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Meghan Spigle Harvard Graduate School of Design 2011 Yale School of Architecture 2009 University of Virginia 2006


Remaking the Campo Grande Lisbon, Portugal

URBAN DESIGN The Campo Grande is an important public space in the city of Lisbon that borders the City Hall, City Museum, and University of Lisbon. As the city begins to rethink its plan for transit infrastructure, the potential also exists to rethink the underutilized public space of the Campo Grande. Currently, the northern area of the Campo Grande includes an intermodal transfer point between metro and bus stations which service institutional and municipal buildings as well as the prominent sports stadium, Jose Alvalde. Both the historical significance of the campo as military training ground, and its capacity to link different institutions in the city, situates the Campo Grande is an important public place and gateway into downtown Lisbon. By reorganizing the existing transit infrastructure and redirecting automobile traffic on the public ground level, a new connected public realm is created. Placing the existing sprawling bus station beneath an elevated ground plinth reallocates space for transit and articulates the plinth as a generative public space. New commercial spaces on the plinth level connect the metro to the bus station and direct the flow of pedestrians to a new urban ground plane straddling the highway infrastructure of the Second Circular. Condensing transit infrastructure allows more territory to be committed to the expansion of institutional buildings for the University of Lisbon and associated outdoor spaces for student activities. Reorganization of automobile traffic creates a hierarchy of flows laterally, from high-use automobile traffic on the eastern Campo Grande Avenue to more pedestrian and bike oriented traffic on the western side of the Campo Grande. Through reinforcing a public pedestrian ground plane, the infrastructure of the Second Circular highway overpass becomes less of a barrier and more of a passage. The proposed urban ground plane connects the intermodal transit station to the civic space of the Campo Grande and potentiates urban development to the periphery.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2010 Academic Work Joan Busquets Urban Design Studio


OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER AND PLAZA


Plan

DIAGRAMS

GARDENS ON THE PUBLIC PLINTH


ELEMENTS AND COMPONENTS

Section C


INTERIOR PUBLIC WALKWAY


Section B


Lusail

E21 HIGHWAY BUFFER AND BOULEVARD

Qatar

ARABIAN PUBLIC WATERFRONT The Lusail development is a mixedused planned city and satellite to Doha, Qatar. Three elements were designed for the landscape component of the project: E21 Highway Buffer and Boulevard, Waterfront Promenade, and South Marina. The extensive nature of each element led to a design in which a linear treatment and section were defined that would modulate in patterns of density and material treatment, producing slight modulations in environment and atmosphere which would define specific areas. The Boulevard consists of a zone designated for high traffic with adjacent large swaths of Eucalyptus tree plantings. The Waterfront Promenade boasts a large shade pergola and granite paving along a 1.5km stretch of constructed shoreline within which pocket gardens and water features are interspersed. Finally, the South Marina is characterized by a large wooden deck with linear strips of Palm plantings and public seating.

Meghan Spigle Summer 2010 Professional Work Team Project with Meghan Spigle, Elinor Scarth, Anne-Fleur Aronstein, and Claudia Aracci Michel Desvigne Paysagiste

WATERFRONT

WATERFRONT PROMENADE

LUSAIL, QATAR

WATERFRONT SQUARES

PARIS, FRANCE

VENICE, ITALY

TRIESTE, ITALY

BEAUBOURGH SQUARE

PIAZZETTA SAN MARCO

PIAZZA UNITA’

