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portfolio of works // meenakshi dravid // summer 2015


Contact

Education

Employment

Meenakshi Natraj Dravid mn5_dravid@yahoo.com 213.675.9869 300- S. Santa Fe Los Angeles, CA 90012

Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) M. Arch 2 | 2017 (expected) Fall 2015 3.74 GPA

P. K. Das & Associates, Mumbai, India Architect ( July 2013 - June 2015) Project Architect | Media Collaboration | Schematic Design | Design Development | Construction Documents | Statutory Drawings | Digital Modelling | Media Publishing | Urban Design | Web Design Intern ( June 2012 - October 2012) Interior Design | Artist Co-ordination | Furniture Fabrication | Detailing | Digital Modelling | Mock-up Fabrication

University Of Pune, India Dr. B. N. College of Architecture B.Arch | 2013 Graduated with Disticntion Rank 1 overall

Skill Set Analogue Pencil / Charcoal Watercolor / Markers Digital AutoCAD Revit + Mental ray Maya + Mental ray Rhino Sketchup Keyshot Adobe CS6 (illustration and media) MS Office Processing Hands-on Woodwork Laser Cutting 3D printing

Volkswagen-Chakan, Pune, India Interior Designer - Expat Canteen Schematic Design | Digital Modelling | Rendering | Execution Drawings | Shop Drawings Vikas Bhandari , Pune, India Summer Intern ( April 2010 - June 2010)

Awards 2013 - AESA Award Pune Graduated with Academic distiction 2013 - Veena Gavande Award Best Outgoing Student 2014 - The Indian Institute of Architects Academic Excellence 2013 - Ar. J. V Gandhe Trohpy Academic Distinction


Contents the symbiote SCIArc Fall2015 Design Studio, Group porject, 2015 basava commune Undergraduate Thesis Project, Individual project, 2013 ‘Best Undergraduate Thesis Award Indian Institue of Architects’ Finalist for NIASA trophy sadanika Semester 8, Design Studio, Individual project, 2011 vidyarthi gruha Semester 9, Design Studio, Individual project, 2012 parametric skins Semester 8, elective, Individual Project, 2012 welspun, anjar Office Project Jun ‘12- May ‘15 Intern - Jun - Nov ‘12 Project Architect - Jul ‘13 - Jan ‘14 delhi public school Office Project Mar ‘14 - Apr ‘15 Architect advanced tectonics SCIArc Fall2015 , Academic Project for Applied Studies, Group Project, 2015


the symbiote

extension to the bibliotheque // semster 1 // fall 2015

The Symbiote, genius of Stan lee, an alien life form, the amorphous and the undefined. Symbiote, derived from the symbiosis, alludes to a quality of entities, that are interdependent but are mutually exclusive. The Symbiote, ever so malleable, draws upon its archetype, exaggerates its qualities and assimilates itself into the context. The Symbiote bonds with an entity with shared qualities. Developing this concept further, the design derives from the qualities of Paris. Qualities from the context are drawn in terms of details. Then it is processed through alienating digital processes, an intentional intervention to form the Symbiote. The process intensifies and exaggerates the notion of texture, details, resolution and scale. The mediatheque, the supposed Symbiote, becomes the antagonist to the bibliotheque, as it reveals itself through sneak peeks and tries to combat the cityscape.


Complex Morphologies Built from the alpha images, the built mass is in close resemblance to the context around it. Since the final mass through alphas, would have resulted in a building quite similar to the immediate context, the images were run through scripts for pixel manipulation. The resultant images, were then used to compose the mass. This gave the built mass additional intentional detailing, yet keeping the overall scale and silhouette in line with the context. The form development was an alternative to conventional methods of deriving form.


