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HEADQUARTERS The Pan-European Magazine for Association Executives Supported by ESAE, European Society of Association Executives, and UIA, Union of International Associations, Brussels

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Meeting Media Company Meetings Industry Publishers (Belgium) Afgiftekantoor 2800 Mechelen 1 Bureau de D茅p么t 2800 Malines 1 Published 6 times a year: February, April, June, September, October & December Edition December 2009 - P3A9029

VALENCIA IN GREAT SHAPE

ESAE & UIA TALK ABOUT PARTNERSHIPS


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> M A R C E L’ S PA G E

EUROPE’ OR ‘EUROPEAN’: WHAT’S IN A NAME?

MARCEL A.M. VISSERS Editor in Chief

I’d like to expand on an article I recently wrote for our European sister corporate magazine MIM, when I asked the following question: ‘Being European, what does that mean in our industry?’. So far, we’ve only got a partial answer. Luckily I learned a lot at the (successful) ESAE Annual Congress in Brussels last October. There I avidly listened to Martin Selmayr, the spokesperson of the Information Society and Media (Commissioner Viviane Reding), who suggested that EU institutions need to welcome and even encourage associations to be part of the dialogue in order to help the EU make the best possible decisions for its citizens. I recommend everyone to visit his presentation on the Institute’s website: www.esae.org. Simply heart-warming.

Europe is about people who want to unite to build a better life – in every possible area. Associations can play a major role in this construction process. Unfortunately there are only a handful of associations who know why they have the word ‘European’ in their name. Ask members of ESAE - The European Society of Association Executives - what ‘European’ means to them… I look further and see ECM, European Cities Marketing, and am curious what their opinion is on the matter. And looking even further, I see Being European… I don’t quite get it and constantly EFAPCO. Here things are quite different, behave to turn to others for guidance. I am convinced cause they’ve already gathered quite a few of one thing though: a European must know his facts about ‘being European’. I look forward history well. Where do we come from and to their 4th congress in the new Square in where are we going? That’s the question Brussels in January 2010. You may already have understood it: I don’t quite get it and constantly have to turn to others for guidance. I am convinced of one thing though: a European must know his history well. Where do we come from and where are we going? That’s the question. Some people have answers. The movie on YouTube entitled I am a European and proud of it is a good example of that - take my word for it and check it out. But I have never heard someone say: ‘We are a European association and proud of it’. The best plea I can make for the European meetings industry is asking ESAE, EFAPCO, ECM (and UIA should be there for sure) organise together a large congress next year in the capital of Europe on the following theme: Europe, our biggest growth market. To my mind, they should do this every year.

» READ MORE OF MARCEL’S STORIES ON HIS BLOG: MARCELSBLOG.HQMAGAZINE.EU!


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> MEETINGS FOREST

THE MEETINGS FOREST IS GROWING SOMEONE WHO TAKES INITIATIVES USUALLY KNOWS WHERE IT STARTS, BUT NOT WHERE IT ENDS. THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT’S HAPPENED WITH OUR MEETINGS FOREST. A FEW MONTHS AGO, HEADQUARTERS AND ITS SISTER MAGAZINE MIM RESOLUTELY CHOSE FOR CARITAS TERRAE - GIVING PRESENTS TO THE EARTH AND STARTING A MEETINGS FOREST. ALREADY 560 TREES HAVE BEEN ORDERED BY TREES FOR LIFE, THE ORGANIZATION IN CHARGE OF OUR COMPANY GROVE IN SCOTLAND. IN SPRING 2010 WE’LL START PLANTING THEM. TEXT MARCEL A.M. VISSERS

than just disappearing anonymously into the giant carbon-offsetting market. Your initiative has provided us with the perfect answer for the first year when ICCA is undertaking this sustainability commitment.’ Robin Lokerman, President and CEO of MCI Asia Pacific - Institutional Division, stated: ‘I presented the Meetings Forest initiative to my MCI partners. We have some problems with the project not having any certification, which means we won’t be able to report it in our Carbon Accounting report to UNGC, the

Martin Sirk, CEO of ICCA:

‘The rightly named Meetings Forest, an initiative taken by Marcel Vissers, has inspired us to choose this project as our 2008 budget year donation.’ The response of the worldwide meetings industry to our sustainable initiative is very gratifying and heart-warming. Let’s start with the good news from ICCA and its CEO Martin Sirk: ‘On behalf of ICCA, I paid GBP 2,715 (=EUR 3,000) towards the Trees for Life (Meetings Forest) project, enabling the future planting of 543 trees as part of the rebirth of the ancient Caledonian forest! This is ICCA’s 2008 budget year environmental contribution in recognition of the necessary carbon impact caused by staff and board flights and our general day-to-day operations during the course of the year. I have always been keen to make sure that our environmental CSR contributions somehow are connected to the meetings industry rather

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Carbon Disclosure project or our GreenGlobe certification. Despite this, I still find it a very good initiative and I will personally support you by ordering 100 trees immediately.’ (editor’s note: we’re looking into this certification problem at this very moment.) Mandy Torrens, EIBTM Exhibition Director, added: ‘I’ve had a look at the website and we are really interested in working with you on this. I’m wondering if it’s something we could offer at EIBTM or even as part of our BS8901 programme to perhaps donate trees to exhibitors who can demonstrate they are doing something to improve their CSR policies. First question: how much does it cost to plant one tree? Do you have any ideas how we could work together on this?’ (editor’s

WHO GOT A MEETINGS TREE? The following meetings industry people have already been More meeti presented with a tree or have ngs trees! bought one themselves to let the Meetings Forest live and grow: + Staff of HeadQuarters and MIM magazine Marcel A.M. Vissers, Cécile Caiati-Koch, Sophie Molle, Rémi Dévé, Igor Hendrickx, Steven Kins + Luxembourg Tourism Office Olivier Barbieux, Director + CUT Communications, London Nina Gardiner, Managing Partner + Darwin Convention Centre, Australia Malu Barrios, General Manager (AIPC Award Winner) + Adelaide Convention Centre, Australia Alec Gilbert, Chief Executive (AIPC Award Winner) + China National Convention Center, Beijing Haiying Liu, CEO Tony Xu, Director of Marketing + Beijing Tourism Administration (BTA) Sandy Li, Head of MICE + China Star, Beijing Ping LIU, CEO + Hong Kong Tourism Board Gilly Wong, General Manager - MICE & Cruise + European Specialist Printing Manufacturers Association (ESMA) Peter Buttiens, General Manager + MIC plus, Milan: 1 tree + ICCA: 543 Trees + Robin Lokerman: 100 trees

note: one tree costs GBP 5 and we shall further discuss how to work together on this.) To tell you the truth, I didn’t expect our initiative to take up so quickly. And I sincerely hope we’ll have even greater news to come. To make a donation / To plant a tree www.treesforlife.org.uk/groves/ meeting_media_company.html


es!

HQ > CONTENTS

COLOPHON

CONTENTS

HQ OR HEADQUARTERS IS A NICHE PUBLICATION FOR EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS HEADQUARTERED IN BRUSSELS AND ALL MAJOR EUROPEAN CITIES DEALING WITH THE ORGANIZATION OF WORLDWIDE CONGRESSES. IT IS PUBLISHED 6 TIMES A YEAR. CIRCULATION IS 5,000 COPIES. Subscriptions Subscription amounts to 65 EUR (all incl.) in Belgium, 75 EUR (all incl.) in the EU and 95 EUR (all incl.) in the rest of the world. The subscription entails 6 editions of HQ per year including the special edition Meeting Trends, as well as an online access to the website. Online subscription for digital magazines is 50 EUR. To subscribe: www.HQmagazine.eu Editor in Chief Marcel A.M.Vissers T: +32 (0)3 226 88 81 marcel@meetingmedia.eu

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MEETINGS FOREST

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CONTENTS

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NEWS

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ASSOCIATION PORTRAIT: FDI WORLD DENTAL FEDERATION Cover HQ36: Lying between history and modernity, Valencia is definitely in great shape. As shown by its state-of-theart conference centre.

Managing Director Cécile Caiati-Koch T: +32 (0)2 761 70 52 cecile@meetingmedia.eu Editorial Officer Rémi Dévé T: +32 (0)2 761 70 54 remi@meetingmedia.eu

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COVER FEATURE: VALENCIA IN GREAT SHAPE

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ESAE: THE PARTNERSHIPS OUT THERE

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UIA: THE MATHEMATICS OF PARTNERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION WORLD

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Editor Igor Hendrickx Design UPSILON advertising, Gent T: +32 (0)9 267 39 40 info@upsilonadvertising.be

DESTINATIONS

Print Cartim - Destelbergen Supported by ESAE and UIA Address 59, rue René Declercq B - 1150 Brussels (Belgium) T: +32 (0)2 761 70 50 F: +32 (0)2 761 70 51 www.hqmagazine.eu Responsible Publisher Meeting Media Company Marcel A.M. Vissers Mechelseplein 23, bus 1 B - 2000 Antwerpen (Belgium) www.meetingmedia.eu

HONG KONG

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AUSTRALIA

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CANADA

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GLASGOW

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ZÜRICH

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LYON

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Cécile Caiati-Koch

STAY TUNED FOR HQ37 Rémi Dévé

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> HEADQUARTERS NEWS

INTRODUCING TOKYO BAY AREA AS A ONE-STOP DESTINATION The three Convention Bureaus surrounding Tokyo Bay - Chiba, Tokyo and Yokohama have announced the publication of the first collaborative area guide. The brochure provides general information in English on the region as a one-stop destination with the aim of appealing to planners and tour operators based in Europe, America and Asia. The fullcolor, 8-page brochure illustrates an array of attractions to visitors as well as an essential information on how best to hold events in Japan. The map and photos show the area’s major convention centres and unique venues, and places of interest at a glance. www.ccb.or.jp www.tcvb.or.jp www.welcome.city.yokohama.jp Tokyo Bay Area

SPAIN IN A MOUSE CLICK

QUEEN ELIZABETH II CONFERENCE CENTRE HALF YEAR RESULTS DOUBLE FORECAST

ESAE CONGRESS BRINGS TOGETHER OPPORTUNITIES IN THE NEW EUROPE

©JamesF

The official website for tourism in Spain www.spain.info provides all the necessary information to make any travelling to and within Spain a sheer success. ‘What to do?’, ‘Where to go?’, ‘Where to eat?’ are three of the many questions that will be answered in great detail on the website. www.spain.info also highlights the latest news about what’s going on in Spain on a week-to-week basis. Readers based in Brussels can also drop a line to the Belgian office of the Spain Tourism Office at bruselas@tourspain.es, of which the airline Iberia is one of the preferred partners. www.spain.info

The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre (QEIICC), one of London’s most prestigious purpose built centres for professional meetings and events, has announced its half year financial results are well ahead of expectations. The first six months of the financial year have been resilient, income is ahead of budget and the net surplus from trading is double what was forecast a year ago. www.qeiicc.co.uk

Last October, 50 association and meetings professionals gathered at the Hotel Amigo in Brussels under the auspices of the European Society of Association Executives to discuss the changes in the European institutions resulting from the fast-evolving landscape of European policy and institutions. Speakers included Martin Selmayr, Spokesperson of the Information Society and Media, Jeroen Jansen, International Director, DLA Piper UK, Filippo Addarii, Executive Director of Euclid Network, Julia Bateman of the EU Office of the Law Society of England and Wales, John Graham, President and CEO of the American Society of Association Executives and the Center for Association Leadership. www.esae.org

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© : Corbis/Getty Images.

Paris, a world class destination for all your events

Are you organising a conference, exhibition or event? Choose an extraordinary venue – Paris, international hub, decision-making centre, and capital of culture and leisure. Ten prestigious sites await you at the heart of the French capital: Paris Porte de Versailles - Paris Nord Villepinte - Le Palais des Congrès de Paris - Paris Le Bourget - Espace Champerret - Cnit Paris La Défense - Espace Grande Arche - Carrousel du Louvre - Palais des Congrès de Versailles - Palais des Congrès d’Issy For a specially tailored welcome, Viparis and its partners offer the Welcome Pack*, a free, turnkey solution provided in airports, train stations and at our sites to welcome your participants on their arrival in Paris. *In partnership with

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subject to eligibility in accordance with Viparis terms and conditions.