72m 30m 155m

120m

200m

50m 45m 72m

80m

30m

LUSAIL - MARINA DISTRICT PUBLIC REALM - AS_MDP_RFR_SOGREAH - 02.07.2010

SOUTH MARINA

PHASE 1A PUBLIC REALM DESIGN - DESIGN STAGE 1A


E21 HIGHWAY BUFFER AND BOULEVARD PLAN

E21 HIGHWAY BUFFER AT 20 YEARS

WATERFRONT PROMENADE PLAN

SECTION WITH PERGOLA AND TREES AT 10 YEARS

SOUTH MARINA PLAN

MARINA SECTION AT 20 YEARS

E21 HIGHWAY BUFFER TREE PLANTING

PROMENADE MATERIAL SELECTION

MARINA DECK CONSTRUCTION


Research: Avian Use of Green Walls Paris, France

URBAN ECOLOGY This study was conducted during the bird breeding season in the urban environment of Paris, France. Field work consisted of an observational analysis of breeding birds’ use of two types of green or vegetal walls. The first wall type, mur emblematique, is a green wall construction with notably high plant biodiversity developed by the botanist, Patrick Blanc. The second green wall type, mur vigne, consists of a planted vine which grows upon an architectural wall or lattice structure. Observations were made at 14 walls (seven of each wall type), within the urban periphery of Paris, using the point count method to test for breeding bird abundance and diversity. The field study reveals trends in the two green walls’ relative ability to host species abundance and diversity in the urban environment. Higher density of generalist bird species was found in the mur vigne category. While higher bird diversity was detected in the mur emblematique category. A correlation between bird diversity and wall area revealed a positive correlation between increased wall area and increased diversity for both wall types. A correlation between bird abundance and wall area revealed a positive correlation between increased wall area and increased abundance for the mur emblematique category. However, a negative correlation was established between increased wall area and increased abundance for the mur vigne category.

Meghan Spigle Summer 2010 Academic Work Independent Research: Penny White Grant


EMBLEMATIQUE: 37 Quai Branly, Musee Quai Branly

VIGNE: 47 Rue Cuvier, Le Jardin des Plantes URBAN CONTEXT

URBAN CONTEXT

SOURCE: Google Earth

SITE CONTEXT

SOURCE: Google Earth

SITE CONTEXT

SOURCE: Google Earth

SOURCE: Google Earth

SOLAR ORIENTATION

SOLAR ORIENTATION

Summer Solstice

Summer Solstice

Equinox

30ft

Equinox

145ft

Winter Solstice

Winter Solstice

MAXIMUM VEGETATION DEPTH & WALL DIMENSIONS

MAXIMUM VEGETATION DEPTH & WALL DIMENSIONS 145ft

30ft 30ft

30ft 1ft

3ft

50ft

80ft

Boston Ivy, Parthenocissus tricuspidata

AVERAGE NUMBER OF BIRDS COUNTED AT THIS WALL RELATIVE TO THE AVERAGE FOR THE WALL TYPE

AVERAGE NUMBER OF BIRDS COUNTED AT THIS WALL RELATIVE TO THE AVERAGE FOR THE WALL TYPE

40.0 35.0

12.0

30.0

10.0

25.0

8.0 6.0 4.0

20.0

47 Rue Cuvier

37 Quai Branly

15.0

Vigne

Emblematique

10.0 5.0

2.0

0.0 Blackbird

0.0 Blackbird

Greenfinch

Common Pigeon

Wood Pigeon

Greenfinch

Common Pigeon

Wood Pigeon

House Sparrow

House Sparrow

OBSERVED SPECIES

OBSERVED SPECIES

Blackbird Turdus merula

Greenfinch Carduelis chloris

SOURCE: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide

Common Pigeon Columba livia

Wood Pigeon Columba palumbus

House Sparrow Passer domesticus

Blackbird Turdus merula

Greenfinch Carduelis chloris

SOURCE: http://www.rspb.org.uk/wildlife/birdguide

Common Pigeon Columba livia

Wood Pigeon Columba palumbus

House Sparrow Passer domesticus


Dynamic Urban Waterfront WILLETS POINT, QUEENS NY

LANDSCAPE URBANISM In 2010, Willets Point is a mixed-use residential enclave that integrates the Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Citi stadium, and commercial activity in order to create new linkages between the neighborhoods of Flushing and Corona. The use of the canal edge changes over time as water levels rise and subsequent changes in vegetation patterns occur. Systems of parks, tree-lined streets, biofiltration swales, and wetland marshes comprise the vegetation of Willets Point. Change in marsh grass distribution indexes rising tides and water salinity fluctuations. In 2100, Willets Point is an older residential neighborhood, distinguished by its engagement with the waterfront where boating and recreation occur. Diagrams show the formal and programmatic components of the Willets Point site. Diagrams show the Willets Point site in relation to the urban context. Rising tides change the canal edge and vegetation cover over time. Sea level rises three feet over the next 50 years and six feet over the next 100 years, changing the perceptual experience of the canal edges.

