Infrastructure Concourse

01 Synergy & Friction 49


hotel hotel lobby

office

tower lobby

occupiable ground/public park ground retail

infrastructure car tunnel, metro tunnel, parking

infrastructure bus depot

50

SELECTED WORKS

Mexico City is a city based on the excavation and layering of many eras and cultures. This complexity and duality of breaking down and building up is characteristic of both the existing site and the proposed design. The complexity of this site situated in the heart of Mexico City is a result of the junction of park and city, financial district and residential district, and transportation hub and pedestrian hot spot. This dichotomy occurring on so many levels with the existing condition of the site is further embodied by the proposal of a collision of a tower and a skin that is both pervious and occupiable. The collision of these two entities allow for the two to maintain their own identities while coexisting. The friction between the two create a synergy that successfully embodies the energy of the existing site. The elaborate infrastructure & public transportation system is comprised of two car tunnels, a metro platform and track, a bus concourse and terminal, and parking. This system all exists within five levels sub-ground. The ground condition that connects this system to ground level is a series of continuous surfaces and steps that take pedestrian below to the transport concourse or above to an occcupiable public space that acts as an extension of the adjacent park. This horizontal surface continues into a vertical skin that reaches up the tower in a triangulated manner on the south and west facades, allowing for sun shade and heat control. The tower that sits within this ground and skin condition sits 1010’ high, surpassing the adjacent Torre Mayor and Torre BBVA, making it the tallest building in the city. The tower is composed of a two separate lobbies at ground level (one hotel lobby and one office lobby), 42 floors of office, two mechanical levels, a secondary hotel lobby, 16 floors of hotel, and two rooftop amenity levels. The five degree cant of the tower towards the city park is structured with a continuous core and outrigger system.


52

SELECTED WORKS


For a deeper exploration of the relationship between the tower and skin, a one-story corner condition at the 72nd floor was constructed in a full scale mock-up. This 22-foot mock up allowed for a better understanding of the play of light, visibility, and experiential quality of the skin that sits three feet off the curtain wall of the tower. Construction and materiality considerations forced a more thorough deliberation of detailed connections and joints. The triangulation of skin is mimicked in the custom design of diamond frame members and diamond mullions. This allows for a consistent reading of a strong edge on many levels and scales. The connection of laminated glass skin panels to the triangulated frame is composed of a double faced clip connection tightened to 1/2” steel rods with a zinc plated shaft collar and machine screws. The careful contemplation of construction allowed for a more extensive understanding of the workings of the design proposal.

T.O. Roof Elev. 20’-0” A.F.S.

11 22

88 33 4 4 55 66 66

99 77

66

10 10

T.O. Floor Framing Elev. 6’-0” A.F.S.

T.O. LVL Foundation Elev. 1’-6” A.F.S.

1. 1/2” 1018 Carbon Steel Rod 2. 1/2” Bore Zinc Plated Steel Shaft Collars 3. 1/4” x 20 Machine Nut 4. 17/64” Zinc Plated Steel Washer 5. 7/8” Zinc Plated Steel Washer 6. 1/4” #6 Wood Screw 7. 16 gauge Steel Clip Back 8. 1/4” Clear PETG 9. 1/8” Acrylic Light Diffuser 10. 1/2” Birch Plywood Clip 11. 1/4” x 20 Machine Screws

11 11

Synergy & Friction 53


Lucky Penny-Threshold [Atlanta, GA] Design Build Workshop with Mack Scogin & Merrill Elam Architects [lead designers] [project manager] [construction manager] [Lucky Penny contributors] [design team]

Mack Scogin & Merrill Elam Susan Williams Danny Davis Black Beckham (choreographer) Malina Rodriguez Allen Pierce, Claire Pardo, Kelly Skaggs, Austin Wright, Jennifer Lewis, Stefann Plishka, Nick Kahler, Megan McDonough

