__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

ESCUELA DE ADMINISTRACIÓN DE EMPRESAS Volumen 13 / Número 3 | Setiembre - Diciembre, 2019 ISSN 1659-3359 • Publicación Cuatrimestral

• Managerial turnover

• Dealing with

heterogeneity: an analysis of spanish universities

and performance in outside boards: Ownership makes the difference Esteban Lafuente Miguel García-Cestona

Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent Dolors Gil-Doménech / Rocío de la Torre

• Autogestión, emprendimiento social

e innovación social: Un análisis de contenidos publicados en twitter

Laura Rojas de Francisco / John Fernando Macías Prada

• Competitividad

empresarial en Costa Rica: Un enfoque multidimensional

Suyen Alonso Ubieta Juan Carlos Leiva

• Eficiencia competitiva de los cantones en Costa Rica: Análisis del índice de competitividad cantonal basado en modelos frontera No-Paramétricos Manuel Araya Solano


MANAGERIAL TURNOVER AND PERFORMANCE IN OUTSIDE BOARDS: OWNERSHIP MAKES THE DIFFERENCE REEMPLAZO DE EJECUTIVOS Y DIRECTORES EN JUNTAS DE ADMINISTRACIÓN EXTERNAS: LA ESTRUCTURA DE PROPIEDAD HACE LA DIFERENCIA

2

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


We examine the relationship between CEO, board and Chairman turnovers and future performance in banks with fully outside boards. Using a rich dataset on executive turnovers from Costa Rica, we find that ownership moderates the effect that control mechanisms have on performance. Our results indicate that executive turnovers followed by the appointment of outside executives (CEO and Chairman) have a positive impact on performance. On the contrary, large board replacements create organisational costs and these negatively affect performance. These results mainly hold for shareholder-oriented banks where managers and owners are more likely to be aligned. Finally, these results underline the importance of examining the effectiveness of governance mechanisms in emerging economies. More detailed information about ownership, legal framework and executive replacements can make a difference when it comes to evaluate the effectiveness of governance mechanisms.

ABSTRACT

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

KEYWORDS: Corporate governance, executive turnover, banks, ownership types

Esteban Lafuente

PALABRAS CLAVE: Gobierno corporativo, reemplazo de ejecutivos, banca, estructura de propiedad

Professor. Polytechnic University of Catalonia (UPC Barcelona Tech), Spain. Esteban.Lafuente@upc.edu

Miguel García-Cestona

RESUMEN

Este trabajo examina la relación entre el reemplazo de altos cargos directivos y gerenciales--CEO y miembros de la junta directiva--y el desempeño en bancos con juntas de administración totalmente externas. A partir de una amplia base de datos sobre cambios de ejecutivos y directivos en bancos de Costa Rica, encontramos que la estructura de propiedad modera el efecto entre mecanismos de control y el rendimiento económico de los bancos. Los resultados indican que los cambios de ejecutivos seguidos del nombramiento de ejecutivos externos (CEO y Presidente de la junta directiva) tienen un impacto positivo en el desempeño. Por el contrario, grandes cambios proporcionales en la junta directiva crean costos organizacionales que afectan negativamente el desempeño. Estos resultados son significativos principalmente entre los bancos privados (governados por accionistas), donde es más probable que los gerentes y propietarios estén alineados. Finalmente, estos resultados subrayan la importancia de examinar la efectividad de los mecanismos de gobierno corporativo en las economías emergentes. Información más detallada sobre la estructura de propiedad, el marco regulatorio así como de los reemplazos de ejecutivos pueden hacer la diferencia al evaluar la efectividad de los mecanismos de gobierno corporativo.

Professor. Universitat Autònoma of Barcelona (UAB), Spain. Miguel.Garcia.Cestona@uab.cat

ARTICLE RECEIVED: 17 / 06 / 2019 ARTICLE ACCEPTED: 04 / 10 / 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL VOL. 13 NO. 3, PP. 2-27

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

3


Introduction

W

hat are the consequences of executive turnover on performance? Clearly, top managers play a key role in many companies: they can help create or destroy large amounts of value. Not surprisingly, many corporate governance studies deal with the possible links between managerial turnover and performance. Yet, the bulk of this research focuses on developed economies (Claessens and Yurtoglu 2013), and the consequences of those managerial replacements remain far from clear (Karaevli 2007). One reason behind the relatively scarce research in emerging economies relates to the lack of more detailed information concerning board characteristics and the different types of turnover. Businesses in emerging markets exhibit significant organisational differences with respect to those in developed markets. Each emerging economy has a corporate governance system that reflects its institutions, and the differences are mainly linked to heavy state intervention and control of strategic firms such as banks (La Porta et al. 2002). In addition, excessive ownership concentration comes as a response to weak external controls and regulatory distortions (Young et al. 2008). This further justifies the need to examine the effectiveness of governance mechanisms in emerging economies (Fan et al. 2011). From a corporate governance perspective, the specific characteristics of the governance system in emerging economies condition internal control mechanisms related to the board (composition and its monitoring role) and executive turnover. In settings that accommodate standard corporate governance assumptions, it seems reasonable to expect that the consequences of executive turnovers will differ depending on whether the incoming managers are internally promoted or appointed from outside the firm. For instance, Denis and Denis (1995), Borokhovich et al. (1996), Huson et al. (2004), and Zhang and Rajagopalan (2010) report, for the US, that the positive relation between CEO turnover and future performance is greater in firms that appointed an outside CEO. Furthermore, there is a debate concerning the role that the current top executive and the board can have

4

TEC EMPRESARIAL

•

VOL 13 - No. 3

at the time of selecting new directors and top-managers (Adams et al. 2010). Finally, other voices claim that outside boards, that is, boards with members that do not directly obey the CEO, could alleviate and even prevent some of the corporate governance problems. We suggest that the decision to promote an insider or an outsider to top positions may respond to different scenarios and ownership structures that we should take into consideration. For the empirical analysis, we use a rich data set of Costa Rican banks for the period 1999–2004 to evaluate the effect that the activation of certain governance interventions has upon changes in firm performance. In particular, our data allows us to study CEO turnover, changes in the board of directors and chairman removal. In addition, we have specific information regarding the nature of the incoming CEO and the chairman (internally promoted or appointed from outside) as well as the contract termination dates for board members and the chairman, so we are able to distinguish between unexpected and voluntary turnovers. We do not have, though, the specific reasons behind the CEO departure. Nevertheless, we are able to show how the use of more detailed data concerning executive turnover and the succession process affect the results on performance. Furthermore, ownership seems to play a role in the executive succession process and when we distinguish between shareholder and stakeholder-oriented firms, this helps explain part of this process, and the presence of negative effects on future performance. In a study of 69 banks from six OECD countries, De AndrÊs and Vallelado (2008) report that board characteristics affect bank performance, however, their study exclusively focuses on commercial banks where boards are more likely to be aligned with shareholders and intensively monitor managers (Adams and Ferreira 2007). We analyse a specific industry, banking, and a given country, Costa Rica. This specific setting is attractive since it previously underwent important changes in the regulatory framework jointly with enhancements in monitoring practices. By 1997 bank activity was deregulated among the different players and the supervisory institution had all its monitoring functions in place. Also, during the period analysed the CAMELS rating system was introduced to evaluate the health of financial institutions (IMF 2003). In


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

terms of governance characteristics, the legal framework establishes that bank boards in Costa Rica must be only formed by outsiders. This is a relevant feature as many papers focus on the presence and the size of outside board members. For example, Adams et al. (2010) find that outside board members have a positive influence on firm performance and that better performing firms are motivated to add independent members to the board. In fact, outside directors may function as a substitute in corporate governance for lower levels of inside ownership. Even in a context with no insiders in the board, we can observe how the decision on promoting an inside or an outside CEO has important implications. In addition, we distinguish two firm types: shareholder-oriented banks and stakeholder-oriented banks and check for the importance of ownership in terms of performance. Our paper contributes to the literature on the effectiveness of control mechanisms in several ways. First we address the relevant question of whether unpredicted changes in the board and in the chairman position positively affect performance in an emerging economy. Corporate governance literature provides some insights about the expected effect on performance of changes in the board. Firms change their boards to improve the quality of decision making processes and firm performance from the shareholders’ perspective (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). A more independent board is more likely to actively monitor managers and respond faster to poor performance, a fact that could signal a higher quality of board’s ability in its main responsibility: to select, monitor and replace managers (Adams et al. 2010). However, we find a negative effect on performance after large changes in the board, especially when this intervention occurs in stakeholder-oriented firms. The replacement of board

members in those stakeholder-oriented banks is negatively linked to performance changes, while CEO turnover seems to be the key (and positive) type of intervention for shareholder-oriented banks. Second, by examining the relation between the characteristics of the succession process in the chairman position and changes in performance in shareholder and stakeholder-oriented firms, we also provide new evidence on whether this governance intervention plays a disciplinary role or just reflects a transition process. Third, concerning the relation between CEO turnover and performance changes, we are interested on testing if those boards more aligned with the principal make better decisions concerning CEO replacements. Denis and Denis (1995), Borokhovich et al. (1996), Epure and Lafuente (2015), Huson et al. (2004), and Zhang and Rajagopalan (2010) report a positive relation between future performance and the appointment of outside CEOs. They only study shareholder-oriented firms and these authors suggest that incoming managers from outside are perceived as good news by shareholders because this could imply an increase in managerial quality. This result is also confirmed in our analysis. Although we have information concerning the chairman departure (through the contract dates) we miss the information for the CEO, and thus we cannot distinguish among the different reasons behind the CEO departure. Finally, and following the growing call about the need to test governance predictions in organisations other than shareholder-oriented firms (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003), we extend the analysis to a sample of both shareholder-oriented and stakeholderoriented firms, obtaining some important differences in their behaviour. We are also aware of the presence of joint endogeneity problems commonly found in corporate governance literature (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). To overcome this, we employ the system generalized method of moments (GMM) regression technique. Also, we focus on performance changes after the activation of control mechanisms to obtain more direct evidence on the effect of these events on future performance. We find that within the banks in our sample, the use of different governance interventions help discipline those managers performing poorly. We report a positive relation between

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

•

TEC EMPRESARIAL

5


CEO replacement and changes in firm performance, especially when the CEO is an outsider. Furthermore, we report that performance improvements are only statistically significant for shareholder-oriented banks. Concerning board replacements, we find that they are not a relevant governance intervention for explaining changes in firm performance in general. Only after controlling for unexpected changes in the board, we do find a significant negative effect on changes in banking firms’ performance. This is especially true for stakeholder-oriented banks. This finding could indicate that for stakeholder-oriented banks, large changes in the board imply the inclusion of members with different and, maybe, conflicting objectives, a fact that is detrimental to the quality of the governance system in these firms. Finally, our empirical findings also reveal that the type of departure and the succession process of the chairman also matter in certain scenarios. In particular, the appointment of an outside chairman exerts an effect on changes in firm performance depending on whether the removal was unexpected or not. Can we establish a systematic relation between ownership types and performance? Not really, but we do find some relation between ownership type and the corporate governance interventions used by firms. Furthermore, this relation is linked to changes in performance. The remainder of the paper is organised as follows. Section two comprises a summary of the Costa Rican financial system, and describes the main organisational features for the firms that participate in the banking system. Section three presents our theoretical framework. Section four describes the methodological approach, while the empirical results are presented in section five. Final conclusions are displayed in section six.

THE COSTA RICAN BANKING SYSTEM BACKGROUND In Costa Rica, like in most developing countries, deregulation processes in the banking system have taken place seeking an improvement in monitoring activities

6

TEC EMPRESARIAL

•

VOL 13 - No. 3

by regulators as well as an increase in competitiveness between banking firms. Before 1980, the Costa Rican banking system was tightly regulated in terms of both interest rates and activities. In 1984, the Costa Rican Central Bank initiated a reform process aiming at eliminating its influence on bank interest rate pricing policies. Despite the market constraints, the new participants in the Costa Rican banking system consolidated. In 1990, a new reform process was launched, with important consequences for the financial system. First, the breakdown of the demand deposit monopoly took place in 1992, and the privately owned banks were allowed to openly capture resources from the population. Second, all state owned and privately owned banks were allowed to grant loans and operate in a foreign currency (US dollar). In 1995 further reforms were undertaken to improve the supervision tasks, transparency and competitiveness amongst financial firms (IMF 2003). Due to the increase in the number of participants and the complexity of the banking system, the Costa Rican Central Bank created the Superintendent of Financial Entities (SUGEF). SUGEF is a supervisory agency that monitors banking firms and operates as an independent organisation closely linked to the Costa Rican Central Bank. Similar policies were adopted in the securities and pension funds markets, and agencies were created to monitor these markets. These latter reforms led to creating, in 1997, the National Council of Supervision of the Financial System. This administrative unit of the Costa Rican Central Bank is the main supervisory authority of the financial system, and is in charge of monitoring and coordinating the work of the banking system superintendents, the stock market, and the pension fund operators (IMF 2003). Thus, full disclosure of bank activities occurred in 1997. The last reform in the regulatory framework took place in 2001. To enhance monitoring, SUGEF introduced the CAMELS rating framework to further evaluate the health of financial institutions (IMF 2003). This scheme allows SUGEF to monitor six major aspects of financial firms: capital adequacy, asset quality, management soundness, earnings, liquidity, and sensitivity to market risk (SUGEF 2000). SUGEF uses the CAMELS framework as well as other qualitative tools to monitor all firms that participate in the financial system, including: state-owned commercial banks, private commercial banks, mutual banks,


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

cooperative banks, financial conglomerates, financial (non-banking) firms, credit unions and currency exchange offices. However, for the purposes of this paper, and given the significant operational differences that exist between these firms, we focus our analysis on those banking firms that operate under the same market conditions, that is, the state-owned commercial banks, private commercial banks, mutual banks and cooperative banks.

OWNERSHIP TYPES Four types of banks jointly participate in the Costa Rican banking system. The first group, the state owned banks, is fully owned by the Costa Rican government. These banks basically aim to promote any kind of productive activity, along with the development of depressed areas. These banks, as well as the Costa Rican Central Bank, are considered independent firms since politicians, in accordance with the financial law, do not influence their managerial decisions. This group controlled over 55% of the deposit and loans market in 2004. Privately owned banks form the second group. Private shareholders hold these firms whose goal is to maximise shareholder value (i.e., profit maximisation behaviour). In 2004, this group controlled nearly 34% of the loans market and 32.77% of all deposits. The third group is the mutual mortgage banks. They are not-for-profit firms. Furthermore, their activity is linked to a specific economic objective established by the government: to grant low adjustable interest rate mortgages, and allocate the governmental resources that facilitate mortgage credits to underprivileged families. The mutual mortgage banks controlled, in 2004, 4.00% and 4.28% of the asset and deposit market, respectively. Concerning their deposit portfolio, both the state owned banks and the mutual mortgage banks are totally guaranteed by the government. The last group is made up of cooperative financial firms. These firms are owned by cooperative members and their primary objective is to attend the financial

needs of their customers (cooperative members or not). They also promote the development of the cooperative partners’ geographical areas. Similarly to the previous banking groups, their capability for financial activities is now unrestricted. Concerning their market share, in 2004 these firms accounted for 7% and 7.95% of the loans and deposit market, respectively. We consider important to remark that these firms differ widely in their organisational structure and their objectives. On the one hand, private banks are shareholder-oriented firms that have profit maximisation as their primary objective. On the other hand, the rest of banking firms can be deemed as stakeholder-oriented firms aiming multiple goals, more related to the access to financial products and services to as many citizens as possible, as well as other social purposes. Agency theory suggests that in the presence of multiple stakeholders, stakeholder-oriented firms will exhibit lower monetary returns as compared with shareholder-oriented firms. In contrast, owners of commercial banks have a common objective function and they have strong incentives to exert a more active monitoring over managers (Shleifer and Vishny 1997; Macey and O’Hara 2003).

BOARD COMPOSITION: BETWEEN MASTERS AND SERVANTS All Costa Rican banking firms operate under the same regulatory regime. However, some important considerations should be made regarding the composition of their boards. According to the national financial law, the banking firm’s board has to be fully composed by outside members1. Consequently, the positions of Chairman and CEO cannot be vested in the same person. This regulatory constraint is in accordance with several corporate governance activists who have expressed their concern about the importance of firm’s leadership structure. In this sense, Fama and Jensen (1983) and Jensen (1993) claim that concentration of decision control in one individual reduces board’s effectiveness and leaves internal control

1 Unfortunately we lack the necessary data to distinguish independent outside members. The Ley del Sistema Bancario Nacional 1644, coming into force in 1953, regulates the composition of the board for the state owned banks in the articles 20th to 37th, as well as for privately owned banks (articles 144th to 149th). For the mutual mortgage banks, this is stated in the articles 76th to 82nd of the Ley del Sistema Financiero Nacional de la Vivienda 7052 coming into force the 13th of November, 1986; and finally, board composition for the cooperative banks is regulated in the articles 46th, 51st, 52nd, 54th and 55th of the Ley de Asociaciones Cooperativas 4179 coming into force the 28th of August, 1968.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

7


mechanisms in a weaker position for disciplining poor managers. In addition, the law remarks that board members should attend the meetings previously determined by each bank, and can only receive meeting fees as compensation. Furthermore, from the regulatory scheme of the Costa Rican banking system we can also obtain the specific conditions that the different bank types must obey in what concerns their boards. In the case of the state-owned banks, and despite the managerial independence of these banks from the Central Government, the financial law tells us that boards must have seven members designated by the Council of Ministers for periods different from the Government’s term of office. In addition, board members neither can be part of the board in any other banking board nor shareholders of commercial banks. These characteristics lead us to suspect that state-owned banks are governed by boards that are more likely to behave as political servants rather than active monitors. Concerning the shareholder-oriented banks, an additional legal constraint prevents board members to participate in the board or in the managerial team of any other bank. As regard board size, each bank determines the number of members in the board, being the only legal requirement that the board must have more than 5 members. There is no impediment concerning the possibility that shareholders sit on the board in these banks but we lack this information. As we indicate in section 4, our data does not allow us to identify board’s shareholding, which represents a limitation in this study. Nevertheless, the presence of an objective linked to the maximisation of shareholders’ residual income allows us to argue that in these firms the board will be more aligned with the principal. Finally, the regulatory regime establishes some legal considerations for the mutual mortgage and cooperative banks. In the former, their boards are restricted to have between 5 and 7 non-executive members, and these members must be mutual partners. For the latter, board size is conditioned to be an odd number over 5 members, and board seats are not exclusive for cooperative partners. However, board members cannot hold a position in any other financial firm. As a summary, the Costa Rican banking system has four types of financial firms that jointly participate in the market. We split them in two groups according to their

8

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

ownership type, shareholder-oriented and stakeholderoriented firms. Boards are fully composed by outsiders and generally small in size. The financial law restricts the composition and remuneration scheme of the board of directors, but it facilitates the access to more detailed information in terms of the nature of the executive turnover and the origin of the successors. This will allow us to compare the effect on performance of the different managerial turnovers according to the characteristics of managers and the firm type.

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE: THEORY AND HYPOTHESES Governance mechanisms are the organisational controls that reduce conflicts amongst the firm’s stakeholders pursuing the maximisation of their welfare. There are two main views concerning corporate governance goals: Shleifer and Vishny (1997) put their emphasis on the maximisation of shareholder value, whereas Tirole (2001) considers stakeholders’ welfare, and he remarks that when a governance mechanism takes place, a reaction in firm behaviour is expected to improve both controlling and noncontrolling stakeholders’ welfare. Although corporate governance has become an important research topic, existing empirical evidence mostly focuses on large and publicly traded enterprises in developed economies, which only represent a small portion of the population of firms (Claessens and Yurtoglu 2013). Concerning the banking industry, and despite its relevance there are still few papers focusing on banks’ corporate governance (Macey and O’Hara 2003; Crespí et al. 2004; De Andrés and Vallelado, 2008; Laeven and Levine, 2009; Erkens et al., 2012). Although banks show important operating differences with respect to firms in other industrial sectors, the lack of research about governance in this sector is especially surprising since banks play a strategic role in an economy (Rajan and Zingales 1998). Banking firms also face problems derived from inefficient control and monitoring since there is a conflict of interests between shareholders and depositors. We examine the effect that three governance interventions (CEO turnover, changes in the board


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

members and chairman replacement) have upon changes in firm performance in firms with different organisational structures. Furthermore, looking at the effect that previous changes in the governance system exert on changes in firm performance allows us to control for potential joint–endogeneity problems due to time considerations.

firm. Hence, voluntary departure is not a signal of poor management or performance, and consequently, firm’s future performance is expected to show smaller variations when compared with unexpected departures. Thus, the problem in identifying the type of departure only adds noise to our variable, which could lead to a downward biased result.

We first evaluate the effect that CEO turnover and the type of the new manager have on changes in firm performance. CEO turnover is a process often linked to the monitoring task of the board. Thus, when there is a poor performing CEO the board can exert its monitoring role and replace him/her to enhance firm performance (Hermalin and Weisbach 1998). However, existent empirical evidence on the relation between CEO replacement and future performance shows mixed results. This can be explained by the presence of several factors that affect the likelihood of CEO turnover, such as the independence of the board members, the presence of large investors, and the participation in stock markets. On the one hand, there exists evidence suggesting a positive effect of CEO turnover on shareholders’ wealth and firm operations (Denis and Denis 1995). Using a detailed database of US firms for the period 1985–1988, these authors show that CEO turnover has a positive effect on operating performance, especially for the case of unexpected departures. Similarly, Borokhovich et al. (1996), Huson et al. (2004) and Zhang and Rajagopalan (2010) report a statistically significant positive change in firm performance after CEO departures followed by a new CEO appointed from outside the firm. On the other hand, CEO replacement might be also seen as a negative signal consequence of poor managerial performance, leading to a fall in both firm value and future outcomes. Along with this interpretation, Warner et al. (1988) find that stock price changes are not influenced by CEO turnover, whereas Khanna and Poulsen (1995) report that in distressed firms stock prices negatively react to turnover announcements.

Concerning the type of successor, firms can appoint an insider or an outsider as CEO. When firms decide to promote an internal candidate to manage the firm, an insider, we do not expect that this type of succession will lead to significant improvements in firm performance, since the new CEO is more likely to continue with the traditional policies and routines within the firm. In the latter case, and as Huson et al. (2004) point out, we argue that a firm hires an outsider CEO seeking an organisational change derived from this new agent who is not influenced by the current schemes of the firm. Furthermore, the appointment of outside managers could imply a larger increase in firm performance, since they are expected to introduce new practices to employees in order to improve operating performance. Consequently, the first hypothesis to be tested becomes:

At this point, it is important to remark that, due to data availability, we focus on the origin of the successor rather than the type of departure. We are aware of the importance in distinguishing between voluntary and unexpected replacements. Nonetheless, Hermalin and Weisbach (2003), and Huson et al. (2004) remark that a voluntary CEO turnover can be due to retirement or the acceptance of some external offer to manage another

H1: (a) CEO turnover increases future firm performance. (b) CEO turnover followed by the appointment of an outsider increases future firm performance. Our second governance intervention deals with changes in the board and its influence on changes in firm performance. Within any organisation, the board of directors is widely recognized to play an important role in corporate governance in monitoring and disciplining managers (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). When the board does not fulfil this monitoring task, replacement of its members appears as a solution to enhance firm performance. Empirical evidence on the role of the board mostly focuses on the effect that board size and composition have upon performance. As regard board size, Yermack (1996), and Eisenberg et al. (1998) find that there is negative relation between board size and performance. This indicates that larger boards are less efficient since free-riding problems within the board rise. Concerning board composition, evidence provided by Hermalin and

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

9


H2: (a) Board turnover positively affects future firm performance.

(b) The relation between board turnover and future firm performance is stronger for unexpected departures.

