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MEGAN M. PRIKOCKIS LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO


PERSONAL STATEMENT The landscape is meant for living. As long as it thrives, so does its inhabitants. The interface where people conflict with their environment has become the stage; my role is mediator. There is a balance to be maintained. The severity of this daily occurrence varies upon location and management. My personal traveling experiences have shaped how I view these instances. With respect to the land, everyone strives towards the same end to harness its resources for their own benefit. This comes in many forms; nourishment, shelter, energy, religion, entertainment, recreation, admiration, and growth. I believe the relationship between man and earth is symbiotic in nature and, as in any other partnership; we must do our part to ensure we both survive.


TABLE OF CONTENTS CONCEPTS & PROCESS Center For the Environment......................................................................................................................1-4 MASTER PLANNING Spring Creek Canyon...............................................................................................................................5-7 Feasibility Study in Mang’ula Villages.....................................................................................................8-13 URBAN SPACES Cologne Plexus: Redesigning Neumarkt................................................................................................14-16 COMMUNITY DESIGN Westerly Parkway Plaza.......................................................................................................................17-19 DESIGN BUILD Laser Cutter Model....................................................................................................................................20 Vario-Solis: A Sun-Based Installation...................................................................................................21-23 CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION.............................................................................................................24-28 OTHER WORKS Hand Drawings....................................................................................................................................29-30 Photographs.........................................................................................................................................31-32


CONCEPTS & PROCESS CENTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT


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CENTER FOR THE ENVIRONMENT LANDUSE & SITE PLACEMENT • CFE placed diagonally in order to mimic the water flow on (and under) the site • Located on relatively flat area for minimal grading/site impact • Carefully placed to avoid building over sinkholes • Forest restoration located on steeper slopes and surrounds campus for secluded mindset • Thick forest provides habitat and adventurous trail experiences • Prairie restoration centrally placed on site adds element of surprise for visitors • Large area of grasses calm guests and provide a unique trail experience • Trails come from multiple locations to encourage everyone to visit

Legend g Forest Meadow Existing Vegetation

Tall prairie grasses create a full enclosure experience for the pedestrian/biker


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CFE: PROGRAM FUNCTION & SITE RELATIONSHIPS Outdoor Classroom

Education Center

Indoor Classroom

Service Lot

Kitchen Rain Garden

Service Road

Courtyard

R Research/ Maintenance

Cafe’ & Gift Shop Thick Forest Thick Forest Prairie Research Plot

Flowering Trees

Welcome Garden

Flowering Trees

Drop Off Zone: + Allows for easy site access for everyone + Extra space in Welcome Garden offers guests area to gather large groups or wait for other arrivals + Wood trellis’s provide shelter for visitors in inclimate weather situations and a transition zone into Courtyard

Initial Gathering Spot Drop-off Zone

Bioswales: + Catch and clean storm water runoff + Provide natural atmosphere amidst sea of permeable pavement

Parking Space

Rain Garden: + Located between two buildings , captures roof runoff, cleans it, and recycles water to be used to power courtyard fountain

Views Overlooking Prairie Restoration

Service Lot

Vegtation: + Thick, tall plantings act as visual buffer from the service access and parking lot. + Thick, low vegetation help define paths + Vegetation kept low in front of Living Machine to get maximum sun + Native plants used to strengthen connection to the environment

Service Zones: + Located on both sides allows for all buildings to be serviced + Two buildings share a zone minimizing overall impact on the site

Thick Hedge Barrier

Service Road

Courtyard: + Central location allows easy access from cafe and education center serving as a casual eating and relaxing area

Outdoor Classroom: + Placed close to Education Center’s indoor classroom + Allows students and faculty easy access to outdoor learning opportunities +Thick hedges act as visual buffer to keep students focused

Parking Lot

Parking Lot: +Splitting parking lot in two, forces visitors to move either left or right to enter campus-making movement patterns opposite, parallels the way water flows on and under the site

Parking Lot Geology Plot

Bioswale

Bioswale

Bioswale

Ground Water Surface Water

KEY

Views to Bald Eagle Ridge

Zones:

Buffering:

Other:

Educational Social Service

Visual-

Connections

High Vegetation

Physical-

Views

Low Vegetation

Building Orientation: + Orienting buildings to face south allows for maximum sunlight flow into Living Machine + Also, this orientation offers opportunity for passive solar heating and cooling