Welcoming outstanding events to Paris

09/10/09 14:39


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> HEADQUARTERS NEWS ESTONIAN CONVENTION BUREAU LAUNCHES ESTONIA’S FIRST AMBASSADOR PROGRAMME The Estonian Convention Bureau has launched an ambassador programme in the country’s main university city, Tartu. The first project of its kind in Estonia, the programme will recruit local academics and business people to act as partners in attracting international conferences to the city. Similar programmes implemented in other European cities have been highly effective, sometimes accounting for as many as 70% of conferences in their markets, according to the ECB’s managing director, Riine Tiigi. www.ecb.ee

Vázquez Consuegra, it will be made up of several modules: a covered footbridge of 3,000 m2, a multipurpose building offering a space of over 2,500 m2, a registration zone of 3,200 m2, 18 multipurpose meeting rooms, and an auditorium with a capacity of over 3,500 people. This extension will place FIBES in the position to catapult Seville towards the circuit of ‘Great Cities of the World’ becoming an international focal point for great events. www.fibes.es

Suntec Singapore International Convention and Exhibition Centre (Suntec Singapore) and MCI announced an agreement to extend its services to attract business events from around the globe. Under terms of a memorandum of understanding, Suntec Singapore will be the preferred partner and venue provider of MCI Group for conference placement. The agreement will also allow MCI to present a series of seminars exploring association management, which will begin early 2010 with the first seminar to be held at Suntec Singapore in February. www.suntecsingapore.com www.mci-group.com

BRAND-NEW SEVILLE CONFERENCE & EXHIBITION CENTRE WELL UNDERWAY The Seville Conference & Exhibition Centre, FIBES, has announced that construction is well underway on their major new extension. Designed by Spanish architect Guillermo

NEW ECO-FRIENDLY PLATFORM FOR SUSTAINABLE MEETINGS

TCEB ANNOUNCES NEW CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD AND PRESIDENT

SUNTEC SINGAPORE JOINS FORCE WITH MCI GROUP

Pieter Idenburg & Robin Lokerman

picture, with only 14% reporting increases and 46% reporting decreases, of which 14% were ‘significant’, but another third saw no change to their financial picture. www.iccaworld.com

Announcing the appointment of two new top executives- Chairman of the Board, Anusak Inthraphuvasak, and President, Akapol Sorasuchart, TCEB shared its new organizational vision and its 7-year strategic plan to build competitiveness through the ‘Thai Team’ initiative, a collaborative public-private partnership. The effort is expected to generate practical and long-term benefits and to increase confidence. This initiative will also press for policy and regulatory improvements to help drive industry growth and enhance convenience for meetings delegates to Thailand. www.tceb.or.th

LATEST RESEARCH CONFIRMS STRENGTH OF ASSOCIATION MEETINGS MARKET Preliminary results from research conducted by ICCA and IMEX amongst international association executives continue to provide the industry with much needed grounds for optimism. Questions about the performance of their main 2009 congresses indicated that fewer than a third of respondents experienced falling delegate numbers, with only one in ten saying this fall was ‘significant’, whilst a quarter saw their attendance climbing, with over 9% saying this growth was ‘significant’. Sponsorship and exhibition revenue presented not quite such a rosy

SustainableMeeting.org has been launched at the 48th ICCA Congress & Exhibition in Florence last November. The website provides a platform for discussion about the relation between corporate responsibility, green meetings and the commercial aspects of doing business in the event sector. It also offers eco-friendly solutions for organizing sustainable meetings. www.sustainablemeeting.org

DISCOVER EUREXPO, LYON CONVENTION AND EXHIBITION CENTRE

Eurexpo

Eurexpo is a spacious and modern centre suitable for holding an event of any size. Situated in the heart of the Rhône-Alpes region and only 30 minutes from Lyon city centre, it is in an advantageous location. Flanked by Bron airport, France’s second business airport, and the Chassieu golf course, Eurexpo combines space with a sense of service, 12 halls, all adjoining on the same level, 4 modular meeting rooms, 1 convention room, one outdoor exhibition area, among other things of course. And the good news is it will be extended: in October 2010, a new amphitheatre will see light of day! www.eurexpo.com

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WONDERFUL IDEAS WONDERFUL PEOPLE WONDERFUL CONVENTION Want a wonderful experience? Then put our statement to the test. Talk to us and let us help you organise your next convention in Copenhagen. You can start with a visit to meetincopenhagen.com, or call Malene and Anne direct. They act as a neutral liaison between you and over 130 suppliers, from congress centres and hotels, to gourmet restaurants. And they’ll help you out for free.

Malene Schrøder Project Manager +45 3355 7485 mes@woco.dk

Anne Dissing Project Manager +45 3355 7441 adi@woco.dk


> HEADQUARTERS NEWS GERMANY #1 WORLD-WIDE FOR EASE OF TRAVEL AND STANDARD OF LIVING

2010 MEETINGS INDUSTRY FAIRS WORLDWIDE: MAKE YOUR CHOICE! MEETINGS AFRICA – Sandton Convention Centre - Johannesburg // 24 - 26 February 2010 // www.meetingsafrica.co.za AIME - Melbourne - MCEC // 2-3 March 2010 // www.aime.au.com EMIF – Brussels - Tour & Taxis // 17-18 March 2010 // www.emif.com GIBTM – ADNEC – Abu Dhabi // March 29-31 2010 // www.gibtm.com IMEX - Frankfurt Messe // 25 - 27 May 2010 // www.imex-frankfurt.com

nights in at least two hotels must be blocked. www.grimaldiforum.mc

Brandenburg Gate

For the very first time Germany is among the Top 10 of the Country Brand Index, and number 9 among 102 rated countries. ‘An excellent result,’ says Lutz P. Vogt, Managing Director of the German Convention Bureau, ‘which also confirms the performance of the German meetings and conventions industry. Germany ranks top exactly in the categories that are important for meetings and events: number one world-wide in the ‘Ease of Travel’ category plus number one in ‘Standard of Living’ - with a good business climate, high per-capita GDP and cutting-edge infrastructure playing a major role.’ www.gcb.de

GRIMALDI FORUM MONACO INVENTS THE WINTER MEETING EXPERIENCE

© Choinie_re

To go beyond the clichés that say Monaco is one of the most expensive meetings destinations, the Grimaldi Forum Monaco and its partners have launched the ‘Winter Meeting Experience’. Together with the hotels of the Principality, the congress centre has designed a competitive offer with tailor-made solutions to help you organise your event in an easy and cost effective way. Of course, there are criteria to be met to qualify: the event must be organised between November and March, there needs to be a significant use of the Grimaldi Forum Monaco and a minimum of 1,200 room nights over two consecutive

Grimaldi Forum Monaco

NEW SOCIAL NETWORK FOR MEETINGS PROFESSIONALS IN AUSTRALIA & NEW ZEALAND

ECO-VENUES PARTNER IN GLOBAL GREEN ALLIANCE Three of the world’s most renowned ecofriendly convention centres have joined forces to create a Global Green Alliance. Arena and Convention Centre Liverpool, Cape Town International Convention Centre and Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre are the founder members of this new alliance, which aims to promote industry best-practice for hosting sustainable events and which will initially focus on developing its combined offer and joint international marketing activities. This initiative was a direct result of relationships forged at the recent ICCA Congress in Florence. website in progress

FIRST ASSOCIATION WIN FOR DUBLIN’S NEW AVIVA STADIUM

Dublin’s newest venue, the AVIVA Stadium, has secured two major contract wins ahead of its scheduled opening in May 2010. Around 300 anaesthesia professionals from the College of Anaesthetists of Ireland will convene at the international stadium for their three day annual conference to deliberate the latest research and developments in the field. The following month, with exclusive use of the Stadium, the annual CEPIC Congress 2010 will bring together over 700 agents in Dublin to meet and make new contacts at the largest image industry gathering in the world. www.avivastadiumevents.ie

Launched in November 2009, Event Famil is a Professional and Social Network tailored specifically for the meeting, exhibition and event industry in Australia and New Zealand. Event Famil provides a forum for its members to discuss current issues and trends representing all aspects of the event industry. Membership is comprised of event managers, event venues, tourism organisations, associations, display equipment suppliers, technical production, event and display designers, graphic designers, social media professionals, online media designers, exhibitors, and delegates. eventfamil.ning.com

IMEX ASSOCIATION DAY TAKES SHAPE FOR 2010 Organisers of the IMEX Association Day 2010, taking place on Monday 24 May in Frankfurt, have announced a diverse and topical programme. Martin Sirk, ICCA CEO, will lead the line-up of the day’s speakers with an examination of the factors involved in deciding where to hold international congresses. Greta Kotler, of the American Society of Association Executives, will moderate a panel which includes Chip Deale, Head of Global Society Relations, CFA Institute and Helga Severeyns, Senior Director of the International Association of Public Transport. Together they will review the variety of global planning strategies available to associations. Pol Van De Perre, Association Director of MCI Brussels, will also offer tips on how to leverage conference content by using online tools and facilities. www.imex-frankfurt.com

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HQ

> ASSOCIATION PORTRAIT

FDI General Assembly - Singapore 2009

FDI Exhibition - Singapore 2009

A TALK WITH HEATHER SHEPPARD, CONGRESS MANAGER OF FDI WORLD DENTAL FEDERATION FDI WORLD DENTAL

HQ: Can you briefly explain what the FDI World Dental Federation is?

FEDERATION IS A ONE OF THE OLDEST INTERNATIONAL PROFESSIONAL ORGANISATIONS IN THE WORLD, REPRE-

Heather Sheppard

SENTING APPROXIMATELY 200 MEMBERS FROM MORE THAN 130 COUNTRIES. ITS MEMBERSHIP INCLUDES NATIONAL DENTAL ASSOCIATIONS AND REGIONAL ORGANISATIONS DEDICATED TO THE

Heather Sheppard: FDI was originally founded in 1900 as the Fédération Dentaire Internationale by Dr Charles Godon (and five other dentists) in Paris. We have since grown to represent more than one million dentists worldwide. Our vision is leading the world to optimal oral health. We work to realise this vision through initiatives and activities including the Annual World Dental Congress, continuing education programmes, partnerships with governmental, non-governmental and corporate organisations, and our international publications.

PROMOTION OF ORAL HEALTH. HEATHER SHEPPARD EXPLAINS WHAT THE FEDERATION IS ABOUT AND ESPECIALLY WHAT PROCESS LIES BEHIND THE ORGANIZING OF ITS EVENTS.

Recently we released ‘The Oral Health Atlas’ in commemoration of World Oral Health Day, an annual event established in 2008 to raise awareness about the critical importance of oral health to general health and well being.

HQ: What is the Federation’s decision process concerning the organization of a congress? Heather Sheppard: The selection process for the FDI Annual World Dental Congress (AWDC) is now two-fold. In the first place, the Member Associations of the FDI are invited to submit bids to host the AWDC through a bid document which is provided by the FDI Head Office. Bids for a specific year are analysed by the Head Office to identify those that are viable on paper. Site visits are only arranged to the destinations that initially seem to be viable, to further examine the facilities available and the meet the various partners that are involved with the bid (representatives of the FDI Member Association, convention bureau, Ministry of Health, congress centre, etc.). The FDI Head Office has however been mandated to proactively seek bids from

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> ASSOCIATION PORTRAIT

Member Associations in destinations that we have previously determined would be sound host destinations. This particularly comes in to play if there is a lack of viable bids for a particular year. On completion of site visits of potential venues, a report is drawn up by the FDI Head Office Congress Department comparing multiple elements of the venues and concluding with a recommendation that is submitted to the FDI Council for the final decision.

HQ: Where will the next congresses be held? And why have you picked these destinations? Heather Sheppard: Our upcoming destinations are: 2010 - Salvador da Bahia, Brazil 2011 - Mexico City, Mexico 2012 - Geneva, Switzerland Our attendance figures can vary as we move around the world but generally we count between 10,000 and 15,000 attendees in total. There are several key points that must be fulfilled by any destination and all of these host cities above satisfy these. The congress centre facilities must meet our requirements (see below), the dental industry in the region must be strong enough to support the Trade Exhibition, there must be sufficient numbers of Dental Professionals within a relatively small radius of the host city, the FDI Member Association in the country must be willing to welcome the event to their country, there must be sufficient numbers of hotel rooms available close to the venue. Given the global nature of the FDI as an organisation the city must be relatively easily accessible for international visitors and representatives of our member associations. Support from the Government (Ministry of Health) and convention bureau is always a great addition to a bid also. While some destinations may score very strongly on one point over another, they must all be satisfied to a minimum level to be considered.

HQ: When choosing a congress centre, what criteria must it satisfy? Heather Sheppard: A congress centre must be able to accommodate the main elements of

HEADQUARTERS 14

the FDI AWDC under one roof, i.e.; the Trade Exhibition, full Scientific Programme for Dental Professionals and the General Assembly and Business Meetings of the FDI World Dental Federation. The location and accessibility of the congress centre is also very important as is the ability of the Project Team to communicate well in English. Perhaps most importantly, once the above requirements are deemed to be satisfied, is the rental cost of the venue. This element is key to the success of a bid and can determine its success or failure.

brought in-house a number of years ago, we have noted significant advantages in terms of business development with industry partners across other activities and consistency within the event. Each year, we do have tailor our model to the local specificities and this will certainly continue to be the case in the future.

HQ: How would you summarize new trends in the association congress world?

HQ: And what about when choosing a conference hotel?

Heather Sheppard: We see more and more elements of congresses integrating online technology to streamline logistics as well as increase the accessibility of the content of

Heather Sheppard: We use a range of hotels for the event but perhaps the most important hotel is our ‘Headquarters Hotel’, which is used to house our Invited Speakers, Council and Committee Members and many official delegations from FDI Member Associations. This must firstly be in a location that is convenient to access the congress centre (ideally on foot), it must be reasonably comfortable and provide business services. The quality of the service is important and English must be spoken widely among the hotel staff. The hotel must have a flexible approach to managing our room block both with regard to price and booking modifications in the run-up to the event.

The global crisis presented a challenging environment in which to organise our congress in 2009, but such conditions force associations to be innovative and creative to continue to produce successful events!

HQ: Do you work with a PCO or a DMC? Why? What do you expect of them? Heather Sheppard: We have a limited requirement for PCO’s. We require a local PCO to print all of the badges and prepare the delegate packs for the pre-registered delegates and provide a full service for on-site registrations under the management of our Head Office staff. The PCO is often contracted to run the housing bureau function for the AWDC as well. We would use a DMC to design and manage the accompanying persons programme and any post-event tours.

HQ: Do you foresee changes to the way in which you operate over the next few years? Heather Sheppard: We are always exploring how we can improve the AWDC and evolve to continue to produce a world-class Congress. However, since the event management was

events to those that are less geographically mobile. The global crisis presented a challenging environment in which to organise our congress in 2009, but such conditions force associations to be innovative and creative to continue to produce successful events! For example, we have made it easier and more practical for delegates to register and collect their CPD points for the Scientific Sessions that they attend through bar code scanning systems on badges that are linked to an online service that can be accessed from anywhere to print out summaries afterwards. We also have worked on integrating sessions and activities from related interest groups (such as the ‘Oral Health Month’ launch in Singapore, ‘Women Dentists Worldwide’, sessions for ‘Young Dentists’ etc.). www.fdiworldental.org


Only in Scotland will your conference be truly inspiring. Scotland provides a stimulating environment to give new perspective to your own ideas and spur you on to greater heights. Some of the world’s oldest universities and modern research institutes nurture fresh talent to follow in the famous footsteps of alumni, who have changed the world as we know it. Given Scotland’s reputation as a leading light in the fields of science, medicine, finance, energy and technology, it’s no surprise we have conference facilities to match. And it’s never been easier to get here. So to find out more about hosting an event in Scotland, log onto conventionscotland.com Or perhaps that should be unconventional Scotland.

Only in Scotland

Hi-tech conference centres in stimulating surroundings. You can’t help but be inventive.


