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utica proud college edition

Volume One • Spring 2018

CELEBR ATI NG TH E PA S T, P R E S E N T & P O T E N T I A L c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

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utica proud college edition

Volume One • Spring 2018

Dedicated to Becky DeCusatis Joe Owens Logan Patenaude and Bridget Swayne


utica proud college edition

contents VOLUME 1 • SPRING 2 018

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 What’s in a name?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Stanley Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Refugee Community . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

ComD 240 | 2017 - 18

Oneida Square Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Research, Analysis and Process

Utica Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Professor Cindiana Koren, Editor PrattMWP College of Art and Design 310 Genesee Street

St. Volodymyr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Union Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Barber Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Utica, NY 13502

Historic View of Genesee Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

ckoren@mwpai.edu

Body Alive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 St. Joseph St. Patrick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

© All Rights Reserved All content of artwork, photography, and illustration is original and created by the authors unless otherwise noted. Authors retain full copyright. Reproduction in part or in whole, without written permission, is not permitted.

Sounds of Utica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Forest Hills Cemetery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Mohawk Airlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . 60 Fountain Elms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 ACR Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

#uticaproud

Utica Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Made In Utica . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Varick Street Nightlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Rutger Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Refugee Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Inkorporated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 Min Htet Win Oriental Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Deja Vu . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Chicken Riggies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 O’Scugnizzo Pizzeria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Off Center Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Q Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Planned Parenthood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118

Cover Art: Mark Pei Back Cover: Sage Lilly


I NT RODUCT I ON

students team up A challenge turns into a movement to be proud of. by Becky DeCusatis Utica, New York is a classic Rust Belt city moving toward renewed prosperity. We, as college students see the potential this city has and believe in what it can become. Once a thriving city, Utica New York has suffered from population and economic decline. Even though it has been referred to as “the city that God forgot" we as students have lived here for the majority of two years and we see that it is a beautiful city­—and we are proud.

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UT I CA PROUD

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T EAM UP

LEFT: Original typeface design by Joe Owens “Design for Good� Trophy Emerging Designers Award

This project showcases Utica from a college student point of view. We celebrate the past, present and potential of the city. In 2017 four PrattMWP students set off on a journey to lift the spirits of the people of Utica by designing a fresh campaign around the mayor's new slogan Utica Proud. The uplifting logo design and customized typeface inspired a media campaign that encourages action; Eat UP, Read UP, Listen UP, Be UP! We, the sophomore PrattMWP ComD class of 2018 were responsible for finding research topics in Utica to be proud of. We we were then required to conduct interviews, take photographs, illustrate, and apply graphic standards to our stories. The following pages are a collaboration that we imagine will be the first edition of an ongoing project focusing on the city of Utica. 2017 Award Winners: Becky DeCusatis, Professor Cindiana Koren, Logan Patenaude Bridget Swayne, and Joe Owens

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UT I CA PROUD

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what's in a name? Do you know how the city name was chosen? by Anastasia Eren There is a reason people are named after certain things. Some people are named for their ancestors, or sometimes their parents choose a name because they just like the way it sounds. We can consider the same process for naming streets, parks, buildings, and perhaps cities. That being said, my goal is to find how people in the past chose the name of our city. c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

1. Why Utica? 2. How did they choose the name? 3. Who were the people involved in the naming process? 4. Who made the final decision?

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HI ST ORY

“On April 3, 1798, Old Fort Schuyler was incorporated as a village. The inhabitants had met at Bagg’s Tavern earlier in the year to discuss the incorporation and to select a name for the village. There was much debate on subject, some wishing to retain the name of Old Fort Schuyler while others suggested such names as Scanandoah, Washington and Kent. As no decision could be reached, selection of a name was left

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to chance. They decided to settle it by allowing each to write the name of their choice and put it in a hat; the first name drawn out to be adopted. This proved to be Utica, choice of classical scholar citizen Erastus Clark. The agreement was adhered to and the bill of incorporation chose the name of Utica, the Port of ancient Carthage. In that year the village contained fifty houses. Talcott Camp was elected the first village president.”


the first city named utica was an ancient city of northern Africa on the Mediterranean Sea northwest of Carthage. According to tradition, it was founded c. 1100 BC by Phoenicians from Tyne. The city declined in the first century BC and was finally destroyed by Arabs c. AD 700. The Phoenician city of Utica was located in present day Tunisia.

Utica translates as “old town” contrasting with the meaning from Carthage which translates as “new town.”

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A RT S AND T HEAT ER

stanley Theater The spotlight shines on this elegant, magnificent theater by Kasey Roberts Utica, New York—the doors to the Stanley Theater first opened on September 10th, 1928. With their first show being the premiere of the silent film, “Ramona,” little did the Mastaum brothers know that their theater would become a big attraction overall, as well as the center of entertainment for this small city in central New York.

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Stanley Theater is and always has been a center for the arts in Utica, New York. Originally owned by the Stanley-Mark Corporation chain (and in 1941, by the Warner Bros), the theater had plans to become a movie house for the Mastbaum chain. In relation to that, the theater’s name was originated from Stanley Matbaum, one of the Mastbaum brothers.

The architect and artistic genius behind this beautiful structure is Thomas Lamb; according to many, he is known to be one of the greatest architects of the 20th century. Lamb was responsible for the design of 300 theaters and cinemas within the 20th century, as stated by Cinemas Treasures as well as The Stanley’s website. Some of his other creations include The Fox Theater in San Francisco and the Capitol Theater in New York. Only three of his theaters remain standing today. These include The Stanley Theater, The Proctor’s Theater in Saratoga, and the Landmark Theater in Syracuse.

In the early 1960s, The Stanley was known to be “Utica’s grandest and most popular movie house from its opening until the 1950s”, according to online news source, Cinemas Treasures. However, by the late 1960s until the early 1970s, The Stanley was suffering greatly and unfortunately had to shut down production until 1974, when the Central New York Community Arts Council purchased the theater. In 1976, The Stanley made the list for The United States Registrar of National List of Historic Places.

The artistry on both the interior and exterior of the theater included more than one style and inspiration. Mexican and Spanish Indian, and Middle Eastern Baroque art as well as Art Deco are all featured styles of architecture at The Stanley. Lam's inspiration to the grand staircase derived from The Titanic and The Olympian. There are also terra cotta mosaics present both in and outside the theater, as well as gold leaf Baroque motifs, exquisite and intricate ceiling designs, and approximately 2,000 seats within the theater.

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ART S AND T HEAT ER

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On a new and final note, The Stanley is reportedly haunted, according to multiple sources and citizens of Utica. It is confirmed by a local ghost-hunting group that some rooms of The Stanley very well could be haunted. These claims are not just from them, but from some other local witnesses as well. Many have claimed to have seen different ghosts, beings, and paranormal activities and have recorded their sightings throughout the theater.

Since the time the Central New York Community Arts Council has bought The Stanley, the council has renovated it, costing millions of dollars. In 2005, Central New York Community Arts Council renamed The Stanley Theatre to The Stanley Center of Performing Arts. Today, this venue is used for wedding receptions, and special events or performances. It also supports the Broadway Theatre League, and the Mohawk Valley Ballet. The Stanley Theatre is a fantastic place for families and travelers to visit, and it is what makes Utica proud. Sources: Krefft, Bryan. “Stanley Center for the Arts.� Cinema Treasures, cinematreasures.org/theaters/1071 http://www.hauntedhouses.com/states/ny/utica_theatre_stanley.htm Visit their website: http://www.thestanley.org/about

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A RT S AND T HEAT ER

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A Burmese dance group performing a Karen dance at Fort Stanwix

making a difference one life at a time Fort Stanwix holds a “cultural showcase� every year; individuals and groups from all over the world come to share their culture. Many are refugees and proudly share where they came from and their excitement for where they want to go.

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PROUDLY DI VERSE

Mohawk Valley Refugee Center

by Bailey Chairez Founded in 1981 Mohawk Valley Refugee Center has resettled more than 15,000 individuals to the city of Utica. This population includes Vietnamese, Russian, Bosnian, Somali Bantu, Burmese, and Nepali refugees. The success of the Refugee Center, and Utica as a welcoming community, has received lots of attention from the community. Mohawk Valley Refugee Center does more services than just helping refugees; they also help immigrant communities. The Refugee Center is unique amongst refugee resettlements because it allows people to access multiple services in one location. Reception and Placement (refugee resettlement) is the core of the center's work and fully represents their mission and values. Dedicated case management service has been provided to refugees since 1981. The Refugee Resettlement department has transformed Utica and has built a community with many cultures. Dedicated staff work with community partners in healthcare, social services, and education to provide the necessary services to newly arrived refugees and their families. Utica believes that together we

can continue to build community with the diverse cultures. 69% of Utica area residents said immigration was good for the area. Utica as a community enjoys its reputation for welcoming new people, feels that the city and its leaders are doing a good job, and believes that immigration offers the city new hope for the future and a fresh image to the rest of the world. The center and its refugees brighten Utica and bring many new cultures into the area. The immigrants have been an economic engine for the city, starting small businesses, buying and renovating down-at-the-heels houses and injecting a sense of vitality to the city streets. A study in 2000 looked at the economical effect on the refugees relocating to Utica. The study found the primary fiscal benefits accruing from refugees stems from their participation in labor markets and real estate markets. Benefits are derived from sales and property taxes. refugees as a whole have improved Utica and everyone is grateful and welcoming.

Mohawk Valley

Refugee Center has resettled more than15,000

people to the city of Utica

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O NEI DA SQUARE PROJECT

one man’s trash is another man’s arT Coming together to transform not only the attitude, but the landscape on the most unlikely of canvases by Adam Afzali Oneida Square Public Art and Design is a social enterprise founded by Cornerstone Community and Plymouth Bethesda Churches with a mission to revitalize our city through creating art and providing jobs for people with significant barriers to employment. The Oneida Square Project creates art and combats neighborhood blight to help make downtown Utica safer and more beautiful just through partnering with existing agencies, creating their own initiatives and social enterprises, and incubating community based not for profits.

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Photograph taken by Adam Afzali

Oneida Square Located in the heart of Utica New York, Oneida Square has become one of the most memorable places on Genesee Street. In 2008, Mayor David Roefaro proposed a plan to replace the traffic signals in Oneida Square with a roundabout to encircle the monument. Nine designs for the monument were submitted to the committee in 1887, and among these excellent submissions was full play for choice and judgment. The design submitted by Karl Gerhardt of Hartford, Connecticut, an American sculptor, was agreed upon as the best and was accepted. The monument consists of a group of figures upon

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a graduated base, from the midst of which rises a short, solid pillar, forming the main shaft, which is caped by a dome and surmounted by a figure, representing the city of Utica. The base is octagonal in form. Three granite steps ascend to the monument proper. Here, a secondary base or pediment of three parts supports the structure. This pediment is raised in outline so as to give support to the bases four allegorical figures at the corners of the monument. These figures rise from the main pediment on separate short pillars of fluted granite with plain caps and are surmounted by bronze figures.


