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//MEGANCARY graphic designer

EDUCATION MFA Candidate (2010 - present) Savannah College of Art and Design Graphic Design, 3.5 GPA

BFA (2009) University of South Alabama Primary - Graphic Design, Secondary - Painting. 3.98 GPA, Summa Cum Laude

WORK EXPERIENCE Graphic Designer (June 2009 - present) Crown Products

Responsibilities include the design of all electronic media including web banners and graphics, e-mail marketing and social media management. Additionally, I create specialty items including custom direct marketing pieces and high-end catalogs. Other duties include product photography and product development design.

Art Director (June 2007 - present) Negative Capability Press

Responsibilities include interior and exterior design and typesetting of books. Additionally, I am responsible for most of the company’s marketing duties.

Student Assistant (June 2006 - May 2009) University of South Alabama Responsibilities included assisting students and trouble shooting graphic design soft- ware and Mac hardware. I also operated several large format Epson printers.

TECHNICAL SKILLS

ACHIEVEMENTS

Silver Addy® Award (2010) Print Collateral Crown Products, AAF Mobile Bay

Silver Addy® Award (2010) Interactive Web Design (w/B. Davis) Crown Products, AAF Mobile Bay

Progress Through Ideas Award (2010) Ebsco Industries Employee of the Quarter (2010) Crown Products SCAD Honors Scholarship Recipient

AFFILIATIONS AIGA AAF Mobile Bay Golden Key Honour Society Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society

Adobe Photoshop CS5 Adobe Illustrator CS5 Adobe InDesign CS5 Adobe Dreamweaver CS5 Adobe Flash CS5 Adobe Acrobat CS5 XHTML/CSS

ADDITIONAL SKILLS Catalog & book production Website production E-blast creation Digital illustration Product photography & design Competitive analysis Copy writing Social media management QR code design & optimization Research

PROCESS BOOK 07 References available upon request.

6711 Overlook Road // Mobile, Alabama // 36618 // 251 454 7510 // megan.cary@gmail.com

Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Project 2 | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product


PROCESS BOOK Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product


Assignment

4

Ideas

6

Visual Research

8

Concept Feedback

9

Product Selection 10 Logo Concepts 11 Logo Feedback 13 Final Logo 14 Packaging Concepts 15 Packaging Mock Ups 16 Final Die Line 17 Visual Inspiration 18 Color Studies 19 Sketches 20 Digital Comps 23 Digital Comps Feedback 26 Analysis & Execution 27 Final Package Design 29 Final Feedback & Revisions 31 Revised Final Photographs 32

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

CONTENTS


Objective:

Design and assemble a package for a common product using paperboard materials and trendy graphics. The package must contain and protect the product and should include an additional special feature. For example, the package could also function as a permanent storage container or work as part of the product.

Process, Part A:

1. Select a product to package. In order for the product to be appropriate for this project, it must be “generic,” for example: a deck of cards, a set of pencils, paper clips, or push pins. It should not be associated with a name brand, since you will be creating one. You might also choose a toy that has not been branded, like the ones you will often find in a dollar store. 2. If packaging multiple items, they all need to be the same. For example, it is ok to package a set of pencils but not a set of pencils, erasers, and markers in the same package. 3. Research the product, the market, and other types of packaging. Don’t limit your research to magazines, the Web, and books. Visit stores around the area that sell similar items, and research materials and suppliers. 4. Brainstorm ideas for the package design.

6. Create a series of paper dummies to test your concepts. Modify the die line as needed. Remember, at this stage you should be working with the structure only—not the graphics. Reference your textbook for template ideas, but don’t copy. 7. Once you have decided upon the design you would like to use, proceed to construct it out of Bristol Board or any other paperboard. This dummy needs to be actual size and should be flawless. Pay close attention to the tabs, scores, and folds. 8. Photo-document this piece. 9. Brainstorm possible product names and logos. Select the ones with the most potential, and move on to the thumbnail stages of the process. You should have at least 5-10 different concepts. 10. Post a multiple-page PDF to the discussion area. The PDF should contain the name of the product, the brand name you selected, sketches of your logo, the product specifics, the unique selling point (what makes that product different from the rest), a description of the target audience, and the retail price. Include a short paragraph describing your choice for the structural design, and explain the special feature. Include your structural pictures. Your pictures should show details of the tuck tabs, dust flaps, and glue flaps.