X Axis

Y Axis

Z Axis


Object Development

Form Development every 5th frame

Program Development

Podium

Circulation Core

Reception Floor

Administration + Auditorium


Reading + Media

Conference + Development centre

Archives

Mediatheque


Textures + Details


basava commune

experiential living through shared activities // semster 10 // spring 2013

The project aims at building a unified campus that encompasses all the activities of the Basava Dharma commune as well as other social service activities undertaken by the commune. The Basava Dharma, a sect founded by Basaveshwara, a saintly statesman of the 12th century, aims at universal solidarity, equality, charity and service to mankind. The institutions that propagate Basavaism today have only house a hall called the ‘Anubhava Mantapa’ where the meditation and discourses take place. Lack of gathering places for devotees to gather elsewhere during festive times. Administration also poses a problem as the social activities carried out by the trusts are scattered. Monitoring funds, allotting spaces and maintenance becomes much more feasible within a campus. Even then, maintaining a holistic campus provides an opportunity to live in practise with the teachings for Basaveshwara. Also, the presence of a strong institutional campus like this besides a lake would help conserve the lake side resources. The planning of the campus too is based on the ancient vedic text of ‘Mayamta’ that sets outline for an ideal community. Based on this planning module, the design aims at addressing to ‘service to mankind’ in ways beyond spirit, attaining a design that is both relevant to context and the brief of the Basava Dharma.


Cluster 2 : Spiritual

Towards Pashan Lake

Cluster 1 : Administrative

5

2

Cluster3 : Residential

5

7

8

7

8

3 6

Entrace to site

1

4

1. Multipurpose Hall 2. Administration 3. Dasoh (Refectory) 4. Musuem Part of the administrative public cluster in North, This cluster aids all public activities and serves as a reception to commune.

5. Meditation Hall 6. Anubhava Mantapa

7. Guest Houses 8. Residences

The Anubhava Mantapa, literally meaning the experience hall occupies the centre place of the centre of Vaastu Purusha. It is the most important part of Basavaism philosophy. It is planned to house 500 individual occupants on individual step seating so as to allow seating in lotus position. This cluster has a separate ceremonial entrance.

The residential cluster comprising of permanent residences and guesthouses occupy the South. This is the only structure in the campus that goes a floor above ground, serving as a taller backdrop to campus.


Design Derivation The ‘Vastu Purusha’, shown in bottom right, guides the placement for program. Based on lighting conditions and prevailing wind directions, the administration, workshops, meditation, and residences are located in the north, east and south respectively. The measurement of 1 Hasta, considered to be a divine measurement, is measured from tip of the middle finger up to the elbow, and measures approx 18”. Based on these proportions, the entire network of grid is formed. The same measurement is used for the smallest element to the dimension of the city. The measurement gets reflected in every element of the design. All the elements are in whole or half multiples of 18”. This reflection of the divine within the design not only enhances the aesthetic appeal, but also conforms to the energy of cosmos, the very notion on which the sacred texts of art of building focus. The division of plan, elevation and various elements like columns, wall, windows, doors and others are a multiple of the whole. The modular planning allows both flexibility and uniformity in design. The design of individual elements is also modular which helps in evolving a unique architectural style, that could be further used and would be associated with Basavaism. The style picked here resembles old Indian architecture to give a rustic and native feel to the design.

Unit of Measurement The base unit of measurement is called a hasta. It measures the length from tip of finger to elbow. It was used as the base unit in all the measurements, including towns and houses. 01 Hasta = 450 mm It roughly measures about 18’’. This grid and its derivative can be adjusted in open spaces but cannot be broken.


Element Derivation

The column orders follow the same proportions of the grid. The overall proportions are maintained in the structural grid as well as the individual as well the individual elements. The columns are designed according to the hierarchy they follow and where they are placed in the overall design. The columns, as depicted on the left, range from being 2 floors tall to columns that act as fenestration separators. As far the column design is concerned, the singular elements of columns like footing and capital are retained in proportions as guided by the ‘mayamta’ scale. Similar proportions are derived for even door and window divisions.