ONEI DA SQUARE

The figure fronting Genesee Street is that of a solider standing easily at “arms a-port” in an attitude calculated to receive a challenge or repel an attack. Opposite and facing west stands the image of a fearless Yankee. This figure is considered the best on the monument. Facing the south is the beautifully executed figure of Peace. Victory, dignified of mein and of graceful bearing, looks south towards the center of the city. The figures are each 6½ feet in height, and are in proportion to the whole monument, the heads reaching a point about the center of the shaft. The main shaft rising between the figures rests upon a round pediment of three parts. Upon the upper of these and on the pillar proper, is the statement: “One flag, one land. One heart, one hand. One nation, evermore.” The selection is from Oliver Wendall Holmes’ “Voyage of the Good Ship Union.” Below this is a bas relief frieze of bronze representing spirited figures of the departed volunteers. Above the inscription

is an ornate cornice. From this rises a dome, upon the front of which are carved in high relief and heraldic shield and coat of arms of the municipality of Utica. At the apex of the dome is the heroic figure representing the city of Utica. This figure is one of dignity and beauty. It represents a female figure, clothed in classic drapery, with bold and striking folds falling gracefully to her feet and partly looped in her girdle. Over her shoulders and falling from them is a cloak, which gives military semblance to the figure. In her left hand is a sword, held out by the scabbard. The right hand is raised and points significantly with open palm to southern battlefields. The head of the figure is surrounded by a mural band. On southern side of the monument is the dedication: “We keep in memory the men of Utica who risked their lives to save the Union.” On the reverse side reads, “from Sumter by land and sea Appomattox.” The structure as it stands today represents an outlay of $32,000.

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Mike Ballman Mike Ballman is the Pastor of both Cornerstone Community Church and Plymouth Bethesda Church and the founder and director of the Oneida Square Project. The initiative creates art and combats neighborhood blight to make downtown Utica safer and more beautiful.

Pastor Mike is a visionary, and when he first came to Utica he noticed it was not in the best shape. He wanted to create a social enterprise that would not only clean up the city, but bring it together. He took time to listen to the community and created the Oneida Square Project. With the help of Cathy Marsh, they created six mosaic trash cans. The cans mesmerized the community and always remind them to pick up their trash.

Cathy Marsh Cathy Marsh is a local artist in residence and the creative director of the Oneida Square Project. Cathy’s philosophy was that if the trash cans can get noticed, then the area will get noticed. Cathy is a firm believer in symbols so she started thinking of art forms that best fit Utica. She saw Utica as a beautifully broken city. She put two and two together and decided to make the trash cans into mosaics.

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ONEI DA SQUARE

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The Tram

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DRI NK UP

where it really swings The story of Utica’s Beer by Sage Lilly

If you’ve ever been to Utica New York, chances are that you’ve seen the signature “Utica Club” logo proudly displayed in neon across a bar window or high above the city atop the Matt Brewery. Though the pilsner is commonplace at social gatherings very few know the interesting history behind the beer and its home.

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UT I CA CL UB

I had the pleasure of sitting down with the brewery’s artistic director John Stewart, with the sole purpose of discussing beer. He informed me of the brewery’s colorful history, and enlightened me with some facts about Utica Club that aren’t exactly common knowledge. Since UC’s conception under Francis Xavier Matt almost 130 years ago, the malt beverage has seen countless highs and lows. Most famously during prohi-

bition in the 1920s the brand survived by selling soft drinks under the same label. After this minor setback and the end of prohibition Utica Club returned and immediately began marketing and selling their beer. Utica Club is actually recognized as the first beer to be sold after prohibition, selling their brew hours after the ban was lifted. As John explained “Before prohibition there were between 80 and 120 breweries

c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

just in Utica, but Utica Club is the survivor amongst these beers.” The company’s mascots Schultz and Dooley entertained countless television viewers in the ‘50s and ‘60s with their beer themed songs. In 1968 Utica Club underwent a marketing transformation and became a party beer. “Swings” as they called it featured Utica Club as a desirable nightclub which only served their beer and audiences loved it.

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DRI NK UP

Since the 1970s sales of Utica Club have declined, only to make a resurgence nation-wide in the mid 2000s with what can only be called the “retro beer movement” among millennials. Stewart stated, “I don’t think UC ever went away, it was just forgotten­—but today what’s old is new and there will always be a place for UC in the pantheon of great American beers. The Matt Brewing Company is currently within its fourth generation of family ownership under Nick and Fred Matt. They run the brewery and produce beer in the very same building that F.X. Matt did more than a century earlier. Who’s to say where the city of Utica would be today without its beer. John Stewart said it best; “Utica Club has been extremely significant to the footprint of Utica.” Growing with the city was not an easy task but John believes that he is helping to market Utica Club and the Brewery’s other products in

a modern way. At this time the Matt Brewing Company is still producing Utica Club beer along with many other beverages. In order to keep up with the craft beer and microbrewery movement the Matt’s flagship beer is actually their Saranac line, named after the popular Adirondack Region to the north. John explained the complex market that is craft beer in the United States to me. The phrase used was “cannibalization”. Microbreweries are pitted against large scale Brewers and The Matt Brewery is stuck somewhere in the middle. But with all of these new choices consumers are confused on what to buy, but John assured me that Saranac is a “top quality product” and “when consumers taste it they will understand.” Along with Saranac they also produce a number of craft sodas. But at the center of the brewery and the hearts of locals­—Utica Club still stands strong.

“Utica Club has been extremely significant to the footprint of Utica.”

LEFT: An Illustration of the famous copper kettles at the F.X. Matt Brewery on Varick Street. c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

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sT. volodymyr's the greaT ukrainian catholic church Giving Back to the Community One Pieróg at a Time by Kaitlyn Cammer If you’ve ever been down Genesee Street or to the Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art, odds are you’ve glimpsed a peek at the beautiful exterior of St. Volodymyr’s, one of Utica’s many churches. If you’ve gotten a closer look, you may have even seen the church’s small pierogies sign, a delicious dish that they are well known in the Utica area for. To give back to the community and raise money to fund the church, volunteers flock to St. Volodymyr’s to help prepare the pierogies and cabbage rolls every Friday during each spring and fall. Each October the preparation begins for the annual Ukrainian Festival, hosted by the church itself. For almost three weeks before the big day, approximately twenty-five volunteers gather in the Church’s auditorium to make over one thousand pierogies to sell at the festival. In addition to filling local Utican bellies with delicious food, the church also sets out to help Utica’s teenage community. The

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Church’s Parish has transformed the rectory into a sanctuary for wayward teens. Overall, the church aims to accept and

support everyone that comes through, whether they’re looking for a place to feel safe, or to enjoy a savory meal.


ST. VOL ODYMYR’S

A Celebration of Culture

From the second you walk through the doors of St. Volodymyr’s, an inviting aroma of delicious pierogies and cabbage wafts through the air. The upbeat sound of traditional Ukrainian music resonates throughout the cozy room of the rectory. There are friendly faces everywhere you look, most of them strangers, but all of them inviting and kind, as if you are dear friends who have known each other for years. This is the scene I walked into Saturday evening at Utica’s annual Ukrainian Festival. There I was, an out of place college kid walking into a culture I knew nothing about with not a familiar face in sight. I stuck out like a sore thumb amongst the other Ukrainian folk, but they welcomed me as if I was one of their own. This is the attitude that they have at St. Volodymyr’s. They are the embodiment of the religion that they practice, always offering their help and hospitality and never turning anyone away. As I sat there eating the delicious pierogies and cabbage that the hardworking volunteers had prepared, I couldn’t help but feel at home even though my actual home was over three hundred miles away.

Support the Church

If you wish to support the church, they sell pierogies every Friday at 4 Cottage Place, Utica, NY 13502. They ask that you call and order ahead of time at 315-269-3679. You can also come out and support the Ukrainian community and culture at the annual Ukrainian Festival every October. Type of Pierogies

Price by the Dozen

Potato

$6.00

Kraut

$7.00

Cheese

$8.00

Ukrainian dancers performing traditional dance at Ukrainian


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T RAVEL I NG

union station Dependable Travel, Utica Proud by Emma Doty Union Station is a train station served by Amtrak, Trailways, Greyhound, Utica Transit and the Adirondack Scenic Railroad in Utica, New York. The station was built between 1912 and May 1914, replacing an older structure dating from 1869. The building was designed by New York architects Allen H. Stem and Alfred Fellheimer. Union Station has long been recognized for the beauty of its design and particularly for the lavish use of marble on the interior. The station was built in the Italianate style and includes a rusticated granite first story with buff brick above. Symmetrically rectangular in plan, there are thirteen bays across the facade and fifteen on the side elevations. A brick parapet crowns the building and over the main entrance is a large clock flanked by eagle sculptures. Union Station was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Inside is a restaurant, the DMV, several county offices and a barber shop—one of the few barber shops in a train station today.

The 15,000 square foot waiting rooms and 47 foot high vaulted ceiling are supported by 34 foot marble columns. An old rumor is that the monolith marble columns came from the “old” Grand Central Terminal in New York City, but there is no evidence to support the story. Eight large benches in the waiting area are heated with steam pipes and vents for the waiting passengers. Union Station deteriorated badly after World War II and was threatened with demolition, but was restored in 1978-79 and is now owned by Oneida County. It is one of the last of the old central New York major stations still serving its original purpose. The station provides a living link between the past and the future. Union Station is a comfortable, reliable and a beautiful place to travel through.

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my story I remember when I first went to Union Station. I was a freshmen in college and it was my first week of school. It was my first time living away from home and being in New York. My friend and I decided to take the train into Penn Station to check out New York City. We walked early in the morning that Saturday from our school to the station. Utica was still very new to me. I remember walking into the building and being in awe of the beautiful architecture inside and all the bright lights. It was my first time ever at a real train station. The inside of the station was so beautiful and made me feel like I was about to have a brilliant adventure. Waiting for the train made me feel calm and nostalgic, it was a very whimsical and pleasant experience. I haven’t ridden the train since that day but it will always be a magical experience and memory in my mind. —Emma Doty

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UNI ON STAT I ON

Union Station Phone: (315) 507-1226 321 Main Street Utica, New York 13501 c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

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UNI ON STAT I ON

Interview questions: 1. What are you doing at the train station? 2. What do you like about the train station? 3. What in Utica makes you proud? My first interview was with a passenger waiting for the bus. She was sitting on the benches, her bus was yet to arrive. She was waiting for her bus to Albany. Her favorite part of the train station was how pretty the inside was. She was proud of her college. I interviewed two other passengers as well. One was a man who seemed to be stressed but still agreed to quickly answer my questions. He was there waiting for his train and liked the efficiency of the station. He wasn’t from Utica but enjoyed the food during his visit. The other passenger I interviewed was a lady with her son waiting for a train. She was waiting on a train to visit her family and liked the pretty interior of the station. She was proud of the family friendly environment.

After harassing the passengers I talked and interviewed two police officers at the station. They both were there for work. They liked the county station in the building and how pretty it was inside. One of them said they were proud of the city itself and how far it has come and the other said he was proud of the good Italian food. The last person I interviewed was the man who worked at the ticket booth. He was very kind and gave me a pamphlet at the end of the interview about the train station’s history. He was there for work and liked the nice atmosphere of the train station. He wasn’t from Utica but he drove an hour everyday for work because he loves the train station. That concludes my interviews!