Weisbach (1991) and Mehran (1995) do not support the positive relation between more independent boards and performance. In fact, Hermalin and Weisbach (1998) suggest that poor performing firms increase their outside directors, leading to the insignificant relation between performance and more independent boards reported in the literature. As we indicate in Section 3, board composition in the Costa Rican banking system is clearly defined in the regulatory framework, since the national financial law states that the bank’s boards have to be outsiders, i.e., members of the board cannot be part of the managerial team. In this case, regulation reduces the bank’s ability to incorporate executive directors into the board. Furthermore, controlling for board composition alleviates the potential endogeneity problems between board composition and performance (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003), a fact that leads us to focus the analysis on the type of departure. We examine the relation between board and firm performance by examining the influence that changes in the board (natural or unexpected) have upon changes in firm performance. We expect that firms change their boards in order to improve firm performance (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). Furthermore, we also expect a positive relation between unexpected board replacements and firm performance: unpredicted changes in the board might be consequence of poor performance results, and if corporate governance works, the new board members show a more active involvement in their roles, aiming to signal their competence and expertise to both the principal and the director’s market (Weisbach 1988; Fama and Jensen 1993). From this argument we formulate our second hypothesis:

10

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Finally, we also consider the replacement of the chairman. Since the chairman can monitor and exert his/ her power in the corporate decision making process, his/ her replacement might be a determining event in the life of the firm altering its performance. We argue that chairman turnover positively affects firm performance due to an improvement in the monitoring role of the board and the decision making process. Nevertheless, we must also pay attention to the type of departure and succession, since predicted replacement of the chairman position reflects a natural transition process for any firm. If this is the case, no change is expected in firm performance since organisational routines remain unchanged. Furthermore, the complementarities between the type of departure and the type of succession might be critical for future operating and corporate performance. The appointment of a chairman from outside the firm after a natural departure is unlikely to have a significant effect on the board members, since board members could perceive that there is no need to change the board routines and processes. In fact, the board could create social barriers to neutralize the new chairman efforts. Conversely, an unexpected departure of the chairman followed by the arrival of an outsider can indeed pursue an organisational change that aims to improve firm performance. The third hypothesis reads as follows:

H3: (a) Chairman turnover increases future firm performance.

(b) The relation between the appointment of an outside chairman and changes in performance is stronger for the case of unexpected departures. Agency theory usually links active monitoring over managers to shareholder-oriented firms. Nevertheless, our setting includes firms where the governance system


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

is affected due to the presence of different stakeholders (debtholders, employees and politicians). In this sense, should we expect that shareholder-oriented firms show a more active disciplinary behaviour over managers? Tirole (2001) shows that the major governance problem faced by firms with multiple goals is to evaluate the quality of decision making. Managers of stakeholder-oriented firms can not clearly know along which lines they will be evaluated, a fact that reduces their incentives. Hence, managers can justify poor (economic) performance results (as compared with those exhibited by competitors) on the basis that other costly objectives more linked to the firm, such as social responsibility or local implication, were better fulfilled. Based on this argument, we attempt to provide new evidence on whether the effectiveness in the implementation of this disciplinary mechanism differs when comparing shareholder and stakeholder-oriented banks. Similarly, we are also interested in exploring whether changes in the board equally enhance performance in shareholder and stakeholder-oriented firms. Arguably, firms that have to respond to potential conflicts amongst their multiple stakeholders in the boardroom usually increase the cost of decision making processes, which could be observed in unfocussed goals and lower levels of decision quality (Tirole 2001). Furthermore, the difference in the objective functions between shareholder and stakeholder-oriented firms leads us to conjecture that the sensibility of changes in performance to changes in the board reveals the effectiveness of governance systems where performance is the dominant objective. Finally, we also estimate an alternative specification to test whether large changes in the board (more than 50%) have an effect on performance changes and if so, check if the impact depends on the firm type.

H4: (a) The relation between CEO turnover and future performance is stronger for shareholder-oriented firms.

(b) The effect of Chairman turnover and large board replacements on future performance is weaker for stakeholder-oriented firms.

DATA AND METHOD DATA The information to carry out this paper comes from the Costa Rican Central Bank for the period 1999–2004. Although the period under analysis witnessed a limited number of mergers and acquisitions, we decided to use an unbalanced panel data, which includes all the commercial banking firms for each year considered in the analysis. The final sample consists of state owned banks, mutual mortgage banks, privately owned banks, and cooperative financial firms. For the period under analysis, we include all 3 existing commercial state owned banks and the 3 mutual mortgage banks. Concerning the number of privately-owned banks, it decreased from 16 in 1999 to 12 in 2004, due to mergers and acquisitions undergone in the market. Finally, the cooperative financial firms account for 25 firms for the period 1999–2003 and 24 in 2004. The total sample size calculated over the period under analysis is 275. Descriptive statistics are presented in Table 1, as well as the frequencies for changes in the CEO, board and in the chairman positions. Concerning the dependent variable, we measure economic performance through three alternative measures: the net interest margin (NIM) which is the difference between interest income and interest expense relative to total assets, the ratio of operating profit to total assets (ROA), and the ratio of net profit to equity (ROE). Since we aim to measure the differential effect of governance interventions upon performance, we introduce these variables as changes between the year t-1 and t. We remark that market based measures cannot be used since only six privately owned banks are listed in 2004. From Table 1 we observe that the average NIM rate stood at 6.69% for the period under analysis, whereas mean ROE and ROA was 10.80% and 2.55%, respectively. In addition, it can be observed that state owned banks are the largest in terms of size and they also show the highest ROE ratio for the period under analysis (15.26%). Due to the legal framework both private and cooperative banks accumulate more capital, while state-owned banks and the mutuals enjoy the government endorsement. This can be observed in the figures of Table 1, where the mean ROA is larger for private and cooperative banks, whereas state owned and

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

•

TEC EMPRESARIAL

11


Concerning the independent variables related to

mutual banks show higher mean ROE rates. Concerning our lending performance variable, cooperative banks show

corporate governance interventions, our data allows us to

the highest NIM (8.75%), a rate that more than doubles

distinguish different types of management changes, i.e.,

that shown by private banks (3.91%). As control variables

CEO, board and chairman turnovers; as well as the exact

we include bank size, measured by total assets (lagged),

date of departure. Figure 1 presents the timing to identify

interaction terms between size and ownership type, and

governance interventions. Here, we consider that firm

time dummies to account for the influence of competition

performance in period t-1 provides relevant information to

over time.

stakeholders and the board that could contribute to decide

Table 1. Descriptive statistics for the variables considered in the analysis State owned banks

Private owned banks

Mutual mortgage banks

Cooperative financial firms

Overall

Net Interest Margin (NIM)

0.0470 (0.0102)

0.0391 (0.0167)

0.0576 (0.0085)

0.0875 (0.0371)

0.0669 (0.0369)

Returns on Assets (ROA)

0.0162 (0.0101)

0.0175 (0.0105)

0.0128 (0.0063)

0.0331 (0.0373)

0.0255 (0.0293)

Returns on Equity (ROE)

0.1526 (0.0743)

0.1332 (0.0768)

0.1460 (0.0565)

0.0824 (0.0893)

0.1080 (0.0869)

585,090.10 (375,014.40)

70,945.45 (77,671.27)

43,270.95 (28,652.29)

5,432.64 (7,990.91)

67,607.69 (174,808.10)

Equity / Assets

0.0805 (0.0311)

0.1280 (0.0582)

0.0700 (0.0160)

0.3338 (0.1783)

0.2321 (0.1783)

Board size

7.0000 (0.0000)

7.4400 (2.0615)

5.6667 (0.4880)

7.6667 (1.0532)

7.4167 (1.4980)

Total assets (million of 2004 Costa Rican colones)

Δ CEO t-1 (Total)

1

11

0

8

20

Promoted

0

1

0

3

4

Hired from outside

1

10

0

5

16

15

41

6

185

247

8

22

5

163

198

7

19

1

22

49

3

10

9

37

59

Natural replacements

0

5

5

31

41

Unexpected replacements

3

5

4

6

18

Promoted

3

4

9

30

46

Hired from outside

0

6

0

7

13

Number of observations

18

91

18

148

275

Δ Board t-1 (Total) Natural replacements Unexpected replacements Δ Chairman t-1 (Total)

The sample includes information for the Costa Rican banking firms between 1999 and 2004. Net interest margin is calculated as the difference between interest income and interest expense relative to total assets. Return on equity is measured as the ratio of net profit to equity, and return on assets is defined as the ratio of operating profit divided by total assets. Total assets are expressed in million of 2004 Costa Rican colones. Board size is the average number of members in the board. CEO turnover, changes in the board and chairman removals are the sum of these events and their corresponding categories (type of departure and nature of the successor). Standard deviations are presented in brackets.

12

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

whether or not implement control mechanisms aiming to improve firm performance. At this stage, stakeholders can decide that the board is doing a poor monitoring task. In this case, governance intervention takes place to improve future performance, and this event is reflected as changes in the board or the replacement of the chairman (Figure 1). Also, the board can inform to stakeholders that the CEO is the main responsible for the poor performance showed by the firm. Hence, the board can intervene by replacing the general manager in order to enhance performance in the following period.

Performance in period t-2

Performance in period t-1

t-1

Performance in period t

t

Time

Corporate decision:

Activation of Governance Mechanisms aiming to improve preformance

Figure 1. Timing of control mechanisms The figure shows the sequence of events that relates control mechanisms and changes in firm performance. The activation of a control mechanism in period t-1 is expected to exert an effect on firm performance variation between periods t-1 and t.

We are interested in clearly identifying and distinguishing those governance interventions that are expected to influence performance in the following period from those that are not because of time considerations. Consequently, we consider that a governance mechanism corresponds to a specific period only if this intervention took place between the second half of year t-1 and the first half of period t2 . For CEO turnover, we create two dummy variables that take the value of one if the successor is from inside or outside the firm, and zero otherwise. We identify

an internally promoted replacement if the new CEO was either in the board or in the top managerial team in the year prior his/her appointment. In this case, it is important to remark that from the data set it is not possible to differentiate natural CEO removals from unexpected ones. From Table 1 we observe that the CEO removal rate is 8.77% for the period under analysis. The CEO turnover rate is similar to that reported by Denis and Denis (1995) and Weisbach (1988) for US firms (9.3% and 7.8%, respectively), by Conyon (1998) for the UK (8%), and lower than that found by Gibson (2003) for eight emerging economies (12.2%). In addition, the mutual mortgage banks are the only financial firms that did not experience any CEO turnover in the period under analysis; whereas the only CEO replaced in state owned banks was followed by a candidate hired from outside the firm. Privately owned banks show a CEO turnover rate of 14.67% (91% of removals were followed by outsiders). Finally, the CEO turnover rate for the cooperative banks is also low (6.50%) and 63% of these removals were followed by the appointment of individuals from outside the firm. Concerning changes in the board, we consider the exit rate from the board. Based on this definition turnover refers to the percentage of directors of a given board that left the position in the reference period. We distinguish between natural and unexpected board turnovers through a feature of our data set that indicates the contract termination date. Furthermore, knowing that only nonexecutive members can sit on the board, we consider the variation rate in the board for those cases when the turnover was natural and unexpected separately. Unfortunately, we cannot identify those members in the board that are also shareholders. From Table 1 we observe that, on average, boards in the sample consist of 7.42 members and that mutual mortgage banks are the only banking firms whose boards have less than seven members. The result indicates that boards in the Costa Rican banking firms are smaller when compared with those reported by De AndrĂŠs and Vallelado (2008) for six OECD countries (16 members). In addition,

2 We also tested alternative definitions based on quarterly periods. Results remain unchanged and they are available from the authors.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

•

TEC EMPRESARIAL

13


boards replace 15.10% of their members per year and these changes are mainly natural (78%). Similar board turnover rates are reported by Crespí et al. (2004) for Spanish banking firms (20%).

equally distributed. For the former, 53% and 47% of board

We also observe that for state owned banks and the private ones the variation rate in the board is more

cooperative banking firms experienced the highest board

replacements represent natural and unexpected changes, respectively; whereas for the latter 53% of board changes were unexpected and 47% are catalogued as natural. The change rate (20.34%), but 88% corresponds to natural

Table 2. Sample frequencies for changes in top management positions by year 2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

N

%

3

1.00

7

1.00

2

1.00

7

1.00

1

1.00

Promoted

2

0.33

0

0.00

0

0.00

2

0.29

0

0.00

Hired from outside

1

0.67

7

1.00

2

1.00

5

0.71

1

1.00

58

1.00

42

1.00

59

1.00

51

1.00

37

1.00

Natural replacements

48

0.83

32

0.76

43

0.73

45

0.88

30

0.81

Unexpected replacements

10

0.17

10

0.24

16

0.27

6

0.12

7

0.19

13

1.00

13

1.00

14

1.00

12

1.00

7

1.00

Natural replacements

10

0.77

7

0.54

9

0.64

10

0.83

5

0.71

Unexpected replacements

3

0.13

6

0.46

5

0.36

2

0.17

2

0.29

Promoted

8

0.62

11

0.85

11

0.79

10

0.83

6

0.86

Hired from outside

5

0.38

2

0.15

3

0.21

2

0.17

1

0.14

Δ CEO t-1 (Total)

Δ Board t-1 (Total)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Total)

N refers to the total number of changes for the different governance interventions. CEO turnover, changes in the board and chairman removals are, for each year, the sum of these events and their corresponding categories (type of departure and nature of the successor).

Table 3. Sample frequencies for simultaneous changes in top management positions

ΔChairmant-1 Λ ΔCEOt-1

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

1

2

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

4

0

0

0

0

0

ΔChairmant-2 Λ ΔCEOt-1 ΔBoard (› 50%)t-1 Λ ΔCEOt-1

1

ΔBoard (› 50%)t-2 Λ ΔCEOt-1 ΔBoard (› 50%)t-1 Λ ΔChairmant-1 ΔBoard (› 50%)t-2 Λ ΔChairmant-1

3

Total number of simultaneous changes for the different governance interventions.

14

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

changes. Finally, mutual mortgage banks show the lowest board variation rate (7.33%) and for these banking firms board changes are mainly natural (84.85%). In addition, Table 2 shows that for every year natural replacements exceed unexpected changes in the board. As regard chairman turnover, we are able to distinguish four different types of chairman replacements: natural or unexpected replacements that can be followed by an internally promoted candidate or by a person from outside the firm. The criteria used to identify an internally promoted (hired from outside) chairman is based on the presence (absence) of the individual in the board during the year prior to his/her appointment. In addition, we can observe if the chairman’s departure was natural or unexpected based on the contract termination date. Therefore, we create a set of four dummy variables corresponding to chairman turnover according to the nature of the replacement (natural or unexpected) and the origin of the new chairman (promoted or hired from outside). Also, we create a set of four interactions terms between these four dummies to test for the presence or complementarities in the chairman replacement process. From Table 1 we observe that, on average, banks replace 25.88% of their chairmen and most of these changes are natural (69.49%) followed by internal candidates (78%). The chairman turnover rate reported in this paper is higher than that found by Crespí et al. (2004), who report a chairman turnover rate of 16% for Spanish banking firms, whereas Florou (2005) finds for a sample of UK firms a chairman replacement rate of 14.17%. In the case of state-owned banks and mutual mortgage banks, all chairmen replacements were followed by internally promoted persons. The cooperative banking firms show a high rate of natural chairman turnover (83.78% of the cases) and most replacements were followed by the appointment of internal candidates (81.08%). For private banks, natural and unexpected replacements are equally distributed in the sample but most of these removals were followed by the appointment of persons from outside the bank (60%). When comparing these results it is possible to differentiate two different trends followed by the Costa Rican banking firms. On the one hand, active chairmen appointments from the market are not used by state owned and mutual mortgage banks as a governance intervention

to attain performance improvements. These banks benefit from external mechanisms such as governmental protection, as well as their position in their corresponding market niches. On the other hand, privately owned and cooperative banks are more active when it comes to the use of internal mechanisms. From Table 1 we observe that CEOs in these firms are mainly replaced by individuals hired from outside the firm. Also, chairman replacement is an important control intervention used by these firms. However, it is important to remark that for the privately owned banks chairmen removal followed by persons from outside becomes the most common pattern, whereas for the cooperative banks internal promotions follow natural replacements. Having determined that the intensity in the implementation of governance interventions differ among the Costa Rican banking firms, we examine whether shareholder oriented banks (privately-owned banks) benefit more from the implementation of governance interventions. Further, we propose to evaluate how these interventions are related to economic and operating performance.

METHOD Concerning the econometric approach, panel data analysis is the most efficient tool when the sample is a mixture of time series and cross-sectional data, since this structure allows for taking into consideration the unobservable and constant heterogeneity, i.e., the specific characteristics of each firm. In addition, we have endogeneity problems since the independent variables related to changes in the governance system could be simultaneously determined along with the dependent variable (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). Consequently, we need to use an econometric method that deals with endogeneity, as well as with the presence of firm specific unobservable fixed effects that can be correlated with some explanatory variables. We use the system Generalized Method of Moments (GMM) estimator developed by Arellano and Bover (1995) as methodological tool. This econometric method considers the unobserved effect transforming the variables into first differences, and it uses the GMM to control for endogeneity problems. The GMM procedure introduces the

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

•

TEC EMPRESARIAL

15


lagged dependent variable to control for serial dependence in this variable, and it allows for building instruments for those variables that are potentially endogenous. Under this technique, the model is estimated in both levels and first differences, as level equations are simultaneously estimated using differenced lagged regressors as instruments. In this way, apart from controlling for individual heterogeneity, variations among firms can be retained (Blundell and Bond 1998). This fact stands as a key point, since the dynamic dimension of panel data permits to check response processes across time and to identify how the firms’ governance characteristics affect their performance. Also, the system GMM estimators with adjusted standard errors are more efficient than the one-step estimator if the residuals are heteroskedastic. Furthermore, Blundell and Bond (1998) remark that the system estimator is more efficient and it improves the asymptotic efficiency of the first difference estimator when the GMM first-difference estimator shows poor performance, particularly when, as in our case, time is short. Performance is assumed to be a function of a set of independent variables where governance system plays an important role. To test this we propose the following regression:

[1] ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1 + β1Sizei,t-1

+ β2 Sizei,t-1 ×Bank Typei,t + β3ΔCEOi,t-1 + β4ΔBoardi,t-1 + β5ΔChairmani,t-1 + ψt + υi,t where i = 1,...,N and t=1,...,T represent the cross-sectional units and the time periods, respectively, while ψt is the time-specific effect and υi,t = εi + νi,t is the error term containing an unobserved time-invariant, firm-specific effect (εi ) that controls for unobservable heterogeneity (like geographic location), and a stochastic error term varying cross-time and cross-section(νi,t ). As mentioned in section 3, agency theory postulates that changes in the governance system aim to enhance firm performance. To corroborate our hypotheses about the presence of a positive effect of governance interventions upon performance we expect β3 > 0 (H1a), β4 > 0(H2a) and β5 > 0(H3a).

16

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

In a second stage we run a set of regressions where we consider the differential characteristics of board changes, as well as CEO and chairman turnovers. The full model to be estimated follows:

[2] ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1+ δ1Sizei,t-1

+ δ2 Sizei,t-1 ×Bank Typei,t + δ3ΔCEOi,t-1 + δ5ΔBoardi,t-1 + δ6ΔBoardi,t-1 + δ8ΔChairmani,t-1 + δ10ΔChairmani,t-1

+ δ4ΔCEOi,t-1

+ δ7ΔChairmani,t-1

+ δ9ΔChairmani,t-1 + ψt + υi,t

Based on our theory, we expect that the appointment of a CEO from outside the bank leads to the achievement of organisational changes that improve firm performance (H1b: δ4>0). We also want to confirm that unexpected board departures imply an increase in the monitoring task for the firm(H2b: δ6>0). And finally, we expect that δ8<0 and δ10>0, i.e., the appointment of a chairman from outside the banking firm affects firm performance depending on the nature of the replacement (natural or unexpected) (H3b). Finally, and given the differences in ownership types, we extend the analysis by evaluating the effectiveness of control mechanisms between shareholder and stakeholder-oriented firms. Theoretical arguments by Shleifer and Vishny (1997) emphasise that the presence of multiple stakeholders with different objective functions can negatively affect the quality of governance because decision making processes become unfocussed. This implies that shareholder-oriented firms, with profit maximisation as objective, will monitor managers more effectively, and consequently, the activation of control mechanisms will be clearly linked to improvements in performance. Hence, we explore the effectiveness of governance systems in shareholder and stakeholderoriented companies by estimating the following regression:

[3] ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1+ γ1Sizei,t-1

+ γ2 Sizei,t-1 ×Private Banki,t + γ3ΔCEOi,t-1 + γ4ΔCEOi,t-1 ×Private Banki,t + γ5ΔBoardi,t-1 + γ6ΔCEOi,t-1 ×Private Banki,t + γ7ΔDChairmani,t-1 + γ8ΔDChairmani,t-1 ×Private Banki,t + ψt + υi,t


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Using this notation, we can rewrite our last hypotheses as follows:

• Hypothesis 4a: γ3 < 0, γ4 > 0 • Hypothesis 4b: γ5 < 0, γ6 > 0 and γ7 < 0, γ8 > 0 Our formulation implies that the effect of changes in the CEO position is stronger for private banks rather than stakeholder-oriented banks (H4a). Similarly, we expect that γ5 + γ6 > γ5 or γ6 > 0 and γ7 + γ8 > γ7 , meaning that changes in the board and in the chairman position are negatively correlated with future performance in stakeholder-oriented banks. As a measure of goodness of fit, we first present the result of the Wald test of joint significance for all the independent variables. We also test model specification validity through the Hansen–Sargan test of overidentification. In particular, this procedure proposed by Arellano and Bond (1991) examines whether the instrumental variables are uncorrelated to the residuals3. Finally, we test for the presence of first and second degree serial correlation amongst the error terms. Failure to reject the null hypothesis of no second-order serial correlation could indicate that valid orthogonality conditions are used and the instruments are valid.

RESULTS GOVERNANCE INTERVENTIONS AND PERFORMANCE In Table 4 we present the results of the first application, which only considers CEO, board and chairman turnovers as independent variables, irrespectively of the characteristics of those changes4. Our empirical findings

indicate that CEO turnover exerts a statistically significant effect upon changes in firm performance. This result is consistent with our hypothesis H1a and is similar to those reported by Denis and Denis (1995), Gibson (2003), and Huson et al. (2004). From Table 4 one can also observe that neither changes in the board nor chairman replacements explain changes in performance. Furthermore, we also estimate an alternative specification to test whether large changes in the board have an influence on changes in performance (specification 2 in Table 4). More specifically, we include in the analysis a dummy variable that takes the value of one if a large change in the board took place (more than 50%), and zero otherwise. For this variable, we report a statistically significant negative effect only when the variation in NIM is the dependent variable. This leads us to partially reject H2a. From the board perspective, the finding could reveal that large board replacements implies the appointment of new members who could lack expertise in board tasks, and their decisions can negatively alter bank’s lending policies, and loan or deposit mix in the short-run. Results for the variable reflecting chairman turnover are not statistically significant. Hence, we reject H3a since the activation of this governance intervention does not seem to be linked to performance in a significant way. (See Table 4) Concerning the possible interaction among different governance interventions, we have also controlled for simultaneous effects, both with and without delay5. As the figures contained in Table 4 show, their effect is rather small and not significant. The result of the Sargan test reported in Table 4 indicates that there is no correlation between instruments and error terms, providing evidence that valid instruments are used. Also, the estimates of the AR (1) and AR (2) lead us to maintain that the error terms are not serially correlated.