Overall Derivation 1x = Single pada Base Grid = 9 Central squares of the odd ‘Paramsayika Mandala’ Primary Streets = 1/3 rd ox ‘x’ Secondary Streets = 1/5 th of ‘x’ Street Squares = 2/3 rd of ‘x’ Main Central Square = Equal to Main Pada ‘x’


Administration Elevation - Shorter column orders

Residence Elevation - Taller column orders

The ‘anubahava mantapa’ located at the centre in the site. Representing the spiritual nucleus of the commune. It is designed to signify unity of all elements, hance has a water court and gardens within. The seating is such that it allows for meditation in lotus position. Transvere Section

Anubhava Mantapa in the centre


sadanika

housing project // semster 8 // fall 2011

The housing is designed to accommodate a total of 130 families of the lower and middle income group with three unit types of 40, 60 and 90 sq.m. each. Each housing unit is designed such that smaller units form bigger unit module with addition of spaces. The idea was to stack bungalow designs vertically and to maximise sides open to the outside. The housing is planned in a densely populated area within the core city, where ground cover area is restricted to 40% or less. The housing tower goes upto 11 floors high, however after 8th floor the floor plate recedes, this lessens the visual impact. This is consciously done, as the neighbouring buildings are not more than 7 floors at the most. Along with the receding floor plate, the building facade has ‘greenwall’. It not only offers camouflage but also offers thermal and acoustic insulation. The design of the entire building is around a central courtyard within that allows informal spaces, visual connectivity and ventilation for the entire structure. The commercial activity is deliberately separated from the residential block so as to provide maximum privacy to residents and preserve the communal fabric established at the podium level.


Alternating Layouts

Floor 1,5

Floor 4,7

Planning Development

The core principle of the design was to modularise the plans of individual units, so as to achieve maximum structural simplicity without compromising the flexibility of design. various permutations of the modules are made possible through minimum variation of the original module. The stacking of these modules also makes way for large open spaces, which seemingly increase the usable area of the unit. Balconies are stacked alternately to allows for better light conditions. The layout of the units around the corridor is such that it minimises circulation to a mere 12% of the built-up area. Since cost reduction was a main concern, the corridors are made to allow a feeling of largess with courts and atriums.

Floor 2

Floor 8

Floor 3,6

Floor 9

The ground floor of the building is used as community space and gathering for small functions that usually take place in a user group like this.


The continuous courtyards at the ground floor allow for visual continuity and gathering places. This has a stepped courtyard and lobbies for lift and stairwells.

The recessing 8th floor, cuts down the visual impact the building has on the cityscape.


The illustration on the left is of one of the twins, that shows the building if it were viewed from the court. The visual continuity, is maintained across both the built masses, which is an important part of social life of the user group. The corridors, owing to their good lighting & ventilation conditions also double as activity spaces for children and adults alike. The stair core is central to the building with the farthest entry being 25m. The staircase cores are placed symmetrically at the end of the corridor. This is so that the circulation is has a dedicated corridor and causes minimal visual interference. The green walls, help camouflage the height of the building and lend it an earthy appearance. Rainwater management is extensively worked out for the irrigation of the same.


Street

Building

Building

Street

Two main concerns of the design; one the visual continuity and second being the continuity of circulation are effectively address as shown by the transverse section. Throughout the building, the circulation remains unbroken. The staircases are fireproof staircases that terminate at the ground level in the court. The basement is accessed by ramps.The visual continuity is maintained by large courtyard in the building that allows light and air to all the floors and the gathering space at the ground level. Below, the illustration shows the detail of each module and the intended user group.

Unit Layouts Type 1 _ Small Family Units

Type 2A _ Medium Family Units

Type 2B _ Medium Family Units

Type 3 _ Large Family Units

Studio Apartment, 40 sq.m. 40 units Living + Resting

1BHK, 60 sq.m. 25 units Living + Resting + Kitchen

1BHK, 60 sq.m. 25 units Living + Resting + Kitchen

2BHK, 90 sq.m. 40 units Living + Resting + Kitchen


vidyarthi gruha

students centre // semster 9 // spring 2012

The students centre serves as both a respite and activity centre to the students of University of Pune. The activity type could roughly be categorised into 2 categories, namely, commercial activity and eateries. Besides these two dominant activity types, there is also an open air amphitheatre that uses the old university building as backdrop. The activities are arranged around open spaces and circulation corridors to afford an ‘open’ feeling. The design is massed similarly around a central axis, and helps in connecting either ends of the plot boundary. The plan is a close ended one, which limits the scope of additional activities that could be pushed in the students centre, ensuring that the current activities remain dominant.