N Not to scale

Entrance

Geology Demonstration: + Welcomes visitors upon entry + Offers symbolic history when water first impacted the site + Provides beatiful vista overlooking Bald Eagle Ridge and entire campus upon arrival

View of Whole Campus

Geo Plot

Passive

Materials: + Site naturally produces crushed limestone and sandstone, used in the Geology Plot + Limestone and sandstone aslo used for seating, walls, tables, stepping stones and fountain

Limestone

Limestone Gravel

Sandstone

B.E. Ridge


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CFE: COURTYARD DETAILS COURTYARD PLAN y

SUSTAINABLE WETLANDS

Education Center

Depressed Wetlands

Drop Off/Waiting Area

N Scale: 1/8”=1’

• Rain collects in the basins and flows through a small fountain • Fountain flows into the wetland depression • Vegetation filters the water and recycles it, continually powering the fountain to sustain a wetland habitat

GEOMETRIC DESIGN PATTERN

FOUNTAINS

A curved ripple of depressed wetland vegetation flows in between the sandstone masses, suggesting that a ‘river’ has cut through the mountains and created a valley.

Small fountains feed into the wetlands providing a calming noise and simple entertainment for guests to enjoy


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CFE: COURTYARD DETAILS INSPIRATION DIFFERENTIAL EROSION Differential Erosion This process occurs when the the exposed rocks rocks erode erode at different speeds. The diagram This process occurs when exposed at different speeds. Theto the diagram left shows thevalleys topography of the valleys in The the State area. left shows to thethe topography of the in the State College area. peaks College are sandstone, The peaks are sandstone, (most resistant to erosion), the middle layers are mostly (most resistant to erosion), the middle layers are mostly shale, (less resistant) and the shale, (less and the bottoms of the valleys are limestone (the least bottoms of theresistant) valleys are limestone (the least resistant to erosion). resistant to erosion).

A+ Vertical tree rows buffer the service

B+ Singular trees growing out of the sandstone

area from view within the plaza

C+ Native boulders cascade down the sandstone

provide shade and a permeable overheard plane for visitor’s comfort.

blocks subtly suggesting that the geometric forms have crystallized from nature.

A B

C G F D

E

Not to scale

+ D Depressed wetlands act as a physical buffer, dictating visitor movement patterns. Depressing the wetlands implies a deeper meaning involving water’s movement under the surface.

E+ Limestone tiles the ground allowing for smooth movement. Since it is the most easily erodible material, it defines the lowest level of the courtyard.

F+ Granite slabs at 18” high provide perfect seating opportunities throughout the space. Granite is used above the limestone to represent shale and its higher resistance to weathering processes.

G+ Sandstone blocks vary in height to create nooks and crannies where plants flourish, adding a unique touch of greenery to the rock masses. As the highest material, the sandstone parallels the peaks of the mountains-the most resisitant to water’s erosional effect.


MASTER PLANNING SPRING CREEK CANYON


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SPRING CREEK CANYON ANALYSIS Analysis PROCESS Process: ByByconducting a suitability analysisanalysis within thewithin spring the creekspring canyoncreek parcels, one can efficiently different design features such as buildings, roads, trails, conducting a suitability canyon parcels, oneimplement can etc. on the landscape with minimal impacts on the environment. efficiently implement different design features such as buildings, roads, trails, etc. on the

landscape with minimal impacts on the environment. Legend Suitability:

Streams Good

INVASIVE Species SPECIESAnalysis ANALYSIS Invasive

Canyon Parcels Fair

Poor

Agriculture Analysis

Distance From Streams

N 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

Feet 4,000

Soil Suitability For Corn

Legend Canyon Parcels

Invasive Concentration: Scattered N 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

Low

Feet 4,000

Slope Common

N 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

4,000 Feet

Abundant

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: WPC 1991 Data Set

Invasive Plant Species N 0

1,000

2,000

3,000

Feet 4,000

Building Analysis

Projection: PA State Plane North Data Source: PSU Larch 311 Data Set

Roads Analysis

Percentage (%)

Acres Within Site

Scattered

16%

301

Low

2%

26

Common

13%

244

Abundant

8%

152

*Chart created by author using data from Municipalities, 2007. Legend Legend

Canyon Parcels

greaterarea

Land Use Canyon Parcels

Residential 2

Transportation 3

3 4

4 5

5 6

6 7 8 9

N N 0

0 1,000

2,000

3,000

Feet 4,000

1,000

2,000

3,000

Feet 4,000

The illustrates the concentration Themap mapabove above illustrates the of invasive speciesofwithin the canyon. concentration invasive speciesThese locations will serve as a guide for the picking within the canyon. These locations will tours. The chart shows how many acres are serve as a guide for the picking tours. invasively within the site.are The chartcontaminated tells how many acres

invasively contaminated within the site.