HQ > VA L E N C I A

CHARMING VALENCIA when history meets modernity

IT’S DEFINITELY NOT A CLICHÉ. THE WEATHER IS ALWAYS GLORIOUS IN VALENCIA. I WAS THERE MID-NOVEMBER, COMING FROM BLEAK AND RAINY BRUSSELS AND WAS DELIGHTED TO SEE IT WAS STILL SUMMER IN THE THIRD LARGEST SPANISH CITY. I ALSO DISCOVERED THAT IN TERMS OF MEETINGS AND CONGRESSES ITS INFRASTRUCTURES HAVE NOTHING TO BLUSH ABOUT. WHETHER IT BE THE EVER-SUSTAINABLE CONFERENCE CENTRE WITH ITS PHOTOVOLTAIC ROOF, THE UNBELIEVABLE CITY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES OR THE GROWING ACCOMMODATION OFFER, VALENCIA IS ON THE MAP AS NEVER BEFORE. REPORT RÉMI DÉVÉ

Hemisfèric - City of Arts and Sciences

a bus or the metro with the super handy Valencia Tourist Card which can be customized to the colors of your event (the public transport network is well developed) or a bike (flat Valencia has more cycling lanes than any other Spanish cities).

Cathedral

One of the most striking features of Valencia is its constant contrasts, the everywhere-tobe-seen mixture of old and new, of remains of an ancient past and state-of-the art architectural landmarks. Rich with a 2000-yearlong history, Valencia seems to look defiantly towards the future without forgetting its roots. For a meeting of any kind, it provides the ideal setting where everything seems to be possible. José Salinas, Managing Director of Turismo Valencia and Valencia Conference Centre, puts it this way: ‘To use a sports metaphor, Valencia is in the Champion’s League both of tourism and the meetings industry. Strictly

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in terms of events, Valencia has of course all the basic infrastructure the planner might need. But it’s its character that’s truly unique. Nowhere else can you hold an event in a modern museum nested in the remains of a Roman city. As the largest port in the Mediterranean, it is clearly open to the world, deeply human, with more than 100,000 students, and is committed to sustainability.’

On a personal note, I was fascinated by the almost tangible effort on the part of the city to be ‘out there’. It’s like Valencia is giving itself the means to become one of the coolest cities in Spain and - why not - in Europe. Everywhere there seems to be a new project worth financing, a hot event venue worth visiting. You can’t really get enough of it. And for a meeting planner it’s simply intoxicating. José Salinas concluded it like this: ‘Valencia has become a reference for all those wishing to associate their event with dynamism, innovation, growth, lifestyle, history and culture.’ Who can ask for more?

CONTACT Located at the centre of the eastern coast of Spain, Valencia is indeed easily accessible, boasting excellent air connections both on the national and international level. Once there, it’s quite easy to get around - simply grab a taxi (they’re everywhere to be found),

Daniel Araiz, Head of Promotion Department Turismo Valencia Convention Bureau Me-events@turisvalencia.es Tel. - 34 963 390 390 - 34 963 606 353 www.turisvalencia.es


> VA L E N C I A

VA L E N C I A CONFERENCE CENTRE excellence is its routine IT’S SOMETHING THAT COMES RIGHT IN YOUR FACE WHEN YOU LOOK AT VALENCIA CONFERENCE CENTRE (VCC). STANDING OUTSIDE, YOU CAN’T BUT BE ENTHRALLED BY ITS CLEAR-CUT ARCHITECTURE BUT ALSO BY ITS ROOF WHICH IS IN FACT A GIANT SOLAR

T H E H A R D FA C T S

PANEL. TALK ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY! BUT OF COURSE THE CENTRE IS MORE THAN JUST A ROOF. OPENED IN 1998, IT’S NOW THE CITY’S MAJOR CONFERENCE VENUE. AND FOR AN ASSOCIATION CONGRESS IT COULD WELL BE AN IDEAL PLACE.

Designed by award-winning Norman Foster, Valencia Conference Centre is one of the most emblematic buildings in Valencia. Although a relatively newcomer in the meetings industry, it has already played host to numerous international conferences. Its design is simple and sophisticated: it’s like a container whose interior houses spaces spread out in a single line under the building’s colossal roof. This unique design gives structure, space and light to its rooms and auditoria which stretch out through a glass-fronted façade. The centre is also closely linked to its immediate milieu. Filled with autochthonous species, its surrounding gardens are the perfect place to unwind between sessions!

SUSTAINABLE IN EVERY WAY The Valencia Conference Centre has been committed to the environment since it opened its doors for the first time. The very concept of a building which takes advantage of Valencia’s splendid natural light, the Mediterranean climate and a

desire to blend in with an urban landscape are excellent starting points to develop a space that is also an economic and social generator. Numerous initiatives have been implemented to reduce energy consumption. The use of more efficient technology, such as low-energy light bulbs, the use of presence detectors and the installation of optical fibre to illuminate the ornamental fountains have meant a reduction in energy consumption and lowered replacement and maintenance costs in the facility. Thanks to the installation of a microprocessor to control its heating and air conditioning system, the centre has managed to reduce its energy costs by 20%. The rational use of water includes sensors to regulate the volume of water, timers for the taps and treating the water in the fountains.

Valencia Conference Centre + 1,800 events and 1.2 million visitors since its opening (206 of those events are international congresses) + Total capacity: 3,318 persons + Number of halls: 4 + Auditorium capacity: 110 to 1,481 people + Multipurpose rooms: 2 + Break-out rooms: 11 for 30 to 350 people + Exhibition space: 2,290 m2 + A total of 1,000 hotel rooms at walking distance

But the most tangible initiative was the installation, in 2008, of a unique 8,200-m2 photovoltaic roof, which is the largest

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> VA L E N C I A CASE

STUDY

2nd World Congress Of Thoracic Imaging And Diagnosis In Chest Disease 30 May - 2 June 2009 - 1,500 delegates Doctor José Vilar explains why Valencia is such a great association congress destination.

Why did you choose Valencia for the congress? The five Organizing Societies (European Society of Thoracic Imaging, American Thoracic Society, Fleishner Society, Korean Society of Thoracic Imaging and Japanese Society of Thoracic Imaging) wanted to hold the congress in a southern European city. The previous Congress was organized in Florence, Italy, and we had a strong desire to hold the second one in a similar environment.

What are the main assets of Valencia according to you? In the past years Valencia has become one of the most popular cities in Europe for medical conferences. The reasons are multiple: its climate is wonderful, its architecture impressive and its 2,000-year-old fascinating. The opera hall, the museums and many other attractions also make Valencia a must in art and entertainment. At the same time it boasts several convention facilities and, in this area, Valencia Conference Centre was an ideal choice for us.

Can you describe how the congress centre and its people helped you make the event a success? A great part of the success of our congress was due to the excellence of the venue. The spaces, like the conference rooms and the areas dedicated to technical exhibitions, posters and other activities, have been rationally and elegantly designed. The conference rooms have very comfortable seats and the audiovisual equipment is perfect, considering that we, as radiologists, are very demanding on this aspect. The people working there are very professional, and all the stress I had before the meeting evaporated the moment we started it. Valencia Conference Centre has also several hotels in the vicinity. To me, this is of paramount importance, especially with the people who are more involved in the meeting such as the speakers and organizers.

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As a result of the management, quality and continuous improvement policies implemented at the Valencia Conference Centre, the building has obtained more certification recognition than the majority of its competitors amorphous silicon solar panel installation in a building of this kind. It has generated over 375,000 kWh of energy since. In addition, the system has avoided the emission of 200 tons of carbon dioxide which would have required over 70,000 trees to absorb. These initiatives have allowed the centre to make money, a good part of which has been reinvested to make the facility even more sustainable. The Valencia Conference Centre has an overall Global Sustainability Plan and aims to combine the holding of events with respect for the environment, making it the ideal venue for green meetings. In practice, the idea is to add extra ecological and environmentally-friendly services to the ones that are already possible. These include the creation of virtual spaces for downloading information, a catering service which provides food from controlled sources and the use of recyclable and reusable materials.

CERTIFICATIONS AND FUTURE As a result of the management, quality and continuous improvement policies implemented at the Valencia Conference Centre, the building has obtained more certification recognition than the majority of its competitors. José Salinas even argued that ‘in that area, we have the greatest number of certifications in Spain

and maybe in Europe. That’s surely one of the reasons why the latest ICCA stats point out Valencia as the third destination that has grown the fastest in world, before cities like Dublin, Munich or Toronto.’ Of course I won’t bore you with all the details, but just be aware that the VCC has implemented programmes or has been given rewards that truly make it stand out. One of them speaks louder than others: the centre has recently implemented the UNE 216301:2007 for Energy Management Systems environmental certification and is the first Spanish conference centre to obtain this endorsement. And because everybody there works hard to put the centre on the international map, over 60 international meetings, to date, have already been scheduled for the forthcoming years. Some of the major events booked in for 2010 include: + Fumigants & Pheromones Technical Conference + 33rd European Cystic Fibrosis Conference + Congress of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Biology (FESPB) + XVI World Congress of the International Society of Senology + European Framework Programmes: From Economic Recovery to Sustainability

www.palcongres-vlc.com


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FERIA VA L E N C I A big as it gets WOW. THAT’S THE FIRST THING THAT COMES TO MIND WHEN YOU TAKE A TOUR OF FERIA VALENCIA. THE PREMISES ARE SO VAST AND THE BUILDINGS ARE SO BIG THAT IT’S QUITE HARD NOT TO PONDER ABOUT THE MANY POSSIBILITIES ON OFFER THERE TO ORGANIZE A SUCCESSFUL EVENT. NUMBER 4 IN THE WORLD’S LIST OF GREAT EXHIBITION CENTRES, IT’S ALSO AN IDEAL PLACE TO HOLD AN INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE OF LARGE DIMENSIONS.

The example speaks for itself. In 2008, the European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition was organized at Feria Valencia and attracted 20,000 professionals and 700 exhibitors from all over the world. And planners were so satisfied with the outcome of the event and the high-quality service of the people working at the Feria that they have already decided to come back in 2010. Doesn’t this say it all?

When it comes to big events, the Feria has thus become the city’s main attraction - and rightly so. As Stefan Kokkes, Director of the International Affairs and Guest Events department, puts it: ‘Feria Valencia has become one of the most attractive business centres at a national and international level. This is mainly due to its management ability

Whether it be in the Central Forum or in the Convention & Exhibition Centre, the possibilities seem just endless. And don’t get me wrong. I’m sure you must be thinking: ‘Great, it’s one of those impersonal, soulless, not-socharming places only good for exhibitions.’ But it’s not. In fact, though it’s a fairground, it’s also an architectural landmark - at least to me. With its cutting-edge design, all in glass, steel and light, it will help your event get a strong identity.

THE FIGURES

Convention & Exhibition Centre of Feria Valencia + 24 rooms + 2 auditoriums + Pavilion 5 + Capacity: from 5 to 12,500 people in Pavilion 5 + 7,700 m2 divided over four floors + 10,000 m2 open plan floor space + 7,000 parking spaces

Exhibition Area: Central and North Forum + 320,000 m2 of exhibition space distributed over 19 pavilions + 12,000 m2 per pavilion + 19 rooms equipped with the most up-to-date technology + 1 auditorium

and its service quality. The large service catalogue, setting up a Service Centre, which enables to save costs, and the versatility of the Convention & Exhibition Centre allow organizations to hold meetings and events of any kind with minimal effort and maximum quality.’

Inside Pavilion 5 of Convention & Exhibition Centre

Of course the event department works hard in order for this to happen, offering a wide range of technical services from event development to hotel bookings for instance. Clearly clientminded, they know how to turn their facility into a wonderful ‘à la carte’ venue which successfully combines all the requirements an association planner might have.

www.feriavalencia.com/centroeventos

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Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia and Hemisfèric

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VA L E N C I A’ S S P E C I A L V E N U E S modernity par excellence THE AIM OF THIS SECTION IS FOR ME TO CONCENTRATE MAINLY ON THE CITY OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, ONE OF VALENCIA’S MOST AMAZING GROUPS OF SPECIAL VENUES, DESIGNED BY FAMOUS SPANISH ARCHITECT SANTIAGO CALATRAVA. FIRST TAKE A LOOK AT THE PICTURES - THEY SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES - AND IF YOU’RE NOT CONVINCED YET, TAKE A SHOT AT MY REPORT.

When you first get there, that’s all you can see. Along an axis of about 2 kilometers that was formerly the bed of the river Turia and which is now a super pleasant park, covering, a surface of 350,000 m2, lies the City of Arts and Sciences, whose perspective is truly unique, whose architectural beauty is tremendously outstanding. The large complex houses several venues, all of which can be used for very special gatherings: the Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia (Opera House),

AT A G L A N C E

City of Arts and Sciences + Hemisfèric - Capacity: 800 (seated) and 1,500 (standing) + 306 in the Auditorium + Science Museum - Biggest auditorium accommodates up to 450 people, biggest hall up to 1,500 + 3,000 m2 of exhibition area + Umbracle - Capacity: 2,000 seated + Oceanográfico - Red Sea Auditorium accommodates up to 470 people + several restaurants for private events for up to 500 persons + Palau de les Arts Reina Sofia for groups from 32 to 1,500 people + Àgora - Big events for up to 5,000 people www.cac.es

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Hemisfèric (Imax and Full Dome), the Science Museum, Umbracle (an outdoor promenade path), the Oceanográfico (Aquarium) and the soon-to-be opened Àgora. Of course I could write on and on about each and every facility because they all boast striking features that make them one-of-akind. But I would be running out of space and time very quickly. Instead I shall try to give you a taste of them. The complex has indeed been set up as one of the greatest cultural dissemination centres. In order to carry out this work successfully, the idea was to maintain a wide offer of contents in four main thematic areas of knowledge: cosmos, biosphere, human being and culture. And I have to say this works beyond the wildest expectations: although it’s named ‘city’, it’s a whole new world which you wander around. You simply feel like you’re taken to places you’ve never been before. From a delegate’s point of view, the experience is unique and the event impossible not to be memorable. Last but not least, two other special venues deserve to be pointed out. First, the Marina Juan Carlos I and Veles e Vents building is the only meeting place in Valencia with breathtaking views of the sea. Its flexible three floors are the ideal place for events for

Although it’s named ‘city’, it’s a whole new world which you wander around. You simply feel like you’re taken to places you’ve never been before up to 300 people. And its panoramic terraces are great for coffee breaks, especially during the Formula 1 festivities, whose circuit they all face. If you’re longing for something with a bit more history, you can always organize something at the Palacio de la Exposición in the city centre: it has just been refurbished and boasts remains of a glorious past with its glazed-tile rooms and its wonderful marble staircase.