Site Plan


kitchen

restaurant

food court

shops

Longitudinal Section

food court

refectory

kitchen

Transverse Section


parametric skins

digital elective // semster 8 // fall 2011

Digital architecture specifically uses data that generates set of numbers that govern a design form. It allows to design an element parametrically, taking cognizance of many factors simultaneously. The design of a tessellated surface for skin of a building was based on trial and error. ‘Harmony’ was run for ‘jitter’. The script allows jittering of objects. It means that a normal geometric solid, changes its physical attributes in certain scale and proportion. The change in the scale and proportion is determined by the curve a surface. The assignment required to design a skin for a definite building type. The priority parameter for the skin design was the climate of the region. The skin to be designed is primarily a tessellated surface stretched across the building face, the tessellations of which correspond to the climate of the area. Structure was taken into consideration at all stages of design. The building skin can thus be modulated to achieve comfort levels within the building by architectural interventions. The building type selected for this purpose was a museum with three main floors dedicated to display and ancillary structures like eatery, retail, and curios.etc. The design on the opposite page, is that of a museum in Bengaluru, India. The top of the building, the truncated cone houses a open sky restaurant. Ancillary spaces like eateries, retail and auditoriums are housed in the base. The gallery spaces are behind the ‘perforated’ wall. A continuous ramp runs up along the wall. In a sense, the corridor allows to view art on the core and on the outside.

1


2

3

4

5


welspun, anjar

professional project // p k das & associates // jun ‘12- may ‘15

The township project proposed for Welspun Corporate includes planning and design of overall master plan for the township as well design of individual elements like housing, hostel, amenity spaces, market, entertainment spaces etc. amongst others. The site is an 35 acre land located in Anjar, Gujarat, an area known for its arid and hot climate. The user group within the site is also diverse comprising of families, students, guests and training personnel. The design solution takes into account various factors, which is reflected in both the macro and micro planning of the projects. The zoning is such that various user groups are separated by large open spaces. Residential cluster, commercial cluster, hostel cluster are all well connected by internal roads. All individual buildings have internal courtyard, a design feature common to this area. It provides coolth to the surrounding building mass. At the master planning level, the buildings are placed such that mutual shading on the streets is possible. The scheme provides 720 families with 2BHK apartments, divided in two phases. Apart from that there is a hostel for senior and junior personnel. The total built-up area for phase one for the housing is around 40,000 sq.m. E3 200

SOUTH TYPE -4 TYPE -E TYPE -5 1

2

1

4

1

3

2

2 TYPE -3

TYPE -E TYPE -3 1

1

CLUSTER - IV 2-3 BEDROOM CLUSTER SIZE OF THE CLUSTER 68.42 X 93.95 MTS.

TYPE -B

TYPE -D

TYPE -A TYPE -1 2

3

2

1 4

2

1

1

1

1

95.03

TYPE -C

CLUSTER - I 1.5 BEDROOM CLUSTER

1.5 BED UNITS - 17.5 BLDG = 220 NOS. 2 BED UNITS 4 BLDG = 42 NOS. 3 BED UNITS2 BLDG = 12 NOS TOTAL = 264 HOUSES.

PHASE -1 TYPE -2

PHASE -2

TYPE -3

E2 100

TYPE -5

BUS STOP

EAST

WEST CULSTER - III 1.5 BEDROOM CLUSTER 62.70 X 95.03 MTS.