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over a century of timeless cuts By: Romeo Herrera

“I feel like I have a great responsibility to keep this place open because when I got the barber shop it was about to close down for good and if I didn’t keep it open they would have probably turned it into a sandwich shop.” ­—Leo Gilman

haircuts to me

Getting a haircut has always been big part of my life. I remember as a child anytime I got my hair cut I would cry, now as an adult I can’t wait for my hair to grow out so that I can visit my local barber shop. I can’t think of another baber shop that I would go to in the city of Utica than Union Station Barber Shop. —Romeo Herrera

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B ARB ER SHOP

Union Station Barber Shop is Utica’s oldest barber shop, being founded in 1914. It is also one of the oldest barber shops in New York State having not been closed down even once throughout its 103 years of operation. For the last six years Leo Gilman has worked with his son Grant since taking ownership from barber Dan Creaco who retired after having the shop in his family for many years. Leo himself has 47 years experience of cutting hair under his belt and is from Sauquoit, NY. Leo

knows a lot about the barber shop’s history and feels that he has a great responsibility to keep the place open. He maintains a strong connection with his customers and considers each one them a friend. He attributes the success of the barber shop to the loyal customers who walk in to get their hair cut. Leo believes many people visit the shop because of the old school look and feel of this historic place, it is what captivates people in Utica to keep coming back for over a hundred years.

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Barber Leo Gilman prepares to cut the hair of a local customers.

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The proud past of

FORMER CITY HALL & BANK OF UTICA

genesee street We take a look back on old landmarks of downtown Utica and how the city came to be­. Although most of these buildings and businesses no longer

Utica’s former City Hall was located at the corner of Pearl and Genesee Street. Bank of Utica can be seen in the background.

exist—Utica still holds onto a rich and proud history. F.W. WOOLWORTH’S

by Mark Pei

Woolworth store in 1940 on the east side of Genesee Street between Bleecker and Elizabeth Streets.

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BEV’S

UTICA OBSERVER-DISPATCH

Bev’s remained at 239 Genesee Street until it moved to 178 Genesee Street to expand.

The Utica Observer-Dispatch, located on Oriskany Street, was sandwiched between two popular businesses that are now parking lots for the newspaper’s employees.

DAW’S DRUG

BOSTON STORE

Part of “Busy Corner” was Daw’s Drug located on the corner of Bleecker and Genesee Streets in downtown Utica.

Boston Store on Genesee Street was a major hub for business in downtown Utica.

*Photographs courtesy of the Oneida County Historical Society

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HI ST ORY

Genesee Street, the main street in Utica, New York, holds a great amount of history and legacies that records the beautiful memories of old Utica. It runs from old Deerfield Corners on the Mohawk Turnpike in present Utica, west to beyond New Hartford, six miles long in total distance. Many of Utica’s finest business buildings and residences lie on Genesee Street. From Baggs Square to beyond Hopper Street, Genesee Street is a business street, traversing the heart of the business section, which is rapidly encroaching on the Genesee Street residential section, southwest. Genesee Street includes government buildings, businesses, restaurants, shopping centers, and churches to accommodate all aspects of people’s living needs.

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It was known as one of America’s most beautiful avenues. Woolworth, Grant, Bev’s, Daw’s Drugs were all located on this street. From the historic Stanley Theater to the world class Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art, Genesee Street is rich with arts and culture. It brought much popularity in earlier years and today features traveling Broadway productions, concerts and local events.


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questions Interview with local historian Frank Tomaino

Q: How long you have lived in Utica? Frank Tomaino: I am a native of Utica and have lived here all my life, excluding 4 years in the Air Force from 195155 during the Korean War. I’m 85 years old. Q: Looking back, which place on Genesee Street do you remember the most? Frank Tomaino: That’s an easy one. The place I remember the most is the old City Hall that was located on Genesee Street on the site of today’s Radisson Hotel. It was designed by the famed architect Richard Upjohn and built in the early 1850s. It was a beautiful yellow-brick building with a tall tower topped by a four-faced clock with Roman numerals. In its early years, a large third-floor hall was used for operas and other shows. By the late 1960s, it needed repairs so it was decided in 1968 to tear it down.

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Q: As an historian, what’s your thoughts on Genesee Street in history?

Q: What’s the biggest change of Observer-Dispatch in the past fifty years?

Frank Tomaino: The history of Utica dates back to the 1780s and so does Genesee Street – Genesee is the Native American word for “beautiful valley.” The street is rich in history and before shopping malls appeared on the scene, downtown Utica and Genesee Street were the business, professional, and entertainment center of the entire region. The biggest department stores in Central New York were located there—such as the Boston Store, J.B. Wells and Son, Frazer’s, Roberts. For decades, every major parade or celebration took place on Genesee Street. The vice president of the United States – James Schoolcraft Sherman, vice president from 19091912 – lived on Genesee Street.

Frank Tomaino: Another easy one. The biggest change at the Observer-Dispatch occurred in 1977 when the newspaper got its first computers. Out the window went our typewriters and so did, in my opinion, the glamour of newspapering. The O-D newsroom smelled and sounded different before 1977. The aroma of printer’s ink could be smelled years ago. So did the smell of – ugh! – smoke (for just about everyone in the newsroom smoked). Gone were the click-clack of typewriters and the shouts of editors and reporters yelling out, “Copy! Copy!” Copy boys and girls were there to move copy from one desk to another and to printers in the composing room. Today, of course, it’s all done electronically.


HI ST ORY

Q: What’s the biggest development do you think happened in downtown Utica in past hundred years? Frank Tomaino: The biggest developments in the last 100 years? Wow! That’s a tough one. I would say the construction of the State Office Building in the 1970s. Its 16 stories makes it the tallest building in Utica. I also would include the renaissance taking place now – the renovation of the Hotel Utica and the construction of so many loft apartments in downtown Utica. And, of course, the great work being done at the Stanley Arts Center. Q: Any fun facts about Observer-Dispatch or Utica generally?

worked for papers in New York City. He reported to work his first day with no tie. When I told him that he had to have a tie, he replied: “You mean I’ll be a better reporter with a piece of string tied around my neck?” Q: How does Observer-Dispatch make Utica proud? Frank Tomaino: Utica should be proud of the fact that it is one of the few communities in the country that has a newspaper that has published for 200 years continuously.

I lived in Utica for 75 years. I consider myself a Utican and am proud of it

Frank To m a i n o : Fun facts? I wrote a book several years ago about Utica in the 19th century and called it, “History Just For the Fun of It.” For me, reading about and researching history is fun because there are so many interesting stories. For example, in the early 20th century, the mayor of Utica – Charles Talcott – was a classmate of President Woodrow Wilson at Princeton and often was invited to the White House. How about the fact that many of the early mayors of Utica were graduates of Yale? O-D fun facts? Male reporters and editors were required to wear shirts and ties. I was city editor when we had just hired a hot-shot reporter who had

Q: What about Utica makes you proud? Frank Tomaino: I now live in Clinton, but am in Utica every day. I lived in Utica for 75 years. I consider myself a Utican and am proud of it. I am proud of the great men and women who are part of our history – for example, Horatio Seymour, Roscoe Conkling, James Schoolcraft Sherman and Helen Munson Williams (whose fortune helped to establish Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica’s magnificent park system and so many other things. If anyone deserves a statue, it’s Helen Munson Williams). I am proud of a city whose citizens are so generous. For decades, they have supported charitable causes. I am also proud of what a great event the Boilermaker Road Race has become.

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B UL K UP

body alive Cutting the Excuses and Cutting the Pounds by Matthew Dempster

Body Alive is a fantastic gym for pros and beginners alike. They are well equipped with free weights and almost every machine you can think of. It is also staffed with helpful employees that want only to help every person that walks through their door to better themselves and reach personal goals. The community found inside Body Alive embodies Utica in every way possible. At first glance it may appear to be a dark forgotten dungeon, filled with metal, rubber, and fabric that would normally have no use—but is actually so much more. It is full of beautiful people, who while are complete strangers, share a common goal and respect for one another as they attempt to reach that goal.

From new comers to the professionals ( like the now Mr. Universe — Melvin Ortiz) there is no judgment or air of superiority that one may find in other gyms. These self proclaimed “gymrats” will show you how these simple heavy bars can teach you a work ethic and gain true a self confidence that is lacking in so many people today. Joining Body Alive is like joining a family. Just like the people of Utica look out for their neighbors, the members of Body Alive look out for each other. From the kids in the park standing up to the bullies to the local cooks who give food to the less fortunate for no charge. It’s all love, tough love­—but love none the less.

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a church like no other St. Joseph and St. Patrick Church by Nicole Abrokwa Located on 702 Columbia Street sits an unassuming Catholic Church, but just like any Catholic Church it’s the interior that sweeps you off your feet. This year will mark 176 years that the church has been open­—but it’s not just it’s history that makes this church special. Founded in 1841, St. Joseph and St. Patrick Church is the oldest diocese in the area. Construction started in 1871 and the church was completed by 1882. Originally known as only St. Joseph the church merged with the neighboring St. Patrick church in 1966. During my visit to St. Joseph and St. Patrick Church I had the pleasure of interviewing Ms. Ellen Benton who informed me of the rich history of this parish. Although Ms. Benton holds the title of Evangelization Director she is what I consider a jack of all trades. You name it, she does it, whether it is helping with baptisms or leading this year’s Catholic Women’s Conference. Utica has the unique honor not many cities can boast about a saint walked its streets—St. Marianne Cope to be specific. Marianne Cope originally born in Germany, moved with her family to Utica, New York. During her stay she attended mass at the one and only St. Joseph and St. Patrick Church. At the age of 15, Barbara Koop, as she was known at that time, felt the call to vocation, but it was not until she was 24, with her mother’s blessing that she left to Syracuse to enter the Sisters of St. Francis.

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B L ESS UP

“We are Eucharistic Apostles of the Divine Mercy of Saint Marianne Cope” At the young age of 39 she became Mother Superior of the order and was instrumental in the founding of two hospitals. In 1883, Mother Marianne as she was known then, left to Hawaii to treat those suffering from leprosy. She looked after those in need until the burden put her in a wheel chair, yet still she continued to help and miraculously never contracted leprosy. She passed away of natural causes on August 9, 1918 and on October 21, 2011 was canonized as a saint. In order to be canonized you must be responsible of two miracles. St. Marianne has had more than two. Ms. Benton shared her own miracle with me “ I fell... in 2013 I missed the bottom step and I landed on my wrists and my knees. As we got closer to the anniversary of her first canonization, I couldn’t wring a dishcloth or open a door knob or dry my hair without pain. I prayed to her please heal my wrists so that I can work for you and I woke up on Monday morning October 21, 2013 with no pain. With a track record like that it’s no wonder why the church is dedicated to honoring St. Marianne Cope in every way. Today there is a soup kitchen named after her with their mission statement being “She crossed the ocean to care for those in need. Will you cross the street to do the same?” Whether you are religious or not St. Joseph and St. Patrick is not only a beautiful church, it is home to beautiful people with kind hearts ready to serve those in need. It is a special church and is definitely a reason to be proud—Utica Proud.