Meghan Spigle Spring 2010 Academic Work Shauna Gilles-Smith Landscape Urbanism Studio


WILLETS POINT IN 2100


URBAN DESIGN COMPONENTS

Plan

Section F

WILLETS POINT IN 2010


TRANSFORMATIVE SPATIAL EFFECTS OF SEA LEVEL RISE

Section A


TRANSFORMATION OF VEGETATION OVER TIME DUE TO GROUNDWATER SALINITY FLUCTUATIONS

Section D


VEGETATION PALETTE

Section C

VIEW OF CANAL EDGE DURING LOW TIDE


Veteran Re-Training Ground SOUTH WEYMOUTH NAVAL AIR STATION, MA

FLEXIBLE TRAINING FIELD With over 350,000 service members decommissioned from the United States military each year, 38,000 of which return from war with high risk of unemployment and subsequent homelessness. At the same time, the nation is trying to relieve itself from oil dependency (a major cause of overseas conflict). The single largest institutional consumer of energy in the US, the Department of Defense, is attempting to decrease its energy consumption by installing wind turbines and solar panels on its own military lands. Organizations, such as Veterans Green Jobs, based in Colorado have formed to address the dual concerns of retraining war veterans and reinforcing the green job sector. With cause established, monetary aid is available; $600 million dollars are allocated to Green Energy Job Training in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The SOWEY site, located outside of the Boston metropolitan region, offers a viable location for a veteran green job retraining field and a potential program prototype for other BRAC sites. To provide a variety of training options for veterans at SOWEY as well as to create closed cycles of CO2 creation and by-product production and consumption, multiple green energy systems are utilized. Solar panels, wind turbines, switchgrass fields, poplar forests, and algae beds are installed and maintained by the veteran population living and working on-site. A single roadway constructed of fill material from the existing 220,000 cubic meters of tarmac will provide a platform for bundling infrastructural components (CO2, water, and electrical conduits) that will enable the flexible expansion and contraction of re-training fields. Flexibility in planning is necessary to accommodate both unknown future energy demands and veteran populations. With current estimates, it is predicted that 500 veterans could be retrained each year on the SOWEY site, producing 190,000 gallons of ethanol and 92,000 MWH of electricity each year. Optimistically, the site could over time, alleviate the current problem of veteran homelessness due to unemployment while at the same time, establishing a workforce of individuals trained in a growing job sector.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2009 Academic Work Team project with Chanwoo Kim and Ben Winters -diagrams and perspectives by Meghan Spigle Christian Werthmann Core Landscape Architecture Studio


SOWEY SITE CONSIDERATIONS

220,000 CUBIC METERS OF EXISTING TARMAC

CONTAMINATED SOILS AND GROUNDWATER

ECOLOGICAL NETWORKS

PROTECTED AREAS

30M BUFFER FROM STREAM

HABITAT: EASTERN BOX TURTLE UPLAND SANDPIPER

CRITICAL DIMENSIONS AND SPECIFICATIONS OF ENERGY COMPONENTS


EXPANSION OF LAND USE TYPES

RENEWABLE ELECTRICITY GENERATION

WIND TURBINES AND PHOTOVOLTAICS veterans trained in installation, maintainance, and repair

ELECTRICAL SUBSTATION veterans trained in electrical operations

BIOMASS ENERGY GENERATION AND CO2 RECYCLING

ENERGY SOLD TO THE GRID

ATMOSPHERIC CO2

POPLAR AND WILLOW FIELDS FOR CULTIVATING BIOMASS veterans trained in propigation, maintainance, and harvest

SWITCHGRASS FIELDS FOR CULTIVATING BIOMASS veterans trained in cultivation and harvest

CO2 uptaken by switchgrass blades and rhizomes

ETHANOL SALE veterans distribute ethanol to the public at on site gas station

d bundle poplar and willow

ETHANOL STORAGE

ETHANOL BIOREFINERY veterans trained in plant operations

BIOGASIFICATION PLANT veterans trained in plant operations

CO2 PIPEPED TO ALGAE increases algae biomass yield

ALGAE POND FOR CULTIVATING BIOMASS veterans trained in construction, maintainance, cultivation, and harvest