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Las Arenas Hotel

Sorolla Palace

R E S TA U R A N T S

VA L E N C I A’ S H O T E L S take your pick !

If you’re looking for somewhere to eat

OF COURSE I WAS NOT ABLE TO VISIT EACH AND EVERY HOTEL

IN VALENCIA, ESPECIALLY SINCE THE CITY COUNTS MORE THAN 17,000 GUEST ROOMS 25% MORE THAN 5 YEARS AGO. BUT I COULD CATCH A GOOD GLIMPSE OF WHAT IT OFFERS IN TERMS OF HIGH-QUALITY ACCOMMODATION.

SOROLLA PALACE It’s for sure the closest hotel to the congress centre - maybe 10 seconds if you walk fast - and that’s where I was lucky enough to stay for 2 nights, in a beautiful room with a breathtaking view of the outstanding solar-panel roof of the facility. With 271 guest rooms, Soroya Pallace is located in one of Valencia’s greatest business area. In terms of meeting space, its 11 conference rooms, the biggest of which can accommodate 700 people, all boast natural light and are equipped with the latest technology. They can be shaped in more than 18 different ways thanks a mobile panel system. Here I must definitely stress the quality of the service and the professional friendliness of the people.

have all the amenities a demanding guest might wish for. When it comes to getting together, its 7 meeting rooms are perfect for hosting events for up to 350 delegates.

LAS ARENAS HOTEL The only 5-star luxury hotel in Valencia that faces the sea, Las Arenas Hotel combines the fine architectural feature of its historic past (it had a spa at the turn of the 20th century, still does, making it one of my personal favorite!) and the elegance and comfort of a modern design. In addition to its 243 rooms, it boasts 11 meeting rooms, 2,000 m2 of outdoor exhibition space and even an auditorium for 500 people.

Two restaurants definitely stood out during my stay in Valencia. First, L’Ancó Restaurant, situated in the immediate surrounding of the congress centre, is the ideal place for smaller gatherings as it accommodates up to 70 people. Located in the Oceanogràphic, El Submarino is a perfect venue for a seated dinner for 120 people. Besides its tasty paella, its giant round fish tank that runs all around the tables makes it an even more special place. And if you’re longing for one-Michelin-Star restaurants, just be aware that there are 5 of them in Valencia!

its grand glass-dominated structure, it brings guests closer to La Albufera Nature Reserve. The lower floor houses a modern conference room with a maximum 400 pax capacity.

Hilton Valencia

PARADOR EL SALER HILTON VALENCIA Directly opposite Sorolla Palace (so really close to the congress centre as well), the avantgarde Hilton Valencia hotel is the highest building in Valencia, thus offering panoramic views of the city from pretty much every of its 304 comfortable guest rooms. It has 16 meeting rooms and a large ballroom in which you can organize an event for up to 800 people.

Located just 10 minutes from Valencia’s city centre, the Parador El Saler provides the perfect environment both to work and unwind. One of the most minimally chic hotels I have ever visited, it’s at walking distance from the sea and boasts an 18-hole golf course right on its premises. Respecting the natural setting with

Parador El Saler

Meliá Valencia

MELIÁ VALENCIA Situated next to the City of Arts, close to the America’s Cup port and the new urban Formula 1 circuit, Meliá Valencia has just been opened after a very chic but not showy refurbishment. Its 262 modern and quiet rooms

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ASSOCIATIONS

involved are satisfied with the impact of the coalition.

the partnerships out there

These are just two examples of how associations in advocacy activities can improve their efficiency and obtain better results from the human and financial means at their disposal. However, partnering with other stakeholders is not only important in advocacy work. All development projects financed by my own association, IFA, are conceived and executed in partnership with other stakeholders. By pooling knowledge and resources, credibility is assured and better results are obtained.

IN TODAY’S GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT AND CERTAINLY CONSIDERING THE ECONOMIC CLIMATE, IT IS ALMOST INEVITABLE THAT ASSOCIATIONS WOULD LOOK FOR PARTNERSHIPS IN ORDER TO BE SUCCESSFUL IN THEIR ACTIVITIES. I WOULD LIKE TO ILLUSTRATE THIS WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL FERTILIZER INDUSTRY ASSOCIATION (IFA). TEXT LUC MAENE DIRECTOR GENERAL OF THE INTERNATIONAL FERTILIZER ASSOCIATION AND PRESIDENT OF ESAE

strength of the network. In some cases, joint positions could be developed. At important international forums, the network could be represented by one of its members, keeping others informed of the proceedings, allowing better management of human and financial resources. The network has stood the test to time and continues to be of great value, not in the least because of its flexibility and the freedom of its members to either act individually or in cooperation with others.

Luc Maene

In 1996, the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO) organised a World Food Summit. Although IFA was accredited to FAO, we were informed that we should caucus and join with other associations representing the farming sector in order to have a voice in this important forum. This led to the establishment of the International Agri-Food Network (IAFN) which has proven to be very successful in the advocacy activities of its members. Indeed, very soon the participating associations recognised the

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A second example I would like to cite is the very recent coalition between farmers, the

Finally, following advocacy and project implementation, I would like to turn to the organisation of meetings, an essential activity for any association. When planning events, we consult a wide range of actors from outside our own organisation. However, while we have in the past conducted joint events and we will certainly continue to do so in the future, it is most important to have a clear line of command with only one organisation in charge. In conclusion, strategic partnerships in all aspects of an association’s activities are powerful tools to obtain better results and to be

Strategic partnerships in all aspects of an association’s activities are powerful tools to obtain better results and to be more cost effective scientific community and the agricultural input sector, called Farming First, in response to the recent food crisis, the economic downturn and climate change concerns. Once again, the different associations

more cost effective. Associations traditionally have limited means and pooling resources can only be beneficial to all those involved. www.esae.org


THE BEGINNING OF A BEAUTIFUL PARTNERSHIP PARTNERSHIPS OFTEN EVOLVE OUT OF NECESSITY. SOMETIMES, THOUGH, RELATIONSHIPS PROVIDE FERTILE GROUND FOR PARTNERSHIPS TO GROW AND THRIVE. GSAE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JIM MOODY, CAE, REMEMBERS HOW THIS MEETING OF THE MINDS LED TO THE ORGANIZATIONS CO-SPONSORING AN ASSOCIATION LEADERSHIP SYMPOSIUM.

Linda Chreno, CAE, was hired as Executive Director of the Florida Society of Association Executives, Tallahassee, not long after I took over as Executive Director of the Georgia Society of Association Executives, Tucker. We met at an ASAE meeting and realized we had much in common. We were new in our jobs, our societies were of similar size, we shared many associate members, and our commitment to raise the standard of professionalism in association management was strong. After a few months of sharing successes and setbacks, our personal relationship was cemented. Then Linda mentioned that we should try to plan a program together to take advantage of our geographical proximity. I was a little hesitant because business sometimes gets in the way of relationships, and my friendship with Linda was one I wasn’t willing to lose. Nevertheless, I saw value for GSAE in the proposition, and I agreed to move forward. We thought it was important to do something significant that would attract leaders from both associations, and we settled on a programme that would help association executives and their elected officers form their own partnerships. While ASAE offers an excellent symposium for chief staff and chief elected officers, the expense puts it out of reach for many of our members. We decided

to conduct a programme similar to ASAE’s but focused more on state and regional associations. We called it the Association Leadership Symposium. We forged our plans at ASAE’s Management and Technology Conferences in 2001. We agreed on a speaker and developed a ‘wish list’ of places to hold the meeting. Since we share many members of the hospitality community as corporate members, it was important to hold the meeting in a location that had supported both of us in the past. We also wanted to hold the meeting in a location easily accessible to both groups of members. But perhaps the most important decision we made was to share the profit or loss evenly. We deliberately chose not to credit each society for members in attendance when calculating profit. All registration and sponsorship money would flow into one pot and all expenses would be paid from that same pot. We did not fully load the cost of staff and other indirect expenses - we presumed from the beginning that the work would be evenly divided between the two societies. We kept it simple, and it worked well. When we divided the responsibilities, Linda agreed to conduct negotiations with the hotel and work with the speaker on

the curriculum. I agreed to develop the registration materials and marketing copy. GSAE would accept all the registration money, supply the badges, pay the bills, and provide a detailed accounting to FSAE. We agreed to market the meeting to our own members and to seek sponsors from among our corporate members. And we promised to keep each other informed at every step of the way.

Partnerships often evolve out of necessity. Sometimes, though, relationships provide fertile ground for partnerships to grow and thrive We settled on a speaker, Bob Harris, CAE, who is well known in Georgia and Florida. The meeting would be held at Marriott’s Bay Point Resort in Panama City Beach, Florida. Both the property and the CVB actively support FSAE and GSAE. We were not successful, however, in seeking other corporate support. Because of the significant support

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we received from the resort and the CVB, we were uncomfortable asking others in the hospitality industry to sponsor the meeting. And since the attendees were from two states, sponsorship would only make sense to those who served both the Georgia and Florida markets. These factors, coupled with the postSeptember 11 downturn, left us without other corporate support.

NONPROFIT JOINT VENTURES BROADLY DEFINED, A JOINT VENTURE IS A RELATIONSHIP WHICH ARISES FROM AN EXPRESS OR IMPLIED AGREEMENT BETWEEN TWO OR MORE PARTIES TO UNDERTAKE SOME COMMON OBJECTIVE

Perhaps the most important decision we made was to share the profit or loss evenly. We deliberately chose not to credit each society for members in attendance when calculating profit The economic slowdown also cut into our attendance. Despite considerable marketing efforts and the presence of a wellrespected speaker at a desirable location, we were able to attract only about 30 attendees. Fortunately, the registration fees and the help from the resort and CVB allowed us to break even. In retrospect, if either of us had conducted this meeting alone, we would have lost money. Despite the financial difficulties, our efforts were justified when we reviewed the evaluations. The comments were overwhelmingly positive. Many of the association executives in attendance begged us to conduct the programme annually. That’s exactly what we did afterwards.

This article first appeared in the November 2002 issue of Association Management. E-mail: jim@gsae.org. Reprinted with permission, copyright November 2002, ASAE & The Center, Washington, DC.

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FOR THEIR MUTUAL BENEFIT. MORE NARROWLY DEFINED, A JOINT VENTURE IS A SEPARATE LEGAL ENTITY FORMED BY TWO OR MORE Gene Takagi

PARTIES TO UNDERTAKE ECONOMIC ACTIVITY TOGETHER.

THE SEPARATE ENTITY MAY BE PURPOSEFULLY CREATED AS A PARTNERSHIP, LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY OR CORPORATION (EITHER FOR-PROFIT OR NONPROFIT). TEXT GENE TAKAGI, OF THE NONPROFIT LAW BLOG

A separate entity may also be unintentionally created by the participating parties. An unincorporated organization with two or more members may be classified as a partnership if its members carry on a trade, business, financial operation or venture and divide its profits. Accordingly, the joint venture may be deemed a partnership regardless of the intent of the parties or whether the parties entered into a partnership agreement. Lack of careful planning may therefore result in each party being liable for the sole action of the other if such action was carried out in the name of the partnership.

CAN NONPROFITS ENGAGE IN JOINT VENTURES? Nonprofit organizations may engage in joint ventures with other organizations, whether nonprofit or for-profit, with certain limitations. The primary limitations for a charitable nonprofit: (1) the operation of the joint venture must be consistent with the charity’s operation primarily for exempt (e.g., charitable and educational) purposes; and (2) the operation of the joint venture must not result in any prohibited private benefit. The law with respect to these limitations has evolved with several seminal cases and IRS revenue rulings.

WHY DO NONPROFITS AND FORPROFITS ENTER INTO CROSSSECTOR JOINT VENTURES? Nonprofits may enter into joint ventures with for-profits to raise capital, to access the expertise possessed by their for-profit co-venturers, and to take advantage of opportunities otherwise unavailable to them. For-profits may enter into joint ventures with nonprofits to access new sources of capital, to exploit specific assets owned by the nonprofit (such as intellectual property rights), to take advantage of available tax credits, and to acquire greater community or political support. In addition, for-profit social enterprises may be motivated to enter into joint ventures with nonprofits to further the philanthropic goals of their owners.

WHAT ARE THE TYPES OF JOINT VENTURES BETWEEN NONPROFITS AND FOR-PROFITS? For tax purposes, one major distinction in the types of joint ventures between nonprofits and for-profits is with respect to the nonprofit’s contribution of its assets to the joint venture. 1. Whole joint ventures (also, in the context of hospitals, commonly referred to as whole hospital joint ventures). The nonprofit contributes all or substantially all of


its assets to the joint venture and receives a partnership or membership interest in the joint venture entity. 2. Ancillary joint ventures. The nonprofit contributes only part of its assets to the joint venture, and the nonprofit’s participation in the joint venture is not its only activity. Another important distinction among crosssector joint ventures is the legal form of the joint venture entity: 1. General Partnership. Pass-through entity for federal tax purposes. Typically, partners share management responsibilities and each is jointly and severally liable for the debts of the partnership. 2. Limited Partnership. Pass-through entity for federal tax purposes. General partners are liable for the debts of the partnership; limited partners (those that do not participate in the management of the entity) are generally liable only to the extent of their investments in the partnership. 3. Limited liability company (LLC). Typically, a pass-through entity for federal tax purposes. Owners (members) have limited liability protection and are generally liable only to the extent of their investments in the LLC (even if they participate in management of the entity). 4. Corporation. May or may not be a pass-through entity for federal tax purposes. Owners (shareholders) have limited liability protection and are generally liable only to the extent of their investments in the corporation (even if they participate in management of the entity).