[program] cardboard house performance set


EXISTING DUCT WORK BEYOND EXISTING TRUSS SYSTEM

HEARTH/FIREPLACE ART FURNITURE INSTALLATION

Threshold is a design build performance set that forced a detailed study of corrugated cardboard as a building material. The structural qualities and characteristics of cardboard were pushed to their limits in constructing an abstracted house structurally sound enough to accommodate dancers on two stories. This house that has been pulled apart and abstracted is meant to dramatize the experience of crossing a threshold. Upon arriving, the audience enters the theater through an abstracted fireplace made of furniture and cross through the cardboard set to the seating. 56

SELECTED WORKS

CARDBOARD SUSPENDED "HANGING HOUSE"

EXISTING THEATRICAL GRID

2" 1' 3'

1'

HANGING HOUSE B

EXISTING MEZZANINE BEYOND 9'

CARDBOARD VESTIBULE BELOW ART FURNITURE INSTALLATION

12'

10”

2"

3 1/2"

WALL HOUSE 9”

5'

20'

6 3/4”

9”

30° 7'

10”

3 1/2"


°

BOX HOUSE

°

HANGING HOUSE A NOOK +48”

+40”

+32”

+24”

+16”

+8”

FIREPLACE

°

WALL HOUSE

HANGING HOUSE B

WALL HOUSE HANGING ROOF

Lucky Penny-Threshold 57


A

A

D

D

D

D

B B

C C

Plan Detail A

Level 1 Wall House 58

SELECTED WORKS

Plan Detail B

Level 2 Wall House


The 50,000 square feet of paper products (hexacomb cardboard laminated with marley) used to construct the house proves a strong contradiction to how we typically view a home: stable, foundational, and permanent. The normative characteristics of cardboard provided a challenge when considering it for a structurally sound element. The performance set of Threshold is composed of up to five layers of laminated hexacomb cardboard that are then fastened together with a series of joint members constructed out of corrugated cardboard. The whole composition is then given a layer of marley as a smooth finish and surface ready for performance.

Typical A

Typical B

Typical C

Typical D

Typical E

Lucky Penny-Threshold 59


60

SELECTED WORKS


Lucky Penny-Threshold 61


22° 54’ 0” S / 43° 14’ 0” W


L’Oreal Labs [Rio de Janeiro, Brazil] Environmental Systems Analysis [semester] [in association with]

Fall 2012 Perkins & Will Atlanta

[professor]

Sami Vikram

[contributors]

Liz Teston Josh Lohr Jacob Davis

Lauren Griffith Soleen Karim

[program] double height lab daylighting and HVAC strategies


In partnership with the Perkins and Will L’Oreal Labs design team, a detailed environmental analysis of the design proposal in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil was undertaken. This analysis included detailed daylighting and HVAC studies and proposals and their effects on the performance of the proposed building. The Perkins and Will Atlanta office provided a schematic design packet to work from. 64

plans & render courtesy of Perkins & Will Atlanta

SELECTED WORKS

73


Option A

January

February

March

Option B April

May

June

July

August

September Option C

October

November

December

The analyzed solar path is indicative that the sun stays fairly high year round. The sun is highest during summer months (December, January) and lowest during winter months (June, July). The North facade receives the majority of the direct light while the South facade has the potential to make use of ambient light. After determining there is a need for daylight shading on the second floor and daylight dispersion on the first floor, a series of brainstorming sketches to investigate different options to approach these needs was executed. Options A, B, and C were chosen for further investigation.

L’Oreal Labs 65


Option C

March

June

December

Option C provided the best solution to what is trying to be achieved. This is a series of 9� x 9� members that span the length of the North facade. Because the members follow the curve of the building, it allowed both shading of the second floor and directing of light further into the first floor, as can be seen in the solar ray studies.

66

SELECTED WORKS


before

after

2nd floor

1st floor

From the before and after light meter readings it can be concluded that in the three months studied the footcandles in hotspots were reduced drastically. On the north side of the buildings the footcandles dropped from 202 footcandles to 63 footcandles in March. During this same month, the west side of the building also shows significantly less hotspots by turning the vertical fins on this side 180 degrees.

L’Oreal Labs 67


gnolreH YLLOM skroW detceleS fo noitcelloC A 3102-0102


A Compilation of Selected Works