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L I ST EN UP

sounds of utica A Look Inside the Musical Community of Utica, New York by Josh Mahoski Every weekend, while in Utica you can always hear live music going on. Whether it’s from one of the many events around the area such as a concert at MWPAI, the Levitt AMP Concert Series or open mic night, music can always be heard. As a musician myself, I decided to take a look into the making of the music. I had the pleasure of sitting down with the owner of the Tramontane Cafe, Garrett Ingraham. He hosts the open mic night there every Sunday, and it always attracts a large crowd of artists, musicians, poets, and comedians from all over Utica and the surrounding area. According to Garrett, he wanted to “create a community, a

place for musicians, artists, and people who just want to get together,” and given the turn out of every event hosted by the Tram he has done just that. The Tram has become a safe place for artists to share their creativity and experiment with new material. This is why the Tram does not serve alcohol, Garrett wanted the Tram to be a “good place to meet where alcohol doesn’t play the main focus.” Garret has certainly succeeded in creating such an environment where everyone is welcome, originality is applauded, and inspiration is all around.

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FOREST HI L L CEMET ERY

forest hill cemetery History Rests Here by Kate Besenty

Forest Hill was founded in 1848, by a group of locals to provide a need for the growing city of the day. The old cemetery was already over crowded and the city needed a newer place. A meeting was held and it was decided that Forest Hill would become the new cemetery. The grounds were designed with an artistic sense by Almeron Hotchkiss. Another project was to obtain and safely transfer the scared stone of the Oneida Nation. The Oneida Nation was named after this stone, as “Oneida” means “keeper of the stone.” In June of 1950, an official opening ceremony was held and it became an important step in the life of a small and growing city. Many important American figures are buried here; several congressmen, civil war soldiers, and James Schoolcraft Sherman, Vice President to President Taft.

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fly mohawk

The Specialist Airline aimed to remain progressive during a time of great changes. By Sidney Namey A huge part of Utica’s rich history is a small passenger airline established in the mid 1940s and based in Oneida County Airport. Mohawk Airlines, a progressive brand, penned the tag line “the specialist airline” in the 1960s referring to the quickly evolving values of the company and the changes it was going through at the time. Although it started in the 40s, Mohawk really got its wheels off the ground in the 60s as it gained business and popularity among travelers. It was a new type of airline somewhere in between regional and national, or as Farquhar and Company stated, it was, “neither fish nor fowl.” In the mid-1960s, Mohawk was the first

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airline on the East Coast to start using jets that flew at higher speeds and altitudes than the older technology. One of Mohawk’s previous PR directors Bob Schulman stated that early on, “painting Mohawk as a modern jet airline was no easy task since few people had ever heard of Mohawk outside of its service area, nor had most of the country’s travel agents, who at the time booked some 60 percent of airline revenues.” When air travel first emerged, just the new experience of flying in an airplane was enough to sell tickets, but when it became more commonplace, the company realized it needed to market air travel to both its loyal and potential customers.


T HE SPECI AL I ST AI RL I NE

Top left: Mohawk’s Gas Light Service is perhaps its most memorable campaign that entailed ostentatious and luxurious plane interiors and costumes inspired by the 1890s.

Top right: Telepak communications allowed the company to have 24 hour phone service, so that bookings could be made any hour of the day.

Above: Mohawk distributed merchandise to its loyal and valued customers, such as a leather bag and letter opener.

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Strong gender roles were perpetuated in the airline industry during Mohawk’s time. When stewardesses first became employed, their purpose was to help alleviate the discomfort of pressurized flight and distract male passengers by giving them something to look at. During the 1950s, stewardesses were considered motherly figures, serving meals to and taking care of passengers. In the airline industry, there was a distinct difference between work for women and work for men. Women would be given secretary or stewardess positions, while men were hired as pilots and mechanics. The criteria to become a stewardess was extremely selective. A flight attendant had to be female, attractive, between 21 and 26 years of age, between 5’2” and 5’6”, white, 56

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and single. When a working woman wanted to marry, she would be out of her job because airlines did not employ married women. Fed up, stewardesses went on strike in 1960, demanding Mohawk increase their salaries. The airline shut down for two weeks, as the pilots supported the strike. By 1966, a number of airlines, including Mohawk, were accused of sexualizing and discriminating against their stewardesses. While airlines claimed they were only creating more jobs for women where there previously weren’t many, women insisted that the strict terms they had to abide by had no relation to the job at hand. Their uniforms changed to ostentatious costumes at one point through the popular and now memorable “Gas Light Service.”


T HE SPECI AL I ST AI RL I NE

People of color struggled for equality in the workplace during the 1950s and 60s. In the airline industry, African Americans were rarely hired, and when they were, they would be given positions on the ground, while pilots and flight attendants were mostly white. However, in 1958, the first black flight attendant was hired by Mohawk Airlines. Ruth Carol Taylor, an equal rights activist and author of “The Little Black Book,” filed a discrimination complaint against Trans World Airlines and was hired by Mohawk shortly after.

Above: Stewardesses served beer and lit cigars while dressed to the nines in Victorian inspired garb during Mohawk’s Gas Light Service campaign. Right: Ruth Carol-Taylor was the first African American flight attendant, hired by Mohawk Airlines.

Photographs courtesy of Oneida History Center

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T HE SPECI AL I ST AI RL I NE

After facing economic decline in 1965, Mohawk started in-flight service campaigns to compete with other airlines. The Utica Club flight was one of Mohawk’s cherished variety flights. The experience included Utica Club beer and snacks served by flight attendants to create an overall “psychedelic atmosphere.” “Gaslight Service” was one of the most popular variety flight options. On these male-exclusive flights, the interiors of the planes were decorated with velvet curtains, carriage lamps, and lavish prints reminiscent of the 1890s. Five cent cigars, free beer, and light snacks were served by stewardesses in sequined and feathered costumes. When asked what people will remember about the airline, Bob Schulman said

that, “people still talk about Mohawk’s Gas Light Flights.” Although memorable and at times ground-breaking, Mohawk’s success was short lived. Each and every department, from pilots to mechanics, went on strike during the 1960s, costing the company loads of money. Poor winter weather also played a strong role in Mohawk’s decline, as heavy snow often grounded flights at small airports with little supplies. Eventually, the company was unable to stay afloat financially and merged with Allegheny Airlines, which later evolved into American Airlines. Thus, Mohawk’s reign came to a bitter end. In the wise and honest words of previous PR Director Bob Schulman, “Mohawk was a scrappy little airline.”

“People still talk about Mohawk’s Gas Light Flights.”

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PHILIP JOHNSON

museum of art by Zhong Baoxian Focusing on the historical Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art, I am going to concentrate on three parts, the history of the building which was designed by Philip Johnson (1906-2005), the art collection, and the Institution’s education program followed by an interview with April Oswald. She is the Education Director of Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum. We had a great conversation. Architect Philip Johnson

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MUNSON- WI L L I AMS- PROCT OR ART S I NST I T UT E

Interior view from south side of upper level

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“What we do is all about interpreting the museum collections and exhibitions” ­—April Oswald

The museum education is different from what is typically considered as class room education. We offer programs that help museum visitors learn more about the museum art collection and exhibitions. We lead exhibition tours for school children and for adult groups. Our focus is on the objects in the exhibitions. This is considered interpretation, somewhat like language interpretation, but we are interpreting the museum collections and exhibitions. The museum hosts fascinating art collections, special exhibitions and education programs for all ages. The historic Fountain Elms, an 1850 Italianate mansion for showing art collections opened to public in 1936. The new International-style museum designed by Philip Johnson opened in 1960. The Museum collection includes approximately 15,000 works of art, the core of which is 19th century through contemporary American fine art and 19th century American decorative art.

Interior view of lower level of Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art.

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fountain elms

A splash from the past

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History of Fountain Elms by Junheng Chen The Fountain Elms building stands on the west side of Genesee Street in Utica, New York. It is surrounded by huge trees and magnificent buildings such as Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art and Utica Public Library. The outer wall of the Fountain Elms building still remains

in a clear charming shallow yellow color after 167 years. The clean outer walls and tidy bricks show that the building is protected very carefully. As I enter the building, the history of the Munson-Williams-Proctor family appears in front of my eyes.

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ART S AND HI ST ORY

Photo: Yulun Eric Wu

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Fountain Elms is a large house where the Munson-Williams couple and their daughters lived. As I enter through the front door, the history of the family appears in front of my eyes. The ground level includes meeting rooms and a dining room. Now there is the place to display the furniture the Munson-Williams family left. Behind these rooms is a big hall which was a kitchen. Today this is a reception area. Five portraits of the Munson-Williams family are displayed here. At the back of the kitchen was the

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room for servants. Currently it is the office for all of the staff. The second floor is now displaying the Munson-Williams family’s collections. When they were alive, it was the place for them to sleep and relax. They have a huge collection of watches from all over the world, ceramics, and paintings. In the past there was more than one building at Fountain Elms. After the daughters grew up, they lived in their own houses near the original Fountain Elms building.


ART S & HI ST ORY

Portrait of Frederick Proctor. He is the husband of Rachel Munson Williams Proctor.

Portrait of Rachel Munson Williams Proctor. Rachel is the daughter of Helen Munson Williams and James Watson Williams.

Review the life of the Munson family through their former home In 1846 Helen Munson married in Utica, she and her husband NY lawyer James Watson Williams built their home named Fountain Elms. It was a lovely beautiful building with a fountain. They raised their two adorable daughters Rachel and Maria in this bright and spacious house. In 1876, James died. Helen and her daughters began a household project that lasted for several years to help them move on from the sadness of losing a family member. They enlarged

the house and purchased some gorgeous and elegant furniture. After the marriage of Rachel to her husband Frederick Proctor in 1894, they acquired artwork that was of their aesthetic. Neither of the Williams-Proctor couples had surviving children. Following the death of Maria who was the last living member of the Munson family in 1935, and the opening of the Institute in 1936, Fountain Elms began service as the museum of the Institute.

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Through the curtain of the veranda on the second floor is a view of the Museum of Art.

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Looking through the French sash of the veranda on the second floor, we can see the Munson-Williams-Proctor Art Museum. The museum was built in 1919. To build the museum, the director of the Institute chose to demolish some of the existing buildings, including the family home and some of the Fountain Elms buildings. So we can’t see the house where the daughters lived.


I NT ERVI EW

Walk to the front of the museum and enter as Philip Johnson intended, through the front door. Immediately you are in the middle of a light filled atrium with a grand staircase and travertine floors. Galleries are around the perimeter and you can walk up to the second floor where several more galleries open to the atrium. The art and the building are stunning. There is also art on the lower level around the auditorium. Be sure to notice the incredible terrazzo in the side stairwells in perfect condition. Joe Kokoszki is one of the staff at the Fountain Elms Building. He has been working here for three and a half years. Before he was hired as a guard of Fountain Elms, he was working for the air-force, casino, and even student loans. He is enthusiastic about all of the artworks in the Fountain Elms. As he says, “The artworks here are gorgeous, I love almost

all of them.” The Fountain Elms building is a special place for him in Utica. It is like a big gift God offers to the city and it attracts a great number of visitors to Utica every year. When I asked him to choose a room he is most interested in, without thinking, he chose the room displaying the family watches. Every time he walks in this room, it brings a huge sense of joy and happiness to him. He also loves the structure of the building. He read the book about why the architect designed the building in the way it is presented to us now. He loves this building and knows it like the back of his hand. He says, “it is a great pleasure to work at Fountain Elms. Sunlight comes in through the French sash of the veranda and brings warmth even in the winter. The museum itself is large granite box on the outside, but a light filled modern art world on the inside.”

“The museum itself is a large granite box on the outside, but a light filled modern art world on the inside.”