SITE PLAN AT 2020

PHASING OF FIXED ELEMENTS PHASE I

PHASE II

cut fill

PHASE III

biocorridor II cut fill

daylight French stream biocorridor I

fill cut biocorridor III

surface wetland (bench)

wetland treatment swales


SITE PROGRAM

LAND USE TYPES AND WIDTHS

30M

30M

60M

60M

120M

SECTION OF FILL ROAD AND BIKE PATH

15M 10M

UTILITY ROAD

BIKE PATH AND PUBLIC ACCESS


BIOCORRIDOR I

POPLAR PLANTATION

WIND TURBINES AND SWITCHGRASS FIELDS


Sustainable Urban Housing EAST DOWNTOWN HOUSTON, TX

GREEN URBANISM The site, EaDo (East of Downtown), is cut off from the downtown area by an array of infrastructures. Circumscribed by highways to the south and west and railways to the north and east, EaDo is isolated from its surroundings but yet, is located minutes away from downtown. New connections are to be made both within the urban fabric of EaDo as well as to its surroundings. At the urban scale, bike trails and light rail can connect this isolated area both to downtown and to the University of Houston while fostering alternative means of transportation. At a smaller scale, connections between blocks and new green spaces create a sense of place and identity for residents. Urban landscape infrastructures are utilized both functionally and programmatically to create social and ecosystemic networks that manage water absorption, aquifer recharge, create recreational spaces, and promote sustainable transportation. Smaller scale landscape interventions infiltrate the existing housing fabric, connecting new housing to old housing through systems of parks, gardens, and recreational pathways. Courtyards at the center of new housing blocks create new community spaces for live/ work and commercial activity to occur, thus stimulating activity and cultivating an identity for EaDo as a live/work district. As a part of this new identity, materiality is implemented metaphorically, reminding residents of the necessary destruction that is required for housing construction. A thin, operable, wood sunscreen covers the southern facade of the housing blocks to shade the units from excessive sunlight and radiant heat. Wood used to construct the screens is harvested from pine plantations along the periphery of the district, visible to the inhabitants from the park and transit networks.

Meghan Spigle Spring 2009 Academic Work Keith Krumwiede and Kate John-Alder Architecture and Landscape Sustainability Studio


NEW DISTRICT PLAN

LANDSCAPE SYSTEMS AT THE DISTRICT SCALE

North


DESIGN OF THE HOUSING BLOCK Units/Block: 44 Average SF/Unit: 1,990

HOUSING COMPONENTS

Retail and Live/Work Spaces

58 Units/Acre

Pathways Through the Block

75% Open Space/Unit

Private Outdoor Space


studio

studio

ACTIVITY WITHIN THE CENTRAL COURTYARD

studio

studio

studio

live/work

live/work

live/work

A

live/work

live/work

studio live/work

retail

retail

studio

live/work

studio

studio

retail

live/work

retail

GROUND FLOOR PLAN OF HOUSING BLOCK North

SECTION A


INTEGRATION OF NEW AND EXISTING HOUSING WITH GREEN NETWORKS HOUSING CONNECTION TO THE DISTRICT NETWORK

BIKE PATH AND DISTRICT PARK


MATERIAL AND METAPHOR: FROM TREE TO SHADE SCREEN

HARVEST OF THE PINE PLANTATION FOR NEW CONSTRUCTION


IT Cattle Campus NEW DELHI, INDIA

LAYERING LANDSCAPES The Delhi Cattle Campus and Gosadan incorporate three principles from Indian architecture and culture: The preservation of water, the incorporation of outdoor spaces into indoor spaces, and the reliance on the sacred Indian cow for sustenance. Situated in a strip of land between the national highway that connects Delhi to Faridabad and a freight railroad, the campus reaches beyond its boundaries to create a new public landscape. The public landscape, on the upper level of the campus, provides space for ad hoc retail vendors to set up shop along a path planted with scented vegetation that connects new, high-end retail development to informal markets and residential communities on the other side of the railroad tracks. This upper landscape, shielding the lower landscape and IT area from the harsh Indian sun and deadly summer winds, contains the Gosadan or cattle preserve, where cattle are brought away from the intensely trafficked Dehli streets, and cared for beneath a shaded grove of trees. Dung from these cattle is collected, processed into methane by anaerobic biodigesters, converted to electricity, and used to power the IT center on the lower landscape. Along with the IT center, on the lower level, are the Grasslands. The Grasslands, open to the IT staff for recreation, are used to produce fodder for cattle on the upper landscape. Here native Dehli grasses and fruit bearing trees are grown, fertilized by byproducts of biodigestion and nourished by collected rainwater. Thus, a symbiotic agricultural process takes shape, wherein energy and resources are continuously reallocated to zones within the landscape.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2008 Academic Work Team project with Rebecca Beyer and Dexter Ciprian -landscape plan, section, and model by Meghan Spigle Diana Balmori and Joel Sanders Landscape and Architecture Interface Studio


CONTEXT AND RAILROAD CROSSING


FOUR PROGRAMMATIC ZONES The Delhi IT Cattle Campus is comprised of four zones that serve ecological and social purposes. The Gosadan and Retail zones are located on the upper level of the campus, while the Grassland and IT zones are on the lower level.