1.5 BEDROOM CLUSTER-2 ENTRY TO THE CLUSTER

NORTH E1 00

INTERNAL 9M WIDE ROAD

MARKET SQUARE

GATEWAY

ENGINEERS SITE OFFICE & STORAGE RECREATION- INDOOR GAMES


EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

0.50 EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

0.50

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

EXPANSION JOINT 25MM

GROUND FLOOR LVL +0.60

FIRST FLOOR LVL +3.70 VERANDAH

ADMINISTRATION - WAITING ROOM ,LOUNGE BLOCK MEETING ROOM , CONFERENCE ROOM KITCHEN , DINING & RECREATION

GAS LINE ENTRY

SENIOR - 96 SINGLE OCCUPANTS (2 BLOCKS)

BULDING CONTROL LINE

JUNIORS - 96 DOUBLE OCCUPANCY (2 BLOCKS) 192 OCCUPANTS

HOSTEL

edi

rsam

PERGOLA FLOOR PLAN FOR CLUSTER I, III, * SCHEMATIC INDICATING VERANDAH & PERGOLA POSITIONS.


ENTRANCE

delhi public school

professional project // p k das & associates // jun ‘12- may ‘15

SECURITY CABIN

BOOK STORE

D2 D3

TOILET D3 D2

ROLLING GATE

ENTRANCE COURT

ROLLING GATE

PERGOLA ABOVE

PERGOLA ABOVE

JALI

The Delhi Public School at Mundra, Gujarat was commissioned by the Calorex Foundation for primary and secondary education. The school is a modular one, with the same module being used for expansion. With a built up area of 15000 sq.m. per building, the school is to be completed in three stages, whereby the scope of the education offered will be upto higher secondary.

VERANDAH 1 2 3 4 5

DOUBLE HEIGHT UPTO SECOND FLR

D1

D1

D1 D1

OPEN COURT

OPEN COURT

Organised around a courtyard, the building is compact and inward looking. This design is climate responsive as it makes provisions to effectively deal with the harsh hot climate of the arid state. The courtyard maximises air circulation, employing the Venturi effect thereby cooling the building. The main mass of the building is concentrated at the centre or around the courtyard, which helps in keeping coolth.

PRINCIPAL

MANAGEMENT OFFICE TOILET GENTS

CONFERENCE

ADMINISTRATION OFFICE

V- PRINCIPAL

TOILET LADIES TOILET

OFFICE AREA

STORE ROOM 2.62 x 2.03 M

ELECT. ROOM

PANTRY 1.97 x 2.03M

D3 D2

D2

The corridors run along all activity spaces and hence ensure maximum continuity both circulation wise and visually. Services are tucked at the corner which make them accessible at equal distances from spaces. The activities are arranged such that study spaces have minimum disturbance from the administration and common areas.