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The last thing I noticed was the original fountain. It is located in the hallway which connects the Fountain Elms building with the Munson-Williams-Proctor Museum of Art.

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Original fountain from Fountain Elms


ACR Health has nine locations in New York State

acr health Opening doors to create a healthy community By Bethany Dunn ACR Health is a non-profit organization offering services to create healthier communities. Their name stands for AIDS Community Resources as they remain large contributors to AIDS awareness and prevention education. For 33 years this organization continues to promote volunteers from the community to help spread their knowledge, educate, and provide support in nine areas located throughout New York state. Many

of their services revolve around prevention and support to people with chronic diseases like HIV/AIDS and mental illnesses. Also, they empower individuals of all ages with community groups like the Q Center, which gives a safe space for people in the LGBTQ community to come and meet. Additionally, Safety First, is peer-based out reach program that provides HIV/AIDS and STDs by offering resources in local neighborhoods.

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SERVI CES

The Safety First Syringe Exchange program (SEP) provides safe injection supplies and disposal units. The goal for this program is to help injection drug users safely do injections to reduce risks of HIV and viral hepatitis. Additionally, clients are educated on the dangers of syringe sharing. Safety First offers traveling mobile units, volunteer peers, and SEP staff as three methods clients can utilize to obtain supplies. ACR Health also helps clients fill out information for the identification card that allows them to carry the syringes. The AIDS Institute of the New York State Department of Health has researched the benefits of this program and has found that the twenty-five syringe exchange programs have been responsible for HIV rate declines between 50% - 75%.

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ACR HEALT H

ACR Health focuses on engaging with the community as many people involved come as volunteers. Furthermore, to spread word of their services they hold many public events that raise money for the organization to provide awareness for health related causes. The largest events they hold are the three yearly walks/runs that happen throughout New York State. The AIDS H i k e F o r L if e is a local walk/run event that has been growing for the past 19 years. This event funded the youth programs, including the Adolescent Health Initiative and Q Center. Hamilton College located in the Mohawk Valley/Utica area provides beautiful walking trails for this 5K walk/run. The Q center located on Genesee Street successfully raised the most money for the AIDS Walk/Run. That earned them the Hike For Life trophy proudly displayed in their center. In April 2017 I participated in this event as a team member for the Q Center. With this being my first experience of ever meeting people from the center, and attending this event I can say that their community is incredibly welcoming and a joy to be apart of. Ever since this event I have been motivated to be a re-appearing member of the center by attending a few of their meetings and holiday parties when I can go. I have also already told everyone at the center that I will return to Hamilton college for

Other events include Dining Out For Life, an event supporting local businesses in the Mohawk Valley area while also funding agencies that serve people with HIV/AIDS donate as a portion of the restaurants’ proceeds go to ACR Health. During the fall masses congregate to local restaurants such as Bite Bakery & Cafe, and Tiny’s Grill to contribute and support ACR Health. Going to Bite myself on the day of this event I saw many of the sign-up sheets for their resources were filled out. The tip jar for extra donations was full. I myself purchased food from the bakery and contributed ten dollars of my own money.

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utica public library by Ashley Liu

T he

origins of the utica library

began in the year 1825, when a private subscription library opened its doors at the Broad Street offices of Attorney Justus Rathbone. Over the years, the library underwent several relocations throughout the city while steadily expanding its now extensive collection. The current location, located on the ever-so-busy Genesee Street, has been in operation since 1903 and boasts an impressive five stories worth of books for local residents and visitors alike to enjoy. As a city of the infamous Rust Belt, Utica still holds many relics of its once prosperous past. This is mainly shown in the architecture, especially in those of public buildings.

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The Utica Public Library is one of those buildings. The grandiose architecture, large, well-furnished interior, and vast collection of books is truly a treasure of the city, and the services hosted within this library allows many citizens have access to free resources such as computers and community activities. There are personalized programs and activities for children, teens, adults, and seniors, marking the library as a place for every Utican to enjoy to the fullest. Whether you visit for information, a quiet place to study, or socialization, the library is a vertebrae of the city’s extensive backbone and brings the community of citizens together as a whole.


READ UP

B O OK C L U BS Book Clubs are a way for literature lovers to enjoy and discuss a variety of books within a passionate and accepting community. The Utica Public Library Book Group meets on the first Tuesday of every month in the Music Room at 11:00 AM. Email sbillman@uticapubliclibrary.org for more information. The Next Chapter Book Club is a book club for adolescents and adults with intellectual disabilities established by the Nisonger Center of Ohio State University in 2002. The local affiliate is a partnership between the Utica Public Library and area disability organizations. Members meet weekly for one hour to read and discuss a book of their choosing. Email hmcmanus@uticapubliclibrary.org for more information. Cafe Chats is a Utica Public Library book club that meets in local cafes on the last Wednesday of every month at 6:00 pm. This book group is geared towards millennials, but all are welcome to join. Email sschultz@uticapubliclibrary.org for more information.

C O M PU T E R CL A S S E S Computer classes are offered throughout the year in our Computer Training Room. Sign up through the website, the library information desk, or by calling 315-735-2279 ext. 20 Computer Fundamentals is a class is designed for beginners who want to understand the basics of operating a personal computer. The library computers run on Windows 7 operating system. Students will learn computer terminology, how to use a mouse, create documents, manage files, and search the Internet. Keyboarding teaches basic typing skills. Those in the class can work at their own pace through easy-to-follow exercises and fun games. Drop-In Lab is hosted every Wednesday from 2-4pm. Anyone with questions about anything technology related can drop into the computer lab for help. Intro to Microsoft Word 2010 is a two day class will cover common tasks to create word processing documents including formatting text, modifying page layout, and line spacing.

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proud to be made in utica Meet a group of Uticans passionate about putting Utica back on the map. by Jamie Yngcong & Cayarah Pyle As college students who are not from Utica and don’t know much about the area or the people, we were met with the challenge of trying to figure what it truly meant to be “Utica Proud.” When we first arrived in Utica in the fall of 2016, we barely knew anything about this city; we didn’t know where to hang out, where to eat, we barely knew where Utica was on the map. We would have been the worst candidates to ask what it exactly it is that people can be or are proud about in Utica. But that was all

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before we discovered Made In Utica,an organization that puts all of the great local businesses and events that Utica has to offer into one hub of information. This group led us to discover cool local spots to dine and hang, eventually helping us become more comfortable and find something to be proud about in Utica. The team behind Made in Utica really solidifies what it means to be Utica Proud because of their great efforts in reviving Utica and bringing the city back to its best potential.


MADE I N UT I CA

Q & A with cofounder; Mark Simon Q: W HAT INS PIRED Y OU TO START MADE IN UTICA? A: Made in Utica was star ted by a group of four friends who originally wanted to create a website to promote local businesses and organizations where people from out of state, or college students would have a central place to lear n about the dif ferent amenities that Utica has to of fer. We wanted people who did not know about Utica to lear n more about the city and want to stay here.

Unfor tunately, many business cannot af ford to promote themselves and that is where we step in and become a pillar for the community by bridging this gap between local business owners and consumers. Made In Utica has been running for about four years and it is an essential par t of the Utica community and out of all these years it has remained a non-profit organization. Any money that is raised or made doesn’t stay in the pockets of any members of the team.

Meet the team! (from left to right): Justin Parkinson (Co-founder and technical engineer), Erin Higgins (Team Member) Mark Simon (Co-founder, public relations, sales and photography), Jillian Ducato(Graphic designer), Tom Knudsen(Videographer), Katie Reilly (Event planner, coordinator), Sam Famolaro (producer and showrunner for the Uticast, the partner podcast), not in photo; Kevin Sullivan (Co-founder, co-host on Uticast), and Zach Wilson (Co-founder, merchandise embassador)

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Q: HO W HAVE YOUR GOA LS CHANG ED SINCE YOU STARTE D THE ORGAN IZATION? A: Our original idea was to just create a simple director y to help others out and to make some extra money on the side. By doing the work that we were doing, we were helping to suppor t and grow the local businesses. We helped these businesses flourish because of our promotional tendencies. For example, during the summer we have our Annual Franklin Square Film Series where we par tnered with Bite Baker y and Nomad Cinema and projected free movies Down town. Through our ef for t s we have found that not only are we able to help local businesses, but we ourselves can also create events for the community to become more involved in. 77


MADE I N UT I CA

Q: WHAT D OES MADE IN UTICA HAVE PL ANNED? We want to continue doing what we have been doing, one of our most popular things that we have created is the Utica Passpor t. Which is essentially to help both local business owners and consumers because it helps consumers retrieve exclusive discounts and deals while promoting dif ferent restaurants or businesses here in Utica. Moving for ward, we are looking at creating a lot of original and new content, especially digital content. We focus a lot on tr ying to positively impact the younger community, and building back that community pride that we all have. We want to instill the community pride in our younger generation so that when we are much older we can pass the torch onto them.

Q: D O YOU THINK THAT MAD E IN UTICA HAS CHA NG ED OTHER’ S VIEWP OINT ON THE CIT Y? A: I think when the change happened, it was a strong community ef for t. Ever yone who kept their faith throughout tough circumstances were those who helped create this shift in the minds of others. We star ted Made In Utica at a time where, the positivity was retur ning to the city. We have contributed to this positive outburst of growth in the city and keeping things local by the things that we have created or promoted for our city.

“U t i c a i s a p l a c e

t h at y o u c o m e f ro m an yw h e re i n t h e

w or l d , a n y s o c i o e c o n o m i c b a c k gro u n d

an d s t i l l b e s o m e o n e h e re . ”

Q: WHAT DO Y OU SEE F OR THE F UTURE OF UTICA? A: I personally think that we are looking at a Renaissance. We are looking at a point where the old Utica is coming back. There is so much growth in Utica,all the new restaurants, hotels, and the AUD is all building up for the Renaissance. Big things are going to happen in Utica and eventually we will get to a point where Utica is a big city. I see Utica coming back on the map as a destination. One thing that I know about any place, once it goes down you can only go up. I know that we went down so far and so hard that it will truly pick up and become stronger from this digression.

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Q: W HAT MAK ES Y OU PROUD TO B E A UTICA N? A: I am proud to be a Utican because Utica is a place that you come from anywhere in the world, any socioeconomic background and still be someone here. You can find something that you are passionate about and make it happen. For example, our refugee community is so large and people come here and lear n to be comfor table in the United States and Utica is a big par t of that. It is the city of oppor tunity, but coming here changed my life. Of course, I could’ve made my life anywhere but Utica made it possible. Here I feel like a big fish in a small pond, whereas in a large city like NYC I would be such a tiny fish in a gigantic ocean. Utica is the prime place for oppor tunity and where young people can grow and become successful. I thank Utica for my success, because just the positive mentality alone, makes me proud to live here and to be a Utican.


varick street The Place for Nightlife by Hallie Kim Known for it’s night life, the brewery district of Utica hosts many local events and entertainment. The combination of old buildings, local folks, and young new people from area colleges always make the street hip. As a lover of adult beverages, I tried to find and experience new

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bars and pubs when I moved to Utica. As a result, I found that the places on Varick Street are the ones that gave me the best memories. I couldn’t help myself from loving Varick Street more and more with every visit. Among those lovely places, I want to share some of my favorite spots.