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE INTERESTING HYBRIDS INVOLVING NONPROFITS AND FOR-PROFITS?

funding and providing other support (e.g. management and consulting services) to beneficiary organizations through a nonprofit corporation (the venture philanthropy entity). Under this arrangement, there are two separate relationships: (1) the individuals and for-profit organizations have a relationship with the venture philanthropy entity as donors and volunteers; (2) the venture philanthropy entity has a relationship to its beneficiary organizations. The second relationship is more than the relationship between a grantor and grantee. According to Venture Philanthropy Partners, such relationships are often ‘more of an active, involved partnership’.

While technically, the second relationship is among two or more nonprofits, it is the individual and for-profit donors/volunteers that are typically referred to as the venture philanthropists. As they are the ultimate source of the funding, and direct source of the services, received by the beneficiaries, they may see themselves as the joint venturers. However, the venture philanthropy entity provides a prudent vehicle for protecting the donors/volunteers from unwanted exposure to liability. 2. Divisions of for-profit organizations devoted to philanthropy. While it is not uncommon for very large business corporations to form corporate foundations that fund philanthropic causes consistent with promoting the business of their affiliated corporations, the business corporation and the foundation may never formally engage in a joint venture. However, there has been a recent trend of for-profit organizations informally devoting resources to a division of the business which will administer the for-profit’s philanthropic activities, possibly including those engaged in by its corporate foundation. The most notable example is Google and Google.org, the umbrella under which Google is putting its philanthropic efforts, including the work of the Google Foundation. It will be interesting to see whether operation of a for-profit corporation’s philanthropic activities through a division or subsidiary of the for-profit entity will change the relationship between the for-profit umbrella and the nonprofit corporate foundation and whether coordination between the two will result in new joint ventures. To view the article, visit www.nonprofitlawblog.com/ home/2006/10/nonprofit_joint.html

1. Venture philanthropy. This often involves individuals and for-profit organizations

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PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS A viable option to increase public investment and efficiency across Europe?

PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS WHICH ESTABLISH BROAD COOPERATION AND SHARE THE FINANCIAL RISKS BETWEEN THE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTORS CAN HELP LOCAL AUTHORITIES TO PROVIDE PUBLIC SERVICES BY INTRODUCING PRIVATE-SECTOR FINANCE

of introducing new legislation, either across the board or for specific PPP set-ups such as concessions, which are not covered by the secondary procurement legislation.

AND SKILLS WHILE RETAINING PUBLIC CONTROL, SPEAKERS SAID AT A EUROPEAN POLICY CENTRE (EPC) DEBATE. HOWEVER, WHILE SOME FELT THAT FURTHER EU LEGISLATION IS NEEDED TO CLARIFY HOW THE RULES GOVERNING THEIR CREATION AND HOW THEY SHOULD OPERATE, OTHERS FEAR THAT MORE LEGISLATION COULD STIFLE INNOVATION.

GREEN PAPER Matthias Petschke, Head of Unit for the Formulation and enforcement of public procurement law I, Directorate-General for the Internal Market, European Commission, said Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) and public procurement law are increasingly important, as local authorities strive to maintain services while making financial savings. This new emphasis

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was reflected in a Green Paper published by the European Commission four years ago. In this Paper the Commission set out the extent to which public procurement rules applied to PPPs, and how far current legislation could be used for all the different types of Institutionalised Public Private Partnerships (IPPPs). The Paper considered the possibility

While there are different types of PPPs, they all feature broad cooperation and a sharing of financial risks between the public and private sectors. A huge advantage for public authorities of using PPPs is that they bring in the private sector’s ability to apply innovative solutions. Matthias Petschke said that was no definition, nor specific rules governing the founding of an IPPP in Community law, but the Commission defines it as a form of cooperation between public and private parties established through a mixed-capital entity which performs public contracts or concessions. As


MIXED-CAPITAL ENTITY Michael Burnet, Director, European PPP Forum, European Institute of Public Administration, said IPPPs occur once a public authority - as a service provider - decides to involve private partners through a mixed-capital entity (held jointly by the public authority and a private partner). IPPPs are created either through setting up an entirely new mixed-capital entity, or by transferring part of the share capital of an existing public sector entity to the private sector. He stressed that they were not service contracts issued by the municipality to a private provider. Burnet believed that IPPPs benefit local authorities by giving them a management - rather than just a regulatory - role in providing a service, and enable them to get value for money while maintaining their capacity to deliver. Given these advantages, IPPPs should form part of a balanced portfolio of service delivery at regional or national level.

well as contributing capital and other assets, the private sector actively participates in managing and operating the contracts. Under another form of IPPP, two municipal authorities decide to act together as a publicpublic corporation. Again, said Petschke, there needs to be further research on the legal implications of this, and the Commission is working closely with local authorities on this. In February this year, the Commission produced an Interpretative Communication on the Application of Community law on Public Procurement and Concession to Institutionalised PPPs. This was designed to invite discussion on whether to introduce legislation to regulate IPPPs in compliance with public procurement rules, and the response so far suggests that some stakeholders believe that any further legislation would starve innovation.

Turning to the question of whether IPPPs are simply ‘new wine in old bottles’ (i.e. an old idea presented as an innovation), he said many local authorities have been using a form of IPPP for many years, after discovering that they could not always work effectively within the restrictive rules relating to municipal services. In such cases, they

Considering whether the Commission Communication on IPPPs is ‘fit for purpose’, Burnet said it was useful in addressing the issue of how they are established and how to award further contracts. However, he would welcome: + more details about what happens if the contract changes; + details on what happens to the assets at the end of the initial contract; + an explanation of why it excludes ‘simple capital injections’, if a private partner wants to take a larger percentage or play a larger role; + more clarity on ‘essential contract terms’.

TOO NARROW Jeremy Smith, Secretary General, Council of European Municipalities and Regions, felt that the Commission Communication’s focus on IPPPs was too narrow, as it concentrates on the legal rules and the impact on the market, while local authorities take a much more ‘results-oriented approach’ to improve services, deliver them more cheaply and get the best value. Assessing the benefits of outsourcing services or keeping them in-house, Smith said that the latter enables public authorities to maintain democratic control and retain the flexibility to adapt the levels of services to changing conditions. However, the downside is that this often involves a higher cost base, and only allows public authorities limited access to private investment, and means that

Public Private Partnerships which establish broad cooperation and share the financial risks between the public and private sectors can help local authorities to provide public services by introducing private-sector finance and skills while retaining public control had transferred entities from the public to the private sector, together with a service contract. However, Michael Burnet said he would welcome a clear statement from the Commission to clarify the situation now that IPPPs were used so frequently.

they do not benefit from the private sector’s management skills and flair. As for outsourcing services, on the positive side this brings in new ideas and can release senior local authority staff from dealing

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with day-to-day issues; however, the disadvantage is that this ties the local authority to a rigid contractual framework which cannot be changed during the contract. On balance, Jeremy Smith felt that an IPPP was the best option, as it is a mix of public control and private sector skills. Within his organisation, some members want to outsource all their services, while others prefer to keep them in-house. It is a matter of maintaining a balance between fair competition and local democratic discretion, he said, and when the European Commission criticises local authorities for not abiding by EU regulations, it should remember that the Lisbon Treaty gives them greater discretion to direct their own activities. There are many local authorities which resent undue interference ‘from Brussels’, he said, as they want to make their own choices about whether to bring in a private partner to boost investment in a particular service. At the same time, many want to exercise the same control on outside companies as they do on their own departments, and do not believe that bringing in private companies should negate this. His members want a ‘fair rule’ which acknowledges that IPPPs are very useful, and that the private sector should be used in a much wider way than is currently permitted. For example, at present it is unclear what happens if a local authority wants to change the terms of a contract in mid-stream. The European Policy Centre (EPC) is an independent, not-for-profit think tank, committed to making European integration work. The EPC works at the ‘cutting edge’ of European and global policy-making providing its members and the wider public with rapid, high-quality information and analysis on the EU and global policy agenda. To view the article, please visit www.epc.eu/en/r.asp?TYP=ER&LV=293&se e=y&t=2&PG=ER/EN/detail&l=&AI=803

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EUROPEAN ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN 2010-2013 Public Private Partnerships in Research Activities AS PART OF THE EUROPEAN ECONOMIC RECOVERY PLAN, THE COMMISSION IS LAUNCHING THREE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS (PPPS). THE THREE PPPS REPRESENT A POWERFUL MEANS OF BOOSTING RESEARCH EFFORTS IN THREE LARGE INDUSTRIAL SECTORS - AUTOMOTIVE, CONSTRUCTION AND MANUFACTURING - WHICH HAVE BEEN PARTICULARLY AFFECTED BY THE ECONOMIC DOWNTURN AND WHERE INNOVATION CAN SIGNIFICANTLY CONTRIBUTE TOWARDS A MORE GREEN AND SUSTAINABLE ECONOMY.

Commissioner Potočnik, Commissioner for Science and Research, and high-level representatives of industry met in Brussels on 30th March 2009 and have agreed upon the following joint statement: ‘We believe that it is important to combine the short-term economic and fiscal measures in the Recovery Plan with longer-term ‘smart investments’ in research and development to lay down a strong base for the future competitiveness of European industry, once we have passed through the current crisis. We need strong cooperation between stakeholders and a coordinated approach at European level to develop the sustainable technologies that will allow Europe to move

forward towards a low-carbon, knowledgebased economy.’ The Commission and the industrial partners work intensively together to develop the implementation plans for the three partnerships: 1. “Factories of the Future” initiative for the manufacturing sector (€ 1.2 billion for R&D); 2. “Energy-efficient Buildings”


Commissioner Potočnik stated:

‘We are pleased that the first steps have already been taken to implement the new PPPs through the creation of ad-hoc industrial advisory groups facilitating the strategic dialogue between the Commission and the industry, which is setting up dedicated industrial research associations.’

initiative for the construction sector (€ 1 billion for R&D); and 3. “Green Cars” initiative for the automotive sector worth a total of € 5 billion, of which € 1 billion is for research activities. The Commission foresees to provide a contribution of 50% to the total R&D budget

priorities and the implementation of the research; + a multi-annual integrated work programme with a pre-defined budget, ensuring continuity and allowing industry to make long-term investment plans; + a cross-thematic approach going from basic and applied research through to validation and large-scale demonstration, with an increased emphasis on impact and exploitation; + increased opportunities to support innovation in SMEs;

It is important to combine the short-term economic and fiscal measures in the Recovery Plan with longer-term ‘smart investments’ in research and development to lay down a strong base for the future competitiveness of European industry from the budget of the 7th Framework Programme, with matching investment coming from the private sector. In the PPP approach, there are the following advantages: + renewed confidence to invest in longterm research even when faced with short-term economic problems; + a leading role for industry, including SMEs, in the definition of the strategic

+ a single-stage submission of proposals leading to a faster evaluation process and time to contract. Commissioner Potočnik and high-level representatives of industry declared: ‘We are pleased that the first steps have already been taken to implement the new PPPs through the creation of ad-hoc industrial advisory groups facilitating the

strategic dialogue between the Commission and the industry, which is setting up dedicated industrial research associations. To allow research on priority topics to startup rapidly, first Calls for research projects will be published in July with deadlines at the turn of the year, which could allow the first projects under the PPPs to start in spring of 2010. The experience gained with the first actions will be used to develop the longer-term strategy and instruments for cooperation between the public and private partners. Industry hopes that these PPPs may lead to the creation of streamlined and lean Joint Technology Initiatives. Support to research will be complemented by demand-side activities, such as standardisation and public procurement, in an integrated approach and building on existing lead market initiatives.’

The European Commission embodies and upholds the general interest of the Union and is the driving force in the Union’s institutional system. Its four main roles are to propose legislation to Parliament and the Council, to administer and implement Community policies, to enforce Community law (jointly with the Court of Justice) and to negotiate international agreements, mainly those relating to trade and cooperation. A full version of this article can be found at ec.europa. eu/research/index.cfm?pg=newsalert&lg=en&ye ar=2009&na=ppp-310309 and http://ec.europa. eu/research/industrial_technologies/lists/ list_114_en.html

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UIA ı UNION OF INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATIONS

THE MATHEMATICS OF PARTNERSHIP IN THE ASSOCIATION WORLD IF WE CONSIDER THE NATURE OF PARTNERSHIPS IN THE ASSOCIATION WORLD, IT IS IMPORTANT TO REMIND OURSELVES THAT THE ASSOCIATIONAL PROCESS ITSELF IS AN EXERCISE IN PARTNERSHIP. FOR WHAT IS AN ‘ASSOCIATION’ IN ITS MOST BASIC FORM THAN A ‘PARTNERSHIP’ OF 2 AND MORE INDIVIDUALS (OR ENTITIES)? AND THIS PARTNERSHIP IS A COMING TOGETHER FOR COMMON PURPOSE, MUTUAL INTEREST AND BENEFIT (AVOIDING ACTIONS WHICH WOULD BE COUNTERPRODUCTIVE OR INJURIOUS TO

the international organization world. They actively advance the headquartering of international bodies through facilitation and assistance schemes. Montréal International (www.montrealinternational.com) is one of the best known cases of host support & services and other cities, like Singapore, are making similar initiatives.

THE INTERESTS OF THE INDIVIDUAL PARTIES). TEXT JOEL FISHER - HEAD, UIA CONGRESS DEPT AND CO-EDITOR OF THE YEARBOOK OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

There is a saying in English that in some circumstances the ‘whole is greater than the sum of its parts’. A well crafted automobile is more than a chassis, seats and an engine; a championship caliber football team is more than 11 people on the field; and so too for a healthy association. But no association exists in a vacuum, some may be fairly self-contained or solitary, but all operate within certain contexts. And it is here, within issue areas and operating environments that the partnerships become clear. Partnership, or cooperation, between an association and other external bodies shares

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the same aims as the general associational impulse: mutual benefit, furthering of causes, mutual support in the face of challenges or dangers. Because, again, the whole may well be stronger than the combined parts.