3 The null hypothesis of the Sargan test states that the instruments are correlated with the error terms. Failure to reject the null hypothesis provides evidence that valid instruments are being used. 4 Estimation of equations [1] and [2] using the first difference GMM are not presented due to lack of space but they are available from the authors. The results of the Sargan test provide evidence that the lagged levels dated t–2 as instruments are not valid in the first difference GMM model. Our estimates of the AR (1) coefficients show that the lagged levels of variables provide weak instruments in the first difference GMM model. 5 Specification (3) in Table 4 was also estimated considering the variables that reflect significant changes in the board and replacement in the chairman position as lagged terms. Results are not shown due to lack of space but they remain unchanged and they are available from the authors.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

17


Table 4. The relation between governance interventions and changes in firm performance Δ Net interest margin

Δ Return on assets

Δ Return on equity

(1)

(2)

(3)

(1)

(2)

(3)

(1)

(2)

(3)

Size (ln assets) t-1

-0.3730 (0.7013)

-0.7823 (0.5475)

-0.6558 (0.5619)

0.0029 (0.0106)

0.0026 (0.0108)

0.0018 (0.0101)

0.0104 (0.0402)

0.0110 (0.0425)

0.0094 (0.0438)

Size t-1×private owned banks

-1.0951 * (0.6076)

-0.8660 * (0.4899)

-0.9157 * (0.5013)

-0.0050 (0.0080)

-0.0046 (0.0079)

-0.0039 (0.0081)

-0.0357 (0.0339)

-0.0355 (0.0331)

-0.0343 (0.0339)

Size t-1×mutual mortgage banks

0.0914 (0.6389)

0.1008 (0.5080)

-0.0039 (0.5014)

-0.0005 (0.0073)

-0.0012 (0.0070)

-0.0007 (0.0074)

-0.0443 (0.0336)

-0.0393 (0.0332)

-0.0383 (0.0341)

Size t-1×cooperative banks

0.2265 (0.5575)

0.4891 (0.4077)

0.4268 (0.4259)

-0.0041 (0.0081)

-0.0039 (0.0080)

-0.0035 (0.0083)

-0.0401 (0.0341)

-0.0397 (0.0327)

-0.0388 (0.0332)

Δ CEO t-1

0.4529 ** (0.2021)

0.4957 ** (0.2426)

0.3855 * (0.2335)

0.0033 * (0.0019)

0.0033 * (0.0019)

0.0039 * (0.0021)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1

-0.2376 (0.4899)

-0.0148 (0.1074)

Δ Chairman t-1

0.0078 (0.0093)

-0.0023 (0.0034) -0.9217 ** -0.9605 ** (0.3858) (0.3995)

Δ Board of directors (>50%) t-1

0.0472 (0.1101)

0.0065 (0.1101)

0.0010 (0.0017)

0.0177 *** 0.0176 *** 0.0182 *** (0.0070) (0.0070) (0.0071)

-0.0018 (0.0020)

-0.0013 (0.0035)

0.0010 (0.0017)

0.0010 (0.0018)

-0.0028 (0.0061)

0.0027 (0.0071)

0.0021 (0.0072)

-0.0028 (0.0062)

-0.0027 (0.0064)

Δ Chairman t-1 Λ Δ CEO t-1

0.9201 (0.7868)

-0.0047 (0.0069)

-0.0056 (0.0223)

Δ Board of directors (>50%) t-1

-0.1011

0.0001

0.0021

Λ Δ Chairman t-1

(0.4749)

(0.0037)

(0.0114)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Intercept

0.0342 (0.0732)

0.1028 (0.0750)

0.0959 (0.0749)

0.0003 (0.0017)

0.0002 (0.0018)

0.0003 (0.0015)

0.0055 (0.0051)

0.0052 (0.0058)

0.0053 (0.0060)

Wald test (chi2)

71.92 ***

92.50 ***

132.26 **

37.95 ***

58.58 ***

65.08 ***

44.78 ***

42.17 ***

52.13 ***

Sargan test

4.37

4.28

4.30

7.35

7.57

7.40

4.94

5.01

5.02

Test for AR1

-1.65 *

-1.37

-1.32

-0.38

-0.31

-0.31

-1.49

-1.54

-1.52

Test for AR2

-1.43

-1.34

-1.38

-1.13

-1.04

-1.09

0.50

0.48

0.47

Time dummies

Regressions are estimated as follow (equation 1):

ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1 + β1Size i,t-1 + β2 Size i,t-1 ×Bank Type i,t + β3 ΔCEO i,t-1 + β4 ΔBoard i,t-1 + β5 ΔChairman i,t-1 + ψt + υi,t ΔCEO dummy equal to one if we identify a change in the CEO position. Δ Chairman dummy equal to one if a change in the Chairman position took place. Board of directors (%) refers to the proportion of directors that left the board. Δ Board of directors (>50%) is a dummy variable equal to one if the exit rate from the board exceeds 50%. We also estimated an alternative specification to evaluate the joint impact of different governance interventions on changes in performance (Model 3). Dependent variables: Variation in net interest margin (NIM), variation in return on assets (ROA), and variation in return on equity (ROE). Standard errors are presented in brackets. ***, **, * indicate significance at the 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10 level, respectively.

18

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

As it has been already mentioned, one of the contributions of the paper lies in the use of more detailed information concerning the features of the different replacements, so we proceed now to examine their influence. Despite the relevance of the finding concerning managerial changes, we analyse next the effect that the dismissal and the succession characteristics of these changes have upon firm performance. Results of this second application can be found in Tables 5a and 5b. We present first the results of all organisational changes when the variation in the net interest margin (NIM) is considered as the dependent variable (Table 5a), whereas Table 5b considers changes in the returns on assets (ROA) as the dependent variable. We also estimated Equations [2] and [3] using changes in ROE as dependent variable. Results for this variable, not presented here due to space limitations, are in general weaker in terms of significance and goodness of fit. We think that the lack of significance could indicate that this variable (ROE), which includes some extraordinary results and financial figures, is more exposed to the influence of other corporate actions not related to the bankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s core activity. Therefore, we consider NIM and ROA as more informative variables about the ordinary economic performance of banking firms, and from now on our comments are based on results from these two variables. In particular, the first column in Tables 5a and 5b examines the effect of CEO turnover followed by an internally promoted candidate and by a person hired from outside the firm. The second specification considers the effect that natural and unexpected removals of board members have upon changes in firm performance. Similarly, columns three and four introduce into the analysis changes in the chairman position followed by a member of the board (internal candidate) or an individual hired from outside, as well as the natural and the unexpected changes in this position. In these specifications, chairmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s replacement and succession processes are considered as independent events. Finally, in column five we consider the different types of CEO and board removals, as well as the possible complementarities between the departure type (natural or unexpected) and the succession type (promoted or hired from outside) for the chairman. As regard measures of goodness of fit, results in Tables 5a and 5b for the Sargan test provide evidence of

the validity of the instruments used in our analysis. In addition, Tables 5a and 5b present the results for the AR (1) and AR (2) tests. Again, we fail to reject the null hypothesis of these tests, indicating that the error terms are not serially correlated. (See Table 5a and 5b) Concerning CEO turnover, our empirical findings are in accordance with those reported in Table 4, revealing that the implementation of this control mechanism has a statistically significant positive effect upon changes in firm performance (NIM and ROA). However, this is only true when the new CEO is hired from outside the firm. That is, the observed positive effect comes only from the fact of hiring an external CEO. Unlike the information on changes in the board or the chairman appointments, we do not know the contract termination date for CEOs. Nevertheless, as we mentioned earlier, we believe that voluntary CEO turnovers are unlikely to explain changes in performance and these events only add noise to our estimates (Hermalin and Weisbach 2003). Our empirical findings are in accordance with Huson et al. (2004), who find that a CEO removal followed by an outsider creates the conditions for organisational change. That is, they introduce new internal policies (organisation dynamics) that become critical to improve team effectiveness and, consequently, firm performance. The result is also consistent with our hypothesis H1b, confirming the disciplinary role that this governance mechanism plays in the Costa Rican banking firms. As expected, these results hold when we use both NIM and ROA as performance measures. Finally, an important qualification is also in order. The intensity in the implementation of this control mechanism varies significantly amongst types of financial firms. As it can be seen in the descriptive statistics (Table 1), this governance mechanism is mainly activated by shareholder-oriented banks, where in 84.65% of their removals a candidate hired from outside replaces the outgoing CEO. Thus, ownership diversity plays also a role when making a decision about the implementation of governance interventions. Concerning changes in the board, we have already argued above that this mechanism could have an influence on performance depending on the type of replacement carried out within the firm. Using the more detailed information we have on these changes, we proceed now

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

â&#x20AC;˘

TEC EMPRESARIAL

19


Table 5a. Effect of governance interventions upon changes in firm performance Δ Net interest margin

Size (ln assets) t-1 Size t-1×private owned banks Size t-1×mutual mortgage banks Size t-1×cooperative banks

Δ CEO t-1 (Promoted) Δ CEO t-1 (Hired from outside)

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

-0.1818 (0.8615) -1.0996 (0.7242) -0.0217 (0.5493) 0.1817 (0.7157)

-0.5854 (0.8232)

-0.3010 (0.5302)

-0.2133 (0.6611)

-0.9306 (0.8465)

-1.3324 (0.7232) 0.1752 (0.7289) 0.3048 (0.7009)

-1.3222 *** (0.4472) -0.2011 (0.4523)

-1.4404 ** (0.5741) -0.2676 (0.5220)

-0.6559 (0.7255) 0.6312 (0.7661)

0.0938 (0.3772)

-0.0088 (0.5034)

0.7167 (0.6820)

-0.2323 (0.6727)

-0.6589 (0.7810)

0.5725 *** (0.1881)

0.5706 *** (0.1881) 0.0957 (0.4215) -1.9619 ** (0.8417)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 (Natural)

-0.0516 (0.4433)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 (Unexpected)

-1.2285 (0.9238)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural)

-0.1664 (0.1403)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected)

0.0893 (0.2001)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Promoted)

-0.1174 (0.1175)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Hired from outside)

0.1529 (0.1388)

-

0.0520 (0.1368) 0.0962 (0.2061)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural Λ Promoted) Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural Λ Hired from outside)

0.1507 (0.2110)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected Λ Promoted)

1.1550 *** (0.1759)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected Λ Hired from outside) Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Intercept

0.0068 (0.0809)

0.0771 (0.0817)

0.0487 (0.0813)

0.0429 (0.0867)

0.0731 (0.0821)

Wald test (chi2)

54.02 ***

98.68 ***

127.40 ***

90.74 ***

848.16 ***

4.76

4.60

3.96

4.35

4.92

Time dummies

Sargan test Test for AR1 Test for AR2

-1.64

-1.50

-1.51

-1.51

-1.54

-1.35

-1.25

-1.42

-1.32

-1.12

Regressions are estimated as follow (re-writing equation 2):

ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1 + δ1Size i,t-1 + δ2 Size i,t-1 ×Bank Type i,t + ΣδkCG i,t-1 + ψt + υi,t CG represents the vector of governance mechanisms. For CEO turnover (ΔCEO), we create two dummies equal to one if the incoming CEO is from inside or outside the firm. We introduce four dummy variables corresponding to chairman turnover (ΔChairman) according to the nature of the replacement (natural or unexpected) and the origin of the successor (promoted or hired from outside).Δ Board of directors (%) refers to the proportion of directors that left the board according to the type of departure (natural or unexpected). Dependent variable: Variation in net interest margin (NIM). Standard errors are presented in brackets. ***, **, * indicate significance at the 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10 level, respectively.

20

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Table 5b. Effect of governance interventions upon changes in firm performance Δ Return on assets

Size (ln assets) t-1 Size t-1×private owned banks Size t-1×mutual mortgage banks Size t-1×cooperative banks

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

0.0058 (0.0109) -0.0056 (0.0078) -0.0022 (0.0065) -0.0046 (0.0079)

0.0050 (0.0104)

0.0029 (0.0115)

0.0038 (0.0108)

0.0040 (0.0109)

-0.0083 (0.0077) -0.0027 (0.0071) -0.0056 (0.0079)

-0.0066 (0.0092) -0.0025 (0.0087)

-0.0073 (0.0082) -0.0027 (0.0076)

-0.0044 (0.0084) 0.0003 (0.0080)

-0.0046 (0.0095)

-0.0051 (0.0085)

-0.0028 (0.0086)

Δ CEO t-1 (Promoted)

-0.0023 (0.0039)

Δ CEO t-1 (Hired from outside)

0.0043** (0.0019)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 (Natural)

-0.0010 (0.0039)

-0.0039 (0.0037) 0.0038 ** (0.0019) -0.0004 (0.0033)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 (Unexpected)

-0.0058 (0.0057)

-0.0097 ** (0.0049)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural)

0.0001 (0.0023)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected)

0.0014 (0.0014)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Promoted)

0.0010 (0.0019)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Hired from outside)

-0.0005 (0.0018)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural Λ Promoted)

0.0006 (0.0024)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Natural Λ Hired from outside)

-0.0025 (0.0021)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected Λ Promoted)

0.0009 (0.0014)

Δ Chairman t-1 (Unexpected Λ Hired from outside)

0.0060 ** (0.0027) Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Intercept

-0.0003 (0.0018)

0.0001 (0.0017)

0.0003 (0.0017)

0.0003 (0.0017)

-0.0001 (0.0017)

Wald test (chi2)

35.25 ***

30.64 ***

36.52 ***

37.39 ***

130.80 ***

Sargan test

6.51

6.28

6.65

6.52

5.86

Test for AR1

-0.27

-0.20

-0.30

-0.29

-0.09

-0.89

-1.17

-1.06

-1.09

-0.73

Time dummies

Test for AR2

Regressions are estimated as follow (re-writing equation 2):

ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1 + δ1Size i,t-1 + δ2 Size i,t-1 ×Bank Type i,t + ΣδkCG i,t-1 + ψt + υi,t CG represents the vector of governance mechanisms. For CEO turnover (ΔCEO), we create two dummies equal to one if the incoming CEO is from inside or outside the firm. We introduce four dummy variables corresponding to chairman turnover (ΔChairman) according to the nature of the replacement (natural or unexpected) and the origin of the successor (promoted or hired from outside).ΔBoard of directors (%) refers to the proportion of directors that left the board according to the type of departure (natural or unexpected). Dependent variable: Variation in net interest margin (NIM). Standard errors are presented in brackets. ***, **, * indicate significance at the 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10 level, respectively.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

21


to check these intuitions. Unexpected changes in boards could lead to the incorporation of new members who can provide fresh ideas to this body that could improve board effectiveness, concerning its monitoring activities. Our empirical findings lead to reject hypothesis H2b: unexpected replacement of board members have a negative and statistically significant effect on changes in performance (NIM and ROA). The result suggests that this governance intervention could also generate costs since it entails the hiring of new members who could lack expertise in board tasks related to a specific firm, leading to a learning process that can negatively affect firm performance. Hence, unexpected replacement of board members could imply an abrupt learning and adaptation process for them. Thus, a negative relation between board turnover and changes in performance would reflect the presence of costs associated to changes in the board that could outweigh its benefits, especially for the case of unexpected replacements. Once again, the descriptive statistics tells us that board replacements are more frequently used by certain banks than others. We know (Table 1) that this governance mechanism is mainly implemented by state owned and cooperative banks. We also observe that most of board replacements carried out by mutual mortgage and cooperative banks were natural (with 84.84% and 86.85% of total board changes, respectively). Conversely, for privately owned banks board departures are more equally balanced (49% of total board replacements were unexpected). The result could indicate that the implementation of this control intervention is more related to performance only for these banking firms. Finally, we present our empirical findings regarding chairman replacement (specifications three, four and five in Tables 5a and 5b), including the type of departure and succession in this governance mechanism. From columns 3 and 4 we can observe that neither natural replacements, nor the origin of the substitute exert any statistically significant effect upon differences in performance when they are individually considered. Such finding corroborates the idea that this change reflects more a transition process within the firm than

a corporate decision aiming to improve performance. Nevertheless, our empirical findings strongly support the fact that an unexpected departure followed by a candidate hired from outside becomes an important disciplinary mechanism to improve firm performance. The result follows independently of the dependent variable (changes in NIM or ROA). Once again, the advantage of having more detailed information concerning the type of change helps us to be more precise with the effect of this governance intervention. Having checked the descriptive statistics (Table 1), we observe once more that this control mechanism was mainly activated by privately owned banks (50% of the total departures)6. Furthermore, an unexpected replacement of the chairman followed by a person from outside the firm could reflect a governance intervention that facilitates organisational change. In this case, results are consistent with our hypothesis H3b, since a chairman from outside the firm is more likely to implement strategic changes such as restructuring poorly performing activities to improve performance. Stakeholders are willing to increase board effectiveness through such organisational change. Hence, board members will perceive the need for an organisational change, leading to positive reactions towards the new (outsider) chairman actions. Also, from the descriptive statistics we observe that the promotion of internal candidates for the chairman position is the dominant path in stakeholder-oriented banks (all chairman replacements in state-owned and mutual mortgage banks were followed by the appointment of internal candidates, whereas this rate stands at 81% for cooperative banks). The result could indicate that internally promoted chairmen, more aligned with the different stakeholders, are preferred by these banking firms. Further, shareholder-oriented banks seek chairmen in the labour market more actively (60% of the chairmen were replaced by persons hired from outside). Again, this could be interpreted as a discipline signal derived from this type of intervention, aiming to attain the shareholdersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interests.

6 All chairman replacements in the state-owned banks were unexpected. However, we consider that the effect of this control mechanism in these banks was lessened due to the fact that all replacements were followed by individuals who were members of the board (that is, internal candidates in our terminology).

22

TEC EMPRESARIAL

â&#x20AC;˘

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

WHO BENEFITS FROM THE ACTIVATION OF GOVERNANCE INTERVENTIONS? In this section, we extend the analysis by questioning whether executive turnovers are more effective in banks where owners have strong incentives to monitor managers. Thus, we conducted our analysis separating our sample in two groups: shareholder-oriented (privately-owned banks) and stakeholder-oriented banks (state-owned, mutual mortgage and cooperative banking firms). Results are presented in Tables 6 and 7, where Table 6 shows the regression results based on Equation [3]. In addition, we evaluate the robustness of our results by an univariate test of mean changes in our performance measures (NIM and ROA) as a response to the implementation of each governance mechanism under analysis (Table 7). Consistent with our previous findings, we observe that CEO turnover is the most important disciplinary mechanism to improve performance (NIM and ROA) (Table 6). More interesting, from specifications 3 and 4 in Table 6, it can be seen that the positive impact that CEO turnover has on changes in performance only applies for shareholder-oriented banks. This is corroborated by the univariate test, where we observe that 73% of private banks that underwent a change in the CEO position significantly improved their performance (5.67% in NIM and nearly 1% in ROA) (Table 7). Consequently, we fail to reject our hypothesis H4a which proposed that the positive effect of CEO turnovers on performance changes is stronger in shareholder-oriented firms. Concerning board replacements, we can confirm now that large changes in the board (50% or higher) create adaptation costs for the new board members leading to a negative effect on firm performance. Nevertheless, the negative impact of this governance mechanism is statistically significant only for the stakeholder-oriented banks. Further, 75% of stakeholder-oriented banks showed a negative change in performance after a large change in the board (11.35% in NIM and 2.26% in ROA). (See Table 6 and 7) This result can indicate that, for shareholder-oriented banks, large changes in the board also imply the inclusion of members who could lack expertise in board tasks, as well as the incorporation of individuals with diverse objectives, a fact that could lead to even more unfocused and longer decision making processes.

Finally, the average change in performance of those banking firms that replaced the chairman is not statistically different from those banks that did not. This finding complements that obtained from the previous sub-section, confirming that the presence of detailed information concerning the type of departure and the nature of the successor in the chairman position becomes critical for understanding the effect of this governance mechanism. Hence, we partially reject our hypothesis H4b, since we only report a significantly greater negative relation between large board replacements and performance changes in stakeholder-oriented firms.

CONCLUDING REMARKS The corporate governance of banks is a ‘trendy’ topic (e.g., Crespí et al. 2004, Epure and Lafuente 2015, Lafuente et al. 2019); however, little is known about both the effect that different governance interventions have on performance, and the role played by ownership diversity in this type of organizations. Using a robust data set for the period 1999–2004, we examine the effectiveness of the governance system in the Costa Rican banking sector, an industry characterised by fully outside boards and where four different types of firms compete in the market. This particular model of board of directors allows some exploration beyond traditional studies on corporate governance. The distinctive features in the regulatory framework of the Costa Rican banking system lead us to question whether the implementation of governance interventions is equally effective in scenarios where board independence and leadership structure are exogenous to the firm. Using more detailed information about control mechanisms, our results reveal that the direction and intensity of the effects of the different governance interventions on changes in performance are conditioned by both the firm type and the underlying characteristics of the replacements. In particular, empirical findings confirm that CEO and chairman turnovers are relevant governance mechanisms that help explaining improvements in firm performance. For the CEO turnover, results indicate that the appointment of a CEO from outside the firm creates the conditions for organisational change, as it could possibly facilitate the introduction of new policies within the firm,

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

23


Concerning the board of directors, our results support that, for stakeholder-oriented banks, unpredicted changes in the board imply an adaptation process by the new board members, leading to higher costs related to this learning

leading to higher positive changes in firm performance. This result holds for shareholder-oriented firms but not for stakeholder-oriented firms, where the role of CEOs seems to be less relevant.

Table 6. Response to the implementation of governance interventions for private and non-private owned banks Δ Net interest margin

Δ Return on assets

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(1)

(2)

(3)

(4)

-0.1448 (0.3219)

-0.2877 (0.3318)

0.0088 (0.2713)

-0.1632 (0.2650)

-0.0016 (0.0073)

-0.0016 (0.0075)

0.0003 (0.0069)

0.0001 (0.0070)

Size t-1×private owned banks

-1.3087*** (0.3718)

-1.3293*** (0.3531)

-0.7711 ** (0.3867)

-0.7991 ** (0.3938)

-0.0013 (0.0048)

-0.0011 (0.0047)

0.0005 (0.0045)

0.0011 (0.0044)

Δ CEO t-1

0.4505 ** (0.2031)

0.4922 ** (0.2428)

-0.1378 (0.2763)

-0.1163 (0.3806)

0.0033 * (0.0019)

0.0034 * (0.0019)

-0.0017 (0.0027)

-0.0016 (0.0027)

1.2778 *** (0.3423)

1.1854 *** (0.4155)

0.0083 ** (0.0034)

0.0083 ** (0.0034)

Size (ln assets) t-1

Δ CEO t-1×private owned banks

-0.3036 (0.5343)

-0.2432 (0.4901)

Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 Δ Board of directors (%) t-1 × private owned banks

-0.6690 (0.9546) -0.9192 ** (0.4005)

Δ Board of directors (>50%) t-1

0.0031 (0.0062) -0.0048 ** (0.0025)

-0.0017 (0.0020)

-1.3507*** (0.5184)

Δ Board of Directors (>50%)

0.8512 (0.6471)

t-1×private owned banks -0.0150 (0.1069)

Δ Chairman t-1

0.0446 (0.1100)

Δ Chairman t-1×private owned banks Time dummies

-0.0045 (0.0039)

-0.0023 (0.0033)

0.1026 (0.1122)

0.1228 (0.1198)

-0.0899 (0.1946)

-0.1074 (0.1788)

0.0045 (0.0037) 0.0010 (0.0017)

0.0009 (0.0017)

0.0015 (0.0021)

0.0013 (0.0021)

-0.0023 (0.0024)

-0.0019 (0.0022)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Intercept

0.0289 (0.0682)

0.0902 (0.0727)

-0.0410 (0.0633)

0.0283 (0.0571)

0.0005 (0.0017)

0.0006 (0.0017)

-0.0001 (0.0016)

-0.0003 (0.0016)

Wald test (chi2)

71.62 ***

90.22 ***

146.52 ***

132.88 ***

23.24 ***

40.50 ***

61.14 ***

95.34 ***

Sargan test

4.40

4.36

4.85

5.35

7.57

7.79

6.88

6.58

Test for AR1

-1.64

-1.35

-2.42 **

-1.83 *

-0.44

-0.37

-0.15

0.04

Test for AR2

-1.43

-1.34

-1.17

-1.17

-1.19

-1.10

-1.16

-0.93

Regressions are estimated as follow (re-writing equation 3):

ΔPerformancei,t = α0 + α1 ΔPerformancei,t-1 + γ1Size i,t-1 + γ2 Size i,t-1 ×Private Bank i,t + Σ γ kCG i,t-1 + Σ γ kCG i,t-1 ×Private Bank + ψt + υi,t Private bank is a dummy variable equal to one if the bank is a shareholder-oriented firm. CG represents the vector of governance mechanisms. CEO is a dummy variable equal to one if we identify a change in the CEO position.Δ Chairman is a dummy variable equal to one if a change in the Chairman position took place. Board of directors (%) refers to the proportion of directors that left the board.Δ Board of directors (>50%) is a dummy variable equal to one if the exit rate from the board exceeds 50%. Time dummies are included in all the specifications. Dependent variables: Variation in net interest margin (NIM), variation in return on assets (ROA), and variation in return on equity (ROE). Standard errors are presented in brackets. ***, **, * indicate significance at the 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10 level, respectively.

24

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

process that might outweigh the benefits derived from this type of governance intervention. The result is also true for the case of large board turnovers. When considering the replacement of the chairman, our results show that the effect that the appointment of a chairman from outside the banking firm has on future firm performance relies on the type of departure. Thus, a natural departure followed by the appointment of a new chairman from outside the board could create a conflict within the board, since the board members can generate barriers to prevent any change in the board routines and processes. To the contrary, we find that after an unexpected departure, the appointment of a chairman from outside the banking firm creates value. We argue that the change in the executive leadership can lead to improve the monitoring tasks of the board and the corporate decision making process.

The results of this paper give support to the argument that ownership diversity entails the use of different governance mechanisms. On the one hand, shareholderoriented banks prefer to hire someone from outside the bank after a departure (both in CEO and Chairman positions) to improve performance. On the other hand, the nature of stakeholders in other types of banks seems to increase the costs of implementing unexpected changes, favouring the search of more broadly agreed alternatives. These findings are open for further verification. Future studies should explore the observed differences in the implementation of governance mechanisms by firms that have different ownership structure. Another interesting research avenue could be to enrich the analysis by examining the governance in emerging markets and see whether the entrance of foreign firms improve firms’ governance practices in developing economies.