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HI ST ORY

from the Utica Saturday, July 28, 1900

Varick Street was named by Abraham Varick, who settled in Utica in 1804. He was an agent of the Holland Land Company, a real estate dealer and a factory manger. Prior to 1888 Varick Street was known as a business center. After the appearance of the brewery, Varick Street was referred to the brewery district of Utica. In Utica, you can’t forget to talk about this beer: Utica Club of Saranac Brewery. This particular one is my favorite at the moment. If you

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have it with pizza or fried chicken, you will experience heaven! Saranac Brewery is one of Matt Brewing Company’s most popular lines. Matt Brewing Company is one of the oldest family-owned breweries in the United States. The history of this business goes back as long ago as the late 1800s. To explore more about this interesting brewery, I interviewed Dominick, the tour guide of Matt Brewery and he answered several questions.


I NT ERVI EW

[Q] What’s your personal favorite beer from the brewery? And which beer would you recommend to first timers? [A] My favorite beer is Utica Club. For the first timer, I would say, either Adirondack Lager or the Utica Club. Adirondack is the most tame of the Saranac ones. [Q] Where did you get the inspiration for your brews? [A] So, I don’t make the beer, but I can tell you where they get the inspiration from. They go all around the country, all different breweries, and try all sorts of different beers, to mix and mingle together. We actually have one guy, who does more ex-

perimental stuff in the micro brewery and whatever he thinks is going to be a good beer, he will just make. He made the coffee lager and he made it better than anybody else. [Q] Have you ever tried brewing something you thought for sure would work and it didn’t, or vice-versa? [A] There has been some stuff, obviously, that has gone bad and didn’t work here. People didn’t hear about it because they don’t get released. So that guy, Scott, who made the coffee lager, made something that didn’t work, so that we had to throw it out. Entrance of 1888 Tavern form the Matt Brewery Store

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View from Nail Creek Pub & Brewery

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I NT ERVI EW

[Q] Is there a reason for Utica Club’s nickname (Uncle Charlie)? [A] I think it just comes, just because it’s funny. There’s no real character called Uncle Charlie, like Uncle Sam. [Q] How did the brand have to adapt in the face of the 2008 fire? [A] Back in 2008 we had the fire. What happened was, one of our building burned down. Actually, we thought it was going to be a lot worse, damage-wise, but it turned out to be not so bad. We didn’t lose much in terms of money. It could have been a lot worse, I’m very grateful that it wasn’t. [Q] How does being based in Utica shape your philosophy on beer? [A] Utica makes the best beer, so I already

know that we are going to have the best beer on the planet. [Q] What are some of your favorite local bands? [A] Sir Cadian Rhythm. Actually I think they are from Long Island, but they play up here all the time, so they’re local, I guess. And my friend is in the band called Blue Cherry, so... [Q] What about Utica makes you proud? [A] Diversity. I went to Proctor High School, so the fact that Proctor High School was a ground for every single culture, almost entire planet, it shaped me around as a better person. So that’s the best part of the Utica, absolutely, the refugees and acceptance.

Pictures from Matt Brewery Company

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“Sit back, chow down and raise a glass with your friends!”­­­ —Stief

One thing unique about Varick Street is, each one of the bars has their own atmosphere and style. Now I’m going to introduce you to some of the bars on Varick that captured my heart.

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VARI CK ST.

Nail Creek Pub & Brewery First one would be Nail Creek Pub and Brewery, which opened relatively recent. Sitting right behind the Matt Brewing Company, Nail Creek always provides fresh and full-flavored beers. Bartenders who are working here are super friendly and kind, so there’s no problem going to the bar alone because they will be your best friend. Also, if you aren’t familiar with their drink menu, just ask! The bartenders won’t disappoint you with recommendations and their great store of knowledge. This place is also perfect for a quick lunch and the locals love to have brunch here.

Photos and Illustrations by Hallie Kim


Mohawk Valley Winery Located right next to the Nail Creek Pub, the Mohawk Valley Winery has a nice balcony where you can enjoy the sunshine, the breeze, and a glass of wine. They provide events such as Bottle Light Paint, and Wine & Chocolate Weekend, which would be a good time for your friends or date. If you are a party lover and both of these places sound “too cozy” try visiting Lukins Brick Oven on weekends. With live music, you will find new friends very easily here. Don’t forget to try Char Broiled Wings, also. If you go on-line and search, you will see a lot of people recommended this dish­—not just me. Besides these three places, Varick Street is full of joy. Mohawk Valley Winery describes Varick like this: “Varick Street is home of Mohawk Valley Winery, Saranac Brewery, Adirondack Distilling Company. This Unique neighborhood of crafted wine, brews and spirits is the inspiration for Varick’s diverse urban culture and celebrated nightlife.” Unique and diverse, Varick Street is definitely the heart of Utica’s nightlife scene. Last, I want to close this article with the statement from Stief, another attractive place. “Sit back, chow down and raise a glass with your friends!”

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Mohawk Valley Winery

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Munn’s Castle Roscoe-Conkling House

historic rutger mansions A PARK STUCK IN TIME The History by Marcela Monko The city of Utica contains some of the most beautiful representations of Victorian architecture in Central New York. The historic district on Rutger Street contains a large amount of these Victorian Italian style buildings and houses—about 63. The most important and highly acclaimed houses reside in a private park, called Rutger Park. The park contains five secluded mansions. They represent what it meant to be part of the elite of Utican society in the 1800s. They demonstrate the wealth of the families who resided in them with magnificent and exquisite architecture built by some of the most well know architects in that time. Many of these houses and mansions that are in the area lack the preservation to uphold their original glory. In 2010, the Landmark Society of Greater Utica bought the mansions in Rutger Park, and aim to restore and preserve some of the rich history Utica has to offer.

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RUT G ER PARK

Munn’s Castle

Roscoe-Conkling House

Built in 1852, Munn’s Castle is one of the first constructed buildings in Rutger Park. This castle was designed by one of the most well known architects of the Italian Gothic Era­ —Alexander Jackson Davis. He designed the U.S. Customs House in NYC, The Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford CT, and the Lyndhurst in Tarrytown, NY. Davis built the mansion in the Italianate style, in the Irregular Villa plan. Davis’s architectural plan of the home can be found at the MET. The home attracted rich families to Utica and was residential before 1950, when it became a nursing facility and then abandoned in 2010. The mansion is rumored to have ghosts of past residents and was featured many times in ghost hunting shows, as well as, investigated by the Rome Investigators of the Paranormal. Munn’s Castle represents the height of the Gothic Era and exemplifies the genius of the architect who built it.

The Roscoe Conkling House, is the third building and significant historical importance in Rutger Park. Built in the 1830, this building was designed and built by architect Philip Hooker in the Greek Revival style. It was originally named the “Miller-Conkling-Kernan House”, and completed by the Miller family during its construction. The first owner, Roscoe Conkling purchased and moved into the home in 1863. The original hip roofed brick house was covered with grey stucco to look like rock. The building soon changed after that and had ongoing renovations by the new owner, Nicholas Kernan; he added a two story east wing, a porch, a dormer and chimney tops. More recently, the building was declared a National Historic Landmark by New York State in 1975, and in 2005 was listed for sale. The Roscoe Conkling House represented the glory of the Greek Revival style in the American Victorian Era.

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COMMUNI T Y

mohawk valley resource center for refugees Refugee Integration By Itahy Silva

Since it’s establishment in 1979 Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees has aided refugee families from all around the world. Relocating individuals from more than thirty-four different countries. It makes you wonder what it took to get to their level of excellence. The organization started with one individual’s concern for her fellow man. Roberta Douglas took action as a result of her empathy towards Amerasian children who were in affliction. Douglas began by assisting a single Vietnamese man with the help of Catholic Charities in Syracuse. In 1981 the Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees became incorporated and essentially made possible by the efforts of a community. The team consisted of the local clergy, Onei-

da County executives, Utica educational institutions, and Roberta’s husband. From 1979 up to today more than 15,000 refugees have not only been given the opportunity of the American dream, but they have been granted the opportunity to a safe lifestyle free of violence, displacement, and uncertainty, all because of the willingness of a United Community. In 1983 Rose Marie Battisti replaced Roberta as the executive director. Within the following ten years the arrivals augmented by three hundred and seventy refugees per year, Battisti brought progression to MVRCR. In her time at Mohawk Valley Resource Center for Refugees she founded the Welcome Home House, when MVRCR became affiliated to the Amerasian Residential Pro-

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gram. The purpose of ARP was to avoid a six month halt of Amerasians at a processing center in the Philippines before embarking to the United States. In 1989 Congress implemented the American Homecoming Act or Amerasian Homecoming Act, in which Vietnamese children of U.S. born fathers were given a pathway to citizenship. Which brought about the influx of Vietnamese. Between July of 1991 and October of 1992 MVRCR had an intake of seventy five young people every three months. They were taught English, Vocational skills, and cultural assimilation in the former Mohawk Valley Psychiatric Center. They were sent to several centers across the United States.

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View of houses from within the De Sales Building

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COMMUNI T Y

Decreasing Crime rates As refugees move in some local residents become fearful and argue that the number of refugees entering Utica may increase the potential for terrorism. This is a major concern for Americans all across the United States, and it is

Fear has affected the progression of thousands of humanitarian efforts to help those stuck in war torn and unstable countries around the world. quite evident that the government feels that it is a potential threat, as President Trump initially placed a ninety day ban on immigration from seven countries, those are Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. However, the Supreme Court later stepped in and negated it. Contrary to the narrative that refugees are a threat to our society research like the one conducted by the New American Economy prove differently. They carefully studied the correlation between crime rates in cities nationwide that are heavily populated with refugees between 2006 and 2015.

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Among them was Utica with a −20% change in violent crime rate and −23% change in property crime rates. At that time Utica welcomed a total of 4,356 refugees. Cato Institute released a study regarding refugee relocation and terrorism. They found that from 1975 to 2015 of the 3,252,493 refugees that were taken in only 0.00062% were terrorist. Fear has affected the progression of thousands of humanitarian efforts to help those stuck in war torn and unstable countries around the world. We must ask ourselves are the precautionary measures ultimately helping or hurting us? Are our actions driven by fear, uncertainty, or a skewed perspective of a group?

Students’ personal narrative paintings in MVRCR class rooms

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I NK ORPORAT ED

pierce up An Interview with Inkorporated’s Piercer, Jeff Waterman by Ashlie Glasper

Q. How long has Incorporated been in Utica? A. It’s been in Utica for 6 years now.

Q. Has there ever been a piercing that you didn’t want to do?

A. I grew up here, and I’ve always loved Utica. I went to school here, and I was born and raised here.

A. Not one that I didn’t want to do, but the big piercing that I don’t do is the horizontal tongue piercing that a lot of people refer to as snake eyes, I do not do that and the main reason is because it’s really bad for your teeth and you’re constricting two muscles together. I don’t do that.

Q. How long have you been doing piercings?

Q. What’s your favorite piercing to do?

A. I’ve been piercing for 12 years now.

A. Well, it’s not necessarily my favorite piercing, it’s more the people. I really enjoy meeting the new people because I mean, a belly button is a belly button, every single time. A tragus is a tragus every single time. So It’s not really a favorite piercing, its the people that come in.

