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Megan Mowry The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture


Art House: Rooftop Design I / Simon Atkinson

Art House is an actual renovation and expansion designed by Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects, located in downtown Austin. Design I students were encouraged to create their own rendition of the Art House Rooftop. Students were asked to explore different site conditions and to analyze how factors of sun, sound, wind, and movement could generate varying design responses to site. The sun catches a heavy glare in the mornings and afternoons. This rendition responds to climate factors of heat, and the intensive need of shade and coverage. Manipulation of light and how it casts on material surfaces led to the creation of wind sails.


12x24 Shade Visual Communications I /Joyce Rosner & Elizabeth Danze

Visual Communication I students were challenged to understand the capacity of gradient and tone in gray scale. The project began by taking a series of images around the campus of the university in search for particular moments that held wide range, variation, and tone. One photo was then selected and scaled to fit a 12x24 inch grid. The grid was then replicated on a sheet of stonehenge and the photo was reproduced with meticulous detail using graphite. Each of the 288 squares were taken into thorough consideration with respect to the varying degrees and intensities of black to white of the image.


Hornsby Bend: Bird Blind Design II / Jennifer Marsh

Hornsby Bend is located on the outskirts of Austin. This site is intended, and is most beneficial, for birders. The first project was located at the edge of the water, overlooking the lake. The students were asked to design a Bird Blind. The most challenging aspect of this design was how to allow one to see out from the inside, and yet disguise a body from the outside simultaneously. Birding accommodations and view were the most important characteristic of this program. Views were carefully considered in order to be most advantageous for birders. Concern for light and individual versus group birding was an important aspect integrated into the design process as well.


Birding Center Design II / Jennifer Marsh

The Birding Center contains a small shop and gallery upstairs, and a viewing corridor and offices down stairs. This site is individually chosen by the student. This particular area was found to be most dynamic not only in plan, but also in elevation. The upper story allows for the birder to enter the center with an image of a wide, horizontal view of the lake. The floor acts as a funnel and bridge to the connection downstairs by denying a complete outlook of the exterior . The birder then progresses downward to the lower floor where they are revealed to the tall and vertical view of the surrounding trees, making their way outwards to bird freely about Hornsby Bend.


Ink & Watercolor Visual Communications II / Nichole Wiedemann & Danelle Briscoe

The study of birds through different forms and mediums. The right image was completed with ink in two minutes. Without looking at the page for support, the students were encouraged to focus on finding the shape of the bird through direct vision, and not on a memory based image. The second drawing was created in the opposite process. Researching unique aspects of the bird, and using watercolor to create the movement of the joints and muscles.


East Austin Library Design III / Juan Miro

The East Austin Library is situated in a site that is currently in the process of re-establishing itself to become a more integral part of Austin as a whole. The challenge was not only to help create a sense of community within East Austin, but to also integrate the Austin community at large. The strategy of this particular library was to allow the facade of the building facing downtown to act as a billboard to the people of central Austin. Art is particularly precious to the region. The art gallery allows for neighbors to publicly display their art, creating a sense of community for the locals. Large louvers were placed on the edge of the facade to block the harsh western sun but to also allow view to the inside, enticing people to visit and explore East Austin.


East Austin Bus Stop Design III / Juan Miro

Bus stops are typically undervalued in terms of design and comfort. Most existing stops are limited to basic seating. The concept of this bus stop is to provide more than just a place to sit. A simple outdoor structure can offer protection from most elements, but also provide certain amenities as well. A single unit can be altered to create varying levels in seating, which accommodate many seating and standing positions. An interactive screen allows for people to check when there bus will arrive along with information on local happenings. A trash can built into the structure itself so it doesn’t obstruct the pathway. Bus stops can be more than just a mere wait. They can be enjoyed.


Shoe-Tech Project

VISUAL COMMUNICATION III

UT School of Architecture

Fall 2010

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Visual Communications III / Marla Smith & Igor Siddiqui

This Visual Communications class was designed to explore the processes and the connection of Auto CAD, Rhino, Revit, Illustrator, and Photoshop. This exercise began with a shoe. The students drew plans and sections of their shoe and traced them in Auto CAD, then taken to Rhino to be created into a three dimensional shoe, which was then extracted out of cubes to create a void. Unfolded, altered cubes were then laser cut and reconstructed. A series of 3D models from Rhino were taken into Revit and rendered. Illustrator and Photoshop were used to alter the renderings. draW

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COMMUNICATION III

UT School of Architecture

Fall 2010

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Airport Boulevard Community Living Design IV / Clay Odam

The challenge of the community living habitat was to bridge the gap between the existing city landscape and the neighborhoods that continue to grow and expand around the city, an urban sprawl. This particular site forced students to recreate the interaction between city and neighborhood by creating an interstitial space. How the inhabitants interact on a threshold between two entirely different landscapes proved to be the programmatic and design challenge of the semester.


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Objects of Defamiliarization Design V / Danilo Udovicki

The studio departed from the premise, enunciated by the Russian Formalist Viktor Šklovskij in 1925, that “A new form creates a new content.” Paraphrasing his claim about art, we tested the position that architecture is not an object, not a material, but a relationship of materials tectonically assembled in space.


Austin Raptor Center Design V / Larry Doll

The Austin Raptor Center proved to be a very unique idea of programming, suited primarily for private use with limited access to the public. The gradient on the plan represents the varying levels of access ranging from (the lightest) public domain, to the most restricted access. The facility contains two flight cages that allow for the birds to practice flight. One flight cage is recessed deep into a tree canopy cantilevering over the edge of a hillside while the other is suspended underneath the highway system utilizing public infrastructure to support the flight cage itself.



Portfolio