OPERATIONAL PARTNERSHIPS Some cities are magnets for association headquarters because they are the seats of decision-making and governance or are home to significant intergovernmental bodies. Washington DC, New York, Brussels, Geneva, Paris, Bangkok etc. are all examples of this. But other cities have taken the industrial promotion model and applied it to

In other cities, cooperative office space is developed to house associations or trade unions. Brussels is home to two such partnership schemes: the Maison des Associations Internationales (www.mai.be) and the International Trade Union House (ITUH). Similar operations providing affordable office space and common services for tenants are found in other cities. Subsidies / subventions offered by conference host cities, or those hoping to be the host city, are a form of partnership which clearly has an impact on association and delegate financial bottom-lines, but which are also causing concern in the meetings industry in relation to ‘competing on merit’ and a level playing field. Whether it is 100 delegates or 2,000 destinations are attuned to the financial benefits of


attracting foreign visitors through conference business and are working with their own partners to make the best possible approach to the association planners. Partnerships like the Best Cities Alliance (www.bestcities.net) allow convention bureaus to promote the strength of their group across five continents. In the hotel industry similar alliances (Luxury Hotels of the World, Global Hotels Alliance, Great Hotels of the World, etc.) allow smaller or independent operations to benefit from a larger profile and business structure while maintaining their unique individuality. In the recent UIA global survey of international associations one of the questions asked: ‘Have you partnered with other distinctly separate international associations to organise a major event?’ + 26% answered: Yes, on a unique occasion + 26% answered: Yes, this is or will be a regular occurrence Elsewhere in the survey a number of respondents had indicated their concern with the proliferation of meetings in their disciplines and an ever-tighter calendar. In light of these concerns, partnering on an event has its clear initial advantages as well as those that are logical conclusions from bringing larger groups of like-interested people together - both from the meeting planner / host associations’ side of things and from the delegate and content perspectives. One would expect further innovative partnerships among associations, and among their commercial partners, as people continue to seek the best return on their investment of time and money in the current financial climate. Partnership always had inherent benefits, the current business and operational environments might make it more of a necessity.

STRENGTH AND FLEXIBILITY OF PARTNERSHIPS AND NETWORKS Diversity in the type of members in a partnership can add strength and increase efficacy significantly. The United Nations Global Compact (www.unglobalcompact.org) and the UN’s Millennium Development Goals

A graphical representation of the ‘NGO Relations’ of the International Association of Universities as detailed in the Yearbook of International Organizations

Sharing costs, information, and workloads enables a partnership to do more than a single association might do on its own project(s) are good examples of how a broad partnership base can achieve significant success that would be well beyond the reach of the individual partners. A look at the some 36,000 active international bodies profiled in The Yearbook of International Organizations gives us a unique and intense picture of partnerships at work. These linkages may be formal - such as Consultative Status granted by an intergovernmental body to an international association, membership in another organization or a Memorandum of Understanding signed between two associations with similar or complementary interests - or they be more temporary - such as a time or issue specific coalition which dissolves when its work is complete. With average linkages across the database running between 5 to 8 per entry, and the total number of links in the many hundreds of thousands, complex webs and networks of interests and action become visible. The simple map of the nongovernmental connections of the International Association of Universi-

ties is a good illustration of this universe of partnerships (see image above). These links and networks cover every imaginable element of partnership in association life: sharing the responsibility for a journal; jointly organizing a congress; accreditation and certification programmes; financial and secretariat support; etc. The list goes on and on because the practical needs and operational or programmatic actions of an association are many and quite varied. Sharing costs, information, and workloads enables a partnership to do more than a single association might do on its own. Establishing fruitful relations with suppliers and commercial partners insures positive outcomes and long-term returns for all parties. Partnerships, whether formal and rigid or fleeting and flexible, provide strong foundations for association success and critical strength to achieve goals and complete projects - an exponential compliment to the core associational process. www.uia.org

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HQ > HONG KONG

A MEETINGS CITY FOREVER AND FOR EVERYONE

Victoria Harbour

WHEN HONG KONG BUILT ITS FIRST PURPOSE-BUILT CONVENTION AND EXHIBITION CENTRE - EMPHASIS ON EXHIBITIONS - ON THE WATERFRONT, OVERLOOKING FAMED VICTORIA HARBOUR, IN 1988, THE MEETINGS INDUSTRY’S REACTION WAS ONE OF CONFUSION. WHAT’S HAPPENING THERE? A NEW CONGRESS CENTRE ARCHITECTURE WAS INTRODUCED WITH COVERED WALKWAYS TO ADJACENT LUXURY HOTELS, LIKE THE GRAND HYATT HONG KONG AND THE RENAISSANCE HARBOUR VIEW HOTEL. THE TERM ‘HOTELS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE’ WAS BORN. IT WAS THE BEGINNING OF A GRAND EVOLUTION IN THE CONGRESS WORLD. AND HONG KONG IS DOING IT AGAIN. AT LEAST, THAT WAS THE IMPRESSION I GOT DURING MY LATEST VISIT, 20 YEARS SINCE THE LAST. REPORT MARCEL A.M. VISSERS

HONG KONG IS A FIRST CLASS ASIAN EXHIBITION CITY I happened to be at the right time in Hong Kong to have a talk with Cliff Wallace, Managing Director of Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC). The great example of all combined congress-exhibition events was there: SIBOS of SWIFT. ‘If this event pays you a visit, then you know that you belong to the great centres of the world’, says a clearly exhilarated Cliff Wallace. ‘Which reminds me of two names Hong Kong earned through its long history: “The Events

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Capital of Asia” and “Asia’s Trade Fair Capital and Premier International Convention and Meeting Centre”. Our centre opened in November 1988, after which Hong Kong’s exhibition industry experienced a period of rapid growth, enabling Hong Kong to establish its position as Asia’s trade fair leader. Having experienced escalating demand from its time of opening, the HKCEC was expanded in June 1997, more than doubling its prime function space. The expanded venue further strengthened Hong Kong’s leading position as Asia’s trade fair hub.’

Cliff continued: ‘With the continuous growing demand of exhibition space from HKCEC’s current and potential clients, the HKCEC commenced its second expansion project in May 2006 and completed it in April 2009. The demand for exhibitions keeps rising, which makes me ask the question if we should build a new purpose-built congress centre in Hong Kong. This time it should only organize congresses. Don’t forget, the HKCEC is primarily an exhibition centre where large congresses can also be held. Keeping this in mind, I see a new beginning in Hong Kong’s future!’

MEHK IS NEW FOR MEETINGS ORGANISERS Ms. Gilly Wong is the General Manager - MICE and Cruise of the Hong Kong Tourism Board (HKTB). In November 2008, the HKTB set up a dedicated office: ‘Meetings and Exhibitions Hong Kong (MEHK)’ is tasked with providing one-stop professional support to events organisers. As the head of the office, Gilly Wong leads the team to roll out a series of measures to ensure Hong Kong’s leading position in the global meetings industry. She said: ‘In my new function - before I was


> HONG KONG the spectacular view of the surrounding skyline, the world famous Victoria Harbour and Kowloon towering skyscrapers and peaceful green hillsides. Back on earth you can go to Jumbo Kingdom at Aberdeen Harbour, home to hundreds of people living on fishing junks. To get a close look at the Aberdeen way of life, many visitors take a sampan ride or look around from one of two magnificent floating restaurants anchored here.

Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre

Marcel Vissers and Gilly Wong, General Manager, MICE & Cruise Division, Hong Kong Tourism Board

With the continuous growing demand of exhibition space from HKCEC’s current and potential clients, the HKCEC commenced its second expansion project in May 2006 and completed it in April 2009 general manager of Destination Marketing (2007) - I have to put Hong Kong on the map as “leading” in the world. With the assistance of a complete team, I’m working on developing a great variety of marketing programmes and mega events. Originally I come from the corporate world and there I learned to clearly formulate and attain goals. The same will happen with MEHK: to give Hong Kong a new

leading place on the international market.’ What has changed in 20 years? You can imagine what the people from Hong Kong always asked me first, after returning for the first time in 20 years. I had to think hard and take a good look around at the new skyscrapers and the complete new Hong Kong site on Lantau Island. Here are my impressions. A successful city tour always starts with a good tour guide: Frederick Cheung managed to impress me with his knowledge and abilities. For your first visit, you should visit Hong Kong on the ground. Subsequent visits should be done by air to better experience this impressive city. High Flyer is a helicopter company specialised in tours above Hong Kong. An example of one of their spectacular programmes is a flight from the Wan Chai Helipad to the roof of the Peninsula Hong Kong Hotel, where you take the elevator down to enjoy an afternoon tea.

Chinese Tea Appreciation

A second dizzying visit involves taking the Peak Tram and climbing the steep Peak. Looking down from the Peak, you’ll be amazed by

Congress delegates are guaranteed to enjoy a harbour cruise with, for example, the Aqua Luna, a traditional Chinese junk handcrafted by an 80-year-old local craftsman. Because of a typhoon, I could not visit a part of Lantau Island and its Ngong Ping Village, Po lin Monsatery and giant Buddha statue - no trip to Hong Kong is complete without a visit to the world’s tallest, outdoor bronze Buddha sitting serenely atop the Ngong Ping Plateau. According to my guide, two other classics should not go missing: Sik Sik Yuen Wong Tai Sin Temple - one of the most popular and colourful temples in Hong Kong, where all three main religions of China (Buddhism, Taoism ad Confucianism) are practiced - and the wet market in the Central District.

A NEW DISCOVERY? Certainly: Lantau Island, which I partly visited. This is a completely new area around the airport and is promoted as Hong Kong’s newest visitor’s site. Two pure design hotels attracted my attention. Regal Airport Hotel enjoys an unparalleled location being connected to the airport’s main terminal by a fully enclosed, air-conditioned linkbridge. The second hotel is the Hong Kong Sky-City Marriott Hotel, set on the banks of the South China Sea and connected to the Asia World Expo. Last but not least, I attended a ‘Chinese Tea Appreciation Class’ at Lock Cha Tea Shop.

CONTACT Gilly Wong General Manager, MICE & Cruise gilly.wong@hktb.com tel: +852 2807 6289 fax: +852 2503 6135 www.mehongkong.com

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> HONG KONG

Case study TIME WITH SIBOS’ PANOS TZIVANIDIS IN HONG KONG ON SEVERAL OCCASIONS I WAS TOLD THAT THOSE WHO HOST THE ANNUAL SIBOS CONGRESS AND EXHIBITION MAY CONSIDER THEMSELVES BLESSED. DURING MY VISIT OF SIBOS 2009 IN HONG KONG (14-18 SEPTEMBER), I MET MONICA LEE, DEPUTY MANAGING DIRECTOR OF HONG KONG CONVENTION AND EXHIBITION CENTRE (HKCEC), WHO GLOWINGLY CHEERED: ‘SUCCESS, SIBOS IS HERE!’. CLIFF WALLACE, MANAGING DIRECTOR OF HKCEC, EVEN ADDED: ‘SIBOS IS THE BEST LEARNING EXPERIENCE FOR ALL EXHIBITION CENTRE MANAGERS AND STAFF!’. BUT WHY DID SIBOS GO TO HONG KONG? LET’S FIND OUT! REPORT MARCEL A.M. VISSERS

HONG KONG ATTRACTS LARGE CONGRESSES In the meetings industry, Hong Kong can be considered one of the most experienced congress and exhibition cities in Asia and even in the world. Is that the reason why many large congresses seem spontaneously to go to Hong Kong? Monica Lee argued: ‘It’s not that simple. When SIBOS came to Singapore in 2003, I visited Panos Tzivanidis, Head of SIBOS, with a heartfelt plea to present Hong Kong as a congress destination. It’s now 2009. For five years I fought for this congress and today I’m a very happy woman because SIBOS has filled up every hall, room and space in our congress and exhibition centre.’ Cliff Wallace added: ‘I’m more than happy because SIBOS enjoys a great reputation in the world of congress organisation. When I heard that Hong Kong had been chosen, I immediately called a staff meeting to tell them that we were getting a unique learning experience. SIBOS is a school for everyone, for the directors, for the caterer and for the logistics department, but especially for the

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Panos Tzivanidis

management. Panos’ organisation knows how to get the best of people when it comes to organise a congress.’

WHAT DO SWIFT AND SIBOS HAVE IN COMMON? A few congresses are important players in the world of monetary transactions. The largest of them is the SWIFT-organised SIBOS congress. Each year SIBOS takes place on a different continent. Last year it was Vienna. This year it was Asia’s turn with Hong Kong. If we want to understand what SWIFT is about, a good talk with Panos Tzivanidis, Head of SIBOS, is in order. I managed to spend a little time with him exploring HKCEC in search of the secret of SIBOS. SIBOS is such an alluring event because of its state-ofthe-art organisation and PR campaign. Not a detail goes unnoticed. I even discovered that Panos had installed a micro-transmitter in his brain, allowing him to sense everything that’s happening at the congress and making it possible for him to react immediately while

remaining calm and smiling! He said: ‘Once a year, SIBOS brings together the financial industry to create opportunities for individuals, organisations and the community as a whole. Facilitated and organised by SWIFT, SIBOS is a unique forum to meet, network and do business while keeping in touch with the industry issues. In 2008, SIBOS attracted over 8,000 participants in Vienna, ranging from the established financial institutions to central clearing systems and consultants. This year, we could count on 5,782 delegates in Hong Kong. We’re very happy with this number because it allowed us to weather the financial world’s large storm. We chose Hong Kong because it’s a key market place, Asia’s prime business hub and China’s leading international financial services centre. Hong Kong was also selected because of its outstanding congress and exhibition centre. Its beautiful port-side location was an additional trump.’ www.swift.com www.swiftcommunity.net/SIBOS


anidis


TAK E YOU R THI NKI NG TO A WHOLE NEW PLACE. 4HERE´SJUSTSOMETHINGABOUT!USTRALIATHATCHANGESTHEWAYYOUTHINK !T½RSTGLANCEYOUMIGHTTHINKIT´STHESTUNNINGNATURALSETTINGSLIKE 3YDNEY(ARBOURORITSUNIQUEMEETINGLOCATIONS"UTORGANISEANEVENT HEREANDYOU´LLSOONDISCOVERIT´SSOMETHINGFARDEEPER !RICHHISTORYOFCULTURALFREEDOMANDINNOVATIONHASHELPED!USTRALIANS THINKDIFFERENTLYFOROVER YEARS-ORERECENTLY OURFRESHAND IMAGINATIVEAPPROACHHASENSUREDTHESUCCESSOFWORLD CLASSCORPORATEAND ASSOCIATIONMEETINGS REWARDINGINCENTIVESANDUNRIVALLEDGLOBALEVENTS 3OIFYOU´REAFTERANEVENTTHATWILLINSPIRENEWIDEAS DELIVERREALBUSINESS RESULTSANDRETURNONINVESTMENT LOOKNOFURTHERTHAN!USTRALIA 4OGETYOURCLIENTSTHINKINGDIFFERENTLYVISITBUSINESSEVENTSAUSTRALIACOM


HQ

> AUSTRALIA

AUSTRALIA’S ENVIRONMENTAL LEADERSHIP ATTRACTS EVENTS DOWN UNDER AUSTRALIAN SCIENTISTS ARE LEADING THE WORLD IN ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND SUSTAINABILITY PRACTICES WITH HIGH-PROFILE BREAKTHROUGHS LEADING TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF SUCH PRODUCTS AS BIODEGRADABLE PACKAGING, A HYBRID, WATER-SAVING TOILET AND SOLAR HOT-WATER SYSTEMS.