GOSADAN: The Gosadan zone is a preserve for Delhi cattle that are brought

RETAIL: The Retail zone is open to public access and forms a public path across

GRASSLAND: The Grassland zone, on the lower level of the campus, is used

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY: The IT zone, on the lower level of the campus, is beneath the Gosadan and Retail zones and is the space where the IT staff work.

to the campus and out of the city streets where they cause traffic congestion. The Gosadan landscape is covered in shade trees, in accordance with the agricultural practice of silvipasture.

for agricultural cultivation of pasture grasses that are used to feed the cattle of the Gosadan.

the upper level of the site. Retail space is available in indoor formal retail space as well as outdoor informal spaces.


LANDSCAPE PLAN


GROUND FLOOR PLAN SHOWING IT AREAS A

B

THE IT ZONE DURING MONSOON

SECTION B SHOWING THE OUTDOOR PUBLIC THEATER


THE RETAIL AND GOSADAN ZONES


Villa d’Este TIVOLI, ITALY

NATURE AND LINE The Villa d’Este, situated on a dramatic hillside in Tivoli, is organized by a major axis that runs perpendicular to the hill (north to south). Cross axes bisect this major axis at various points along the hillside, connecting the town of Tivoli and the headwaters of the Anio River to the east, to the views of the Villa Adriana to the west. These cross axes create terraces and paths that extend the spatial experience of the garden along the compressed site of the hill. Each cross axis presents a unique experience through the integral design of water features, architectural and vegetative elements, and views beyond the extent of the villa. A series of seven cross-axial perspective views, drawn as one progresses along the north/south slope of the hill, illustrate the unique and distinct design of each terrace; from the grotto and trees at the base of the hillside to the fountains within the subterranean hallway of the villa. The series of drawings, created in pen, explore variation in line type and quality in order to represent vegetation and water.

Meghan Spigle Summer 2008 Academic Work Hand Drawings Rome Seminar


THE WATER ORGAN


THE TIVOLI TOWN GATE

THE GARDEN PORTICO


THE HERCULES GROTTO


Gowanus Canal BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

STITCHING AND BRIDGING The Gowanus Canal, known for its toxicity and foul smell, was historically used for freight shipping while the land surrounding the canal was used for manufacture and storage of gas. Currently, the city’s Combined Sewage Overflow system pours raw sewage into the canal when heavy rainfall occurs. Yet despite its toxicity and location within the 100-year flood plane, the area around the canal is now under extensive real estate pressure as residential areas begin to encroach. Currently zoned for light industry, the area around the canal will soon witness change. An urban analysis of the site reveals latent variables that can be used to successfully stitch together the two residential areas on either side of the canal: vacant and low-use lots, existing commercial avenues, and a network of pedestrian paths and green spaces. Just at the bend in the canal, is an area of publicly owned land, that can be used to initiate an urban intervention that would set a precedent for housing development and the remediation of toxic soil and land. This initial intervention at Public Place, would be the first of a series of ‘stepping stones’ that cross over the canal and thus bridge one side to the other. Operating at the scale of the detail, the Bioswale Bridge Barge, is a small scale intervention that is designed to decrease toxic Combined Sewage Overflow effluent from entering the Gowanus Canal while also serving the larger urban goal of stitching the two sides of the canal together.