CLASSROOM 1

CLASSROOM 10

ACTIVITIES' COURT LAWN

+ 0.30 LVL

CLASSROOM 2

CLASSROOM 9

CLASSROOM 3

CLASSROOM 8

DRINKING WATER PROVISION

CAVITY WALL

CAVITY WALL

DRINKING WATER PROVISION

D2 D3

CLASSROOM 7 BOYS' TOILET

CLASSROOM 6

CLASSROOM 5

CLASSROOM 4 GIRLS' TOILET


8

9

10

11

3000

12

14

3000

3000

5500

13

15

16

6000

3000

17

6000

18

3000

19

20

3000

3000

21 3000

5500

LVL + 14.90M TOP OF SLAB

750 eq

1500 900 600

900

1200 3000

W2

450

PASSAGE

12309

1000

1500

4000 600 4000 CLASSROOM

750

PASSAGE

1500

W3

W1

900

600 3250

D1

600

750

750 D1

W3

2500

W3

D1

800

900

900 750

9752 D1

CLASSROOM

PASSAGE

200

CLASSROOM

750

750 W3

D1

750 2500

3250

4000

PASSAGE

2350

3100

4000

D1

W3

900

W3

750

750

600

D1

450

LVL + 00.00M GROUND LVL

W1

CLASSROOM

750

586 684

900 2350

3400

4000 600

900 1500 800

W3

200

W2

3000

PASSAGE

750

LVL + 00.75M PLINTH LVL

600

600

600

750 1500 900

12309

1200

LVL + 04.75M FIRST FLOOR

D1

W3

CLASSROOM

eq

9" STEEL COLUMN

750

PASSAGE

W3

9" STEEL COLUMN

1465

1465

900

900

CLASSROOM

750

LVL + 08.75M SECOND FLOOR

2855

9" STEEL COLUMN

1147

eq 6140

eq

1500

1147

750

134째

SECTION A-A

20

21

19

18

16

17

15

13

14

12

10

11

9

8

LVL + 14.90M TOP OF SLAB

750

LVL + 12.75M TERRACE FLR

1500 900 750

600

LVL + 08.75M SECOND FLOOR

850

1200 1000

600

LVL + 04.75M FIRST FLOOR

3000

700

200

1500

4000

600

600

900

12309

1500

4000

3400

750 3250

LVL + 00.75M PLINTH LVL

750

450

450

3250

600

600

750 2350 900

900 850 2400

750

9752

900 850 2400

750

900 750 600

600

1147

6140 2855 900

900 750 2350

4000 600

1000 1500

750

200

3000

CLASSROOM 11

700

CLASSROOM 20

4000

1200

900

W1

1500

12309

850 750

600

900

W1

3692

6140

750

OPEN COURT

1147

LIBRARY FOR JUNIORS

1500

OPEN COURT

LVL + 00.00M GROUND LVL

SECTION B-B CLASSROOM 12

CLASSROOM 19

CLASSROOM 18

CLASSROOM 13

B

D

B'

E

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

Q

P

R

S

U

T

2770

A 3000

5500

3000

3000

6000

3000

3000

6000

3000

3000

6000

6000

3000

3000

3000

5500

3000

3250 750

1200

LVL + 08.75M SECOND FLOOR

600

2000

3250

V2

LVL + 04.75M FIRST FLOOR

1500

D1

V2

4000

W3

D1

2000

W3

D1

2500

W3

3250

3250

1200

750 1500

4000 FRONT OFFICE

1046

1200 1500 2500

GIRLS' TOILET

900

900

D1

2350

2350

W3

D1

750

4000

W3

D1

1000

SECURITY OFFICE

150

150

2000

4000

1500 1000

W3

GIRLS' TOILET

LVL + 00.75M PLINTH LVL LVL + 00.00M GROUND LVL

300

5050

1000 750

FIRST FLOOR PLAN @4.75M LVL

750

4000

1000

W1

W1

1500

LIBRARY

3475 600

900

GIRLS' TOILET

750

900

D1

2500

W3

D1

2004

2350

W3

750

750

D1

W3

750

1500

4000

W1

900

6000

LIBRARY

W1

V2

1679

2600

850

750

1500

750

GIRLS' TOILET

600

CLASSROOM 17 CLASSROOM 16 CLASSROOM 15 CLASSROOM 14

600

774

LVL + 14.90M TOP OF SLAB

SECTION D'-D'

8

9

10 3000

11 5500

13

12 3000

3000

14 3000

15 6000

16 6000

17 3000

18 3000

19 3000

20 5500

21 3000 LVL + 14.90M TOP OF SLAB


advanced tectonics

academic project // smester 1 // fall 2015

The purpose of the class was to understand tectonics of already existing structures and the implcations both structural and aesthetical, that the tectoinics have on these buildings. The case study was conducted in group of 5, along with studio partners Indhumathi Venkatachalam, Amritha Rambalakrishnan, Xinlei Li and Yi Zhou. we concerntrated on understanding and researching the building and its components so as to replicate the same system in a model later. Preliminary excercises inlcuded making 3D drawings of the existing building and understandijng the systems at work. The later part included replicating the same systems in a 1 cubic foot model.

The tesselated roof has 2 thin slabs that are attached to a steel truss at intermediate intervals. The gap in the roof is supposed to house various services viz. mechanical ventilation, lighting .etc.

The case study that we analysed for the excercise was the Tenerife Espacio de Les Artes in Spain, by Herzog and de Muron. This was one of the options assigned by the instructor.

The external wall is a heavily reinforced structural wall with apertures that correspond to the pixel design. This external wall takes maximum structural loads that act upon the building. The wall takes brushed concrete finish. The apertures and their placement make the otherwise monolithic concrete look lighter.