Table 7. Test of difference in the response to the implementation of governance interventions between private and non-private owned banks Δ Net interest margin

Δ Return on assets

No intervention

Governance intervention

No intervention

Governance intervention

Private owned banks

-0.0148 (50:50)

0.0567 ** (73:27)

-0.0010 (50:50)

0.0072 ** (73:27)

Non-private owned banks

-0.0076 (53:47)

-0.0270 (44:56)

-0.0002 (53:47)

-0.0069 (44:56)

Private owned banks

-0.0784 (54:46)

-0.1196 (40:60)

0.0004 (54:46)

-0.0025 (40:60)

Non-private owned banks

0.0108 (54:46)

-0.1135 *** (25:75)

0.0006 (54:46)

-0.0226 ** (25:75)

Private owned banks

-0.0753 (57:43)

-0.1189 (30:70)

0.0011 (57:43)

-0.0056 (30:70)

Non-private owned banks

-0.0275 (53:47)

0.0309 (51:49)

0.0005 (53:47)

-0.0031 (51:49)

Governance mechanism Δ CEO t-1

Δ Board of Directors (>50%)t-1

Δ Chairman t-1

The table presents, by type of bank (private and non-private owned bank) and type of governance intervention (CEO turnover, Chairman removal and large changes in the board), the average change in performance (net interest margin and return on assets). For each performance measure we split the sample into two mutually exclusive groups: banks that implemented a governance mechanism, and banks that did not implement any of the governance mechanisms under evaluation. The univariate test compares, by type of bank, the difference in the mean performance change between banks that implemented a governance mechanism and those banking firms that did not. Percentage of firms with positive and negative changes in performance are reported in brackets. ***, **, * indicate significance at the 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10 level, respectively.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

25


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: The authors gratefully acknowledge insightful comments by Øyvind Bøhren, Jose Maria Labeaga, and Vicente Salas. This research was funded by a grant from the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science (SEJ200767895-C04-02/ECON and ECO2010-21393-C04-01).

Blundell, R., Bond, S., 1998. Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models. Journal of Econometrics, 87, 115–143. Borokhovich, K., Parrino, R., Trapani, T., 1996. Outside directors and CEO selection. Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, 31, 337–355.

References Adams, R., Ferreira, D., 2007. A Theory of Friendly Boards. Journal of Finance, 62 (1), 217–250. Adams, R., Hermalin, B. Weisbach, M., 2010. The Role of Boards of Directors in Corporate Governance: A Conceptual Framework and Survey. Journal of Economic Literature, 48 (1), 58–107.

Claessens, S., Yurtoglu, B., 2013. Corporate governance in emerging markets: A survey. Emerging Markets Review, 15, 1-33. Conyon, M., 1998. Directors’ Pay and Turnover: An Application to a Sample of UK Firms. Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 60, 485–507.

Arellano, M., Bond, S., 1991. Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations. Review of Economic Studies, 58, 277–297.

Crespí, R., García-Cestona, M., Salas, V., 2004. Governance Mechanisms in Spanish Banks: Does ownership matter? Journal of Banking and Finance, 28, 2311–2330.

Arellano, M., Bover, O., 1995. Another Look at the Instrumental-Variable Estimation of ErrorComponent Models. Journal of Econometrics, 68, 29–51.

De Andrés, P., Vallelado, E., 2008. Corporate governance in banking: The role of the board of directors. Journal of Banking and Finance, 32, 2570–2580.

Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1953. Ley Orgánica del Sistema Bancario Nacional Nº 1644 del 27 de septiembre de 1953. San José, Costa Rica. Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1968. Ley de Asociaciones Cooperativas y Creación del Instituto de Fomento Cooperativo Nº 4179 del 22 de agosto de 1968. San José, Costa Rica. Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1986. Ley del Sistema Financiero Nacional para la Vivienda Nº 7052 del 13 de noviembre de 1986. San José, Costa Rica. Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1988. Ley de Modernización del Sistema Financiero de la República Nº 7107 del 4 de noviembre de 1988. San José, Costa Rica. Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1994. Ley Reguladora de la Actividad de Intermediación Financiera de las Organizaciones Cooperativas Nº 7391 del 27 de abril de 1994. San José, Costa Rica.

26

Asamblea Legislativa de Costa Rica, 1995. Ley Orgánica del Banco Central de Costa Rica Nº 7558 del 3 de noviembre de 1995. San José, Costa Rica.

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Denis, D., Denis, D., 1995. Performance Changes Following Top-Management Dismissals. Journal of Finance, 50, 1029–1055. Eisenberg, T., Sundgren, S., Wells, M., 1998. Larger Board Size and Decreasing Firm Value in Small Firms. Journal of Financial Economics, 48, 35–54. Epure, M., Lafuente, E., 2015. Monitoring bank performance in the presence of risk. Journal of Productivity Analysis, 44 (3), 265-281. Erkens, D., Hung, M., Matos, P., 2012. Corporate governance in the 2007–2008 financial crisis: Evidence from financial institutions worldwide. Journal of Corporate Finance, 18, 389–411. Fan, J.P.H., Wei, K.C.J., Xu, X., 2011. Corporate finance and governance in emerging markets: A selective review and an agenda for future research. Journal of Corporate Finance, 17, 207–214. Fama, E., Jensen, M., 1983. Separation of Ownership and Control. Journal of Law and Economics, 26, 301–325.


CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Florou, A., 2005. Top Director Shake-up: The Link between Chairman and CEO Dismissal in the UK. Journal of Business Finance and Economics, 32, 97–128. Gibson, M., 2003. Is Corporate Governance Ineffective in Emerging Markets? Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, 38, 231–250. Hermalin, B., Weisbach, M., 1991. The Effects of Board Composition and Direct Incentives on Firm Performance. Financial Management, 20, 101–112. Hermalin, B., Weisbach, M., 1998. Endogenously Chosen Boards of Directors and Their Monitoring of the CEO. American Economic Review, 88, 96–118. Hermalin, B., Weisbach, M., 2003. Board of Directors as an Endogenously Determined Institution: A Survey of the Economic Literature. FRBNY Economic Policy Review, 9, 7–26. Huson, M., Malatesta, P., Parrino, R., 2004. Managerial Succession and Firm Performance. Journal of Financial Economics, 74, 237–275. International Monetary Fund (IMF), 2003. Costa Rica: Financial system stability assessment. IMF Country Report No. 03/103. Jensen, M., 1993. Presidential Address: The modern industrial revolution, exit and the failure of internal control systems. Journal of Finance, 48, 831–880. Karaevli, A., 2007. Performance consequences of new CEO ‘outsiderness’: Moderating effects of pre and post-succession contexts. Strategic Management Journal, 28, 681–706. Khanna, N., Poulsen, A., 1995. Managers of financially distressed firms: villains or scapegoats? Journal of Finance, 50, 919–940.

Laeven, L. Levine, R., 2009. Bank governance, regulation and risk taking. Journal of Financial Economics, 93, 259–275. Macey, J., O’Hara, M. 2003. The Corporate Governance of Banks. FRBNY Economic Policy Review, 9, 91–107. Mehran, H., 1995. Executive Compensation Structure, Ownership, and Firm Performance. Journal of Financial Economics, 38, 163–184. Rajan, R., Zingales, L., 1998. Financial Dependence and Growth. American Economic Review, 88, 559–586. Shleifer, A., Vishny, R., 1997. A Survey of Corporate Governance. Journal of Finance, 52, 737–783. Superintendent of Banks (SUGEF), 2000. Reglamento para juzgar la situación económica-financiera de las entidades fiscalizadas. Costa Rican Central Bank, Acuerdo SUGEF 24-00. Tirole, J., 2001. Corporate Governance. Econometrica, 69, 1–35. Warner, J., Watts, R., Wruck, K., 1988. Stock prices and top management changes. Journal of Financial Economics, 20, 461–492. Weisbach, M., 1988. Outside Directors and CEO Turnover. Journal of Financial Economics, 20, 431–460. Yermack, D., 1996. Higher Market Valuation of Companies with a Small Board of Directors. Journal of Financial Economics, 40, 185–212. Young, M., Peng, M., Ahlstrom, D., Bruton, G., Jiang,

La Porta, R., Lopez-de-Silanes, F., Shleifer, A., Vishny, R., 2002. Government ownership of banks. Journal of Finance, 57, 265–301.

Y., 2008. Corporate Governance in Emerging

Lafuente, E., Vaillant, Y., Vendrell-Herrero, F., 2019. Conformance and performance roles of bank boards: The connection between non-performing loans and non-performing directorships. European Management Journal, in press, doi: 10.1016/j. emj.2019.04.005

196–220.

Economies: A Review of the Principal–Principal Perspective. Journal of Management Studies, 45 (1),

Zhang, Y., Rajagopalan, N., 2010. Once an outsider, always an outsider? CEO origin, strategic change, and firm performance. Strategic Management Journal, 31, 334–346.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

27


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL EN COSTA RICA: UN ENFOQUE MULTIDIMENSIONAL

BUSINESS COMPETITIVENESS IN COSTA RICA: A MULTIDIMENSIONAL APPROACH

28

TEC EMPRESARIAL

â&#x20AC;¢

VOL 13 - No. 3


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

This article evaluates the competitive efficiency of 67 Costa Rican small and medium-sized businesses for 2017. Building on the resource-based view postulates, the proposed competitiveness index is based on the methodology developed by Lafuente, Leiva, Moreno and Szerb (2019b) in competitiveness. By employing a non-parametric model (Data Envelopment Analysis, DEA) with a single constant input and one output (competitiveness index) the results of the empirical application reveal that, on average, the analyzed Costa Rican SMEs can improve their competitive efficiency by 54.45%. Additionally, the findings indicate that businesses in manufacturing and service sectors present the highest competitive efficiency levels, which is explained by the pillars linked to product innovation and business networks. The proposed competitiveness index is a valuable tool that can

ABSTRACT

which ten interconnected competitive pillars shape business

support businesses’ decision-making processes as well as the design of specific strategies that contribute to improving resource allocation processes and the configuration of competitive pillars at business level.

Suyen Alonso Ubieta

KEYWORDS: Data envelopment analysis, Competitiveness, Costa Rica, small enterprises, system dynamics

PALABRAS CLAVE: Análisis envolvente de datos, competitividad, Costa Rica, pequeña empresa, sistemas dinámicos.

salonso@una.cr

Juan Carlos Leiva

RESUMEN

Este artículo evalúa la eficiencia competitiva de sesenta y siete pequeñas y medianas empresas costarricenses para el 2017. A partir de las bases teóricas del Enfoque Basado en Recursos, se aborda metodológicamente la medición de la competitividad empresarial del grupo de empresas en estudio a través de un índice compuesto por diez pilares, según lo propuesto por Lafuente, Leiva, Moreno y Szerb (2019b). Estos pilares se encuentran interconectados y configuran la competitividad empresarial de las pymes. Para estimar su eficiencia, se realiza un modelo de análisis envolvente de datos (DEA por sus siglas en inglés), con especificación de un input y un output. Los resultados de la investigación indican que las empresas agrupadas en los sectores de manufactura y servicios muestran los índices de competitividad y eficiencia mayores, lo que es explicado por los pilares de innovación de productos y redes de negocios; mientras que los pilares menos priorizados son internacionalización, mercado interno y recursos humanos. Se concluye que el índice de competitividad es una herramienta que favorecería la toma de decisiones empresariales, pues contribuiría con en el diseño de estrategias empresariales orientadas hacia una configuración más homogénea en la asignación de recursos y capacidades.

Candidata a Doctora por el Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica. Académica del Centro Internacional de Política Económica, Universidad Nacional de Costa Rica

Profesor. Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica, Costa Rica. jleiva@itcr.ac.cr

ARTÍCULO RECIBIDO: 05 / 07 / 2019 ARTÍCULO ACEPTADO: 10 / 10 / 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL VOL. 13 NO. 3, PP. 28-41

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

29


IntroducCiÓn

L

a definición de competitividad ha evolucionado a lo largo de las décadas, principalmente como resultado del avance de distintos postulados teóricos. Actualmente, en la literatura científica, impera abundante evidencia sobre su definición y los niveles de análisis en que se puede aplicar, sean estos nacional, sectorial, regional y empresarial (Bič y Stuchlíková, 2013; Charles y Sei, 2019; Krugman, 1994; Lafuente, Acs, Sanders y Szerb, 2019a; Porter, 1991). En la discusión inicial sobre los alcances del concepto de competitividad, se pueden identificar al menos dos corrientes predominantes: la primera focalizada en la perspectiva macroeconómica y centrada en el tema de productividad país, donde se postula la necesidad de mecanismos de política económica para crear un ambiente adecuado para el desempeño empresarial (Buckley, Pass y Prescott, 1988; Delgado, Ketels, Porter y Stern, 2012; Lafuente et al., 2019a); y la segunda, desde una perspectiva microeconómica, enfocada en que las empresas logren su mayor eficiencia, mayor porcentaje de mercado y mejores tasas de rendimiento sobre el capital invertido a través de la creación de ventajas competitivas por medio de la estrategia empresarial (Newbert, 2007; Sirmon, Hitt, Arregle y Campbell, 2010). Dentro de la perspectiva microeconómica, y como parte de la escuela de pensamiento sobre estrategia, surge el enfoque Basado en los Recursos (Barney, 2001, Wernerfelt, 1984). Dicho enfoque propone que los recursos y las capacidades pueden distribuirse de manera heterogénea entre las empresas competidoras; estas diferencias pueden ser duraderas y podrían explicar el por qué algunas empresas superan de manera consistente a otras (Barney, 2001, p. 304).

Si bien es cierto, las aproximaciones teóricas y metodológicas dominantes han abierto un abanico de posibilidades sobre la definición de competitividad; otro de los elementos al que se debe prestar atención es su medición, pues las medidas de competitividad propuestas por la literatura no capturan todos los elementos del concepto (Buckley et al., 1988). Este aspecto es de especial consideración porque la competitividad requiere un abordaje y medición integral, la cual no se obtiene a través de la estimación de factores económicos específicos en el corto plazo, sino todo lo contrario, requiere el abordaje de recursos intangibles y sociales, con una visión a largo plazo (Lafuente, Leiva, Moreno y Szerb, 2019b). Sobre este particular, existen llamados para medir la competitividad desde una perspectiva compleja que considere los distintos activos y procesos que tienen lugar al interior de la empresa. A nivel de medición nacional, se puede citar a autores como Csath (2007) y Bič y Stuchlíková (2013). A nivel territorial, a Lafuente et al. (2019a) y Charles y Sei (2019); y desde un ámbito empresarial se encuentran Man, Lau y Chan (2002); Newbert, 2007; Sirmon et al. (2010) y Lafuente et al. (2019b). En el ámbito empresarial, los estudios indican que, en el abordaje del constructo competitividad, las fortalezas y debilidades, cuentan al momento de discutir la eficiencia empresarial (Lafuente et al., 2019; Sirmon et al., 2010). No obstante, se requiere más evidencia científica para entender cómo y en qué medida los recursos, capacidades y competencias básicas facilitan el logro y sostenibilidad de la ventaja competitiva de una empresa y el impacto en su rendimiento (Newbert, 2007). Es importante mencionar que la mayoría de las investigaciones reseñadas en el campo de la competitividad empresarial se han centrado en estudiar fortalezas más que debilidades, ignorando, especialmente, que las debilidades también son parte integral de las empresas (Sirmon et al., 2010). Lo anterior abre espacios de investigación empírica y metodológica en las que se busque, de forma más deliberada, su inclusión, y aporta en la pertinencia de la presente investigación. Bajo las anteriores consideraciones, el objetivo del artículo es realizar una aplicación del concepto

30

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

de competitividad empresarial desde un enfoque multidimensional en pymes costarricenses durante el 2017. Para su estimación, se adopta la definición y abordaje metodológico realizado por Lafuente et al. (2019b). El aporte del artículo es empírico, pues contribuye con evidencia de cómo las fortalezas y debilidades de las firmas no solo interactúan de forma conjunta e inciden sobre su eficiencia competitiva, sino que arrojaría elementos de cómo potenciar las fortalezas de las pymes. También realiza una contribución metodológica sobre la validación de estimación de un índice multidimensional de competitividad empresarial. Por último, las implicaciones prácticas se centran en mostrar evidencia de cómo las empresas organizan sus recursos y hacen un llamado a repensar en dicha distribución.

MARCO TEÓRICO TEORÍA BASADA EN LOS RECURSOS El enfoque Basado en los Recursos (EBR) surge como una rama de la literatura sobre pensamiento estratégico, en donde se buscaba explicar las fuentes de ventajas competitivas de las empresas. Esta se centra en el vínculo entre la estrategia y los recursos internos de las firmas, y explica cómo esos recursos hacen a las empresas únicas, pero también condicionan una mayor o menor posición competitiva respecto a las otras. Desde este planteamiento, la diferenciación competitiva se encuentra en función de la interacción entre los recursos y capacidades endógenas de las empresas –mismas que pueden ser adquiridas o desarrolladas– y a la selección de la estrategia que deliberadamente realicen (Barney, 2001). Los supuestos del EBR critican las premisas que hasta entonces predominaban en la discusión sobre generación de ventajas competitivas, en las que se asumía la existencia de homogeneidad de los recursos en empresas de un mismo sector y la libre movilidad de recursos heterogéneos (Porter, 1981; Porter, 1991). En contraposición a ello, el EBR encuentra base en dos supuestos centrales: en el primero, se proponen que los recursos y las capacidades pueden distribuirse heterogéneamente entre las empresas dadas sus dotaciones; en el segundo, se especifica que estas diferencias pueden ser duraderas a razón de la persistencia

de heterogeneidad de las dotaciones de recursos dada su movilidad imperfecta (Barney, 1991). A su vez, desde el enfoque, existe una triada de conceptos básicos que toman relevancia para explicar las decisiones de las firmas y está conformada por: los recursos, la ventaja competitiva y la ventaja competitiva sostenible. Los recursos incluyen una amplia lista de activos, capacidades, procesos organizacionales, atributos de la empresa, información, conocimiento, entre otros recursos controlados por una empresa, que le permiten concebir e implementar estrategias para mejorar su eficiencia y efectividad (Barney, 1991). En cuanto a la definición de ventaja competitiva, esta se obtiene cuando una firma implementa una estrategia de creación de valor, la cual no está siendo implementada de forma simultánea por ningún competidor actual o potencial. Por su parte, la obtención de una ventaja competitiva sostenida no se expresa en función del tiempo, sino más bien de la capacidad que tiene una empresa de sostener su ventaja competitiva aun cuando otras intentaron replicar sin éxito su estrategia (Barney, 1991; Barney, 2001). Partiendo de los anteriores supuestos, la creación y sostenibilidad de una ventaja competitiva de una empresa es un resultado que se obtiene a través de la eficiencia en la utilización de sus dotaciones de recursos y capacidades, que derivan en la obtención de rentas. En la configuración estratégica de las firmas, todos los recursos aportan, tanto las fortalezas como las debilidades, y es su interacción lo que permite el logro de las ventajas competitivas sostenidas (Sirmon et al., 2010). Así, el mantenimiento de estas ventajas no recae solo en el entendimiento de cuál es base de la ventaja competitiva de las firmas, sino también en la comprensión e identificación de aquellos factores o recursos (fuertes o débiles) que pueden conducir a cambios dinámicos en esta base. Para nuestro planteamiento, este aspecto es central, pues justifica la necesidad de considerar, en el abordaje y medición de la competitividad, múltiples interacciones entre pilares o recursos fuertes y débiles que moldean la competitividad de las empresas. Los pilares en sí representan diferentes recursos y capacidades (por ejemplo, recurso humano, innovación, tecnología) que moldean la competitividad de las empresas y su configuración incide en la eficiencia de las firmas (Lafuente et al., 2019b). Así, la competitividad empresarial debe ser

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

31


estudiada y medida desde una perspectiva holística, donde la amalgama de recursos y capacidades heterogéneos permite la creación de valor agregado para la empresa (Lafuente et al., 2019b; Newbert, 2007).

LA HETEROGENEIDAD DE LOS RECURSOS Y LA COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL Desde los argumentos del EBR, el vínculo entre estrategia y los recursos internos de las empresas se puede explicar desde la heterogeneidad de recursos, planteando así que un recurso o capacidad específica se considera valiosa, rara, inimitable y no sustituible (VRIO). Esta combinación de recursos “define radicalmente los tipos de procesos por los cuales las empresas podrían explotarlos” (Newbert, 2007, p.124). El anterior argumento es importante de destacar porque cada recurso y capacidad realizan contribuciones individuales que aportan en el desempeño general de la empresa, no obstante, estos, a su vez, son improductivos de forma individual, pues la clave para lograr una ventaja competitiva no es la simple explotación de un recurso o capacidad valiosa, sino más bien su explotación dada a través de una combinación de recursos y capacidades. Cuanto más valiosa sea la capacidad de la firma de hacer combinaciones de sus recursos, mayor será la ventaja competitiva para disfrutar como resultado de su explotación (Newbert, 2008). Lo anterior lleva al planteamiento de que la competitividad es un concepto multidimensional. En la combinación de recursos y capacidades, las fortalezas y debilidades aportan por igual en el desempeño competitivo de las empresas. Desde 1984, Wernerfelt sugirió que tanto las fortalezas como debilidades conformaban las capacidades de las firmas, y un par de décadas después, la consideración de las debilidades ha tomado fuerza en la literatura sobre estrategia empresarial (Arend, 2008; Sirmon et al., 2010). Como Sirmon et al. (2010) lo indican, así como es importante identificar las capacidades más valiosas y

raras, también se debe trabajar en las menos valiosas, pues la rareza puede existir tanto en la presencia como en la carencia de un recurso en específico, y ello afecta la configuración de sus recursos. Similar a lo que sucede con las fortalezas, entre las debilidades pueden existir complementariedades que juntas producirían resultados negativos en el desempeño y deben ser consideradas en la configuración de las competencias (Sirmon et al., 2010), en especial porque la debilidad competitiva podría manifestarse en mayor escala en pequeñas empresas (Lafuente et al., 2019b). Por tanto, en el proceso de generación de ventajas competitivas sostenidas, las fortalezas y debilidades, tienen un efecto significativo en la participación competitiva de los mercados y en la configuración global de su estrategia.

ABORDAJE METODOLÓGICO La estimación empírica se realiza en un grupo de sesenta y siete empresas pymes costarricenses que operan en diversos sectores industriales (manufactura, distribución y servicios). Los datos de las empresas seleccionadas se recolectaron entre abril y junio de 2017, dentro del marco del Global Competitiveness Project (GCP: www.sme-gcp.org)1. El objetivo principal del GCP es promover el debate académico sobre competitividad empresarial mediante la estimación de un índice de competitividad empresarial en los países que forman parte de la iniciativa. Gracias al esfuerzo y la cooperación internacional del GCP, es posible crear el índice de competitividad empresarial, el cual es una herramienta de valor tanto para académicos como los encargados del diseño de políticas de apoyo a pymes. Propiamente sobre el método de estimación del índice de competitividad, este considera las diferentes interacciones que ocurren entre recursos y capacidades a nivel empresarial, fundamentado en la amalgama de diez pilares (tabla 1). El cómputo del índice de competitividad (CI) se lleva a cabo mediante un proceso de cinco pasos (ver, Lafuente et al., 2019b).

1 El GCP es un grupo de investigación científica que involucra a académicos de diez universidades ubicadas en Europa (España, Francia, Hungría, Bosnia, Rusia y República Checa) y América Latina (Costa Rica, Colombia, México y Brasil).

32

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

En el primer paso, las variables seleccionadas para crear los pilares competitivos ( j=1,…J; J = 46) son normalizadas en el rango [0,1].