5. Select the ideas with the most potential, and move on to the thumbnail stages of your design. You should have at least 5-10 different concepts to work with.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

ASSIGNMENT


Process, Part B:

the whole package and the details. Remember, you will be graded on presentation, so make sure the files are organized/labeled.

2. Begin the creative process on the surface graphics. Post in-progress sketches to the discussion board for feedback. When developing the surface graphics, take all sides and angles of the package into consideration for your design.

Other Project Criteria:

3. Make changes based on feedback received from the discussion boards (your professor and peers).

• The package must include dust flaps where necessary.

1. Finalize your logo designs.

4. Prepare a full-color rendering of the surface graphics. Show all sides of the package. These can be digital or marker renderings. 5. Post a document with the final renderings to the discussion board. Include a short design brief with your posting.

Process, Part C:

1. Construct a full-color, fully functional comp of your final package design. Surface graphics should be clean and legible, and they must work well with the construction you have created. Don’t forget to include all the pertinent information, such as: quantity, weight, color, manufacturing place, barcodes, trademark, © information, etc.

• Both the structure and the surface graphics should reflect the nature of product. • The package must include at least one lock tab. • The package must be more than a standard box. It must have a special feature. • The package must be functional. Anyone should be able to open the package, pull the product out of it, and then put it all back together without damaging the package or the product. • The final package must be able to stand up on a tabletop. • Take into consideration how this product will be displayed when designing it. Will it stack? Hang from peg board? • Surface graphics must contain all required information, including UPC (bardcode).

2. Submit photos of your final comp and the process book to the Submissions area, and post the final design to the discussion board. Your submissions should include a series of photographs showing

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

ASSIGNMENT


Primary Ideas:

Additional Concepts:

Dog Treat Packaging - My initial idea was for dog treat packaging that was shaped as a dog house and would convert into a type of dispenser for the treats. In my sketches you can see, it has an easy carry handle and the door flaps down. I also thought it could be recycled again and again by buying refill packs for the dispenser. From my visual research I found that there are some boxes shaped as dog houses already, but I didn’t see many that function as dispensers. I also thought of making it shaped like a fire hydrant.

Cardboard Ramen Cup - For a short while, I tried to concept a cardboard ramen cup that could function as a bowl as well and then be recycled. But I can’t really think of a way to make it food safe or water tight sensibly.

Sock Packaging - My favorite idea is this one. Most socks come packaged in plastic or attached to a sticker type wrap-around. This packaging would be made of cardboard and have 4-6 slots for socks. There would be a clear lid so the buyer could see the socks. Rather than have this packaging all thrown away, the user could simply put the cardboard “organizer” into their drawer (discard the lid) and use it as an sock drawer organizer. I have also considered making the packaging modular (sock pods) that hook together individually or in packs of two. That way it will fit all drawer types. In my visual research, I have found many types of sock packaging and many types of sock drawer organizers, but thus far I haven’t found one that functions as both, perhaps it does though. I do think the modular system would set the design apart however.

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Cookie Packaging - I also thought of cookie snack pack - packaging that would look like one large box of cookies on the shelf, but would break down into individual packs that one could break off and take for school/work lunches easily. Cold/Flu Medicine Box/Dispenser - This idea I really like, but I think is probably too complicated for my skill level. I’ve been sick with a nasty cold/flu for almost 3 weeks now and I’ve become very familiar with cold medicine blister packs. I absolutely hate them because I can never rip off the backing right or find a pair of scissors. I also thinks its probably not very eco-friendly with the plastic and foil. This idea would sell cold medicine in 7 days sets. The box would look like a plastic pill dispenser made of paper/cardboard. A simple paper tab could be ripped up to open that days medicine and then the day could be broken off (perforation). I’m also unsure of the restrictions on medicine packaging, I’m not sure paper would suffice.

Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

IDEAS


Thumbnail sketches of packaging concepts

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

IDEAS


After brainstorming and writing out my initial ideas I set out to find examples of current packaging. I began to use the internet to conduct visual research using keywords like socks, drawer organizers, dog treats, dog house, cold medicine, noodle cups, ramen noodles. I also looked around my house for products that were similar to my ideas and ended up photographing packages of noodles, dog treats and cold medication. To the right are some examples of my visual research of packaging.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

VISUAL RESEARCH


Concept Feedback:

Jamie Endres - “I think both are great ideas. I have to say that I’m very jealous of the dog treat idea... I have dog treats/dog toys listed on my brainstorm list.. but I couldn’t figure out what to do with them. I think the dog house dispenser is a really cute idea. The sock organizer is pretty cool too though. I could see either one working.” Debra Foster - “I have to say, as the mother of a 6 year old boy who goes through socks like they are made of water, I LOVE the idea of a box that can be used as a sock drawer organizer. My first thought is that drawers aren’t standardized, so could you make it modular? Maybe make each section an individual piece that hooks together, so that they can be customized to fit the space they are going into?”

Jamie Allen - “I agree I think the idea of an interlocking pod is great and could be a lot of fun to put together. If you go with this idea I think you should also focus your name around the idea of loose socks.” Kevin Opp - “I need to jump on the sock wagon as well... I think the logistics of the pill dispenser and the FDA would be overwhelming..... And we need a solution to the sock drawer disaster zone. (I don’t I’ve worn two black matching socks in the past week...).”

Marshelle Coyle - “Megan, I’m convinced! After seeing your sketches, I’m loving your sock concept. I love the individual sock pods (very clever, by the way) that are grouped and packaged to ultimately end up interlocking together to fit into a drawer. I would give anything for my sock drawer to look like that!” Prof. Trudy Abadie - “From looking at these and reading your previous post - the sock idea may actually have more potential than I originally thought. I did a quick Google search to see what is out there and I see your point of the combined features now. I would go with it. ...not to mention you already have your first customer - Marshelle!”

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

CONCEPT FEEDBACK


Product Selection:

After reviewing feedback from my peers and instructor, I decided to move forward with the sock packaging. I began to brainstorm names based on the product and the unique selling feature (the organizer): Sox in a Box Box o’ Sox Sox Box Sox Squared Mod Socks Sock Pods Sockular I ultimately chose Sox Squared because I felt it was modern, included the product itself and referenced the unique selling feature.

Product Description:

Sox Squared would be made of light weight white cardboard and have 4 sock cubes. These cubes would be modular and hook together individually to create a built-in sock drawer organizer. The original store packaging would include a die cut lid with a clear inset so that customers could see the socks and the cubes.

Unique Selling Feature:

Instead of throwing away the packaging, after purchase the customer would simply put the cardboard “organizers” into their drawer (discard the lid) and use it as an sock drawer organizer. Because the packaging is primarily paper-based, the organizers could simply be recycled when the customer no longer wishes to use them.

Price Point:

I then began to consider the appropriate price point for my product. I used google’s shopping feature to search for average prices of packages of four socks. I found the average price to be $6 - $15 depending upon brand. I then researched sock drawer organizers and found that prices ranged from $6 - $30. Based on these prices, and the fact that the organizers are made from paper, a cheaper material, I decided that my initial price point for a package of my product (4 socks and modules) would be $14.99. After posting my product for feedback it was suggested that I take another look at the price point, in order to stay competitive. I decided to drop the price to $12.99.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

PRODUCT SELECTION


After selecting my product I began to brainstorm logo ideas. I started with quick sketches and chose my favorite out of the line up to create larger concept sketches. To the right are scanned images of some of my thumbnail sketches and larger concept sketches for the logo thus far.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

LOGO CONCEPTS


sox sox SOX SOX SOX SOX SOX

sox S O SOX X 2 sox S O SOX X SOX2 SOX S O sox X 2

S O

S O

S O

Xsox2

X

X

SOX

S O S O X

squared

sox

squared

SOX sox sox SOX SOX SOX SOX SOX

S O SOX2 X

X

2

2

2

2

S O

S O

X

X

2

2

S O

S O

X

X

2

2

SS O O

S O

S O

XX

X

X

2

2

2

2

Type studies and logo revisions

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

LOGO CONCEPTS


Logo Feedback:

Marshelle Coyle - “Megan, I absolutely love your design and also the play on words! Socks in a box = SOX Squared. Brilliant. Your construction is flawless. The final packaging works well as a whole, yet the ability to use the pods as a drawer organizer takes it to the next level. Great job so far.”