Q. What do you like about Utica?

Q. Okay then, what was the grossest piercing that you’ve ever had to do? A. The worst one I ever had to do was when a lady came in to do a below the belt piercing and as I got ready to pierce, I saw a little string hanging out at me, and that was a little uncomfortable.”

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I NK ORPORAT ED

ink up An Interview with one of Inkorporated’s Tattoo Artists Jim Johnson by Ashlie Glasper

Q. Are you from Utica?

Q. Did you ever have to tattoo yourself?

A. Yeah, I’m from Utica. I was just in South Carolina for 5 years and then I came back here.

A. Traditionally in an apprenticeship you have to tattoo yourself first because you have to know what it’s like to be tattooed by yourself.

Q. How do you feel about Utica? A. Utica? I used to actually tattoo and bounce up here, and it’s a lot different. In the time I was gone it turned into a little hipster spot.

Q. How long have you been working here at Inkorporated? A. I’ve been working here since April.

Q. How long have you been doing a tattoo artist? A. I’ve been piercing for 14 years.

Q. Did you always want to be a tattoo artist? A. Yeah, since I was like, 11 or 12 years old. I used to watch my godfather tattoo my dad at the table. When I was 12 my friend showed me how to do it with a needle and thread.

Q. Have you ever had a tattoo that you didn’t want to do on people? A. Yeah, I deny a lot of tattoos. The most common one is like something that’s not gonna last. Like a finger tattoo or a white tattoo.

Q. What’s the dumbest tattoo that you’ve been asked to do? A. Probably the one of two frogs sixty-nining, it said “It tastes like chicken.”

Q. If you weren’t doing tattoos what would you be doing right now? A. Meth. Actually no, I used to want to be an architect.

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asian flavor It all started in Downtown Utica by Sherry Jenvsiriwanich Min Htet Win Oriental Market is an Asian market owned by Burmese refugees that came to Utica, New York in the 1980s. It was formerly located at 620 Albany Street, until it moved to the cur-

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rent location in 2013, which is at 115 South Street.On my first visit to the market, I inspected all the aisles, visually noting down the categories and types of products being sold at the market.


ORI ENTAL MARK ET

I saw beverages, snacks, cooking sauces, fresh produce, fruits, canned food, household items, clothing, toiletries, and the list goes on. I realized that only about 10% of the store is American products, with the rest being imported Asian products. On my second visit, I brought a digital camera along with me. I took a couple dozen pictures, unfortunately, I found them over exposed from the market’s bright fluorescent lights. On my third visit, I went back to take some more pictures and interview a lady working behind the cashier.

I inter viewed a 23-year-old woman, her name is Cho Mar Be. She is a cashier at the market. She said working there is like working with family because everyone is related in some way. She started working here in 2013. According to her, the most popular product here is a Bur mese product since Utica has a large Burmese community. Other than Burmese people, there are a lot of Cambodian, Vietnamese, and Indian shoppers. They recently had a renovation, she said it is easier to find items since they moved the cashier counters to make more space. She said they increased the number of Indian products to cater to Indian people. The market is special because it’s one of the main destinations the Asian community in Utica go to to purchase things from their native countries. Her favorite product sold here is the tea salad, which is a Burmese snack that can also be sold with rice. The positive aspect about the market is that they have fresh produce delivered every Friday at 10 a.m. The fresh vegetables such as morning glory, napa cabbage, tomatoes, string beans, lettuce, and even kaffir lime leaves can be found at the market. In addition, they have a lot of rare fruits that we won’t be able to find outside such as dragon fruit, durian, tamarind, and persimmon. All the items sold at the Min Htet Win Market definitely cater to the Asian community and others in the Utica area.

Min Htet Win Oriental Market 115 South Street Utica, NY 13501 Hours: 8:30 AM–8 PM Phone: (315) 732-9990

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L I VE I T UP

night life deja vu The night time is our time. Step out of your comfort zone and into the party. by Joseph Wendolowski For most of us who aren’t Utica natives, or who don’t know much about this rather quiet, yet exciting city, it seems as if there isn’t much to do to enjoy the weekend. Because of this I want to bring attention to the amazing nightclub that is Deja Vu! As a student here in Utica, I often found my friends and I searching for something fun to do after the long weeks of work, with no luck—until we found Deja Vu. Aside from the breathtaking decor and the great music, the club offers a fun yet safe atmosphere where you can dance it up, sing it up, and simply LIVE it UP!

An Interview with Emma Doty What did you do before discovering Deja Vu? My friends and I were ultimately forced to go to sketchy, random, less fun events. What are your favorite aspects of Deja Vu? The people and the environment. The party color scheme promotes a great vibes. How was co-mingling with your Utican peers? It is a very interesting experience, getting to discover how other people enjoy their lives. So many different types of people come out to party. Would you say Deja Vu is an environment for all types of people?

Yes, they offer a bar, hookah specials, an amazing dance floor with a wide variety of music. So whatever you like you’ll probably find it here. If you could, what would you improve at Deja Vu? I would like to see a student night where we get in for free or are able to host a party.

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RI G G I ES

home of the chicken riggies Utica’s Famous Dish by Tiger T

Anything that is famous has to start somewhere. So what does Utica have to offer to the world? Chicken Riggies a.k.a. Utica Riggies. This dish of rigatoni pasta is present in almost all of Utica’s Italian restaurants. The Origination There are many conflicting stories on the origin of Chicken Riggies. There is a common ground though; “the dish was created in the late 1970s or early 1980s and the original recipe did not include cream. ”Everyone has their own story after that. These people take these riggies and their origins seriously. The Chesterfield Restaurant however claims to have made the dish famous. They had the Chicken Riggies on their menu since 1989. Best Riggies Although the very first appearance of chicken riggies is not known, that doesn’t stop chefs of Utica from claiming that their riggies are the best. Annual Chicken Riggies festivals are held each year around the Utica area. Chicken Riggies are simply rigatoni pasta with chicken breast cubes and tossed in a pink marinara sauce. Some Utican chefs do much more with this dish.

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“the

word

(Utica)

has become

synonymous with delicious authentic

-charlie

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I ta l i a n

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cuisine�


Rigatoni Pasta Chicken Breast Marinara Cheese White Wine Onion Garlic Peppers: green, red, and yellow

Chef Adam Spellman uses grated cheese instead of cream. “This sticks right to your pasta; gives it that nice hearty flavor you know.� c e l e b r at i n g pa s t , p r e s e n t & p o t e n t i a l

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O’SCUG NI Z Z O

2nd Oldest Pizzeria in the U.S. by Tiger T In 1914, Eugeno Burlino founded O’Scugnizzo Pizzeria. He was selling only tomato pies at the time for a nickel each. The pizzeria was then passed on to his son, Angelo “Chops” Burline, who brought O’Scugnizzo to fame. O’Scugnizzo is still open today and was declared the second oldest pizzeria in the U.S. Many people refer to O’Scugnizzo as the king of pizza. Currently run by his sons, Steven and Michael Burline, the pizzeria continues to live up to it’s name. Their pizza is known for being upside down; the sauce being on top of the cheese. O’Scugnizzo have been making bake-at-home pizzas for over 50 years. They can ship their pizza to anyone in the continental U.S.

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Q & A with MICHAEL BURLINO O’Scugnizzo Pizzeria 614 Bleecker Street Utica, New York

Q: Tell me about yourself. A: I am the grandson of the original owner. I started working here after I retired from my old job. I’ve been here for 12 years now. I own this pizzeria with my brother, but I also do some of the cooking around here. Q: Let’s start off with some of the items on your menu, Chicken Riggies. Who taught you how to make riggies? Was a recipe passed on to you? A: Dick Scamardo was the one who originally came up with Chicken Riggies. It happened over at Clinton House. It wasn’t perfect at first, but we worked on it. Overtime, we made slight changes to the recipe till we finally got it just right. Q: What about your pizza? Are you still using the original recipe? A: My grandparents were pastry chefs. They had to make a lot of dough. We still use the original recipe for the dough. We still use our original recipe for the pizza. We make the pizza with the best ingredients we can get. This raises the

price of the pizza a bit, but it’s worth it. Everything about it is made here: the sauce, dough. None of that canned stuff. Q: Your pizza is known as being upside-down. How did this process start? A: Is our pizza really upside-down? I mean, we’re the second oldest pizzeria in the country. Wouldn’t that mean that everyone else is you know, upside-down. We’ve always made it this way. Let’s say the sausage for example. We cooked that with the dough. It starts off with putting the sausage on top of the dough and then the cheese right over it. The sauce goes on last, over the cheese. Q: This pizza can be shipped all across America, how did this process start? A: It started with my son. He used to work for UPS. He knows everything about shipping. He questioned it before, “We can ship just about anything. Why not pizza?” He did all the testing with the packaging and what not. We ship the pizzas with FedEx’s 2-day shipping. It’s pricier, but we try to get the pizza to the customers as quickly as possible.

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Q: O’Scugnizzo has achieved so much this past century, what’s next? What future goals do you have for the pizzeria? A: Soon, I’m going to retire from here and pass the pizzeria on to my son. This pizzeria has been run by my family now for three generations. Hopefully this business will keep going on. Maybe we’ll innovate things. Q: What about Utica makes you proud? A: I was born here. “It’s home.” My grandparents were immigrants. They came here for a better life and they worked hard for it. Now we have more people immigrating here from other countries for the same reasons. I’m proud that they are coming here to work hard and become Americans. In this city; it’s not that big, but this small city builds a tough character though. We keep pushing through together as a community.

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L I ST EN UP

off center Records by Jairo Gomez

Based and located in Utica, New York for over 25 years Over the years, Keller bought out collections from shops and collectors from as far away as Buffalo to Binghamton, increasing the variety and overall amount of his shop’s library or inventory. From CDs to cassettes you name it. Vinyl in this shop is alive as the day it opened up. John Keller’s Off Center Records offers an extensive collection of vinyl and memorabilia. From movie soundtracks and scores, to classic rock this shop holds three floors that store timeless records for any audiophile to sort through.

After several years of traveling to record shows week after week, John Keller began looking for a more permanent location to do business. Off Center Records began as a small corner kiosk in 1988 - 89 at a short-lived multivendor shop in the former Boston Store. If you are looking for somewhere to hang out and browse a large collection of music, Off Center Records is the spot to be and is located on 116 Bleecker Street. If you want expand your listening experience this is definitely a shop to drop by. John started this shop with his own collection that he no longer wanted.

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a safer community Utica’s very own LGBT center is providing education and resources for the city and beyond. by Peter Corbin

THE Q CENTER i s an organization that provides support and resources for LGBT individuals and families in the Mohawk Valley. Growing out of Syracuse, NY, they now have a center in Utica to care for and uplift the local community. Group meetings occur weekly at the Q where individuals of all ages can find help, as well as hope and support, when they need it the most. Locals gather together to share their experiences, make friends, and play games. The lounge has a computer, Wifi, a TV, snacks, and books. Food, clothing, personal hy-

giene items, contraceptives, and other supplies are donated and made available. The Q works with ACR Health to offer a variety of services to LGBT youth including housing, healthcare, case management, outreach, education, transportation, and special events. The “Q” in The Q Center stands for questioning. The Q is open to anyone who is searching for their identity and to those who are looking for a supportive space. Volunteers are members of the LGBT community along with allies from all walks of life.