[3B]

[1]

En las expresiones (3a) y (3b) el término δ representa “la magnitud de ajuste” para el pilar ν, esto es, el momento δ que iguala Ρi,ν al promedio del respectivo pilar (ȳν). La ecuación (3b) representa una función convexa y decreciente, y la solución para δ se obtiene mediante el método Newton-Raphson, con unos valores iniciales de cero. Una vez el término δ es estimado, el cómputo de la magnitud del efecto de ajuste se realiza de forma directa. De esta forma, a partir de las ecuaciones (3a) y (3b) sabemos que:

xi,j =

xi,j max ( xj )

,

j=1,..., J and i = 1,..., N

En la ecuación (1) xi,j es el valor normalizado de la variable j obtenida para la empresa i, y xi,j es el valor original de la respectiva variable ( j). El conjunto de referencia (benchmark)(max ( xj )) es, para cada variable ( j), el valor más alto que representa una aproximación de “las mejores prácticas” en el sector. El segundo paso implica el cómputo de los diez pilares competitivos que forman el CI(v=(ν1,...,ν10) ϵ RV). Los valores de los pilares son el promedio de las variables ( j) incluidas en cada pilar (v). Además, los valores de los pilares se normalizan en el rango [0,1] con el fin de facilitar la interpretación de los resultados. Los valores normalizados de los pilares competitivos se computan según las ecuaciones (2a) y (2b):

[2a] Ρi,j =

Σj = i x ν

i,j

,

ν = 1,...,10 and jν = 1,..., Jν

[2B] Ρi,j =

Ρi,ν max ( Ρν )

En este punto, es importante destacar que los valores de los pilares (Ρi,ν) se computan a nivel de empresa (i=1,...,N) y que el número de variables usadas para computar cada pilar ( jν=1,…,Jν) puede variar entre los distintos pilares competitivos (v). El tercer paso iguala el efecto marginal que resulta de mejorar un pilar competitivo dado (Ρi,ν), y además estima la dirección y magnitud del ajuste mediante la estimación de las siguientes expresiones (estimación de la raíz para δ en la siguiente expresión):

[3a] yi,ν = Ρi,ν

Σ Ρi,ν –Νȳ i=1

ν

=0

pν < ȳν

δ<1

pν = ȳν

δ=1

pν > ȳν

δ>1

El cuarto paso introduce el concepto de “penalización” (penalty for bottleneck) en el índice de competitividad con el objetivo de tener en cuenta las relaciones mutuas que existen entre los diez pilares que forman el índice de competitividad. En términos matemáticos, esta penalización (penalty for bottleneck) se modela a través de una corrección a una función exponencial (Tarabusi y Guarini, 2013). La función de penalización tiene la siguiente forma:

[4] hi,ν = min(Ρi,ν ) + (1 - e-(P

)

i,ν – min(Pi,ν ))

En la ecuación (4) hi,ν es el valor post-penalización del pilar ν y min(Ρi,ν ) es el valor mínimo del pilar reportado para la empresa i. Finalmente, en el quinto paso se emplean los valores obtenidos para cada pilar competitivo (ecuación (4)) para calcular el índice de competitividad (CI):

[5] 10

CIi = Σ ν=1 hi,ν

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

33


Tabla 1. Descripción de variables empleadas para estimar el índice de competitividad empresarial Pilar Competitivo

Variables Incluidas en el Pilar Número y ratio de empleados con estudios superiores. Problemas con empleados.

1. Capital humano

Proporción de empleados que participaron en programas de formación. Sofisticación del sistema de compensación. El nivel de “rareza” del capital humano en la empresa. Innovación de producto.

2. Innovación de producto

Introducción de nuevos productos o productos mejorados. Ratio de ventas de nuevos productos respecto al total de ventas. Innovación continua y nivel de “rareza” del producto de la empresa. Ámbito geográfico de las ventas de la empresa. Nivel de competencia en el mercado local.

3. Mercado doméstico

Crecimiento de mercado esperado en los próximos cinco años. Intensidad competitiva del sector. Nivel de respuesta a las demandas del cliente / consumidor. Número de acuerdos de cooperación y colaboración.

4. Redes de negocio

Tiempo operando con la red de contactos respecto a la edad del negocio. Dependencia de ayuda externa para el desarrollo empresarial. Nivel de especificidad (unicidad) de la red de contactos. Nivel tecnológico de la empresa respecto al mercado local. Innovación tecnológica y antigüedad de la tecnología de la empresa.

5. Tecnología

Inversiones ambientales y garantías de calidad. Nivel de aplicación de herramientas tecnológicas (ICT). Desarrollo de tecnología (licencias, patentes, know-how, etc.). Uso de distintas fuentes de información.

6. Toma de decisiones

Aplicación de análisis financiero en la empresa. Compartir información como práctica empresarial. Uso de consultores internos y externos en procesos de toma de decisión. Rutinas organizacionales relacionadas a la gestión de información. Dirección de la estrategia empresarial (defensiva, proactiva).

7. Estrategia competitiva

Estrategia de crecimiento basada en el número de locales de la empresa. Atributos emprendedores de los fundadores de la empresa. Nivel de “rareza” de la estrategia proactiva de la empresa. Producto. Estrategia de fijación de precio del producto principal de la empresa. Sofisticación de los canales de distribución usados por la empresa.

8. Marketing

Marketing aplicado y herramientas de comunicación. Innovación de marketing. Nivel de “rareza” de las técnicas de marketing empleadas por la empresa.

34

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

Pilar Competitivo

Variables Incluidas en el Pilar Importancia de clientes en el exterior.

9. Internacionalización

Proporción de ventas al exterior (exportaciones, etc.). Manejo de idiomas entre los empleados de la empresa. Valor de la localización del negocio (en el mercado local y foráneo). Características técnicas del sitio web de la empresa.

10. Presencia online

Servicios ofrecidos en la página web de la empresa. Contenidos de la página web de la empresa. Uso de aplicaciones de marketing online.

Para el caso del índice de competitividad (CI), la descripción de las cuarenta y seis variables empleadas dentro del proyecto GCP se presentan en la tabla 1. Por otro lado, para las estimaciones de eficiencia competitiva, se emplea el modelo de Análisis Envolvente de Datos (Data Envelopment Analysis- DEA), el cual en este estudio está basado en una tecnología de rendimientos constantes de escala que considera que un input produce un output. Esta técnica no-paramétrica (Data Envelopment Analysis, DEA) permite conocer la eficiencia competitiva de las empresas costarricenses que participaron en el GCP en 2017. Para su estimación se usó el software Efficiency Measurment System, versión 1.3 (http://www.holger-scheel.de/ems/), desarrollado con fines académicos por la Universidad de Dortmunt, Alemania. Así, la eficiencia competitiva de las empresas analizadas se computa de la siguiente forma:

se debe resaltar que θ=1 para las empresas eficientes, mientras que para las empresas ineficientes θ > 1 y 1 − θ representa el nivel de ineficiencia (posible expansión del output necesaria para alcanzar la frontera de eficiencia). Como se indicó anteriormente, el modelo presentado en la ecuación (6) considera que un output −esto es, el índice de competitividad (CI)− es producido y que el único input constante (x) es un vector i × 1 para todas las empresas (k = 1). El término λi es el vector de variables de intensidad (pesos virtuales) empleado para formar las combinaciones lineales de las empresas analizadas (N), y la restricción λi > 0 impone que el peso virtual para todas las empresas debe ser positivo.

RESULTADOS DE LA APLICACIÓN EMPÍRICA COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL EN COSTA RICA

[6]

La tabla 2, presenta datos descriptivos de las empresas analizadas en función de la estimación del índice de competitividad.

D(1,CI) = max θi subject to:

Σi=1 λiCIi,m

Σi=1 λi xi,k

≥ θiCIi,m

≤ 1

m=1,...,N k=1 ˅ i (i = 1,..., N)

λi > 0 Al resolver el programa lineal presentado en la ecuación (6), la solución para θ es el estimador de eficiencia calculado para la empresa i. En este punto,

De las sesenta y siete observaciones, un 58,2% pertenece al sector de servicios, un 23,8% al sector de distribución y un 17,9% al sector de manufactura. Sobre la base de 10, el promedio general del índice de competitividad es de 5,21. En la tabla 2 se dimensiona que las variables con mayor peso para explicar la competitividad de este grupo de empresas son: redes de negocio, innovación de producto y marketing. Por su parte,

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

35


los pilares menos priorizados son internacionalización, capital humano y mercado doméstico.

de toma de decisiones (0,5130), marketing (0,5049) y mercado doméstico (0,5042).

Haciendo la revisión por sectores, los datos indican que el sector de manufactura presente el índice de competitiva más alto, seguido del sector de servicios y el de distribución. En el caso del sector manufacturero, los pilares priorizados en orden son: el de innovación de producto (0,6512), redes de negocios (0,5887) y marketing (0,5694), mientas que los pilares débiles son mercado doméstico (0,5153), capital humano (0,4920) e internacionalización (0,4915); los cuales también son coincidentes con los pilares más débiles del índice de competitividad en general.

Finalmente, en el caso de las pymes ubicadas en el sector de distribución, los pilares priorizados son marketing (0,5152), innovación de productos (0,4993) y presencia online (0,4892). Con relación a los pilares débiles, la tecnología (0,4288), el capital humano (0,4208) y el mercado doméstico (0,4092) representan estos aspectos.

Al considerarse el sector servicios, la innovación de productos (0,6189), presencia online (0,5896) y las redes de negocio (0,5857) son los pilares priorizados, mientras que los pilares más débiles se ven reflejados en los aspectos

EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA EN COSTA RICA Con la estimación del índice de competitividad según los pilares de mayor y menor priorización, se procedió a conocer la eficiencia competitiva de las empresas pymes costarricenses. Para ello se aplica el análisis DEA, cuyos resultados se sintetizan en la tabla 3.

Tabla 2. Competitividad empresarial en Costa Rica: estadísticos descriptivos Total

Manufactura

Distribución

Servicios

Índice de Competitividad Empresarial Pilares competitivos

5,2178

5,4619

4,5865

5,4016

Mercado doméstico

0,4835

0,5153

0,4092

0,5042

Redes de negocio

0,5619

0,5887

0,4840

0,5857

Internacionalización

0,4961

0,4915

0,4329

0,5234

Capital humano

0,4939

0,4920

0,4208

0,5244

Innovación de producto

0,5961

0,6512

0,4993

0,6189

Tecnología

0,4965

0,5252

0,4288

0,5155

Marketing

0,5189

0,5694

0,5152

0,5049

Presencia online

0,5583

0,5486

0,4892

0,5896

Toma de decisiones

0,4997

0,5434

0,4343

0,5130

Estrategia

0,5129

0,5366

0,4729

0,5221

67

12

16

39

Observaciones

Nota: Los valores resaltados indican los pilares más importantes (valores más altos), mientras que los valores en itálica indican los pilares débiles (valores más bajos).

36

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

Tabla 3. Eficiencia competitiva en las empresas de Costa Rica: resultados del modelo DEA Total

Manufactura

Distribución

Servicios

Promedio

5,2178

5,4619

4,5865

5,4016

Mediana (Q2)

4,2180

4,7766

3,4006

4,6457

Primer cuartil (Q1)

5,2178

5,4619

4,5865

5,4016

Tercer cuartil (Q3)

5,2222

5,3007

4,5367

5,4768

Promedio

1,5445

1,4300

1,8825

1,4410

Mediana (Q2)

1,4100

1,4150

1,6750

1,3500

Primer cuartil (Q1)

1,2400

1,2050

1,3900

1,2400

Tercer cuartil (Q3)

1,7300

1,5700

2,2300

1,6100

Empresas eficientes

4

1

1

2

Observaciones

67

12

16

39

Panel A: Índice de Competitividad Empresarial

Panel B: Eficiencia Competitiva (DEA)

De acuerdo con los datos arrojados, las empresas más eficientes, las del primer cuartil, poseen un promedio de 5,21. De este grupo, el sector manufacturero presenta el índice de competitividad más alto, con un 5,4619, superando al promedio del cuartil. Con una mínima diferencia, le siguen las empresas del sector servicios con un 5,4016 y, en un tercer lugar, las empresas del sector de distribución con un 4,5865. Un hecho interesante a anotar es que las distancias entre el sector 1 y 2 son significativamente pequeñas, al ser la diferencia de un 0,0603. Ambos, además de superar el promedio general, también presentan índices bastantes homogéneos. Con relación al tercer cuartil, en el cual se concentran el 25% de las empresas con menor índice de competitividad, su promedio es de 5,22, que resulta superior al promedio general. En este caso, respecto a los demás sectores, las empresas del sector servicios presentan el mejor índice de dentro de este grupo, con un 5,4768, seguido del sector de manufactura (5,3007) y el de distribución (4,5367). La diferencia en las distancias de los índices es de un 0,1761. Sobre el intercuartil (Q2), el índice es de 4,2180, por lo que resulta el sector manufacturero

con mayor competitividad con un 4,7766, seguido del de servicios (4,6457) y finalmente distribución (3,4006). Ahora bien, al considerar los resultados del modelo de eficiencia competitiva, se tiene que, en promedio, las empresas pueden mejorar su eficiencia en un 54%. Otro dato para destacar es que, del total de sesenta y siete empresas, se identifican cuatro eficientes o empresa modelo (benchmark) para su grupo, una para el sector de manufactura, una para el sector de servicios y dos para el de distribución. Según los datos, las empresas del sector manufacturero podrían optimizar su producción en un 43%, es decir, podrían reducir esta brecha de ineficiencia en este porcentaje. Por su parte, el sector servicios podría mejorarlo en un 44,10% y las del sector de distribución deben optimizar la asignación de recursos en más del doble, un 88%, en comparación al total de empresas. Si se considera el primer cuartil, que corresponde al 25% de las empresas más eficientes, el sector de manufactura podría optimizar su eficiencia en un 20%, en un 24% el sector de servicios y en un 39% el de distribución.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

37


Sobre el tercer cuartil, las de menor eficiencia competitiva, su media de optimización es de un 73%. En este caso, las empresas de manufactura de este cuartil podrían optimizar en un 57% las de la rama manufacturera, en un 61% las del sector servicios y en un 123% las del sector de distribución. Sobre el Q2, donde se centra el promedio de las empresas, su porcentaje de optimización es de un 41%. La menor optimización en la asignación de recursos la harían las empresas del sector de servicios con un 35%, seguido de las de manufactura con un 41,5% y con un 67,5% las de distribución. Al observar las tablas 2 y 3, es posible ver que las empresas agrupadas en los sectores de manufactura y servicios son las que presentan los índices de competitividad y eficiencia mayores, lo cual es explicado por el pilar de innovación de productos y redes de negocios. El sector de distribución, que engloba un 24% de las empresas consultadas, presenta el menor índice de competitividad, así como también los menores valores de eficiencia competitiva. Estas empresas, a diferencia de los otros sectores, priorizan el marketing sobre la innovación, seguido de la presencia online.

DISCUSIÓN De acuerdo con los anteriores resultados, la eficiencia está ligada a la innovación del producto, pero también a las redes de negocios y a las actividades de marketing (tablas 2 y 3). Por su parte, los procesos de internacionalización, recursos humanos y mercados internos se identificaron como los pilares más débiles o menos priorizados que explican la competitividad y eficiencia de las pymes estudiadas. Estos recursos y su interacción están marcando tanto el nivel de competitividad empresarial como la eficiencia competitiva de las empresas analizadas. En cuanto a la innovación, en el escenario comercial de las últimas décadas, las pymes han tenido que adoptar estrategias de negocios muy innovadoras a fin de acoplarse a formas de organización más efectivas, pero sobre todo flexibles. Además, aún son empresas que participan con recursos limitados y, en ocasiones, con condiciones nacionales que determinan su desempeño; para estas

38

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

empresas, la innovación y el aprendizaje se consideran mecanismos centrales para mantener su competitividad (Theodoulides, 2006). Desde esta perspectiva, el papel de la innovación es clave y las pequeñas empresas han estado desempeñando un rol importante como motor tecnológico de desarrollo innovador de productos y procesos, por lo que no es casualidad que, en la apuesta hacia prácticas innovadores, la innovación de producto sea uno de los pilares que explique competitividad y eficiencia para nuestro grupo de empresas. Pese a su relevancia, la innovación y el aprendizaje no se producen de forma aislada y requieren que las pymes participen de varios tipos de redes en las que se involucren diferentes actores, tales como empresas grandes, proveedores de conocimiento, agencias de transferencia y otras instituciones de apoyo, donde se intercambian y exploten diferentes tipos de conocimiento (Cooke, 2007). De ahí que su participación en redes es vital y se evidencia como el segundo pilar más fuerte. La evidencia empírica internacional explica cómo la vinculación de empresas, a través de redes de negocio, se asocia a mejoras en su desempeño y acelera el desarrollo de negocios en el extranjero (Tang, 2011), lo cual se ha asociado a factores como la adquisición de nuevo conocimiento del mercado, aprendizaje organizacional y posibilidades de mejora de su posicionamiento en el sector (Chaminade y Vang, 2008; Tang, 2011). Empero, sostienen los autores, las diferentes formas de vinculación en redes varía entre las industrias, por lo que se requiere una especial consideración de las particularidades del sector para la adquisición de nuevas competencias y recursos, o bien, una recombinación de estos. Las redes, además, son un factor que coadyuva al desarrollo de actividades de marketing específicas para las pequeñas empresas (O’Donnell, 2011; O’Donnell, 2014), pero, para que esto se dé, resultan cruciales las habilidades de los gerentes de las pymes para gestar, de forma natural, las interacciones en la red. De esta manera, el fomento de capacidades gerenciales dinámicas que respondan a las particularidades del sector comercial, podría ser un recurso valioso e inimitable que las pymes costarricenses deben considerar para sostener su competitividad. Sobre los pilares menos priorizados, la internacionalización, el mercado doméstico y el recurso humano son de igual consideración que los de mayor


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

Los resultados de la investigación indican que las empresas agrupadas en los sectores de manufactura y servicios muestran los índices de competitividad y eficiencia mayores, lo que es explicado por los pilares de innovación de productos y redes de negocios; mientras que los pilares menos priorizados son internacionalización, mercado interno y recursos humanos priorización, pues cada uno de los recursos de forma individual realiza su aportación en la competitividad de las firmas, pues existe una mutua dependencia entre los recursos y capacidades de cada pyme. A partir del pilar de internacionalización, Ghosh, Mehta y Avittathur (2019) explican cómo, para el caso de un grupo de empresas indias dedicadas a la manufactura de alta tecnología, la decisión de buscar mercados externos fue afectada por un tema de gestión de redes y contactos, pero aún más por un tema de calidad de los insumos requeridos, así como de los proveedores intermedios de los cuales dependían. Este hecho no solo influye en la búsqueda de mercados nuevos, sino también en la atención al mercado doméstico. Para el caso de nuestro grupo de empresas, esta evidencia debería llamar la atención para repensar las estrategias de atención de los mercados actuales; así como valorar estrategias para mercados potenciales, que bien podrían estar en otra región geográfica del país o en el exterior. En fin, es importante mejorar en esta debilidad para que así contribuya con la generación de valor agregado. Por último, y ligado al tema de mercados, la calidad del recurso humano con que cuenten las pymes influye tanto en su internacionalización (Onkelinx, Manolova y Edelman, 2016) como en su desempeño (Sheehan, 2014). Investigaciones como la de Collins y Smith (2006) y Huselid, Jackson y Schuler (1997) ya habían aportado evidencia general sobre la relación positiva entre el recurso

humano y performance para las empresas, sin embargo, en el caso de las pymes, la adquisición del recurso humano es diferente a la de las demás empresas, y se encuentra definida por su constitución (Richbell, Szerb y Vitai, 2010). En el citado estudio realizado en pymes en Hungría, los autores evidenciaron que el recurso humano de este grupo de empresas se definió desde su propia constitución, la formación de los propietarios, y que ello también se reflejó en carencias de estructuras organizativas formalizadas, como lo son, por ejemplo, contar con un plan de negocios o su estrategia comercial por escrito. Bajo esta consideración, los propietarios pymes podrían pensar en acciones para capacitar y potenciar este recurso, con miras a que esta debilidad sea mejorada y, de esta forma, aporte en la configuración de competitividad empresarial gestada a través de las complementariedades entre los recursos y las capacidades.

CONCLUSIONES E IMPLICACIONES Con la aplicación del índice de competitividad desde un enfoque multidimensional en pymes costarricenses, se evidencia la importancia de detectar tanto los factores que impulsan la competitividad, así como sus debilidades. En este sentido, es vital estudiar la competitividad desde una perspectiva sistémica, ya que permite generar medidas en las que se contemple el potencial efecto negativo que las debilidades competitivas tienen sobre la competitividad general de las pymes. A su vez, la estimación del índice de competitividad, así como el de eficiencia competitiva del grupo de empresas, identifica los elementos que potenciarían las fortalezas de las pymes y, asimismo, llama a la reflexión sobre nuevas configuraciones y acciones para mejorar las debilidades. En sí, invita a repensar a organización de los recursos y capacidades actuales de las pymes, a fin mejorar su distribución y contribución en la generación de ventajas competitivas basadas en los recursos. Se concluye que la competitividad es un constructo multidimensional y el proyecto GCP ofrece una herramienta que permite conocer el nivel competitivo a nivel empresarial, así como la configuración de los pilares que conforman el índice de competitividad. Esto debe ser

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

39


considerado si el objetivo es generar políticas de apoyo a la pyme con impacto efectivo en la competitividad empresarial.

la ventaja competitiva de una empresa y el impacto en su rendimiento.

En términos prácticos, si se parte del hecho de que la heterogeneidad en los recursos y capacidades marcan la diferencia en la generación de ventajas competitivas sostenidas para las firmas, los anteriores resultados poseen implicaciones para los hacedores de política productiva y propietarios/gerentes de pyme. Con relación a los hacedores de política, los resultados indican la existencia de una diferenciación y priorización de los pilares por sectores, por tanto, estos lineamientos deberían ser diferenciados para que cumplan el objetivo de su formulación. De esta manera, la promoción de iniciativas de apoyo y capacitaciones para fomentar y desarrollar ciertas habilidades y recursos requieren adaptación a los sectores y a las necesidades de las empresas.

Referencias

Al considerar las recomendaciones para los propietarios de pymes, el resultado individual del índice daría una dimensión clara de cómo se está realizando la distribución de recursos con miras a gestar una disposición más homogénea entre los pilares. También, permite evidenciar cómo las debilidades interactúan con las fortalezas, que a la postre incide en la generación de ventajas competitivas. Los propietarios de las pymes podrían planificar mecanismos, acciones y estrategias operativas y económicas que paulatinamente les permita superar dichas debilidades. La gestión de trabajo en redes con otras pymes del sector o de alianzas entre instituciones públicas y privadas son medios que se deberían de explotar, a fin de ir paliando u optimizando las debilidades identificadas. En futuras investigaciones sería interesante monitorear los cambios en el tiempo del actual grupo de empresas analizadas, lo cual podría dar evidencia de la contribución que el instrumental empleado realiza en la medición de competitividad desde un enfoque integral. Finalmente, también sería valioso contrastar los resultados obtenidos a través del índice de competitividad en una muestra más grande de pymes costarricenses, en la que se integren a la estimación empresas de todo el territorio nacional Como lo planteó Newbert (2007), se considera todavía necesario continuar generando evidencia científica para entender cómo y en qué medida los recursos, capacidades y competencias básicas facilitan el logro y sostenibilidad de

40

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Arend, R. (2008). Differences in RBV strategic factors and the need to consider opposing factors in turnaround outcomes. Managerial and Decision Economics 29(4): 337-355. Barney, J. (1991). Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage. Journal of Management, 17, 99-120. Barney, J. (2001). Resource-based theories of competitive advantage: A ten-year retrospective on the resourcebased view. Journal of Management, 27(6), 643-650, doi.org/10.1177/014920630102700602. Bič, J y Stuchlíková, Z. (2013). Japan’s competitiveness: Trends and challenges. Society and Economy, 35(4), 471-492, doi.org/10.1556/SocEc.35.2013.4.3. Buckley, P., Pass, C. y Prescott, K. (1988). Measures of international competitiveness: a critical survey. Journal of Marketing Management, 4(2), 175-200. Chaminade, C. y Vang, J. (2008). Upgrading in Asian clusters: Rethinking the importance of interactive learning. Science, Technology and Society, 13(1), 61-94. Charles, V. y Sei, T. (2019). A two-stage OGI approach to compute the regional competitiveness index. Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, 29(2), 78-95, doi.org/10.1108/CR-08-20170050. Collins, C. y Smith, K. (2006). Knowledge exchange and combination: The role of human resource practices in the performance of high-technology firms. Academy of Management Journal, 49(3), 544-560. Cooke, P. (2007). Social capital, embeddedness, and market interactions: An analysis of firm performance in UK regions. Review of Social Economy, 65(1), 79106. Csath, M. (2007). The competitiveness of economies: Different views and arguments. Society and Economy, 29(1), 87-102.


COMPETITIVIDAD EMPRESARIAL

Delgado, M., Ketels, C., Porter, M. y Stern, S. (2012). The determinants of national competitiveness (No. w18249), National Bureau of Economic Research. Ghosh, D., Mehta, P. y Avittathur, B. (2019). Supply chain capabilities and competitiveness of high-tech manufacturing start-ups in India. Benchmarking: An International Journal, doi.org/10.1108/BIJ-12-20180437. Huselid, M., Jackson, S. y Schuler, R. (1997). Technical and strategic human resources management effectiveness as determinants of firm performance. Academy of Management Journal, 40(1), 171-188. Krugman, P. (1994). Competitiveness: a dangerous obsession, Foreign Aff, 73, 28. Lafuente, E., Acs, Z., Sanders, M. y Szerb, L. (2019a). The global technology frontier: productivity growth and the relevance of Kirznerian and Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics, en prensa, doi.org/10.1007/s11187-019-00140-1. Lafuente, E., Leiva, J., Moreno, J. y Szerb, L. (2019b). A non-parametric analysis of competitiveness efficiency: The relevance of firm size and the configuration of competitive pillars. BRQ Business Research Quarterly, en prensa, doi.org/10.1016/j. brq.2019.02.002. Man, T., Lau, T. y Chan, K. (2002). The competitiveness of small and medium enterprises: a conceptualization with focus on entrepreneurial competencies. Journal of Business Venturing, 17, 123-142. Newbert, S. (2007). Empirical research on the resource-based view of the firm: an assessment and suggestions for future research. Strategic Management Journal, 28 (2), 121-146. Newbert, S. (2008). Value, rareness, competitive advantage, and performance: a conceptual −level empirical investigation of the resource− based view of the firm. Strategic Management Journal, 29(7), 745-768. O’Donnell, A., Gilmore, A., Cummins, D. y Carson, D. (2001). The Network Construct in Entrepreneurship Research: A Review and Critique, Management Decision 39(9), 749- 760. O’Donnell, A. (2014). The contribution of networking to small firm marketing, Journal of Small Business Management, 52(1), 164-187.