Prof. Trudy Abadie - “Since you have the 2 and you have the squares, I don’t think you need the word “squared” as part of this. Test this logo on the actual box if you haven’t. You have created a small space on the top of the box for copy that has a diagonal angle. This may make it a bit of a challenge to work with it.

Jamie Allen - “Really nice work. I think its a great concept and I like how you incorporated the function of the box into the logo. The logo having a darker grey/black section as the “pull out” section does have a tendency to steer the eye down to that corner first. Might consider making the separated box color a little closer to the others to make it not as “pulling” on the eye? Just an idea. Maybe like a dark version of the cyan? Just a thought. I do think the word “squared is needed due to the layout of the logo. Nice.”

As you are working on your surface graphics - provide some info on how to use this box. While it may be obvious to us because we have seen your process, the average consumer”

Debra Foster - “I had a similar thought about the color, making the ‘2’ box a similar color or tone would give it less weight in the overall image. Is the ‘q’ in the word squared deliberately touching the box? If so, I’m curious why you made that choice? I’m not trying to imply it’s wrong, but rather find I am curious about that part of your process. I think the concept is great, and will work really well. You’ve given yourself a simple, but excellent way to convey the brand image and the different products.”

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

LOGO FEEDBACK


My final logo is a based on one of my original thumbnail sketches. The square cubes mimic the product design and function - with one slightly offset suggesting that they interlock. The typeface used are all various weights of Arial – black, bold and regular. In the decision making process I considered whether or not to use only the numerical symbol for “squared” or include the additional wording. After receiving feedback from my peers and instructor I decided to use only the numerical symbol. The top version is a simple gray scale logo in tints of black and the bottom one is Cyan and PMS 7455C. The color could easily be changed according to packaging and type of socks. For example, children’s socks and fun patterned socks would feature brighter colors.

S O X

S O X

14

2

2

Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

FINAL LOGO


I also began to draw out concepts for the packaging of the socks. The major hurdle in this design was to figure out how to interlock the sock pods. I drew out several ideas that included several tab locking systems, magnets, and velcro. The interlocking boxes will be covered with a brightwood style lid that features a die cut window covered in transparent plastic so the product can be seen. I also began to draw out ideas for the lid die cut. To the right is a scan of some of my packaging concept sketches.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

PACKAGING CONCEPTS


A

D

E

B

F A. Three cubes interlocking B. Detail of glue flap C. Detail of lock tab

C

D. Complete module for sale interlocked E. Bottom view of module with lock tabs F. Complete packaging with lid

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

PACKAGING MOCK UPS


Box Lid

Individual Module

(four equal complete package)

12"

9"

6” 3”

12"

3”

6”

9"

3”

Cut Area Fold Area Glue Area Perforation Area

Final die line for lid and individual modules that interlock. Note: Lid die cut was modified after feedback to allow more room for surface graphics.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

FINAL DIE LINE


After finalizing my die line, I began to search for visual examples of surface graphics that I felt were appropriate for this packaging. I knew that I wanted the graphics to be clean, simple and allow the product to be the primary focus. To the right are some examples of visual inspiration that I collected during this process.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

VISUAL INSPIRATION


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

COLOR STUDIES


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

SKETCHES


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

SKETCHES


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

SKETCHES


2

place in sock drawer

3

add on squares as needed Sox Squared® is the innovative new sock solution that is chic and sustainable. When you are finished with your sox squares simply recycle them as you would any paper product.

© 2011 Sox Squared®

socks that keep you organized

1

discard lid

First surface graphic mock-up based on my visual inspiration

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

DIGITAL COMPS


Surface graphic renderings based on initial design concept

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

DIGITAL COMPS


2

socks that keep you organized

sizes 6-10

four pair

1

25

place in sock drawer

add on squares as needed $13.79 CA

$12.99 US

Sox Squared® is the innovative new sock solution that provides you with high-quality 100% cotton socks that are simple and chic. Each package of Sox Squared® includes 4 pair of color coordinated socks in basic solids or sophisticated pattern and are packaged in our patented interlocking sock drawer organizers.

100% Cotton Natural Stretch Made in the USA. Machine Wash/Tumble Dry

To the right are the final surface graphics.

© 2011 Sox Squared sockssquared.com

I revised the copy on the side panel to focus on the quality of the primary product (the socks). I also removed the copy about recycling and added a simple recycle logo. The text overall was adjusted for leading/kerning issues. I also revised the price point to make it more competitive with the current market.