Meghan Spigle Spring 2008 Academic Work Team project with Reuben Herzl and Philip Drew -site strategy, section, and barge detail by Meghan Spigle Andrea Kahn Urban Design Studio


BIOSWALE BARGE FLOATING IN THE GOWANUS CANAL


URBAN ANALYSIS

PRESSURE: Residential pressure from Carroll Gardens and Park Slope encroach upon the Gowanus Canal which has increased speculation in real estate prices

FLOOD LINE: The area currently under speculation is also within the 100-Year flood line

TOXICITY: A history of manufacture and storage of gas has left toxic elements that have leached into the soils. Additionally, raw sewage coming from the Combined Sewage Overflow system toxifies the canal waters

PEDESTRIAN PATHS: Pedestrian paths and greenspaces will create a network to guide people into the proposed site

COMMERCIAL AVENUE: A new commercial avenue that brings in existing commercial activity will activate the site

URBAN STRATEGY

STITCHING LOTS: Low-use and vacant lots are targeted for development in order to bridge across the canal and stitch together the two neighborhoods


PLAN OF BRIDGING INTERVENTION

SITE STRATEGY

CAPPING CITY BLOCKS: A strategy to safely contain toxic soils and create buildable ground

RESIDENTIAL TOWERS: Positioned on capped blocks, these allow residential pressures to infiltrate

COMMERCIAL AREAS: Feed the pedestrian paths with activity and bring in existing commercial business

GREEN SPACES: These service the residential towers and commercial areas


SECTION OF INITIAL INTERVENTION AT PUBLIC PLACE

Displayed Soil and Water Remediation

Public Walkway Revitalized Vegetation Soil Cap

Toxic Soil


Housing

Scented Flowers

Office

Outdoor Retail

Retail

Public Walkway


BIOSWALE BRIDGE BARGE The bioswale barge and dock areas are planted with Reed Canarygrass and Cattails that clean the 300 million gallons of raw sewage that flow into the Gowanus Canal each year through the Combined Sewage Overflow system. 250,000 square feet of bioswales are needed to treat the sewage that enters the Gowanus. The barges and docks are located at streets that currently dead end at the canal. Thus, the bridge barges connect residential neighborhoods on either side of the canal, stitching them together and creating public green space.


THE BARGE AND DOCK SECTION OF THE BIOSWALE BRIDGE BARGE

Toxic Water

Toxic Soil


Kunsthalle NEW HAVEN, CT

GARDEN AND GALLERY The New Haven Kunsthalle is conceived as an art and media center, which would serve both the Yale and New Haven community. The given the wide array of art media to be displayed and interacted with in the museum, the Kunsthalle is designed to address the curatorial needs of conditions with and without light. Art and media requiring visual projection or media interaction are located on the ground level. The ground level is spatially defined by a series of steps and ramps which negotiate level changes through what is otherwise a fluid and connected space beneath a large green roof surface. The green roof, a sequence of ramped surfaces, offer exhibition space for art pieces that are better suited for outdoor display. A portion of the green roof which slopes down to the ground floor, adjacent to the lobby entry, is accessible and open to the public and provides an informal outdoor meeting space for larger groups. Artwork requiring display in natural light is accommodated in the ‘light box’ gallery which appears to float over the constructed landscape of the green roof. Natural daylight is brought into the gallery space by a light tray ceiling system that captures southern light and reflects it into the gallery spaces. The light trays are situated so that they articulate the structural elements within the space.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2007 Academic Work Peter de Bretteville Architecture Studio