Onkelinx, J., Manolova, T. y Edelman, L. (2016). Human capital and SME internationalization: Empirical evidence from Belgium. International Small Business Journal, 34(6), 818-837. Porter, M. (1981). The contributions of industrial organization to strategic management, Academy of Management Review, 6(4), 609-620. Porter, M. (1991). La ventaja competitiva de las naciones. (Vol. 1025). Buenos Aires: Vergara. Richbell, S., Szerb, L. y Vitai, Z. (2010). HRM in the Hungarian SME sector. Employee Relations, 32(3), 262-280. Sirmon, D., Hitt, M., Arregle, J. y Campbell, J. (2010). The dynamic interplay of capability strengths and weaknesses: investigating the bases of temporary competitive advantage. Strategic Management Journal, 31(13), 1386-1409. Sheehan, M. (2014). Human resource management and performance: Evidence from small and mediumsized firms. International Small Business Journal, 32(5), 545-570. Tarabusi, E. y Guarini, G. (2013). An unbalance adjustment method for development indicators, Social Indicators Research, 112(1), 19-45. Tang, Y. (2011). The Influence of networking on the internationalization of SMEs: Evidence from internationalized Chinese firms. International Small Business Journal, 29(4), 374-398. Theodoulides, L. (2006). Inter-organizational networking and innovative clusters between small and medium-sized companies, Society and Economy, in Central and Eastern Europe. Journal of the Corvinus University of Budapest, 28(2), 181-191. Wernerfelt, B. (1984). A resource-based view of the firm. Strategic Management Journal, 5(2), 171-180.

AGRADECIMIENTO Le agradecemos de especial manera al Doctor Esteban Lafuente del Global Competitiveness Project (GCP: www. sme-gcp.org) por su invaluable apoyo en la aplicación de la metodología del Índice de Competitividad Empresarial para el caso costarricense, y por los comentarios realizados al presente artículo. Por supuesto que cualquier error u omisión es responsabilidad exclusiva de los autores del artículo.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

41


AUTOGESTIÓN, EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL E INNOVACIÓN SOCIAL: UN ANÁLISIS DE CONTENIDOS PUBLICADOS EN TWITTER SELF-MANAGEMENT, SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND SOCIAL INNOVATION: A CONTENT ANALYSIS OF MESSAGES IN TWITTER

42

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


Messages published in Twitter, related to the hashtags in Spanish “#Autogestión”, “#EmprendimientoSocial” and “#InnovaciónSocial”, are analyzed. These messages were obtained through data mining, collected during two years, then filtered and evaluated by thematic analysis of contents. The purpose is to analyze social practices related to new paradigms of organization and management aimed to the self-resolution of needs, from an innovative social perspective, in Spanish-speaking scenarios, using digital environments as alternatives to traditional ways of managing and forming organizations. The analyzed message’s corpus shows how digital environments are used to undertake diverse initiatives, carried out through autonomous management to build support networks, in order to obtain resources and information through associations, solidarity and mutual help. These elements are key to define the concept of management in contemporary organizations.

ABSTRACT

EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

KEYWORDS: Self-management, social entrepreneurship, social innovation, social media.

Laura Rojas De Francisco

PALABRAS CLAVE: Autogestión, emprendimiento social, innovación social, medios sociales.

Profesora. Universidad EAFIT, Colombia lrojas3@eafit.edu.co

John Fernando Macías Prada

RESUMEN

En este artículo se analizan mensajes publicados en Twitter obtenidos mediante minería de datos que aparecen vinculados a los hashtags “#Autogestión”, “#EmprendimientoSocial” e “#InnovaciónSocial” recolectados durante dos años, y que fueron filtrados y evaluados mediante análisis temático de contenidos. El propósito es analizar prácticas sociales con relación a nuevos paradigmas de organización y gestión que, desde una perspectiva social innovadora, desarrollan iniciativas orientadas a resolver necesidades de forma autónoma, y que hoy se reconfiguran en los escenarios de habla hispana y en el uso de entornos digitales como alternativas a las formas tradicionales de gestionar y formar organizaciones. Los corpus de mensajes analizados muestran cómo se usan los entornos digitales para emprender iniciativas diversas, realizadas mediante gestión autónoma para construir redes de apoyo, tanto para obtener recursos como información mediante asociacionismo, solidaridad y ayuda mutua. Estos elementos resultan clave para resignificar la gestión en las organizaciones contemporáneas.

Docente de cátedra. Universidad EAFIT, Colombia jmaciasp@eafit.edu.co

ARTÍCULO RECIBIDO: 03 / 04 / 2019 ARTÍCULO ACEPTADO: 14 / 08 / 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL VOL. 13 NO. 3, PP. 42-57

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

43


IntroducciÓn

H

oy el mundo occidental asiste a un escenario donde las tecnologías digitales reconfiguran los procesos de participación de las personas (Masuda, 1984; Rheingold, 1996; Pérez-Luño, 2004; Bradley, 2007; Fuchs, 2014). El acceso que se tiene a estas tecnologías produce la impresión de que el tamaño del mundo se ha contraído y que la ciudadanía y las comunidades se encuentran más próximas que en cualquier momento histórico previo. Además, existe la convicción sobre un hábitat político de “aldea global”, donde las personas con el acceso a Internet, en tiempo real, desde donde se encuentren y sin límites de espacio, pueden contactarse con sinnúmero de posibilidades que inciden en sus relaciones (Castells, 2014). Esto ofrece un panorama de posibilidades frente a varios acontecimientos, por ejemplo, los relacionados con la recesión financiera de 2008, o las diversas crisis ambientales, sociales y políticas con implicaciones económicas, donde las personas afectadas, más allá de su contexto particular, encuentran en las tecnologías digitales oportunidad para afrontar múltiples dificultades, entre otras: el difícil acceso a los mercados laborales, la dificultad de mantener modelos de negocio sostenibles y rentables económicamente, y entrar en contacto con quienes pueden dar soporte o información, para desarrollar sus iniciativas, de forma autónoma. En ese marco de acontecimientos, y frente a la desilusión de la ciudadanía con la gestión de organizaciones públicas o privadas, han surgido iniciativas de autogestión (León, 2006; Castilho, Mariani y García, 2012), de emprendimiento social y de innovación social (Alvord, Brown y Letts, 2004; Mair, Robinson y Hockerts, 2006; Phillips, Lee, Ghobadian, O’Regan y James, 2015), como un medio para aliviar los problemas sociales y construir una agenda de acciones centradas en oportunidades y estrategias para la transformación social y el desarrollo sostenible, que procuran una cultura de participación, de intercambio de saberes y de acciones de transformación social que se organizan cada vez más, recurriendo a espacios colaborativos que tienen la potencialidad de resignificar las concepciones

44

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

tradicionales sobre la gestión y la participación en las organizaciones (Scheider, 2016; Pret y Carter, 2017). Las múltiples posibilidades de expresión e intercambio que hoy brindan las tecnologías son inéditas en la historia y han permitido interacciones de nuevos actores sociales que buscan formas alternativas de expresión y visibilización de sus intereses y metas (Fuchs, 2014). Entre estas tecnologías, los medios sociales, las redes sociales y los microblogs se han constituido en plataformas para visibilizar la información que se comparte sobre estas nuevas experiencias de organización social (Rojas, Reguero y Grahraman, 2015). Teniendo esto en cuenta, esta investigación estudia la forma en que el entorno digital ha sido aprovechado como plataforma de acciones estratégicas para compartir información y procurar la conexión con personas interesadas en apoyar iniciativas de emprendimiento o resolver diversas problemáticas de manera autónoma y asegurar soluciones innovadoras a problemas sociales, con lo cual se aporta a la sociedad al crear nuevas relaciones de colaboración mediante el uso de medios sociales digitales. En ese contexto, se han explorado contenidos publicados en formato microblog, particularmente en la plataforma Twitter, a partir de usuarios que generan información o conversación con los marcadores conocidos como hashtag (#tag): Autogestión, Emprendimiento Social e Innovación Social, los cuales han sido seleccionados en tanto guardan relación empírica con las tendencias ya mencionadas. El objetivo es analizar las prácticas sociales que los mensajes publicados sugieren en torno a esos tres hashtags y su relación con nuevos paradigmas de organización y gestión que, desde una perspectiva social, buscan emprender iniciativas orientadas a resolver necesidades de manera autónoma mediante el uso de entornos digitales. El servicio de Twitter es idóneo porque permite seguir contenidos que se comparten públicamente en esa plataforma y, si bien se trata de contenidos a los que tienen acceso principalmente usuarios con acceso a Internet, sus expresiones e intercambios tienen gran valor como reflejo de las acciones empíricas que dichos usuarios realizan en sus prácticas cotidianas, por lo cual los contenidos en formato microblog manifiestan y, a la vez, producen dinámicas y fenómenos sociales (Castells, 2014; Fuchs, 2014).


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

En este artículo, en primer lugar, se expone la revisión de literatura que hace una aproximación a los conceptos de autogestión, emprendimiento social e innovación social; se explica la metodología cualitativa usada, y luego se presentan los hallazgos y la discusión sobre las temáticas relacionadas con los marcadores. Finalmente, se comparten las conclusiones más relevantes acerca de las relaciones entre los contenidos de los mensajes y los nuevos paradigmas de producción y gestión implicados en la autogestión, el emprendimiento social y la innovación social.

REVISIÓN DE LA LITERATURA El signo de nuestro tiempo se distingue por la omnipresencia de las tecnologías digitales en todos los aspectos de la vida institucional y colectiva. En los últimos años se ha incrementado decisivamente la incidencia de estas en amplios sectores de la experiencia social, económica, jurídica y política, lo que invita a plantear su repercusión en el alcance y ejercicio del emprendimiento y la innovación social. En efecto, para autores como Bradley (2007) y Castells (2014), la incidencia de las tecnologías digitales en la vida de las personas les ha hecho ser partícipes de procesos globales que dan oportunidades y se da lugar a un escenario de apropiación y uso de estas tecnologías, que ha contribuido tanto a la visibilización de conflictos, contradicciones y luchas en diversos contextos geográficos, como a posibles soluciones que parten desde quienes han sido afectados (Sierra-Caballero y Gravante, 2016). En ese escenario, las prácticas del emprendimiento social, de la innovación social y de la autogestión pueden abarcar concepciones de auto-sustentabilidad y horizontalidad en la toma de decisiones colectivas; asimismo, involucran principios como autonomía y solidaridad que suelen integrarse en prácticas, como la recuperación de fábricas (Gracia, 2013) y otras experiencias alternativas que Boaventura De Sousa Santos (2011) llama caminos de la producción no capitalista, constituidas por colectivos que desafían los modelos del status quo y pueden, a su vez. representar el intercambio de recursos, tecnología y conocimiento entre países en desarrollo o personas que pueden actuar colectivamente con el uso de las tecnologías

En este artículo se analizan mensajes publicados en Twitter obtenidos mediante minería de datos que aparecen vinculados a los hashtags “#Autogestión”, “#EmprendimientoSocial” e “#InnovaciónSocial” recolectados durante dos años, y que fueron filtrados y evaluados mediante análisis temático de contenidos digitales para plantear nuevas vías de acción. Frente a esta realidad, podría afirmarse que no se trata meramente del desarrollo de capacidades y competencias digitales que hacen parte de una comunidad, sino, principalmente, del desafío de repensar una autogestión en el contexto de la difusión masiva de las tecnologías, de la creciente importancia de las experiencias digitales y del papel de las redes sociales interactivas, todo lo cual, en su conjunto, contribuye a facilitar los procesos de apropiación tecnológica y de la formación de una cultura digital que ha fortalecido tanto los escenarios de difusión del conocimiento, como los de solución a las necesidades (Torres y Vila-Viñas, 2015). Si bien se asume que son acciones sociales y realidades complejas que siguen en construcción (Sierra-Caballero y Gravante, 2016), para efectos de este texto se ha querido delimitar su análisis a la esfera de las experiencias de autogestión que se separan del establecimiento político tradicional y optan por la exploración de recursos y capacidades basadas en el emprendimiento social y la innovación social, prácticas que en la actualidad vienen convirtiéndose en un campo de estudio y de gestión que está transformando las dinámicas de movilización en medios digitales (Khajeheian y Tadayoni, 2016; Achtenhagen, 2017). La palabra autogestión viene de la traducción francesa del vocablo servo croata samoupravlje, que designaba la administración de las fábricas por los propios trabajadores en la organización de la producción (León, 2006). Pero las

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

45


figuras que adopta la autogestión varían según su contexto y finalidad, pueden ser sobre las tierras comunales, las asociaciones civiles, las cooperativas, los colectivos sociales informales o las formas alternativas de producción y consumo (Gagnon y Rioux, 1988). La autogestión es, entonces, un concepto transversal y se extiende a varios contextos. La investigación académica ha estudiado el tema de la autogestión en temas como la recuperación de empresas y su autogestión por parte de trabajadores (Deledicque, Féliz y Moser, 2005), los emprendimientos económicos solidarios (Culti, 2002; Gaiger, 2004), la creación de cooperativas y asociaciones de desarrollo local (Vásquez y Gómez, 2006; Sarria, 2012), las redes de economía solidaria (Mance, 2004) asociadas a la producción y gestión de recursos naturales (Seoane, 2006), los intercambios con monedas alternativas (Hintze, 2003), entre otras iniciativas relacionadas con la transformación social (De Sousa, 2011). Hoy en día, la autogestión toma diferentes formas, cuyo punto de encuentro es encontrar soluciones en común, tomando en consideración los mecanismos de funcionamiento del sistema y aportando propuestas y nuevas vías para administrar y lograr el desarrollo económico, muchas veces como respuesta a la exclusión social, al desempleo, o a problemáticas causadas por ajustes en el sistema de producción capitalista, pero también por su valor social e incidencia en el desarrollo económico (Guzmán y Trujillo, 2008). En este sentido, la autogestión se trata de un concepto emparentado con las prácticas sociales que se nombran, actualmente, como emprendimientos sociales. No obstante, entre ambos conceptos existen diferencias en cuanto a su procedencia. En efecto, el emprendimiento social emerge en la década de los noventa como alternativa al emprendimiento comercial o tradicional que focaliza sus operaciones en la búsqueda de impacto económico y de rentabilidad al explotar oportunidades de mercado (Neck, Brush y Allen, 2009), donde los precios, capital y salarios provienen del mercado (Dees y Anderson, 2006), y se trata de identificar y aprovechar nuevas oportunidades que suponen compromiso, asumir riesgos y mantenerse (Nicholls, 2006). Desde luego, tanto la autogestión como el emprendimiento social se relacionan en cuanto que son conceptos hoy utilizados para describir las iniciativas

46

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

de sujetos sociales y comunidades, así como de redes de voluntariado, organizaciones públicas y privadas, que trabajan para resolver una diversidad de problemas sociales; pero en términos generales la autogestión es asumida más como un estilo de vida (Deledicque, Féliz y Moser, 2005), mientras que el emprendimiento social está más orientado a la generación de una iniciativa de negocio propiamente dicha. Rodríguez y Ojeda (2013) confirman que no existe una definición única y universal, ni tampoco existe un único tipo, pero encuentran que todo emprendimiento social incluye tres elementos: 1) posee un objetivo orientado a la creación de valor social mediante acciones que tienen impacto en un grupo o sociedad, y genera cambios positivos que apuntan al aumento de la calidad de vida; 2) contiene una innovación transformadora; y 3) está asociado a un modelo de negocios sostenible. Las iniciativas de los emprendedores sociales requieren ser administradas –desde el punto de vista de su gestión técnica y estratégica– desde su funcionamiento dual, con la lógica simultánea de ser una empresa de negocios con vocación social (Alter, 2006). En ese sentido, Yujuico (2008) afirma que el emprendimiento social suele desarrollarse exitosamente bajo la forma de iniciativas empresariales en sectores de la economía donde el mercado ha fallado y la acción del Estado es inexistente o ineficaz, y allí los emprendedores sociales no sólo buscan transformar las vidas de los beneficiarios, sino también incidir en la forma de abordar, desde el punto de vista de la gestión, los problemas sociales y, al mismo tiempo, generar beneficios económicos que dan sostenibilidad al negocio. Por su parte, la innovación social tiene un origen relacionado con la acepción clásica de la idea de innovación empresarial, según la cual la innovación es sinónimo de producir, asimilar y explotar con éxito una novedad, en las esferas económica y social, de forma que aporte soluciones inéditas a los problemas y permita responder a las necesidades de las personas y de la sociedad. Sin embargo, la innovación social, tal y como se la entiende actualmente, surge con la obra de Kanter (1998, citada por Phillips et al., 2015), quien postula que se comenzó a percibir que las organizaciones debían transitar hacia procesos de innovación, que fueran gestionados desde las propias organizaciones, diseñando instrumentos


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

para percibir las oportunidades que brinda en el sector social y su potencialidad para desarrollar ideas y producir innovaciones que no sólo sirvan a nuevos mercados, sino que también proporcionen beneficios a las comunidades (Calderón, 2008). Es por esto que hoy la noción de innovación social aparece fuertemente conectada a la creación de espacios de autonomía social, de empoderamiento ciudadano −principalmente de sectores poblacionales en situación de vulnerabilidad social− y al desarrollo de procesos sociales que promuevan y mejoren los derechos de la ciudadanía (Martínez, Blanco y Salazar, 2019). Ahora, al tener en cuenta las posibilidades que ofrece Internet para gestionar el conocimiento sobre diversos aspectos de la vida social, parece lógico suponer que las tecnologías digitales se transformen en un escenario desde el que las personas compartan, cooperen, organicen y promuevan sus actividades cotidianas (de Aguilera y Casero-Ripollés, 2018). Por ello, las prácticas de autogestión, emprendimiento social e innovación social pueden ser rastreados allí, razón por la cual buscar contenidos y opiniones de las personas sobre dichas prácticas posibilita una primera base para obtener una visión del fenómeno a partir de mostrar su significado y analizar su aplicación en iniciativas sociales diversas. Los actores sociales que adelantan estos procesos y prácticas son agentes de transformación social, que al día de hoy están ejerciendo una participación política inédita a través de los medios sociales (Fuchs, 2014).

METODOLOGÍA Este estudio de naturaleza cualitativa con enfoque etnográfico busca comprender la interacción social en contextos digitales mediante prácticas de investigación relacionadas con la recopilación de datos y análisis (Kozinets, 2007), y tiene como propósito explorar los usos e interacción de usuarios de medios sociales que tienen interés en temas de autogestión, emprendimiento social e innovación social, con el objeto de interpretar algunos de los principales rasgos en los contenidos que permiten, a su vez, identificar los temas asociados a los tres conceptos −autogestión, emprendimiento social e innovación social−, y establecer las relaciones presentes entre ellos.

Para cumplir con estos objetivos, se realizó minería de datos y web scrapping sobre contenidos disponibles en las redes sociales publicados en idioma español en Twitter, recopilando los hashtags Autogestión, Emprendimiento Social e Innovación Social, dadas las posibilidades para explorar mensajes con el uso de hashtags, que son palabras o frases precedidas por #, utilizadas para identificar palabras clave o temas de interés para facilitar su búsqueda al ser indexadas a la red social, y con un clic enlazan todo lo marcado con el hashtag. Cuando esa etiqueta toma fuerza y se replica, crea tendencia, y eso puede entenderse como tema que suscita interés de conversación y popularidad, lo que le hace estrategia para ganar visibilidad al tratarse de información de interés para los usuarios (Batrinca y Treleaven, 2015). El rastreo de las palabras clave precedidas por el hashtag permite conocer lo que marca la tendencia y se enlaza con otras temáticas asociadas a la expresión según sea el contexto de quien las usa. Estas estrategias han sido utilizadas para diversos estudios utilizando un conjunto de técnicas para estudiar el intercambio de recursos entre individuos, grupos u organizaciones (cf. Xiang y Gretzel, 2010). Para el caso de este estudio, se trata de información para gestionar iniciativas sociales de emprendimiento e innovación, con la que se puedan localizar patrones regulares del intercambio de información que revelan a esos actores sociales o permiten encontrar las relaciones y el intercambio de información como conectores (cf. Eagle y Pentland, 2006), que aquí sirven para detectar las conexiones entre temas discutidos. Con este proceso, se logra obtener conocimiento sobre cómo funcionan esas rutas de intercambio, quiénes proveen información, cómo se aprovechan oportunidades relacionadas con esta, o incluso realizar cambios para mejorar la prestación de servicios de información (cf. Haythornthwaite, 1996); en este trabajo se exploran para detectar temáticas de interés para las personas que usan Twitter como canal de intercambio y de información. Para ello, la utilización de métodos como la minería de datos (Pang y Lee, 2008) para comprender una realidad con el análisis de redes sociales digitales (cf. Eagle y Pentland, 2006), se aplica para procesar el lenguaje natural presente en un texto, como un tweet (Chowdhury, 2005), y generar clasificaciones por niveles, polaridad de las palabras y frases, análisis de los sentimientos o clústeres de temáticas (Speriosu, Sudan, Upadhyay y

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

47


Baldridge, 2011). En esta investigación se han tenido en cuenta estas técnicas facilitadas por servicios de social media analytics para la obtención de datos, comenzando por capturar los contenidos mediante rastreadores en tiempo real o por búsqueda histórica, para aglutinar por etiquetas los tweets, que luego, basadas en su contenido, permiten comparar frecuencias del mensaje (si se repiten), contribuyentes y seguidores más activos, que son organizados por tópicos (cf. Adedoyin-Olowe, Gaber y Stahl, 2014), que fueron compartidos con los hashtags #Autogestión, #EmpredimientoSocial e #InnovaciónSocial, o en contenidos que integren esos términos, que son considerados como palabras clave. Por eso, este estudio tiene en cuenta la tradición hermenéutica que lleva a considerar los mensajes así obtenidos, como textos en los que se pueden buscar características comunes.

Gráfico 1. Categorías de análisis de los contenidos

48

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

La recolección de datos fue realizada en la red social Twitter, que posibilita el acceso a contenido público y se realizó en dos períodos: enero a junio de 2016 y enero a junio de 2017. Inicialmente los contenidos fueron obtenidos mediante minería de datos con el programa Bluemix de IBM (Gheith et al., 2016), un Programa de Aplicación de Interfaz −IPA− para el filtrado, y Buzzsumo para ampliar la muestra. Con la minería se obtuvieron más de un millón de tweets (1.046.243) escritos en español que provienen de países latinoamericanos, España, Estados Unidos y Francia. Los mensajes constituidos en promedio por reenvíos (45%), conversaciones (24%) y respuestas (14%) sobre los originales y compartidos (17%), fueron filtrados mediante algoritmos diseñados para la clasificación de datos, eliminando enlaces, identificadores de usuario, emoticonos y publicidad; una vez hecho el


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

filtrado se codificaron 146.580 con contenidos sobre el uso, significado y relaciones entre #Autogestión, #EmprendimientoSocial e #InnovaciónSocial. Dado que los usos de cada uno de los tres hashtags pueden variar dependiendo de la zona geográfica (p.e. la presencia de eventos relacionados con los temas específicos o la incidencia de los influenciadores), los contenidos fueron codificados en software CADQAS para encontrar relaciones que se constituyeran en categorías temáticas comunes. Esto se hace desde cada uno de los mensajes obtenidos por la minería de datos con la lectura e interpretación de los contenidos realizada por los investigadores a partir de la revisión de literatura. Con esta organización se procede a la categorización. (ver gráfico 1) Así se obtienen veintitrés categorías temáticas que agrupan los mensajes según los contenidos que fueron categorizados por lugar de procedencia, palabras claves y hashtag más utilizados y se integraron perfiles destacados por participación, mención y relevancia, para luego, mediante análisis temático −tanto de los textos originales, como de las conversaciones−, construir narrativas que integran apartados (que se presentan entre comillas en el análisis), y las relaciones entre los datos, que permiten explorar la calidad y la cantidad de las asociaciones, en los que podrían evidenciarse la formación de opiniones o comunidades temáticas (cf. Boccaletti, Latora, Moreno, Chavez y Hwang, 2005).