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After posting my initial surface graphics to the discussion board I received several suggestions that I felt would refine the current design.

discard lid

Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

DIGITAL COMPS


Digital Comps Feedback:

Jamie Endres - “The simple color palette and your choice of font work really well together. The blue is eye catching which is great and then the gray kind of softens everything. I love how the instructions are on each side of the box and work as the graphics for that side of the box.” Debra Foster - “This has really come along, and your mock-up is excellent. The color choices work well together. The combination does lean to the masculine side a little. It’s not a bad thing, (I’m all for breaking those crazy color barriers) just something to be aware of. The die cut strip across the middle is a really strong addition. I’d make it even wider, maybe filling in one gray and two white stripes. I wasn’t sure if you were planning on including acetate on the lid, or if not, how you were planning on securing the socks. I agree with Jamie about the side graphics. I like the way you repeated the offset angled block from the logo in the design. You do have a lot of information left to put on the box - have you considered where it will all go?”

The solution is a must for all that this product stands for...keep it clean, blue, linear and organized—tres Bauhaus, no? Great work...btw, the photography that you have shown is well done.” Prof. Trudy Abadie - “Simple, practical, ... good job on this. One thing is that maybe you should place more emphasis on the organized part. In the hierarchy of things you are drawing a lot of attention to other things. I would also work on the copy. Talk about the quality of the socks first (that is the product) and then the box. The box is the “bonus” or should be perceived as such. The price point should align with that of other socks so people will chose this over the others because of this special feature. Encourage people to keep them and add to them. I am not sure I would emphasize getting rid of them. The recycle symbol on the box would speak to that.”

Marina Madden - “I am such a fan of this concept and you should apply for a patent. I would love to line my husband’s drawers with these socks. I feel like the GAP or the Container store would share in the same consumers as SOX SQUARED.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

DIGITAL COMPS FEEDBACK


This assignment was a challenge to say the least. Coming up with an original pattern for the interlocking modules that was both secure and versatile was more difficult than I originally anticipated. I am glad I pushed forward. While the lid is a simple brightwood style pattern, I feel the custom die cut and acetate overlay give it character and sophistication while securing the contents and allowing the customer to see the product before they purchase it. Overall, I am pleased with my outcome. I think that I was able to successfully create an original packaging concept for a common product that functions beyond the normal scope of product packaging. The surface graphics are clean, simple and suit the nature of a household product while maintaining a contemporary and sophisticated design scheme.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

ANALYSIS & EXECUTION


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

ANALYSIS & EXECUTION


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

FINAL PACKAGE DESIGN


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

FINAL PACKAGE DESIGN


Final Design Feedback:

Marshelle Coyle - “Megan, I’ve said this from the beginning...I love your product choice and seeing your development of the piece. The functionality of the piece really stands out and could serve a real need in the marketplace. Your logo is extremely appropriate and fun for this product. If I were to harp on something, it would be to show the product with color coordinating socks...colors that blend and work well together as a group. And I also am unclear about the big “3” on the side panel and the amount of real estate devoted to “discard lid.”.... Ah ha! Okay. I just went back and looked at it again. It’s a 1, 2, 3 step approach!!! Maybe keeping this information grouped together would make it more immediately clear. Anyway...the construction of the package is great. Figuring out the locking feature had to have been a tough one. Good work!” Prof. Trudy Abadie - “About the final solution - the idea of this reusable package is interesting and could potentially provide a an additional application to this package...based on the copy - I expect to see “simple and chic” - but the product shown is not meeting that expectation. I would replace with trendy socks and photograph again. The ones shown don’t compliment the packaging colors well. (so should the packaging colors change so the socks shown work, or the other way around?)”

Revisions:

Based on the final comments received from Marshelle Coyle and Professor Trudy Abadie I have chosen to rephotograph my packaging with trendier socks that coordinate with the packaging.

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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

FINAL FEEDBACK & REVISIONS


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

REVISED FINAL PHOTOGRAPHS


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

REVISED FINAL PHOTOGRAPHS


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

REVISED FINAL PHOTOGRAPHS


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Megan Cary | GRDS 730 | Prof. Trudy Abadie | Process Book

Project 2: Package Design for a Common Product

REVISED FINAL PHOTOGRAPHS


Process Book 7