MODEL SHOWING CONSTRUCTED GREEN ROOF AND GALLERY


CHAPEL STREET AND PASSAGE TO THE KUNSTHALLE

NORTH EAST ELEVATION AS SEEN FROM CHAPEL STREET

KUNSTHALLE AND ADJACENT YALE ARTS BUILDINGS

KUNSTHALLE IN URBAN CONTEXT


DIAGRAM OF NEW HAVEN GREEN SPACE

SITE PLAN SHOWING PASSAGE TO CHAPEL STREET


VIEW TO THE PUBLIC GREEN ROOF

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

VIEW OF THE GROUND FLOOR GALLERY

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


GALLERY SECTION WITH NATURAL LIGHT STUDIES

THIRD FLOOR PLAN


Slagscape NEW HAVEN, CT

CONSTRUCTIVE WASTE Union Station is a nexus for collection and distribution of people in and out of the city of New Haven. As people are processed through the station, they leave waste behind. Union Station alone handles over 4,500 cubic feet of rubbish each week. Three times a week, this waste is shipped off-site via petroleum fueled vehicles to an incinerator in Bridgeport, CT, some 20 miles away. The incineration method of waste management in the county of New Haven and the use of transport are unnecessary and are contributing factors to its low air quality rating, placing it in the top 10% of counties with the worst/dirtiest air quality. Plasma gasification is a relatively new method of waste management that densely consolidates waste matter into byproducts of vitreous slag and energy filled gas. If this process were to be used to treat the waste from the city of New Haven on the site of Union Station, a new system could emerge; whereupon waste from the city could be used to generate a new landscape that provides new ecologies for humans and wildlife. The Slagscape uses city waste as a programmatic fuel for reinventing the site adjacent to Union Station. Vitreous slag byproducts are used as building blocks to make new connections on site and to remediate the site by creating new natural and constructed environments. The Slagscape self-multiplies in order to continuously grow eastward, toward New Haven Harbor, overtaking existing hazardous waste producing meat packing factories. This new swath of natural territory would then link the shoreline of the harbor to the nexus of Union Station via a new and healthy ecological environment. The new ecology would provide a home and breeding ground to summer dwelling grassland songbirds native to the Northeastern US, whose habitats are now dwindling due to urban development and farmland reforestation. Visitors and city residents could then participate in this dynamic landscape by observing bird life in the summer and occupying heat pockets produced by the plasma gasification process during wintertime.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2006 Academic Work Ben Pell Studio


TEXTURE AND PATTERN OF THE SLAGSCAPE


The project is motivated by an attempt to create new habitat for native grassland birds in New Haven. This map shows the relative size and location of existing habitat areas, also called Important Bird Sites.

SECTION A

PROGRAMMATIC PATHS


SLAGSCAPE PLAN

Union Station after 20 years

Pigeons and Gulls are becoming more prevalent as urbanization occurs and the natural landscape is destroyed. These birds scavenge food waste produced by people and industry.

Union Station after 40 years

A Union Station after 60 years

Meadowlarks, Sparrows, and Bobolinks are grassland birds native to the Northeastern United States. They are loosing their natural habitat due to urbanization and reforestation of farmland.


SLAG ASSEMBLY One Slag component equals two weeks of processed waste produced by the entire city of New Haven and can be assembled according to programmatic conditions.


BIRDWATCHING AREA


Biofuel Research Institute PHILADELPHIA, PA

ENERGY HARVESTING The site for this project, an aging parking garage, is bordered on the south and east by a service alley. The alley, the backdoor to approximately ten restaurants that front on the exterior of the city block, is the repository for kitchen waste and cooking oil. Restaurants typically pay to have their cooking oil removed from the site and taken to either a landfill or an animal feedlot. Each restaurant along this alley produces over 15 gallons of waste oil each week, which alternatively can be converted to an automotive fuel additive: biodiesel. The Biofuel Research Institute collects kitchen oil from the alleyway and converts this to biodiesel. The biodiesel is then used to refuel cars that visit the parking garage and to meet the Institute’s energy needs. A symbiotic industrial process is created in which researchers use waste kitchen oil to fuel their own research in new, eco-friendly biofuels. Rainwater and light captured from the site are also used as resources and are directed into a self-watering and light filtering greenhouse, which cultivates high energy yielding plants such as Soybeans, Gopher Plant, Green Algae, Rubber Tree, and Chinese Tallow Tree. Thus, the Biodfuel Research Institute channels kitchen waste and resources from the site into itself, using them as fuel for research.

Meghan Spigle Fall 2005 Academic Work Jason Johnson Studio


THE BIOFUEL RESEARCH INSTITUTE FROM PEDESTRIAN APPROACH


HARVESTING: Restaurants adjacent to the existing parking garage provide the site with used kitchen oil; programmatic fuel.

CONVERTING: Used kitchen oil is carried away from the restaurants by tenuous conduits to the bioshpere where the raw oil is converted into biodiesel.

FLORIDA TO ALASKA: The amount of waste oil produced on site would be enough to power a car from Florida to Alaska, a distance of 5,000 miles.

KITCHEN TO CAR: Used kitchen oil, mixed and processed with ethyl, produces glycerin and biodiesel. Biodiesel is an envionmentally sound fuel alternative that can either be mixed with regular diesel fuels or used alone.


SECTION THROUGH THE PARKING GARAGE AND RESEARCH INSTITUTE


STREET LEVEL ENTRY

SOLAR ORIENTATION


INSIDE THE BIOSPHERE

SECTIONS DEMONSTRATING INFLATION AND DEFLATION OF THE BIOSPHERE WITH CHANGES IN THE SEASONS


Meghan Spigle. Portfolio 2011.