HALLAZGOS Los mensajes analizados para elaborar categorías temáticas relacionadas con los contenidos corresponden a la revisión de literatura y contienen al menos uno de los tres conceptos estudiados. Si bien, el análisis interpretativo a profundidad permite la confección de relacionamientos detallados, a continuación se hacen descripciones generales de la interpretación, que ilustran los alcances de los datos surgidos de los contenidos y que sugieren evidencias de la dinámica de participación en el ciberespacio de diversos actores sociales y las expresiones relacionadas con los procesos ‘autogestivos’ que se relacionan con actividades de emprendimiento social o apuntan a la innovación social.

Una mirada a las geografías de los territorios de habla hispana en que usaron más frecuentemente los hashtags estudiados muestra que, desde Barcelona, Ciudad de México y Valencia (España), se comparte la mayor concentración de mensajes. Ello se explica porque en esas ciudades, durante el tiempo de seguimiento de los contenidos (2016-2017), se desarrollaron actividades institucionales, académicas y comunitarias en torno a temas como la innovación social. Algunos de esos procesos de emprendimiento e innovación estuvieron relacionados con eventos (Foro21S) e instituciones (LabsCreativa). Sobre emprendimiento social resalta un hashtag que se utiliza para vincular temas diversos, #emprendesocial, que se asocia tanto a la innovación social, como a las prácticas de Responsabilidad social corporativa #RSC (7,2%), que, a su vez, se vinculan al hashtag #RSE para Responsabilidad social empresarial (11,6%). También el hashtag #socent (Social Entrepreneurship) sirve como un marcador que permite hacerle seguimiento a los temas más reconocidos. Según el seguimiento de estos marcadores, el concepto emprendimiento social se emplea especialmente en países de habla hispana, mayormente en España y Chile, y es alta en México y Venezuela. Desde, Nicaragua, Colombia, Ecuador, Argentina y Reino Unido se conversa sobre el tema con las palabras ‹‹empresarismo›› o ‹‹emprendeduría››. Por su parte, el tema de Innovación Social parece estar más distribuido globalmente, destaca en España, Colombia, México o Argentina y, aunque son en español, los mensajes categorizados también vienen de Reino Unido, Estados Unidos y Rusia. Las palabras clave que se integran con mayor frecuencia son Social (20,6%), Autogestión (15,1%), Innovación Social (12,6%), Emprendimiento (11,7%), Innovación (8,5%), Red(es) y empresas (3%) y Emprendedores y sostenibilidad (2%), y en ocasiones Premios o Financiación. Además, se agregan otros a partir de los contenidos que aportan ejemplos, soluciones, ideas y ayudas o apoyo, tanto en términos de financiación, como de participación en iniciativas: asociados a la innovación social como ‘cambio’, en el que la interpretación apunta hacia asumir la idea de que existen otras formas de responder a los problemas sociales. En cuanto a los hashtags asociados a la Autogestión, se encuentra Liderazgo (16%), el concepto de Emprendimiento social anotado como “socent” (15,9%),

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

49


aparece el concepto CreActiva [actividades de creación y creatividad] (11,6%), Holocracia (8,7%) “sistema de organización donde la autoridad, gestión y toma de decisiones distribuidas de forma horizontal”, Impacto social (7,2%) y Co-working y Apoyo Mutuo (5%). Como se observa, en su conjunto son contenidos que comparten expresiones relacionadas con el interés de los usuarios en temas relacionados con la solución de problemáticas sociales de forma innovadora, pertinente y, en muchos de los casos, desde unas miradas alternativas al mundo de los negocios tradicionales. Estos temas son, precisamente, características de procesos que incluyen el emprendimiento, la innovación y la autogestión con carácter social. En cuanto a los influenciadores que usan los tres temas principales, se detectaron casi quinientos colaboradores que comparten información sobre los tres temas, dentro de los cuales destacan: @Red_Creactiva, una red para compartir y transferir conocimiento en materia de Innovación Social y Emprendimiento Social; Inntegrity8, un blog para empresas y emprendedores cuyo personaje, Nicanor el emprendedor, da consejos; Qarepa_music, un portal de Venezuela que desarrolla proyectos relacionados con las industrias creativas y recurre al Crowdfunding o micro-mecenazgo mediante el entorno digital y al Sponsorship “patrocinadores que hacen pequeños aportes mediante donaciones en la red” y son considerados inversores; @Emprendedor_Soc, una organización que ofrece información, recursos y consejos sobre empresa social, innovación social y bien común de una ONG MovimientoIdun del influenciador Ginès Haro

Los corpus de mensajes analizados muestran cómo se usan los entornos digitales para emprender iniciativas diversas, realizadas mediante gestión autónoma para construir redes de apoyo, tanto para obtener recursos como información mediante asociacionismo, solidaridad y ayuda mutua 50

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Pastor; @SocentLabo, organización que ofrece soportes al emprendimiento social; @CleantechMX, concurso de empresas verdes de México que impulsa la innovación y el emprendimiento de tecnologías limpias; @barrixe, iniciativa del País Vasco que promueve la innovación y ofrece eventos y formación; @Things2Help, App móvil española para compra y venta de segunda mano a través de subasta. Todas estas iniciativas tienen el común denominador de responder a necesidades sociales, ya sea emprendiendo, apoyándose mutuamente o gestionando procesos en la red, sin recurrir a los canales tradicionales de financiación y comercialización.

ANÁLISIS DE CONTENIDOS Los mensajes con los hashtag estudiados contienen una serie de códigos sobre los que se construyen las categorías, las cuales pueden referirse, bien sea a sitios web en los que se comparte información, o bien a charlas, materiales de consulta, software libre para autogestionar labores o, incluso, a procesos sociales para lograr autonomía en temas laborales y políticos, y difusión de procesos de asociación, como la Permacultura, un “sistema de principios de diseño agrícola y social, político y económico, basado en los patrones y las características del ecosistema natural”. Asimismo, aparecen propuestas como las Ecoaldeas, que los contenidos se explican como: “comunidades cuyo objetivo intencional es ser sostenibles social, ecológica y económicamente, respetando la naturaleza con uso de Energías Renovables” que apuntan a lo que es llamado como “Soberanía Energética, Sustentabilidad Alimenticia y Económica”, y prácticas relacionadas con la sostenibilidad, tales como el veganismo. Otra modalidad de asociación que aparece son las escuelas autogestionadas, que son ejemplo del reordenamiento desde las organizaciones sociales que se apoyan en principios como el feminismo y el cooperativismo, según los contenidos. Este tipo de asociacionismo se apoya en expresiones representativas de los contenidos que abogan por reivindicaciones sociales, políticas o ambientales como “la revolución global”, luchas por la consecución de “medios


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

de todos” que propicien la autogestión digital o para lograr el “gran desafío de ser dueños de nuestro propio destino”. Asimismo, se reclama la promoción de espacios de “construcción colectiva” que apuesten “por un sistema democrático participativo, donde el pueblo asuma un rol activo y protagónico”, mediante el uso de “medios de comunicación independientes” o desde el asociacionismo, que busca “la formación de asociaciones que defiendan intereses comunes”. Estos temas ilustran las conexiones de los hashtags estudiados con procesos de participación política que buscan fomentar la construcción de una ciudadanía fuerte e independiente de las organizaciones tradicionales. La categoría de Autogobierno se usa en contenidos que apuestan por “contribuir a una transformación social”, “con una Cultura Libre” o en explicaciones sobre qué son los “Bienes Comunes, la autogestión y participación”, los cuales buscan maximizar la suma de beneficios para todos y se logra con “el liderazgo y los equipos en los modelos de autogestión”. Un evento clave para este tipo de iniciativas es “la Semana Cultural Libertaria”, realizada en Valladolid, España, que agenda exposiciones sobre cooperación voluntaria versus la coerción. En este tipo de eventos se explora la innovación social y se ofrecen diversas formas de entrenamiento (coaching) de “Habilidades para la Autogestión e innovación” y se plantea la importancia de vincular la innovación social con la autogestión. En la categoría Ocupación Fábrica/Vivienda se pueden encontrar referencias a “Fábricas Sin Patrón”, #FaSinPat, que se asocia al referente de fábricas de propiedad colectiva, donde la autogestión es dada a conocer como “un triunfo de la resistencia y organización de los trabajadores” según publicaciones de @pormastiempo. A esta categoría se acerca la de Movimientos sindicales/ Organizaciones de trabajadores, pues “las empresas recuperadas” o “colectivizaciones” son gestionadas por sus trabajadores y sindicatos de manera autónoma, resultado de una negociación colectiva, y recurren a la autogestión como “una posibilidad de construir una economía de los trabajadores que sea alternativa al sistema capitalista”. En este tipo de contenidos suele acusarse al Estado de “ser capitalista”, por lo que se hace un llamado a “Reformas inmediatas, toma de los medios de producción y sindicalismo revolucionario y hacia la autogestión de la sociedad”, para pasar del “contrapoder sindical a la autogestión social”. Esta categoría también refiere a los

“espacios ocupados para vivienda, que surgieron por la especulación inmobiliaria”, conocidos como movimiento Okupa, que toma lugares desocupados temporal o permanentemente, con el fin de utilizarlos y con ello denunciar y responder a dificultades para acceder al derecho a la vivienda, según los contenidos. En la categoría Gestión Empresarial/Gubernamental se encuentran los contenidos que proponen la autogestión como “clave para el éxito empresarial”. Algunos de los usos más extendidos refieren la invitación a realizar “el manejo autogestionado de Riesgos Laborales” en las empresas para “disminuir accidentes laborales con un programa de autogestión en seguridad y salud”, que incluya, por ejemplo, “la autogestión hospitalaria”. También apunta a la responsabilidad corporativa con procesos de “autogestión ambiental” que pueden pensarse para el “manejo de las basuras, en ciudades como México o Valparaíso”, o “la autogestión de los acuíferos”. Pueden también tratarse propuestas vinculadas a “organizaciones centradas en las personas que conllevan a la efectividad desde la autogestión” o “empresas sin jefes. En torno a esto último, suelen aparecer los conceptos de Coworking, “filosofía de vida orientada a compartir un mismo espacio de trabajo sin perder independencia”, y de Holocracia, “modelo de gestión empresarial sin jerarquías que delega funciones y responsabilidades en función de proyectos”, los cuales se enlazan con la autogestión y la presentan como “herramienta de competitividad”, que se puede utilizar para “logística o para aumentar la productividad”. De este modo, vista la autogestión como herramienta, se la vincula con “mecanismos e instrumentos de control interno para una buena ‘autogestión’ organizacional” que puede verse planteado desde una “capacitación en talleres socio-productivos de autogestión comunitaria”. La categoría Financiación Colectiva/Crowdfunding corresponde a las iniciativas que buscan encontrar fondos, usualmente para emprendimientos artísticos, musicales, audiovisuales, fotográficos o literarios. A estos procesos se les suele denominar “emprendimientos culturales”, de la “economía naranja” o “autogestión cultural”; esta se concibe como “auto sustentación, proactividad, insumisión, independencia, contracultura, cultura alternativa o ruptura colectiva”. Son contenidos que invitan a realizar aportes económicos a partir de la participación

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

51


en fiestas, venta de mercancías o producciones, de las que se hace difusión con talleres, cursos y charlas. Por tanto, la figura de los micromecenazgos digitales colectivos resulta relevante para obtener recursos independientes. En el caso de los emprendimientos culturales, llama la atención que, además de los formatos de crowfunding, es también usual encontrar combinaciones con difusiones gratuitas o permisos de compartir y utilizar las creaciones artísticas bajo modalidades de licenciamiento que denotan un interés de difusión de la cultura más allá de la búsqueda de rentabilidad económica. La Agroecología/Permacultura es una categoría que apunta a la “autogestión de la alimentación con siembra y producción ecológica y solidaria” en “proyectos agroecológicos comunitarios”; para esto, además, hacen “educación agrícola” y se “facilitan las prácticas agropecuarias”, en donde “los huertos urbanos” son “centros de cambio responsables” y se destacan las “historias de autogestión de mujeres campesinas y de barrios populares y mercados municipales” “sin intermediarios entre quienes cultivan y quienes consumen”, o los “comedores comunitarios”. Esta categoría se interpreta como una práctica que busca reducir pasos en la cadena de comercialización, tanto para conectar productores con consumidores de forma sostenible y para el bien común, como para resolver problemas sociales. La categoría Participación/Políticas Públicas está relacionada con el papel de las comunidades, por eso la formulación de políticas que buscan una “planificación participativa o re-conceptualización del mercado” sobre el principio de “Bienes comunes, autogestión y participación”. Esta se expone en reuniones para “elaborar reglamentos de autogestión” que funcionan en “centros para jóvenes” o como “vigilancia indígena”, entendida como “capacidad de autogestión de los pueblos indígenas para crear alternativas concretas para las instituciones ambientales”. Esta categoría también se usa para visibilizar foros y escritos que dan a entender “la autogestión cultural” como “ensayos de resistencia” o explica la “autogestión comunitaria y educación financiera” como una forma de “progresar con solidaridad” en una “autogestión del dinero”. Estos asuntos se pueden interpretar como manifestaciones del interés para que las comunidades hagan parte del diseño y gestión de las políticas públicas y así lograr objetivos colectivos.

52

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Lo anterior está íntimamente asociado a la categoría Empoderamiento Comunitario, lo cual se refiere a la organización y la descentralización de procesos que las comunidades realizan, sin depender del Estado o el sector privado, para afrontar sus problemáticas en casos como enfrentar “la gentrificación desde la autogestión vecinal” o mejorar su entorno de forma “autogestiva” para “cambiar la imagen de los barrios”, lograr “el mantenimiento de instalaciones como hospitales o plazas de mercado” o el trabajo desde la “alternativa de inclusión en el mercado laboral mediante cooperativas”. Esta categoría también abarca contenidos sobre la opción de controlar conflictos locales, por ejemplo, mediante la creación de “programas culturales para escenificar las capacidades y competencias de autogestión”, asimismo convoca la intención de “protesta” mediante “autogestión política” como “forma de resistencia contra el desalojo” de viviendas hipotecadas y “como “prevención”. De este modo, el empoderamiento comunitario también alude a “Iniciativas de Economía Social o Solidaria”, las cuales asocian la autogestión, el emprendimiento social y la innovación social a procesos de “emancipación en el trabajo, en reciprocidad y solidaridad”, con la intención de “romper esquemas”. Todo ello conduce, finalmente, a la categoría Modelos Alternativos al Desarrollo, que contiene las propuestas que surgen de la base comunitaria y demandan acciones de “planificación participativa o reconceptualización del mercado” y de replantear “el poder y la dominación”, por ejemplo, mediante una “rebelión económica”. Este tipo de contenidos destaca por la alta valoración que asignan a las “organizaciones sociales”, asumidas como potenciales escenarios de “protestas sociales”, todo lo cual evidencia una mirada crítica a la gestión gubernamental y empresarial tradicionales. En suma, como se observa, los conceptos de Autogestión, Emprendimiento Social e Innovación Social son vistos como una alternativa para que “las comunidades gestionen su propio desarrollo”, lo que les “permite acceder a diferentes beneficios y recursos”, por ejemplo, a partir de “modelos de negocio, con una cierta horizontalidad y desde la autogestión”, todo lo cual se asume como un “camino clave para combatir la pobreza extrema”. En ese panorama, la autogestión en procesos de emprendimiento social e innovación social se propone como una opción


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

frente a la recesión económica con iniciativas, proyectos y experiencias consideradas como “una nueva economía”, donde se pueden “emprender proyectos” con estrategias como bootstrapping, es decir, “una financiación con fondos propios”, para no “depender de inversiones de capital o de préstamos”, que puede “aplicarse a empresas familiares”, “en iniciativas del tercer sector” o “beneficiar a organizaciones no gubernamentales”.

DISCUSIÓN En este artículo se ha mostrado que, mediante el análisis de tweets, desde los contenidos de mensajes cortos en redes sociales digitales, pueden vislumbrarse algunas de las formas en que se están concretando hoy en día diversas iniciativas para afrontar las dificultades sociales, las insatisfacciones con las empresas y organizaciones tradicionales, y se están proponiendo modelos de acción alternativos frente a contextos de crisis económica y política. Entre estos modelos, la autogestión, el emprendimiento social y la innovación social aparecen como prácticas relevantes que construyen redes de apoyo y solidaridades para realizar esfuerzos colectivos transformadores (De Sousa, 2011). Al respecto, diversos autores en años recientes han señalado que, en efecto, los actores sociales que deciden emprender iniciativas sociales poseen un papel destacado para la formación de una mirada crítica hacia formas de gestionar y participar en y desde las organizaciones (Nicholls, 2006; Lumpkin, Bacq y Pidduck, 2018), lo cual anuncia el desafío extendido de revisar las racionalidades, prácticas y procedimientos con los cuales el mundo de hoy es administrado (Muñoz, 2011). En la literatura de ciencias sociales, gestión y organizaciones crecen las evidencias sobre la necesidad de criticar la faceta deshumanizante de la gestión, particularmente de la gestión empresarial, la cual se interpreta como un escenario que ha estado desconociendo toda responsabilidad social diferente a la optimización de utilidades como criterio principal de desarrollo (Grey, Huault, Perret y Taskin, 2016). Las voces que se han levantado son múltiples y heterogéneas (Hinkelammert, 2017), y entre ellas los medios sociales se han convertido en espacio de producción de conversaciones, contenidos, opiniones y acciones para

viabilizar acciones ante los descontentos y preocupaciones sociales (Fuchs, 2014). En ese sentido, los mensajes que aparecen vinculados a los hashtag Autogestión, Emprendimiento Social e Innovación Social, publicados en español, muestran significados y acciones que se relacionan con ese desafío de resignificar los procesos de gestión tradicionales. La ‘alternatividad’ lleva a buscar en los principios y orientaciones solidarios, creativos y comunitarios, la génesis de nuevos paradigmas para la consecución de recursos, visibilización, financiamiento y logro de competencias, todo lo cual expresa la voluntad de los actores sociales que se valen de medios sociales para actuar, algunas veces desde el mercado, pero siempre desde la esfera pública para promover principios de asociacionismo, solidaridad y ayuda mutua que, por su propia naturaleza, riñen con los modos de gestionar y rentabilizar de las organizaciones tradicionales del capitalismo predominante (Hintze, 2003; Mance, 2004; Gaiger, 2004). Los datos recabados en Twitter permiten hacer una aproximación de las implicaciones de reunir esos tres elementos que se analizan, orientados al cambio o a la solución de problemas sociales. Allí, la autogestión aparece orientada hacia el diseño de formas de emprendimiento, producción, gestión y consumo que se relacionan con la economía solidaria y con la autoeficacia, y que tienen un componente de innovación, en la medida en que apunta hacia la unión de esfuerzos para encontrar una vía común de maneras creativas y comunitarias. Sierra-Caballero y Gravante (2016) señalan que el entorno digital se transforma en un camino para la renovación de formas comunitarias de acción, lo cual anuncian como una nueva forma de acción colectiva, mediación y apropiación para la movilización social. En la muestra analizada destacan los usos y la movilización hacia la consecución de recursos y la organización social como forma de compartir logros, lanzar retos y reflexionar sobre las acciones y metas de diversas iniciativas sociales y de organizaciones. Destacan, también, las participaciones provenientes del ámbito cultural, especialmente de la industria musical; asimismo, se evidencian iniciativas dentro de las industrias culturales y la creación y producción artística, y se hacen extensivas las invitaciones a medios libres y conocimiento abierto a todos los públicos, representados en software

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

53


libre y aplicaciones gratuitas. En general, se detecta información relacionada con metas colaborativas, todo lo cual apunta justamente a evidenciar el impacto creciente del ciberespacio como foro de ideas y planes de acción que, dialógicamente, fomentan la construcción de redes de contacto con posibilidades de asociación para la solución de problemas. Desde el punto de vista de la gestión, los contenidos analizados promueven acciones de gestión autónoma, porque se asume que, al impulsar la cultura de autogestión, se ayuda a emprender de forma innovadora. De ahí que los procesos de soporte a la autogestión son valorados como importantes y como “laboratorios creativos” que vale la pena promover. Esto implica recuperar una perspectiva de la gestión con sentido solidario, que supera el punto de vista de la optimización y la rentabilidad, evidenciando que el comportamiento en los mercados, el papel de las empresas y la participación de los diferentes actores sociales en los procesos organizativos, no son tan solo procesos organizacionales que deben administrarse para la obtención de beneficios económicos, sino que son, ante todo, fenómenos sociales con características culturales, sociopolíticas e históricas complejas (Granovetter, 1985). Por ello, tiene sentido plantear que los contenidos en redes sociales digitales en torno a los temas estudiados llevan a instalar una serie de desafíos y demandas a las tradicionales formas de construir los mercados, de participación de las empresas y de gestionar los asuntos públicos por parte de los gobiernos, lo cual merece y requiere ser estudiado para lograr una comprensión de las transformaciones sociales que se han puesto en marcha.

CONCLUSIONES Los medios sociales digitales son, en la actualidad, un foro para discutir y determinar el rol y las responsabilidades que tienen las empresas y los negocios en la construcción de la sociedad, trabajando en los derechos humanos, el crecimiento económico y el bienestar general. En ese sentido, el microblogging es una esfera pública alternativa en la que se pueden encontrar expresiones directas y llamados a la acción y participación que propician formas de organización para la búsqueda de recursos, visibilización y logro de metas variadas.

54

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Los contenidos publicados en los medios sociales, al interpretarse, dan cuenta de la manera en que usuarios de Twitter comparten opiniones y experiencias, promueven y organizan actividades de autogestión, emprendimiento social e innovación social, con propósito de atender demandas sociales, inconformidades, promover acciones creativas y movilizaciones que cuestionan las formas tradicionales de hacer gestión. Las personas, mediante sus tweets, establecen temáticas en común que, vistas en detalle, amplían el espectro de significados del mundo de los negocios, el papel de las empresas en el mundo actual, la economía, el compromiso social, la responsabilidad corporativa, el capitalismo y las nuevas necesidades de la sociedad al integrar los temas sociales y financieros. Dichas expresiones han permitido identificar, en los medios digitales, la idea de la #autogestión como punto de partida para hablar de gestión empresarial, autonomía laboral, protestas sociales, soberanía energética, entre otras. Este marcador unido a #emprendimiento social, convoca temas como crowdfunding, movimientos sindicales, gestión alternativa de la educación o tecnologías y medios sociales libres. La autogestión y la innovación social muestran miradas alternativas de desarrollo y opción participativa en la formulación de políticas públicas o movimientos, como la ocupación de fábricas y viviendas, que resignifican la incidencia de las personas en esos espacios. En consecuencia, los tres conceptos confluyen en iniciativas de economía social y solidaria, permacultura o agroecología, empoderamiento comunitario, organizaciones sociales, autogobierno y gestión alternativa de las artes y la cultura, todo lo cual se constituye en nuevos paradigmas de organización y gestión que, desde una perspectiva social, buscan emprender iniciativas orientadas a resolver necesidades de forma autónoma. El mensaje identificado es que existe una búsqueda de “otras vías” para gestionar la vida social, los asuntos públicos, las expresiones culturales y el desempeño de las organizaciones e instituciones. En este escenario, las herramientas que ofrecen las tecnologías de la comunicación sirven como medios que ayudan a resolver necesidades y obtener difusión, ideas y estrategias; con la oferta de recursos para producir, conseguir fondos, generar nuevos públicos, encontrar espacios de venta,


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

evitar intermediarios, lo que implica la necesidad de construir opciones y alternativas al funcionamiento de las organizaciones en el mundo contemporáneo, a través del espíritu solidario, emprendedor, innovador y de autogestión. Los alcances de este este estudio se circunscriben, por lo menos inicialmente, a los espacios geográficos de habla española en los cuales se rastrearon los contenidos de los mensajes. La investigación da origen a una extensa base de datos que cuenta con tweets de las conversaciones originales, reenviadas e imágenes que acompañan los mensajes, conformando un conjunto de información que constituye un corpus de trabajo para posteriores preguntas, miradas y análisis. En posteriores investigaciones es necesario detallar el comportamiento, tendencias y prioridades que los actores sociales dan a cada uno de los temas abordados en cada contexto específico. En esta investigación, la aproximación realizada pretende resaltar las potencialidades de la metodología de minería de datos y la relevancia social que la autogestión, el emprendimiento social y la innovación social han cobrado en años recientes. Pero se hace necesario continuar avanzando en la identificación de las relaciones e interacciones que los medios sociales digitales reflejan de las prácticas sociales concretas. Si bien el acercamiento a los mensajes en formato microblog permite identificar tendencias y comportamientos empíricos, la metodología usada permite, principalmente, el análisis de los contenidos producidos por personas con acceso a Internet que usan plataformas como Twitter, por lo que, en futuras investigaciones, entre los retos estaría el uso de estrategias adicionales de generación de información, que complementen este análisis general. Así, por ejemplo, la minería de datos facilita la detección de actores sociales e iniciativas clave a las que se les puede dar seguimiento mediante observación y entrevistas directas. En tanto objeto de estudio, parece relevante continuar estudiando procesos sociales diversos en que se vienen usando los medios sociales digitales, ya que se convierten en plataformas de construcción colectiva de nuevas formas asociativas de participación política y organizativa. Estos procesos están configurando arreglos organizacionales y de gestión alternativos que requieren ser estudiados para seguirle el pulso a nuevas expresiones que buscan atender los desafíos de la sociedad contemporánea.