The national effort to fight climate change and protect Australia’s pristine environment has helped cement its reputation for innovation as a caring and environmentally aware community. ‘Australians are setting the agenda for best practice across various fields of endeavour and that extends to our ability to offer environmentally sustainable, world-class business events,’ says Tourism Australia’s Head of Business Events Australia, Ms. Joyce DiMascio. ‘We celebrate originality and thrive on innovation and uniqueness and our business events are no exception.’ Over the next two years, thousands of delegates will visit Australia to attend association meetings and conferences in the environment, sustainability and cultural industries. These include the GMCC 09 International Conference on Coexistence between Genetically Modified (GM) and non-GM based Agricultural Supply Chains (400 delegates in Melbourne), the International Congress

for the Chemistry of Crop Protection (1,500 delegates in Melbourne), the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect Asia Pacific Regional Conference (1,200 delegates in Perth) and the massive Lions Clubs International Convention, which is expected to attract up to 25,000 delegates to Sydney in 2010.

‘With a growing global presence in a range of sectors including information and communication technologies, life sciences and creative industries, Brisbane offers associations excellent links to thought leaders and a world-class research and development community.’

COMING EVENTS The director of Brisbane Convention Bureau, Annabel Sullivan, says Brisbane’s growing reputation for its expertise in knowledgebased industries has helped it secure a raft of events with an environmental, community and science focus. Events filling out Brisbane’s event calendar include the 10th International Congress of Ecology 2009 (2,000 delegates); 19th World Congress of Soil Science 2010; International Society of Arboriculture Conference and Trade Show 2011 and the 34th International Geological Congress 2012. ‘Brisbane is Australia’s new world city - a city of skills and strengths in emerging knowledge-based industries,’ Ms. Sullivan says.

+ International Congress for the Chemistry of Crop Protection (ICCC IUPAC), Melbourne, July 2010, 1,500 delegates + International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Asia Pacific Regional Conference, Perth, November 2009, 1,200 delegates. + International Peace Research Association Global Conference, Sydney June 2010, 400 delegates. + Lions Clubs International Convention, Sydney, June 2010, up to 25,000 delegates.

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> AUSTRALIA

In February, more than 680 delegates from 66 countries travelled to Brisbane to attend 29th Annual Symposium on Sea Turtle Conservation and Biology 2009. The largest event in the world dedicated to sea turtle biology and conservation, the event explored themes such as building communication and networking at local, regional and global scales (see sidebar).

Case study 29TH ANNUAL SYMPOSIUM ON SEA TURTLE CONSERVATION AND BIOLOGY 2009 Held in Brisbane in February, Turtles Brisbane 2009 brought together 680 delegates representing 66 countries to promote the exchange of information that advances the global knowledge of sea turtle biology and conservation. The largest event in the world dedicated to sea turtle biology and conservation, the event explored themes such as building communication and networking at local, regional and global scales. It aimed to create links between communities and to connect policy-makers with the latest information coming out of sea turtle research and conservation programs. This was the first time the symposium had been held in Australia and was sponsored by the Queensland Environmental Protection Agency. It was attended by researchers, resource managers, indigenous communities, government representatives, NGOs, community groups and people who work as volunteers on sea turtle projects. A major factor in the selection of Brisbane was the existence of an internationally renowned research program in Brisbane’s home state of Queensland and the fact that Australia is home to six of the seven endangered sea turtle species. Pre- and post-event touring centred around sea turtle watching islands along the Queensland coast. The proximity of Brisbane to the Great Barrier Reef meant it was high on the agenda for many of the delegates.

www.turtlesbrisbane2009.org

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The symposium heard from the world experts about the latest research on sea turtles, including keynote addresses by Karen Bjorndal from the University of Florida, the former CEO of KwaZulu-Natal Nature Conservation Service, George Hughes, Col Limpus from the Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service and Sally Hopkins-Murphy from the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. While Australia has a reputation for delivering world-class events, the tourism industry also is also well known for its focus on sustainability. An independent audit of Australia’s corporate social responsibility cre-

An independent audit of Australia’s corporate social responsibility credentials found last year that the nation was deeply committed to sustainable tourism and is leading the world in its efforts to achieve it

dentials found last year that the nation was deeply committed to sustainable tourism and is leading the world in its efforts to achieve it. Commissioned by Tourism Australia, it found that all sectors of the industry were committed to environmental sustainability and most had achieved, or were working to achieve, green accreditation.

RECENT EVENTS + GMCC 09 International Conference on Coexistence between Genetically Modified (GM) and non-GM based Agricultural Supply Chains, Melbourne November 2009, 400 delegates. + 15th UICC Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference, Brisbane, May 2009, 1,000 delegates + The 10th International Congress of Ecology 2009 (INTECOL 10), Brisbane, August 2009, 2,000 delegates.

Like all Australian destinations, Brisbane is proud of its green credentials. ‘As the most biologically diverse capital in Australia, Brisbane is a green city with a clear commitment to the environment,’ Ms. Sullivan says. ‘Through Brisbane City Council’s Green Heart CitySmart initiative, local residents and businesses have committed to a program of environmental initiatives designed to make Brisbane Australia’s most sustainable city and a carbon-neutral destination by 2026.’ Australia offers a wealth of incredible locations, venues and facilities for business events, and many of them offer sustainable, carbon-neutral options, Ms. DiMascio says. A recent investment of $8.1 billion in infrastructure, including new hotels and convention centres, adds to a wealth of resources. Australian expertise and business leaders are world renowned and that attracts other thinkers and business leaders from around the world, she says. ‘We are leaders in many different fields. We expose international visitors to that and that is our uniqueness. They take away so much more than they expected.’ www.businessevents.australia.com


HQ

© Randall Stout Architects Inc.

> CANADA

Ca

Calgary Telus Convention Centre

No

© Calgary Telus Convention Centre

Art Gallery of Alberta

A view from Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

MEETING IN ALBERTA land of contrasts THANKS TO THE 2010 WINTER OLYMPICS IN VANCOUVER AND THE EFFORT ON THE PART OF THE CANADIAN TOURISM COMMISSION (CTC) TOWARDS THE EUROPEAN MARKET, CANADA AS A WHOLE HAS DECIDED TO PUT ITSELF ON THE MEETINGS INDUSTRY MAP AS NEVER BEFORE. SO, AT HEADQUARTERS, WE WOULD LIKE TO GIVE THIS MIGHTY, VERY ACTIVE COUNTRY PRIDE OF PLACE. AFTER ALL, IT’S GOT VALUES THAN CAN EASILY BE TRANSLATED INTO THE MC&IT INDUSTRY. THAT’S WHAT I DISCOVERED WHEN I TRAVELED TO THE PROVINCE OF ALBERTA. WHETHER IT BE THE FASCINATING SCENERY, THE LAIDBACKNESS OF THE PEOPLE, THE COMMITMENT TO SUSTAINABILITY OR THE PURE SPACIOUSNESS OF THINGS, CANADA IS THE PLACE TO BE. REPORT RÉMI DÉVÉ

It has been a few years since Alberta promoted itself as a meetings destination and as the CTC decided to be more visible and active on the European market, I was kindly invited on a press trip to discover the jewels of Alberta. And guess what? Whether you’re looking to host a meeting in a charming alpine castle or a conference at an all-star urban convention centre, Alberta’s facilities will reward you far beyond the walls of a boardroom.

HEADQUARTERS 40

CONGRESSING IN THE CITY Alberta is a land of contrasts. In the whole week I stayed there, I was taken to places with countless possibilities, both city and more ‘nature’ wise. My meetings adventures first took me to Calgary, where delegates will definitely enjoy its cosmopolitan atmosphere, easy accessibility and safe environment. For quite a big city, it doesn’t bear the hassles of big-city problems. And, with the spectacular Canadian Rockies only an

SUSTAINABLE ALBERTA Although oil is the #1 resource in Alberta - in fact Calgary has been nicknamed the ‘Dallas of Canada’ -, the province, together with the many people working in the meetings industry, have shown a commitment towards sustainability. This includes: + LEED (Leadership in Environmental and Energy Design) certifications of several buildings in Calgary + a zero-waste programme in the Telus Convention Centre in Calgary - the denomination says it all! They even got the 2005 Go Green BOMA Environment Award in recognition of responsible environmental practices in Building Operations + the Homeless Connect programme, which, in the Shaw Conference Centre in Edmonton, brings together over 25 agencies helping the community’s poorest with services, including finding permanent shelter and employment + the Fairmont Green Partnership programme which allows to exceed meeting planner expectations when it comes to operational sustainability


> CANADA

ta

re

Canadian Rockies

Edmonton, rightly nicknamed the ‘festival city’, is a gateway destination filled with contrasts. The province’s largest venue of its kind, the Shaw Conference Centre, accommodates up to 7,000 people. And you should see the views there are from its floor-to-ceiling windows! Northlands Park is also worth mentioning, as they are expanding their conference facilities as we speak. Located on the outskirts of the city, it welcomes as many as 17,000 delegates! The Art Gallery of Alberta in Edmonton was another highlight of my trip. Currently undergoing a major expansion program, the striking new 8,000-m2 facility is scheduled to open January 31, 2010. Designed by renowned architect Randall Stout, this signature building will become both a downtown landmark and a great meeting venue.

Northlands Park

hour’s drive from the city’s centre, it’s also easy to offer pre- and post-meeting outdoor adventures! For large events, the following venues are just ideal. Situated right downtown, Telus Convention Centre accommodates up to 4,000 delegates. Connected by a network of enclosed pathways to three four-star hotels - the Calgary Marriott, the Fairmont Palliser and the Hyatt Regency Calgary - the capacity goes up to 17,000 m2 of space, in addition to 1,100 guest rooms! I also have

I’m sure the association planner will also like Banff Centre, an educational institution whose mission is to inspire creativity and which provides meeting and accommodation facilities with over 400 guest rooms and 60 meetings spaces, lecture theatres, and auditoriums to accommodate groups from 5 to 1,000 people. Here the impact of the inspiring mountain location, the creative atmosphere, and the strong, friendly support from the staff will make any event one-of-a-kind.

CONGRESSING IN NATURE But it’s the driving between Calgary and Edmonton that took my breath away. Stretching over 400 kilometers, along the jagged crest of the Rockies, Banff is Canada’s oldest national park, while Jasper is the largest - and I drove through a good part of both of them! Together they embrace a patchwork of vast summits and unbelievably bluegreen lakes and the good news is you can hold any kind of meetings - of course not as large as in the cities - in this stunning, truly inspirational landscape!

To conclude, I will stress the fact that everything is big in Alberta: the hotels, the roads, the cars, everything! It lends a kind of serenity to the overall atmosphere. I mention that because I feel it’s very important for a meeting to be held in the most ideal environment possible. You can forget the occasional ‘crowded’ feeling you can get in a city, here you can take a deep breath, thinking the sky is the limit!