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SPRING CREEK CANYON MASTER PLAN

Using the suitability analysis on the previous page, the placement of an Education Center, Agricultural Research fields, Recreational Trails, and areas designated for Restoration and Conservation Management Practices were effectively determined.


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SPRING CREEK CANYON

RESTORING INDIGENOUS PLANT COMMUNITIES • Reduce survival of invasive species • Reforest existing open & thinning native communities • Enhance overall habitat quality • Trail head board provides key maps and wildlife info • Gates keep vehicles off hiking trails

• Allows stormwater to infiltrate • Filter rocks and fabric reduce pollutants entering Spring Creek

• Able to store farming equipment without compromising visitor lots

CONSERVATION & RESTORATION METHOD Restoration areas will undergo evaluation to select which native ecosystem fits best to protect and maintain the high level of biodiversity within the Canyon. With management efforts led by the Clearwater Conservancy, the invasive species will thin out and let the true native vegetation thrive.

• Encourage people to visit • Increase learning opportunities • Locations offer scenic views and • Offers adequate info but suggests seating visiting education center


MASTER PLANNING FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES

TEAM PROJECT


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: BIOGAS ANIMAL PENS IN MANG’ULA A The map shows the location of animal pens in Mang’ula A. Targeting families with existing cattle will minimize start-up costs.

FEED SOURCES • Grass gathered based on convenience • Along streams, roads, in between Shambas or structures, and any bushland areas

AVAILABLE LAND FOR FEED

DIGESTER FOOTPRINTS Tubular Plastic

Fixed Dome

Example Plot

The total available land was calculated by taking the existing land uses such as cultivation, residential and a potential stream buffer in Mang’ula A, and finding their total area and subtracting it from the area of the overall village. The cow carrying capacity for the158 Hectares in Mang’ula A is 387 cows.


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: BIOGAS CURRENT ENERGY CRISIS As of 2006, 95% of the villages surrounding Udzungwa Mountains National Park relied upon firewood as their main energy source. July 1, 2011, villagers were banned from collecting wood from the park. Currently, wood still remains the main fuel source despite the ban. These communities will need to make the switch to an alternative energy source in order to survive. BIOGAS BENEFITS Biogas is formed from the natural dioxide in the absence of oxygen. • • Improves sanitation • • Reduces indoor smoke • • Produces better lighting • • Reduces labor efforts

process of converting organic material, such as manure, into the gases methane and carbon Generates employment Improves water quality Conserves natural resources Reduces greenhouse gas emissions


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: WATER QUALITY WATER QUALITY ISSUES Simple diagrams help to illustrate the main concepts to non-English speakers when working with a heavy language barrier.

Erosion

Downstream Effects

Flooding

SOLUTION: BUFFER STREAMS IN MANG’ULA

The map above indicates the 100m buffer plan along the streams of Mang’ula. The circled areas show where the buffer would disturb people and structures.


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: WATER QUALITY COMPROMISE BUFFER ALONG STREAMS IN MANG’ULA

CONFLICT CHART Minimum buffer width is 100 meters surrounding a water source. This zone should be free of animal pens, latrines, houses, and agricultural activities. The 100m buffer results in the displacement of people and structures. Through compromising a few areas by 50 meters, the number of affected structures is reduced by 58%.

BUFFER BENEFITS No Buffer

Vegetated Buffer

Planting the right vegetation can maximize soil stabilization along stream banks, efficiently filter stormwater runoff, and can even serve as a feed source for livestock. DIFFERENCE IN BUFFER LENGTHS

Short buffers help cleanse water before returning it to a bigger source but they are not as effective as long buffers.


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICTS Wildlife accounts for approximately 40% of crop loss of all that are planted (Nahonyo 2012). Elephants wander into Mang’ula and destroy farmlands as they eat and trample most, if not all, of a cropland that they venture into. Such destruction devastates the income of affected farmers, as there is no compensation for lost crops by Udzungwa Mountains National Park. SOLUTION: CREATE WILDLIFE CORRIDOR

Udzungwa Mountains National Park

Providing a safe passage for the elephants will keep them away from village crops and angry vengeful farmers.