Skylights in the roof are supported by the tesselated roof slab. The glass in the skylight is toughened glass and is held in place with aluminuim sections.

Reinforced cement concrete being the structural system being used in TEA, A few of the internal walls use the same system. Dry wall /partition wall systems are used for internal walls.

Toughened tinted glass is used at the courtyard, and covers full height. The galss is held in place by steel channel sections and is divided by vertical square sections.


VIEW-I 1. SKYLIGHT WITH 12MM THICK TOUGHNED GLASS 2. TESSALLATED ROOF STRUCTURE 3. REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL 4 50 MM THICK C- CHANNEL BEAMS 5 PIXELATED 50MM THICK PERFRATIONS

1

2 1 3 4 2

5

CASTED CONCRETE WALL WITH PIXELATED PERFORATIONS

VIEW-II 1. SKYLIGHT WITH 12MM THICK TOUGHNED GLASS 2. PIXEL SHAPED CONCRETE SKYLIGHT 3..REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL 4.FIBREGLASS FORMWORK MOULDS

3

4

1

3 2

4

5

VIEW - III 1. TESSELLATED CONCRETE ROOF 2. REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL 3.25MM THICK STEEL CIRCULAR REBARS 4. TRANSPARENT SILICONE GASKET 5 12 MM THICK SUNBAN TOUGHENED GLASS 6. FIBREGLASS FORMWORK MOLDS

6

CASTED CONCRETE WALL WITH INSERTED STEEL ARMATURE

Precedent Study: Tenerife Espacio De Las Artes, Spain Facade System: Perforated Concrete Wall

WOODEN FORMWORK FOR PIXEL PERFORATIONSWOODEN FORMWORK FOR PIXEL PERFORATIONS

ROOF CASTED WITH CONCRETE WITH PIXELATED SKYLIGHT ADDED TO IT

Advance Tectonics 3200 Meenakshi N Dravid, Xienlie Li, Amritha Rambalakrishnan, Indhumathi Venkatachalam, Yi Zhou


edent Study: Tenerife Espacio De Las Artes, Spain de System: Perforated Concrete Wall dent Study: Tenerife Espacio De Las Artes, Spain e System: Perforated Concrete Wall

DETAILDETAIL 1 1 1

1 2

1. STRUCTURAL 1. 32MMMEMBERS TOUGHNED GLASS 2. REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL 2. ALUMINIM SECTION WITH RUBBER GASKET 3. FIBERGLASS FORMWORK BLOCKS 3. INSULATION 4. 100MM THK REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB 5. STEEL I SECTION 6. 30MM STEEL FLAT 7. STEEL JOINT 8. 25MM DIA STEEL REBAR AT 150MM C/C 9. 40MM THICK REINFORCED CONCRETE WALL

2

3 4

5 3

6

7 8

9

DETAIL 2 DETAIL 2 1. 25MM DIA STEEL BAR VERTICAL REINFROCEMENT 1. 25MMCONCRETE STEEL REBAR AT 120MM C/C 2. REINFORCED WALL 2. 25MM DIA STEEL GASKET REBAR AT 150MM C/C 3. TRANSPARENT SILICONE 3. THICK 25MMSUNBAN DIA STEEL BAR VERTICAL REINFROCEMENT 4. 12 MM TOUGHENED GLASS 5. FIBREGLASS FORMWORK MOLDSAT 175MM C/C 4. 25MM DIA STEEL REBAR

1

1

2

2 3

4 5

3 4

Advance Tectonics 3200 Meenakshi N Dravid, Xienlie Li, Amritha Rambalakrishnan, Indhumathi Venkatachalam, Yi Zhou Advanced Tectonics 3200 Meenakshi N Dravid, Xienlie Li, Amritha Rambalakrishnan, Indhumathi Venkatachalam, Yi Zhou


// meenakshi dravid


Profile for Meenakshi Natraj Dravid

Selected Works upto FALL2015  

Selected Works upto FALL2015  

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