In this area, two Fairmont Hotels definitely stand out. The Fairmont Banff Springs

Whether you’re looking to host a meeting in a charming alpine castle or a conference at an all-star urban convention centre, Alberta’s facilities will reward you far beyond the walls of a boardroom to mention the Calgary Stampede, which bills itself as the ‘Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth’. This large festival, exhibition and rodeo lasts for 10 days every summer from early to mid-July and might be an ideal time to hold a meeting!

the shores of postcard perfect Lake Louise - with the bluest water ever! - the Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise was designed by Canadian Pacific Railway’s chief architect Walter Painter. The meeting space available measures 3,500 m2 and there are even guides on-site if you want to take your delegates for a hike to see white goats and grizzli bears!

is a world-renowned symbol of Canadian hospitality. Looking almost like a gigantic Bavarian castle in the Black Forest, the hotel offers 768 guestrooms and suites. As for meetings, it boasts more than 7,000 m2 of meeting and banquet space. Nestled on

CONTACTS + In Canada: Susan Frei, Director Canadian Tourism Commission Tel 703 825 1134 Frei.Susan@ctc-cct.ca www.meetings.canada.travel + In Europe: Roger Bradley, Axis Travel Marketing Ltd Tel: +44 (0) 208 686 2300 roger@axistravelmarketing.com + More info on Alberta: Travel Alberta www.TravelAlberta.com/meetings

HEADQUARTERS 41


HQ > GLASGOW

Glasgow City Halls

Buchanan Street

GLASGOW

GLASGOW, THE HARD FACTS

a city that understands conferences IT’S AMAZING HOW MUCH GLASGOW IS CHANGING. I WAS THERE A LITTLE MORE THAN A YEAR AND A HALF AGO AND THEN I COULD ALREADY SENSE THAT THE CITY WAS EMBRACING TRANSFORMATION AS A TRUE WAY OF LIFE. THIS TIME THIS FEELING WAS EVEN MORE TANGIBLE. AS GLASGOW PREPARES TO HOST THE 2014 COMMONWEALTH GAMES, IT IS ALL SYSTEMS GO FOR MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENTS. THE CITY WAS ALREADY A DESTINATION OF CHOICE FOR (BIG) INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION CONGRESSES; IT’S BECOMING EVEN MORE SO. REPORT RÉMI DÉVÉ

STRONGER TOGETHER When you talk to anybody involved in any way with Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, you can’t but be impressed by the common effort to put Glasgow on the international map, the unified message that they want to bring out there. In fact, I didn’t find the title of this report all by myself, I blatantly stole it from Scott Taylor, Chief Executive of Glasgow City Marketing Bureau, with whom I shared a nice breakfast. ‘We have a deliberate strategy of targeting the large international meetings with high numbers of delegates. Whenever we want to bid on a conference, we don’t waste time convincing our members that it might be good for the city. It just happens.’ he said. This everybody-working-hand-in-hand ethics was confirmed by Molly Doheny, Head of

HEADQUARTERS 42

Convention Bureau: ‘As a business destination, we have a well-deserved serious reputation. Glasgow is well grounded in research and education for instance and these sectors are growing, so we are on the map as never before. The Convention Bureau works very closely with our membership base, and hardly a day passes by without our members getting updated on the progress of our projects. A lot of cities don’t have this kind of close, almost personal relationship with their members. And besides Glasgow offers excellent value for money…’ And just to give you an idea, Glasgow’s Ambassador Programme counts more than 2,000 ambassadors. Doesn’t that say it all? According to the last ICCA stats, Glasgow is the UK’s international conference capital. It’s of course mainly due to the strong presence of the

+ Flexibility of the SECC accommodates meetings for 50-10,000+ delegates + 5940 hotel rooms within 0-2 miles of SECC + More than 17,000 hotel rooms (including student accommodation and B&B / Guest House), with way more to come + Voted Britain’s top retail destination in 2007 + Glasgow International Airport serves more than 100 destinations + Biggest conference to date: European Respiratory Society Congress, 4-8 Sept 2004 (14,000 delegates)

Scottish Exhibition + Conference Centre on the market. The SECC seems to have a natural affinity with large meetings. As Ben Goedegebuure, SECC Director of Sales, says: ‘We’re considered to be one of the key players on the conference side; we can adapt our location in any way you want. And with the National Arena being built next door, we’ll be able to accommodate even bigger congresses in the near future.’ So it’s like everything is changing at the speed of light, with the city preparing to host even larger conferences (see box for a list of scheduled major developments). For those who might be scared that Glasgow is becoming one of those major, impersonal metropolises, it’s not. Indeed for an international


> GLASGOW

Old Fruit Market

WHAT’S JUST HAPPENED AND WHAT’S TO COME + 5-star Blythswood Square hotel (2009) + 5-star Jumeirah Glasgow, with 160 rooms and suites, 85 serviced apartments and extensive conference facilities (opening in 2012) + 5-star Hamilton Hotel (2012) + Riverside Museum, set to be one of Glasgow’s architectural landmarks (2011). It’s part of the Clyde Waterfront generation programme. + National Indoor Sports Arena and Velodrome (2011) + 230-bedroom Jury’s Inn near the SECC + 12,000-seat National Arena across the SECC

conference capital, it’s rather compact, easy to get around and above all definitely human.

PLACES TO MEET During my (way too short) trip, I got a good glimpse of what Glasgow could offer in terms of alternative meeting space or exclusive venues for, say, very special gala dinners. Here are the highlights of an ever-regenerating city. Right across from the SECC, Glasgow Science Centre offers a wide choice of unusual venue options. In addition to three floors full of fun exhibits, the Centre also houses Scotland’s only IMAX cinema plus the ScottishPower

Clyde Auditorium and River Clyde

House for An Art Lover

Planetarium. It accommodates a meeting for 50 or an event for up to 3,000. If you’re into education, the University of Glasgow is also definitely the place to be: a historic architectural masterpiece, it comprises of over 150 meeting spaces ranging from the traditional to modern purpose-built conference facilities and can cater for a wide range of events. I was personally impressed by two venues. Designed in 1901 by Glasgow’s most famous architect, Charles Rennie Mackintosh, the reknowned House for an Art Lover is a fascinating, cultural attraction that could suit any ‘small’ event, such as board meetings, workshops or training sessions. Not so far away lies Pollok House, the typical, elegant Georgian mansion - at least to me - which reinforces the city’s branding ‘Glasgow: Scotland With Style’. Considered one of Glasgow’s finest historic venues, it boasts magnificent interiors: its many rooms are suited for a whole range of events from large standing reception to exclusive luncheons or dinners. My personal favorite is the Edwardian Kitchen with its gloriously glazed tiles. Downtown, I also definitely have to mention Glasgow City Halls, which has just reopened its doors after a nice redevelopment. Next door, the Old Fruitmarket is a dramatically visual setting dating from the Victorian era with cast iron columns and original signs still hanging from the balcones, where you can seat 1,400 people. Nearby is the Glasgow Trades Hall, the older secular building in the

University of Glasgow & Kelvingrove

city which was built between 1791 and 1794 by the reknowned architect Robert Adam for the city’s 14 incorporated trades. It is a wonderfully historic building still used for its original purpose, which acccommodates up to 250 people.

CONTACT Molly Doheny Head of Convention Bureau Glasgow City Marketing Bureau Tel: +44 (0) 141 566 0801 Fax: +44 (0) 141 566 0810 molly.doheny@seeglasgow.com www.seeglasgow.com/convention-bureau

HEADQUARTERS 43


HQ > ZÜRICH

ZÜRICH the unique mix

Gala Dinner in Kongresshaus Zürich

JUST A STONE’S THROW FROM THE ALPS, ZÜRICH IS TRULY A WONDERFUL PLACE SET AMONG SOME OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SCENIC VISTAS ON THE SHORES OF LAKE ZÜRICH. AS A CONGRESS DESTINATION, IT COULD WELL HAVE EVERYTHING A DEMANDING INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION COULD POSSIBLY WANT.

TO INTRODUCE ZÜRICH Zürich offers shopping, culture, nightlife with sea breezes and an Alpine panorama. With the added bonus of a top quality of life, it’s Switzerland’s centre of culture and business. As one of the leading cities in the art trade as well, Zürich opens its doors to art with over 50 museums and more than 100 galleries. The cultural calendar leaves nothing to be desired: from the Street Parade with the most colourful house and techno party in the world to the Zürich Festival; the latter being a unique inspirational combination of opera, concert, play, dance and Free Form Theatre in the Zürich cultural locations of the Opera House, the Schauspielhaus (Swit-

HEADQUARTERS 44

zerland’s largest theatre) and the Tonhalle (Concert Hall). The Old Town with its history going back over 2,000 years invites discovery of the traces of the past, whilst the currently trendy former industrial quarter of Zürich-West attracts with its urbanity. From the latest culinary trends behind old factory walls through Zürich specialties in historic guild houses to open-air eateries Zürich tempts the palate of its guests - with 1 restaurant for every 180 inhabitants. One can become immersed in clean lake and river water in the middle of the city. Where people go swimming during the day, at night there is dancing, as the swimming facilities

transform into bars and lounges at twilight! Further idyllic oases of nature give an energy boost in and around Zürich: whether on a nostalgic steamship ride or a hike up the Uetliberg, Zürich’s local mountain, with views of the snow-covered Alps on the horizon. As the gateway to Alps, Zürich is the ideal starting point for day excursions to snow and eternal ice. And upon return, just enjoy the colourful Zürich nightlife!

INTERESTING FACTS FOR ASSOCIATION PLANNERS + Access Zürich is situated in the heart of Europe: international flights from over 150 destinations as well as many non-stop flights of low-fare carriers are arriving at Zürich Airport. The transfer between the airport and the city centre takes just 10 minutes.

+ New hotels Renaissance Zürich City West: The five-star hotel is being built in the rapidly developing district of Zürich West, opening


> ZÜRICH in January 2011. It will feature 284 rooms and suites over 11 floors, executive levels with views of the city and lake, and a 24-hour executive lounge on floor 14. The hotel will boast 1,050 m2 of meeting and events space including a large ballroom, a junior ballroom, four conference rooms and an executive boardroom. Ramada Hotel Zürich City: Due to open in spring 2011, the four-star hotel

Zürich offers shopping, culture, nightlife with sea breezes and an Alpine panorama. With the added bonus of a top quality of life, it’s Switzerland’s centre of culture and business

is being built directly opposite the Letzigrund football-arena close to the city centre. There will be 165 comfortable rooms, equipped with state-ofthe-art technique, a restaurant, bar as well as a fitness and wellness area. Meetings will take place in the three meeting rooms with a capacity for up to 65 persons.

+ Coming Events 2010: International Conference on Physical Modelling in Geotechnics (500 participants) 2010: Congress of the European

Association of Hospital Managers EAHM (700 participants) 2010: Conference of the International Union of Marine Insurance IUMI (600 participants) 2011: Congress of the International Federation of Landscape Architects IFLA (500 participants) 2011: European Management Assistants EUMA 37th Annual Conference (350 participants) 2012: ICSE International Conference on Software Engineering® (800 participants)

Testimonial 18TH EUROPEAN CONGRESS OF VETERINARY DENTISTRY

ZÜRICH CONVENTION BUREAU Over the years, Zürich Tourism has greatly expanded its collaboration with Zürich’s universities and colleges, and provided help and advice for countless convention projects. The increased focus on this area has paid off as more and more association conventions are being held in Zürich. Scientists from around the world gather here to exchange ideas and information, either in an academic setting on the campus of the University of Zürich or the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, at the Kongresshaus with its gorgeous lakefront location, or in one of the excellently equipped seminar hotels in Zürich and the surrounding region. The Convention Bureau of Zürich Tourism provides a wide range of complimentary services to conference organisers including: venue location and reservation, preparation of bid documents, accommodation booking service, organisation of site inspections, arranging social events and much more.

CONTACT ZÜRICH TOURISM Romy Brändli Convention Marketing Manager Tel: +41 44 215 40 73 Fax: +41 44 215 40 99 romy.braendli@zuerich.com www.zuerich.com

Date: 10 - 12 September 2009 Number of participants: 180 Convention hotel: Hotel Renaissance Zürich Gala evening: Zunfthaus zur Meisen, Zürich Daniel Koch, D.V.M., member of the organising committee: ‘Isn’t it satisfying when at the end of a congress, the participants spontaneously thank you for a successful event and say they are already looking forward to the next one? That’s what happened to us after the European Congress of Veterinary Dentistry at the Hotel Renaissance Zürich. As an organiser, this is rather flattering, of course, and makes you grateful for all the capable partners who were with you all the way from the beginning to the end of the successful congress. We appreciated the professional service provided by Zürich Tourism during the selection of the congress location and the perfect spot for the gala dinner. In the end, we were convinced that we had made the right choice. We enjoyed the best of care at the Hotel Renaissance, where the events manager anticipated our every wish and assisted us greatly with the on-site organisation, and at the Zunfthaus zur Meisen, with its terrific location and décor. The congress participants were very impressed not only with the way the congress was run but also with Zürich as an attractive and easily accessible city.’

HEADQUARTERS 45


HQ © Depaule PAD Asylum pour Lyon Confluence

> LY O N

4 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT LYON

© N. Robin

the new Confluence district Lyon Convention Centre

BOTH A EUROPEAN METROPOLIS AND THE CAPITAL OF THE RHÔNE-ALPES REGION, LYON IS CHARACTERIZED BY A CONSTANT WILLINGNESS TO REINVENT ITSELF. RICH WITH 2000 YEARS OF HISTORY, DIFFERENT NEIGHBOURHOODS CHOSEN BY UNESCO AS A PART OF WORLD HERITAGE, GREAT VENUES AND AN EVENTFUL ART AND CULTURAL LIFE, IT’S DEVELOPING AT THE SPEED OF LIGHT. HERE ARE THE LATEST NEWS FROM LYON.

LYON CONVENTION CENTRE: MORE HI-TECH THAN EVER At the beginning of 2009, Lyon Congress Centre carried out important investments to adapt to the needs of its customers. The major challenge was to make all flows of information converge together (video, sound, light, technical management of the facility, etc.) on one single data-processing network. This has just been created on Ethernet and all the spaces in the venue are now interconnected thanks to a hi-tech web of optical fibers.

OVER 1,500 NEW HOTEL ROOMS BY 2012 Sustained growth in the meetings industry has required that new hotel facilities be opened. Among the numerous projects that have been confirmed, several include converting hospital buildings that have been left vacant. Among them, the old Debrousse hospital, which will be endowed with a 150-

HEADQUARTERS 46

room four-star hotel in 2011. New hotels are also planned to be opening in totally renewed neighbourhoods such as the Confluence, the Part-Dieu and the Carré de soie. As for the Lyon-Saint Exupéry Airport, it is now home to a four-star hotel (NH Hoteles Group). All in all, the hotels under construction and identified projects will increase accommodation capacity from 11,600 to 12,700 rooms on a 2009-2010 horizon then to 13,200 by 2012, to which 2,900 apartment hotel rooms must also be added.

ble the area of the city’s urban centre, which is a rare achievement in Europe.

LYON’S SAINT-EXUPÉRY AIRPORT Lyon’s Saint-Exupéry Airport underwent heavy construction development in 2007, with no less than the opening of 15 new routes since then. This year, a Business Hub, started in 2007, saw its completion. Access to it and the airport has been made easy thanks to many means of transport. Lyon’s Saint Exupéry Airport along with Roissy is the only European airport that has a TGV train station that links 15 or more cities. It will also be directly linked to the city centre by 2010.

THE NEW CONFLUENCE DISTRICT Located south of the Peninsula, situated between the Rhône and Saône rivers, the Confluence district is a modern extension of the city of Lyon. This fluvial site which in the past was largely devoted to industries has slowly rediscovered the beauty of its riverbanks and natural surroundings. Once completed, the Confluence district will dou-

MORE NEWS + about Lyon Convention Centre: www.ccc-lyon.com + about Lyon: www.onlylyon.org


© Depaule PAD Asylum pour Lyon Confluence

“If you’re going once, chances are you’ll be going twice.”

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22/09/2009 17:50:57

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The 36th edition of HeadQuarters magazine

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