The Selous Game Reserve


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FEASIBILITY STUDY IN MANG’ULA VILLAGES: HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICTS CORRIDOR COMPROMISE Implementing this 100m wildlife corridor would provide the beginnings of migration route connecting Udzungwa Mountains National Park to the Selous Game Reserve. Beyond the sugarcane fields, the rest of the corridor will need to be identified in order to link to the Selous. EXTRA INCENTIVE To keep elephants on the path, bee boxes and tasty crops should be implemented within the 100m corridor. Also any villagers living close to the corridor’s edge will be advised to relocate or assume responsibility for the risks. PLANNING A WILDLIFE CORRIDOR Since wildlife corridors work better if they have already been identified as existing migration routes, it would be best to define those movement patterns first and develop the corridor along them. The above solution is likely to have complications unless the corridor follows an established elephant migration pattern.

Based on studied corridor widths, 100m is only one tenth of an appropriate size to accommodate large fauna, such as elephants. If a corridor was to be implemented immediately, the compromise for a 50m corridor may not be in the locals’ best interest.

Fencing corridor with bees can help keep elephants on the path.

Small corridors do not provide adequate space to keep wildlife separated from humans.


URBAN SPACES COLOGNE PLEXUS: REDESIGNING NEUMARKT

TEAM PROJECT


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COLOGNE PLEXUS: REDESIGNING NEUMARKT INITIAL ANALYSIS Neumarkt is located in the heart of Cologne Germany. Historically established as a trade market and event space, this plaza is currently surrounded by three lanes of moving automobiles, trams, and bicycles; Neumarkt becomes a quiet island in a sea of traffic. Many storefronts overlook the plaza as well as St. Aposteln Church.

By pushing the traffic to the southern side of the site, shoppers and pedestrians can safely enjoy the plaza without having to cross the busy traffic. The main pedestrian path follows the Decumanos, the first city road built by the romans.

Legend Trams Cars Bicycles Pedestrians

Views Nodes

NEW CIRCULATION Legend Trams Cars Bicycles Pedestrians

All diagrams created by me


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COLOGNE PLEXUS: SEASONALITY PLAN

KARNEVAL

CONCERT SETTING

CHRISTMAS MARKET

All plans rendered by Elliot Shibley

The main goal of this open air design allows Neumarkt to continue to host its famous Christmas Market and popular parade during the Karneval festivities. It can also serve as a concert venue. The overhead suspension system can provide a unique atmosphere tailored to each event taking place in the plaza. It could even become a covered canopy adding shade during the summer months.


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COLOGNE PLEXUS: SEASONALITY CHRISTMAS MARKET SECTION

KARNEVAL SECTION

All sections rendered by me

KARNEVAL SECTION DETAIL

CHRISTMAS MARKET SECTION


COMMUNITY DESIGN WESTERLY PARKWAY PLAZA

TEAM PROJECT


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WESTERLY PARKWAY PLAZA

The Westerly Parkway development will convert a predominantly commercial plot of land into a green community backyard. With the upcoming student housing project, the“Retreat,� the community will use this common area to gather, picnic, play, stroll and unite.


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WESTERLY PARKWAY PLAZA CIRCULATION DIAGRAM CONFLICTS & OPPORTUNITIES: 1. Opportunity to keep existing connections to the site from the high school. 2. Opportunity to implement bus stops to create social nodes and promote public transportation. 3. Conflict area: redirect “Retreat” traffic so it does not disturb existing residential communities. CONFLICT AREA #3

• Narrow street to discourage traffic through residential neighborhood • Sidewalks for safe pedestrian movement • Vegetation acts as barrier for pedestrians Analyzing existing circulation conditions help identify opportunities and constraints when designing for multiple modes of transportation. By using the existing bus route, residents will have easy access to the University and surrounding amenities without needing their own vehicle.