#KEEPMOHAWKVALLEYPROUD

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Q CENT ER

42%

OF LGBT YOUTH SAY THEIR COMMUNITIES ARE NOT ACCEPTING OF LGBT PEOPLE.

IN A PROVINCIAL TOWN LIKE UTICA, THIS NUMBER IS LIKELY TO BE EVEN HIGHER.

2X

LGBT YOUTH ARE TWICE AS LIKELY AS THEIR PEERS TO SAY THEY HAVE BEEN PHYSICALLY ASSAULTED, KICKED, OR SHOVED.

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BECAUSE OF THE Q, LGBT YOUTH HAVE ACCESS TO OUTREACH & EDUCATION

SUPPORT GROUPS

AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS CASE MANAGEMENT

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Drop in time includes opportunities for tutoring, college counseling, meeting with the Case Manager, the Eddie Future Greatness Scholarship, which provides four monetary awards a year to college bound Q members, and access to computers. The Q Center offers weekly and biweekly support groups, such as LGBTQ Youth & Allies (ages 1317), LGBTQ Young Adults (ages 23-29), TransYouth, and TransParent, to name a few. Case management services are available for LGBTQ youth who need assistance with housing, advocacy, medical care, mental health services, transportation, identity documents, and other issues. Cultural Compe-

tency/LGBTQ Sensitivity trainings for agencies and organizations are available free of charge. Additionally, the center lends support to local Gay-Straight Alliances in schools, Annual Pride Prom, Q Pride Celebration, a trip to the state capital to lobby legislators, and much more. These events provide semi-structured socialization time for youth to connect and realize they are not alone. Elliott Sharrow, The Q Center’s Program Coordinator for the Mohawk Valley, provides positive visibility for the LGBT community and orchestrates most of the activities represented by the Q Center.

LGBT youth have assistance with housing, advocacy, medical care, mental health services, identity documents, transportation, etc.

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utica planned A Helping Hand by Catlyn Smith

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The Planned Parenthood, located in Their services include, but aren’t limited Utica, New York, was opened about to birth control distribution, emergenforty years ago. It’s currently named af- cy contraception including the mornter Margaret Roberts, a former co-pres- ing after pill, general health care, HIV ident/CEO, who has since passed services, LGBT services, men’s health away. A couple of years ago the build- services, patient education, pregnancy ing was renovated with emphasis on se- testing and services, STD testing, treatcurity and privacy all while being fairly ment and vaccines. In their blind loyalty modernized to push to their ignorance, the the sense of comfort. “Are you okay working protesters lack the viIt is not a secret sion to see the bigger in an establishment that picture that is Planned Planned Parenthood deals with protesters Parenthood. provides abortion daily at probably Even though I’ve nevall of their estaber personally received services and LGBTQ lishments. Protesters any kind of treatment make it a point to reproductive healthcare?” from Planned Parentvocalize their disgust hood, I feel a strong for Planned Parentattachment to it. The hood’s practices. The most complained few times I’ve been inside, I could just about practice would undoubtedly have tell that the workers were genuine and to be abortion. However, what they fail passionate. Some because they seem to realize is that Planned Parenthood ac- to relate to the patients, and others betually offers a wide range of services, not cause they really just want to lend a only for women but men as well. helping hand.

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U TI CA PROUD NOT ES

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CONT RI B UT ORS

Nicole Abrokwa Nicole Abrokwa is a current student at Pratt Institute in Utica, New York, Studying Communications Design with a focus in Illustration. When she is not in school She is continuously immersing herself in art. After graduating she plans to pursue a career in illustration living in New York City. Adam Afzali Adam Afzali is a New York City native who is currently studying at PrattMWP in Utica N.Y. Adam has a passion for illustration, design, and typography. You can usually spot him at your local bodega.

Katie Besenty Katie Besenty is an illustration major at PrattMWP College of Art and Design.

Bailey Chairez-Nelson Bailey Chairez-Nelson an advertiser, photographer, and creator currently studying at PrattMWP College of Art and Design. From Granite Bay, California she's been in media production for six years.

Kaitlyn Cammer Kaitlyn Cammer is a graphic designer from Bel Air, Maryland. She has worked on various catalogs, calendars, logos, and illustrations for a variety of companies and businesses. She currently attends Pratt Institute School of Art’s satellite campus, Pratt MWP in Utica, NY. Peter Corbin Peter Corbin is a student at PrattMWP. He was born and raised in a small town in New York. Currently studying Communications Design, his work focuses on illustration, sculpture, writing, and poetry.

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Matthew Dempster Matthew Scott Dempster (born January 29, 1998) is a New Jersey native with a story yet to be told. Equipped with a unique imagination, unparalleled work ethic, can do attitude, and a hunger to start working in the world of Communications Design.

Emma Doty Emma Doty is a student at PrattMWP. She is from Atlanta Georgia, she is an illustrator, animator and painter. She hopes to one day work for and have her own cartoon on a major network, like Cartoon Network.

Bethany Dunn Bethany Dunn is a current student at Pratt Institute in Utica, NY, studying Communication Design with a focus in illustration. When she is not in school she can be found exploring different art forms in her hometown Mesquite, TX. She strives to be an illustrator loving the work she produces.

Anastasia Eren Anastasia Eren was born in Ankara, Turkey and moved to Washington, DC in 2013. With her great experience in fine and digital arts, she enjoys working with a vast range of materials and subjects. Anastasia is an experienced artist with focuses that include drawing, murals, digital illustration and advertising. She is currently a sophomore Communication Design student focusing on Advertising at PrattMWP.

Ashlie Glasper Ashlie Glasper is a Chicago based illustrator, painter, and character designer. She takes commissions to do logos and paintings. She is also working towards being a freelance designer and having her own studio and equipment.

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Jairo Gomez Jairo Gomez is a graphic designer and photographer from Miami, FL currently attending Pratt Institute's extension campus PrattMWP in Utica, NY.

Romarío Herrera Romarío a.k.a. Romeo was born in Bronx, New York and is an inspiring illustrator.

Sherry Jensiriwanich Originally from Thailand, Sherry Jensiriwanich is a current student at PrattMWP in Utica, New York. She is majoring in communication design with a focus in advertising. She has designed t-shirts to help raise funds for natural disasters, designed logo and packaging for "Baking for a Change" project. Her other passions are photography, traveling, fitness, and cooking. Hyojung Kim Hyojung Kim was born and spent most of her formative years in South Korea and moved to the United States with her family in 2008. She is a Maryland resident, and spends her time searching for cafes, bars, and vintage shops in her area. Hyojung cultivated an interest in fashion at a young age, but fell in love with graphic design as well while attending PrattMWP, located in Utica, NY. Hyojung aspires to be the kind of designer that can act as a medium for her clients and bring their dreams to life. She has always dreamed of a big city lifestyle, and is planning to work in New York City after she graduates from the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. Sage Lilly Sage is a freelance illustrator and graphic artist from the Finger Lakes region of New York. Sage is currently attending Pratt Institute’s Utica campus where he studies communication design with a focus in illustration.

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Ashley Liu Originally from the swamps of Florida, Ashley is an aspiring illustrator/graphic designer that currently studies at Pratt Institute in upstate New York. Now instead surrounded by excessive amounts of snow, she spends the majority of her time practicing her skills in both digital and traditional media. Josh Mahoski Josh Mahoski is a graphic designer currently attending Pratt MWP. Prior to attending Pratt, Josh lived in Bridgewater New Jersey where he attended Somerset County Vocational Technical School(SCVTHS) part time, for graphic design and silk screen printing. While there he discovered his love for design and decided to make a career out of it. Josh is mainly inspired by music,specifically classic rock and blues. outside of graphic design, Josh also plays guitar and does martial arts. Marcela Monko Marcela Monko is a Connecticut based designer and artist now studying at Pratt Institute, majoring in Communications Design. Illustration and Graphic Design being her primary focus, Marcela hopes to become a graphic designer and work at a design agency once she graduates college.

Sidney Namey Sidney Namey attends PrattMWP College of Art and Design where she studies Communications Design with a focus in illustration. When she is not in school, she resides in a rural town outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Mark Pei Mark Pei is a Communication Design student in Utica, NY pursuing a BFA with Pratt Institute. He believes design is the translation from nature to technology, and he enjoys the different reactions from audiences to his design. He dreams to be a graphic designer who can combine the variety of digital work with the simplicity of the real world.

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Cayarah Pyle Cayarah Pyle is an aspiring art director, who currently is studying Communications Design at PrattMWP in Utica,NY. When she isn't in school, she resides in Brooklyn where she enjoys creating personal projects, dancing, and listening to music.

Kasey Roberts Kasey Roberts is an Illustration student from Unity, Maine. Roberts studies Communication Design with an emphasis in Illustration at PrattMWP with a minor in Digital Arts. Kasey also loves to travel, and has found art inspiration in South Korea, France, Scotland, New York, and Canada to name a few. After she completes her studies in New York City, she hopes to either continue living in NYC or move out of the country to a bigger city to pursue her dream in illustration and animation within the gaming industry or comic industry.

Itahy Silva Itahy Silva is an aspiring artist born and raised in the Catskill Mountains. She is currently enrolled at Pratt Institute in Utica. Her major is communications design, with a concentration in graphic design. She also has a passion for sculpture and installations. A vast majority of her projects are influenced and driven by concern due to social, economical, and worldwide political issues in the 21st Century. Her goal is to communicate the conflicts of individuals who are voiceless through her work.

Catlyn Smith Catlyn Smith is an artist originally from Paterson, New Jersey currently enrolled at Pratt Institute. She officially started her artistic journey in 2012 at PCTI, where she worked to receive an Adobe Photoshop certification. She's constantly working on new styles and concepts. Stay tuned.

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Tiger Truong Straight out of Utica, New York, the city that God forgot, Tiger T. did not grow up with a lot—but with just enough. He is a self-taught digital artist. Grinding through the early years of life, chasing dreams of becoming his own boss and making his own cartoons, shows, and movies. The American Dream and the pursuit of happiness has always been his basic goal in life.

Joseph Wendolowski Joseph Wendolowski is a student at Pratt Institute studying Communication Design. Aside from digital art, Joseph enjoys drawing and painting. As a profession, Wendolowski dreams to work for a magazine company or branding for celebrities/influencers.

Yulun “Eric” Wu Eric Wu is graphic designer/illustrator from China, who is studying communication design in PrattMWP College of Art and Design in Utica NY, USA.

Jamie Yngcong Jamie Yngcong, “also goes by the alias “JIMMIEJAMS” is an Artist, Illustrator, and Graphic Designer and a current student at PrattMWP College of Art and Design in Utica, NY. Jamie is based in New York and Connecticut.

Baoxian Zhong Baoxian Zhong is a Chinese student at Pratt Institute in Utica, New York. Zhong is interested in Communication design. Zhong played Pipa at Chinese traditional orchestra at high school.

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Special thanks to TEAM UP Oneida History Center Mayor Robert Palmieri Paul Buckley AIGA Upstate and all of the people who agreed to be interviewed. # UTICAPROUD

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Utica proud vol 1 6  

This project showcases Utica from a college student point of view. We celebrate the past, present and potential of the city. In 2017 four Pr...

Utica proud vol 1 6  

This project showcases Utica from a college student point of view. We celebrate the past, present and potential of the city. In 2017 four Pr...

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