ON-SITE TRAFFIC • Street lights line roadways for safe travel at night • Planters slow traffic and boost visual quality in roadways throughout the site


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WESTERLY PARKWAY PLAZA PRECEDENT STUDIES

• Communal Land Use

• Pedestrian Friendly, Urbanized Neighborhood

• Curving Paths, Meadow, Calming Atmosphere

• Rhythm, no barriers, welcoming vegetation

COMMERCIAL ‘WOONERF’ This space serves multiple functions. It provides an access-way for small service vehicles, and initiates a connection between the surrounding green space and the mixed use commercial area. This ‘woonerf’ inspired space also serves as a social setting for shoppers and residents. These buildings also allow on-site residents to work locally, limiting the need and use of vehicles.


DESIGN BUILD LASER CUTTER PALM TREE


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LASER CUTTER PALM TREE PRELIMINARY SKETCHES

MODEL

This project was meant to challenge our mechanical thinking of how to design two dimensionally in AutoCAD for a three dimensional outcome. Inspired by the lazy days of summer, I created a palm tree. By cutting out different sized notched cogs out of chip board and threading them onto a pipe cleaner, I gave the trunk a rough texture and the ability to sway gently in the breeze.


DESIGN BUILD VARIO SOLIS: A SUN-BASED INSTALLATION

TEAM PROJECT


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VARIO SOLIS: A SUN-BASED INSTALLATION PRELIMINARY SKETCHES

SITE & CONCEPT

The future site of the conservatory is ideal for this installation. There is no set path here and this spot has excellent sun exposure.

CONCEPT MODEL CONCEPT To create a space where one can relax and interact with the sun. Bean Bag chairs made out of plastic will be located under “stained glass” awnings which create different shapes and shadows depending on the position of the sun. The path will mimic the sun’s daily journey, rising in the east and setting in the west.


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VARIO SOLIS: A SUN-BASED INSTALLATION PLAN

The path of the sun was crucial to our design. In order to achieve the desired results, the chairs and awnings must be placed on an arc according to the sun’s position throughout the day. With this arrangement one can experience the installation in a variety of different ways all within the same day. CONSTRUCTION PROCESS

MATERIALS

THE DESIGN The design consists of five bean bag chairs covered by colored awnings that reflect shapes onto the ground and visitors. The bean bags are made entirely of plastic bags. Large white bags were cut apart and fused together with an iron. After the fusing process, these large sheets of plastic were then cut according to a pattern (shown above) and sewn together. These plastic bean bag shells were then stuffed with small grocery bags.


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VARIO SOLIS: A SUN-BASED INSTALLATION

INSTALLATION AT THE PENN STATE ARBORETUM The installation process went well. The group ran into some minor problems. First, some of the awnings ripped so we had to fix them with clear tape. Second, we were forced to install all of the metal poles upright instead of on various angles due to high winds. We were not forced to use the buckets as anchors, so we stuck the poles into the ground for stability. The sun shone through the awnings, reflecting beautiful shadows and color patterns onto the bags.


CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION: MESIC MEADOW & FOREST PLAN


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION: WALL & PAVEMENT DETAILS


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION: STAIR DETAIL


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION: EDUCATION CENTER GRADING PLAN

Pipe Chart: Pipe Name A B C D E F G BC-1 BC-2 BC-3

Pipe From DI-1 to grass DI-2 to grass DI-3 to grass DI-4 to DI-1 DI-5 to DI-7 DI-6 to DI-7 DI-7 to grass Roof to Bio Ret. Roof to Bio Ret. Roof to Bio Ret.

Diameter (in) Slope % 8 1.00 8 1.00 8 1.00 8 1.00 8 1.00 8 1.00 8 1.00 Drainage connec Drainage connec Drainage connec

Length ( ) RIM Inv In Inv Out 45 1108.50 1104.83 1104.38 60 1105.50 1101.83 1101.23 50 1103.50 1099.83 1099.33 100 1109.50 1105.83 1104.83 112.5 1103.25 1097.95 1096.83 101 1103.25 1097.84 1096.83 40 1100.50 1096.83 1096.43 on from building to bio-reten on area on from building to bio-reten on area on from building to bio-reten on area


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CONSTRUCTION DOCUMENTATION: EDUCATION CENTER GRADING DETAILS

1

2


FINE ART WORKS


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TANZANIAN TEMBO


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A STUDY AT HAND


PHOTOGRAPHY


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WHITE BREEZE

VENICE, ITALY


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DOUBLE TROUBLE

MANG’ULA, TANZANIA


CONNECT MEGAN M. PRIKOCKIS mmprikockis@gmail.com 484-653-8369 THANK YOU

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