RECONOCIMIENTOS Agradecemos la labor de Paulina Aguirre Arias por su colaboración en el análisis cualitativo y categorización de los contenidos, la revisión de estilo y contribución en las conclusiones.

Referencias Achtenhagen, L. (2017). Media Entrepreneurship-Taking Stock and Moving Forward, International Journal on Media Management 19 (1), 1-10. Adedoyin-Olowe, M., Gaber, M. y Stahl, F. (2014). A Survey of Data Mining Techniques for Social Network Analysis. International Journal of Research in Computer Engineering and Electronics, 3(6), 1-8. Doi: https://doi.org /10.1080/00131881.2016.1220810 Alvord, S., Brown, I. y Letts, C. (2004). Entrepreneurship and Societal Transformation: An Exploratory Study. The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, 40(3), 260-282. Alter, S. (2006) Social Enterprise Models and Their Mission and Money Relationships. En A. Nicholls. (2006). Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Batrinca, B. y Treleaven, P. C. (2015). Social media analytics: a survey of techniques, tools and platforms. Ai & Society (Vol. 30). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00146-014-0549-4. Bradley, G. (2007). Social and community informatics: humans on the net. New York: Routledge. Boccaletti, S., Latora, V., Moreno, Y., Chavez, M. y Hwang, D. U. (2006). Complex networks: Structure and dynamics. Physics reports, 424 (4-5), 175-308. De Aguilera, M. y Casero-Ripollés, A. (2018). ¿Tecnologías para la transformación? Los medios sociales ante el cambio político y social. Icono 14, 16 (1), 1-21. De Sousa, B. (2011). Producir para Vivir: Los Caminos de la Producción No Capitalista. México: Fondo De Cultura Económica. Calderón, F. (2008). Una Perspectiva Social de la Innovación. Contribuciones a las Ciencias Sociales. 4(2), 45-92. Castells, M. (2014). The impact of the internet on society: a global perspective. 132-133. Castilho, M., Mariani, M. y García, R. (2012). Economía

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

55


solidaria y condiciones de autogestión en emprendimientos económicos solidarios en el municipio de Aquidauana (MS-Brasil). Estudios y perspectivas en turismo, 21(5), 1225-1243. Chalmers, D. (2012). Social innovation: An exploration of the barriers faced by innovating organizations in the social economy. Local economy, 28(1), 17-34. Chowdhury, G. (2005). Natural language processing. Annual Review of Information Science and Technology, 37(1), 5189. http://doi.org/10.1002/aris.1440370103 Culti, M. (2002). El cooperativismo popular en Brasil: importancia y representatividad. Anais do Tercer Congreso Europeo de Economía Disponible en http:// www.unitrabalho.org.br/IMG/pdf/el-cooperativismopopular-en-brasil.pdf Dees, J. y Anderson, B. (2006). Framing a theory of social entrepreneurship: Building on two schools of practice and thought. In R. Mosher-Williams (Ed.), Research on social entrepreneurship: Understanding and contributing to an emerging field (pp. 39-66). ARNOVA Occasional Paper Series 1(3). Deledicque, L., Féliz, M. y Moser, J. (2005). Recuperación de empresas por sus trabajadores y autogestión obrera. Un estudio de caso de una empresa en Argentina. CIRIEC-España, Revista de Economía Pública, Social y Cooperativa, Abril (51), 51-76 Gracia, M. (2013). Fábrica de resistencias y recuperación social: Experiencias de autogestión del trabajo y la producción en Argentina. México D.F.: El Colegio de México, A.C. Eagle, N. y Pentland, A. (2006). Reality mining: Sensing complex social systems. Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 10(4), 255-268. https://doi.org/10.1007/ s00779-005-0046-3 Fuchs, C. (2014). Social Media, A critical introduction. Londres: Sage publishing. Gagnon, G. y Rioux, M. (1988). À Propos D’ Autogestion Et D’ Émancipation. Montreal: Institut québécois de recherche sur la culture. Gaiger, L. (2004). Emprendimientos económicos solidarios. En A. D. Cattani (Ed.). La otra economía. Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento. Disponible en: http://www.tau.org. ar/upload/89f0c2b656ca02ff45ef61a4f2e5bf24/

56

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

emprendimientos_eco n_micos_solidarios.pdf Gheith, A., Rajamony, R., Bohrer, P., Agarwal, K., Kistler, M., Eagle, B. W., Hambridge, C., Carter, J., y Kaplinger, T. (2016). Ibm bluemix mobile cloud services. IBM Journal of Research and Development, 60(2-3), 7–1. Granovetter, M. (1985). Economic Action and Social Structure: The problem of embeddedness. The American Journal of Sociology, 91(3), 481-510. Grey, C., Huault, I., Perret, V. y Taskin, L. (Eds). (2016). Critical Management Studies. Global Voices, Local Accents. Oxon: Routledge. Guerra, F. (1993). El ciudadano y su reino. Reflexiones sobre la génesis del ciudadano en América Latina. Ponencia presentada al foro sobre representación política. Bogotá: Instituto de Estudios Políticos y Relaciones Internacionales de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia, mayo de 1993. Guzmán, A. y Trujillo, M. (2008). Emprendimiento social – revisión de literatura. Estudios Gerenciales, 24(109), 105125. Haythornthwaite, C. (1996). Social network analysis: An approach and technique for the study of information exchange. Library & Information Science Research, 18(4), 323-342. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0740-8188(96)90003-1. Hintze, S. (2003). Trueque y Economía Solidaria. Buenos Aires: ICO, Instituto del Conurbano. UNGS, Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento. Disponible en http://biblioteca.clacso.edu.ar/Argentina/icoungs/20110914114945/trueque.pdf. Hinkelammert, F. (2017). La vida o el capital: el grito del sujeto vivo y corporal frente a la ley del mercado. Buenos Aires: CLACSO. Khajeheian, D. y Tadayoni, R. (2016), User innovation in public service broadcasts: creating public value by media entrepreneurship. International Journal of Technology Transfer and Commercialisation, 14(2), 117-131. Kozinets, R. V. (2007). Netnography. The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Sociology, 1-2. León, A. (2006) Emancipação no cotidiano: iniciativas igualitárias em sociedades de controle. Tesis de doctorado en Psicología Social, PUC-SP. São Paulo, Disponible en http://www.sapientia.pucsp.br/tde_busca/arquivo. php?codArquivo=3053.


EMPRENDIMIENTO SOCIAL

Lumpkin, G. Bacq, S. y Pidduck, R. (2018). Where Change Happens: Community-Level Phenomena in Social Entrepreneurship Research. Journal of Small Business Management 2018 56(1), 24–50. Mair, J., Robinson, J. y Hockerts, K. (Eds.). (2006). Social Entrepreneurship. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Mance, E. (2004). Redes de Colaboración Solidaria. En A. D. Cattani (Ed.), La otra economía (pp. 353-362). Universidad Nacional de General Sarmiento. Martínez, R., Blanco, I y Salazar, Y. (2019). La innovación social, ¿prácticas para producir autonomía, empoderamiento y nueva institucionalidad? Revista Internacional de Sociología, 77 (2), e126, abril-junio, 2019. Masuda, Y. (1984). La sociedad informatizada como sociedad postindustrial. Madrid: Fundesco, Tecnos. Muñoz, R. (2011). Formar en administración: Por una nueva fundamentación filosófica. Medellín: Siglo del Hombre, Universidad EAFIT. Neck, H., Brush, C. y Allen, E. (2009). The landscape of social entrepreneurship. Business Horizons, 52, 13-19. Nicholls, A. (2006). Social Entrepreneurship: New Models of Sustainable Social Change. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pang, B. y Lee, L. (2008). Opinion Mining and Sentiment Analysis. Foundations and Trends® in Information Retrieval, 2(1-2), 1-35. http://doi.org/10.1561/1500000011 Pérez-Luño, A. E. (2003). ¿Ciberciudadaní@ o ciudadaní@. com? Barcelona: Gedisa. Pret, T. y Carter, S. (2017). The importance of ‘fitting in’: collaboration and social value creation in response to community norms and expectations. Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, 29 (7-8), 639-667. Phillips, W., Lee, H., Ghobadian, A., O’Regan, N. y James, P.A (2015) Social Innovation and Social Entrepreneurship: A Systematic Review. Group and Organization Management, 40 (3), 428-461. Rheingold, H. (1996) La comunidad virtual. Una sociedad sin fronteras. Barcelona: Gedisa. Rodríguez, A. y Ojeda, E. (2013). Emprendimiento social: un concepto en busca de sostenibilidad. Debates IESA. 18(4 octubre - diciembre), 49-52. Rojas, L., Reguero, N. y Ghahraman, A. (2015). ¿Qué se dice en

Twitter sobre la autogestión?. En I. Verdet y Y. Onghena (compiladoras). Tránsito: voces, acciones y reacciones, 159-176. Sarria, A. M. (2012). Economía solidaria, acción colectiva y espacio público en el sur de Brasil. Université Catholique De Louvain. Sartori, G. (1998) Homo Videns. La sociedad teledirigida. Madrid: Taurus. Scheider, A. (2016). Social Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship, Collectivism, and Everything in Between: Prototypes and Continuous Dimensions. Public Administration Review, 77(3), 421-431. Seoane, J. (2006). Movimientos sociales y recursos naturales en América Latina: resistencias al neoliberalismo, configuración de alternativas. Sociedade E Estado, 21(1), 85-107. Sierra-Caballero, F. y Gravante, T. (2016). Ciudadanía digital y acción colectiva en América Latina Crítica de la mediación y apropiación social por los nuevos movimientos sociales. La Trama de la Comunicación, 20 (1). Speriosu, M., Sudan, N., Upadhyay, S. y Baldridge, J. (2011). Twitter polarity classification with label propagation over lexical links and the follower graph, 53-63. Disponible en http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2140458.2140465. Torres, J. y Vila-Viñas, D. (2015) Conectividad: accesibilidad, soberanía y autogestión de las infraestructuras de comunicación (v.2.0). En Vila Viñas, D. & Barandiaran, X. (Eds). Buen Conocer / FLOK Society Modelos sostenibles y políticas públicas para una economía social del conocimiento común y abierto en el Ecuador. Quito, Ecuador: IAEN-CIESPAL. Disponible en http://book. floksociety.org/ec/4/4-3-conectividad-acceso-soberania-yautogestion-de-infraestructuras-de-comunicacion/ Vásquez, S. y Gómez, G. (2006). Autogestión Indígena en Tlahuitoltepec Mixe, Oaxaca, México. Revista Ra Ximhai Publicación Cuatrimestral de Sociedad, Cultura Y Desarrollo Sustentable, 2(001), 151-169. Xiang, Z. y Gretzel, U. (2010). Role of social media in online travel information search. Tourism Management, 31(2), 179-188. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2009.02.016. Yujuico, E. (2008) Connecting the Dots in Social Entrepreneurship through the Capabilities Approach. Socio-Economic Review, 6(3) 493-513.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

57


DEALING WITH HETEROGENEITY: AN ANALYSIS OF SPANISH UNIVERSITIES

ABORDANDO LA HETEROGENEIDAD: UN ANÁLISIS DE LAS UNIVERSIDADES ESPAÑOLAS

58

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


Universities are highly dependent on regulatory frameworks, the geographical setting as well as on requirements for the creation of the different outputs they pursue. As a result, universities are heterogeneous organizations. This study analyses universities’ heterogeneity in Spain. By using a dataset from the Spanish higher education system, we model the objective function of universities and investigate which factors help explain universities’ performance, in terms of the three missions that they mostly perform (teaching, research and technology transfer). Also, a cluster analysis is performed to categorise Spanish universities. The findings contribute to better understand the different behaviours shown by universities. The findings underline the heterogeneity of Spanish universities: while some universities focus more on formation (teaching) goals, other universities excel at disseminating knowledge through different scientific outputs. The study concludes with a detailed inter- and intra- group analysis.

ABSTRACT

HETEROGENEITY

Jasmina Berbegal-Mirabent Associate Professor. Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC Barcelona), Spain.

KEYWORDS: Higher education institutions; resources; objective function; cluster analysis

jberbegal@uic.es

Dolors Gil-Doménech

PALABRAS CLAVE: Instituciones de educación superior; recursos; función objetivo; análisis clúster

Adjunct Professor. Universitat Internacional de Catalunya (UIC Barcelona), Spain. mdgil@uic.es

Rocío de la Torre

RESUMEN

Las universidades dependen en gran medida de los marcos regulatorios, la visión estratégica y del contexto geográfico. Consecuencia de esto, las universidades son claramente organizaciones heterogéneas. Este estudio analiza la heterogeneidad de las universidades en España. Utilizando datos del sistema universitario español se propone la formulación de la función objetivo de las universidades y se investiga qué factores ayudan a explicar el desempeño de las universidades en términos de las tres misiones que realizan principalmente (enseñanza, investigación y transferencia de tecnología). El estudio se acompaña de un análisis de clústeres en el que se caracterizan distintas tipologías de universidades. Los resultados obtenidos ayudan a comprender mejor los diferentes comportamientos mostrados por las universidades. En concreto, los resultados subrayan la heterogeneidad del sistema universitario español: mientras que algunas universidades se centran más en los objetivos de formación (enseñanza), otras universidades destacan por sus actividades de investigación y transferencia. El estudio concluye con un análisis detallado inter- e intra-grupo.

Lecturer. Public University of Navarre, Spain. rocio.delatorre@unavarra.es

ARTICLE RECEIVED: 05 / 07 / 2019 ARTICLE ACCEPTED: 08 / 10 / 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL VOL. 13 NO. 3, PP. 58-77

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

59


INTRODUCTION

I

n recent decades, universities have faced many changes in both their internal and external environments, being constantly submitted to new challenges as society advances in science and technology (Abankina et al., 2016; SánchezBarrioluengo, 2014). Universities are required to simultaneously excel at three main domains—teaching, research and technology transfer—with the ultimate purpose of giving immediate responses to industry demands (Berbegal-Mirabent et al., 2013) providing the marketplace with new knowledge, experience and cuttingedge solutions, and therefore, contributing to the economic regeneration of the region (Shattock, 2009). Moreover, universities operate in a highly competitive environment with a strong competition for attracting the best students, outstanding research staff and capture research funds (Olivares and Wetzel, 2014). In this sense, rankings have been widely considered as a valuable source of information to identify best performing institutions (Agasisti and Johnes, 2015). Given the high influence that these assessment tools can have, the pressure under which universities operate is remarkable, particularly if they want to scale positions and be placed among the top ones. Despite rankings have become a global phenomenon, there are however some concerns about how they are built and the partial view they offer, being a widespread consensus on that the information provided does not fully represent all the activities conducted at universities, not only because of the differences intra- and inter- institutions, but also because of the sensitivity to the methods applied to obtain the rankings (Agasisti and Bonomi, 2014). Universities have responded differently to these requirements, often influenced by governments and funding agencies (Taylor and Miroiu, 2002). Previous evidence shows that this process has taken place at different rates and intensities (Shattock, 2009), and that universities’ transformations are highly tied to a specific strategic vision, drawing different ways through which universities address their multiple objective function. Said differently, universities are heterogeneous and manage their resources differently. This approach assumes that

60

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

By using a dataset from the Spanish higher education system, we model the objective function of universities and investigate which factors help explain universities’ performance, in terms of the three missions that they mostly perform (teaching, research and technology transfer) different orientations might be adopted; consequently, universities might allocate their resources differently. As a result teaching, research and third mission activities are pursued at different intensities (Berbegal-Mirabent et al., 2013). This strategic orientation—commitment to the three missions—is not the only source of heterogeneity among higher education institutions (HEIs). Horizontal diversity is also due to differences in disciplinary subjects and types of research. On the other hand, there is also vertical diversity originated by distinct accreditation results, diverse positions in the existent rankings, and in the differential capabilities to compete for and obtain funding (Daraio et al., 2011). This high level of heterogeneity prevents making significant comparisons within universities (Agasisti and Bonomi, 2014; Agasisti and Wolszczak-Derlacz, 2015) and makes it harder to study HEIs performance. At this point, the question of how the internal configuration of resources −i.e., technology, capital and other productive factors− influence the universities’ capacity to achieve their different missions gains relevance. Given the resource constraints and universities’ vulnerability with respect to uncertainty and environmental changes, a better understanding of the factors that explain their performance stands as a key issue for academics and policy makers (Agasisti et al., 2016; Agasisti and Johnes, 2015). Following the recent calls of Daraio et al. (2015) and Sánchez-Barrioluengo (2014), in this study we examine how universities operate. More precisely, the objective of


HETEROGENEITY

this paper is two folded. First, we analyse the impact that universities’ internal resources have on the achievement of universities’ main objectives: teaching, research and third mission. To do this, we assess each university objective individually. We propose a conceptual framework highlighting a number of factors (human capital, specific infrastructures, financial resources and university’s profile) that are suggested to shape universities’ performance. Different regression models are run to verify the explanatory power of the previously identified factors. Second, by means of a cluster analysis, we classify universities in different groups based on the strategy they follow when prioritising the different missions. This analysis is complemented with the investigation of the role played by the critical antecedents −identified in the first stage− of each mission. The empirical application considers the Spanish public higher education system. The remainder of the paper is organised as follows. In section 2 we present the conceptual framework used to assess university’s performance. This leads to the definition of a number of hypotheses related to different organisational factors. Next, section 3 describes the data and method. A two stage analysis is conducted. First we assess each mission individually using regression techniques, and second, we run a non-hierarchical cluster analysis as the method to classify universities. The findings are discussed in section 5. Section 6 closes the article, highlighting the main concluding remarks and suggesting future research avenues.

CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK During the last decades, an extensive body of literature has been developed trying to explain universities’ performance (Fischer et al., 2015; García-Aracil and Palomares-Montero, 2010; Johnes and Ruggiero, 2017; Shin et al., 2011). Universities operate like any other organisation within the service sector, but with a main difference in their raison d'être, that consists in knowledge creation and diffusion. Therefore, in order to explain and evaluate their performance it is necessary to take into account tangibles (e.g. economic resources and facilities) and intangibles (e.g. experience, or specialisation of the

human resources). Following Del-Palacio et al. (2011) we consider universities’ internal services as inputs, measured as human capital, financial resources, and organisational assets −including infrastructures and the profile of the institution.

HUMAN CAPITAL Human capital comprises individual’s attributes as formal education, abilities and previous experience. This type of capital is considered unique since it cannot be taken away from the individual as tangible assets and financial capital can. Aryee et al. (2016) remark that the presence of high levels of human capital influence the quality of business behaviour. This is relevant in the case of universities as this type of business heavily relies on individual’s knowledge and capacities (Huggins et al., 2012). The first dimension we consider refers to academic staff (Chinta et al., 2016). This dimension does not only capture the commitment of staff in the missions of the universities but also their capabilities and merits (e.g. PhD completed, awards). Academic staff constitutes a unique resource for universities, as faculty and researchers are the first frontline in command of the academic and research activities (Light and Calkins, 2015). In addition to the academic staff it is necessary to consider non-academic (or technical) staff, that is, the personnel responsible for providing administrative support for the proper performance of academic functions (e.g. records management, schedules, students’ enrolment) as well as for performing the appropriate operations and maintenance of the facilities. The second human capital component relates to the previous experience or background that both the faculty and the institution have in a specific field (WolszczakDerlacz, 2017). Through this component we aim at capturing the dynamic knowledge spillovers derived from past experience which may help create a more fertile setting for the development of new activities (van der Ploeg and Veugelers, 2008). One way to account for this experience is measuring how actively the university has been in producing the desired outputs—depending on the mission being measured—during the last years (Anderson et al., 2007). Those universities with seniority are more likely to have developed appropriate procedures and managerial capabilities that facilitate the production of the desired outputs today.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

61


The third dimension considers the knowledge stock available at the university, which represents the ultimate consequence arising from any activity carried out at the university. This knowledge may be used or turned into another tangible or intangible output with a different use and nature (Anderson et al., 2007). Here, we assume that knowledge accumulation represents the basis for further developments within the university. Also, it might help reducing time spans necessary to develop new activities. Given all these considerations, we hypothesise that:

H1:

There is a positive relation between human capital components (faculty, experience and capacity to accumulate knowledge) and the achievement of university’s objectives.

FINANCIAL RESOURCES Many studies report a positive relationship between access to financial resources and university’s knowledge transfer activities (Landry et al., 2007; Muscio, 2010). Financial resources comprise sources of fundraising for the day-to-day operations, such as external research funding coming from governmental agencies, commercial sponsorships, research grants, and revenues from tuition and fees (Kongar et al., 2010; Abramo et al., 2008). Yet, income from R&D activities may be considered a better proxy for university’s financial resources as it represents the monetary income from the exploitation of research results, and this is closely related to the quality of the research performed by universities (Caldera and Debande, 2010). This income may be seen as that derived from specific fundraising universities-industry contracts, licensing agreements, or that coming from the commercialisation of specific research outcomes such as patents (Caldera and Debande, 2010). Given that financial resources are critical for developing HEIs’ activities, we hypothesise:

H2: There is a positive relationship between universities’ financial resources and the achievement of universities’ objectives.

SPECIFIC INFRASTRUCTURES Spaces and infrastructures that support university activities are also relevant. These include specific areas

62

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

which are necessary to achieve university goals (BerbegalMirabent et al., 2015). According to Del-Palacio et al. (2011) these facilities include lecture rooms, laboratories and libraries. In terms of third mission activities, this space can also be represented by incubator facilities, that is, specific spaces that bring together entrepreneurs with a formal or an in-progress idea that is expected to evolve and become a real business (Grimaldi and Grandi, 2005; Wonglimpiyarat, 2016). In addition, over the last decades, universities have become increasingly entrepreneurial, generating value for society through the commercial exploitation of research outputs (Berbegal-Mirabent et al., 2015). In this particular, universities have created mechanisms to promote university-industry relationships. The establishment of technology transfer offices (TTOs) has hastened the interactions between academics and industry professionals, thus, bridging the gap between science and practice. These structures are responsible for the management of these interactions and have become key agents given their commitment with society (Aragonés-Beltrán, 2017). This way, our third hypothesis emerges:

H3:

The presence of specific infrastructures (i.e. technology transfer office) has a positive influence on the achievement of universities’ objectives.

UNIVERSITY PROFILE One of the key aspects that students, researchers and companies look at when deciding where to study, where to work or with whom to collaborate with, is the reputation of the institution (Ho and Peng, 2016). Universities are likely to desire a good positioning in these rankings, as it signals universities’ capacity to educate and to create cutting-edge research (Hazelkorn, 2009). A closer look at how these rankings are built reveals that publication counts and number of citations are recurrent indicators, having a relevant weight in these evaluation schemes. This means that if we use how well universities are positioned in rankings to explain research outputs, these two measures will be highly correlated. For the purpose of this study we use an alternative approach to account for the reputation of the university. Specifically, we focus on the teaching mission and compare the offer with the demand. More precisely, we look at the percentage of new entries in first option with respect to the total number of new entries (adequacy ratio)


HETEROGENEITY

and the demand compared to the total number of places offered (preference ratio). We argue that those students that are able to enrol in the university and the academic program they wanted to will be more committed with their studies and consequently, the dropout rate will be lower. Accordingly, we hypothesise that:

H4:

There is a positive relationship between how demanded is the university (i.e. adequacy ratio and preference ratio) and its performance in teaching activities. Expertise understood as seniority is another key factor. Experiences implies dynamics of people working together and the establishment of group structures (WolszczakDerlacz, 2017), which are found to ease the work done by university workers. These structures might relate to either administrative process (i.e. regulatory framework for the three missions) or performance (i.e. working groups, TTOs and grant system among others). Based on these arguments, the following hypothesis is derived:

H5: There is a positive relation between seniority (i.e. age of the university and of the TTO) and the achievement of universities’ objectives. Lastly, we control for the university’s academic diversification and the orientation of the research engaged (McMillan and Chan, 2006). Previous research indicates that universities either with medical schools or more oriented towards engineering studies are more likely to engage in third mission activities than those with a greater orientation in social sciences or humanities (Carlsson and Fridh, 2002). In terms of publications, a similar behaviour is observed as in some knowledge fields it is easier for academics to develop their research activities and publish in scientific journals (engineering and medical sciences) than in other fields (arts and humanities) (McKelvey and Holmén, 2009). On the contrary, the recent work of Chinta et al. (2016) point out that the fact of offering different studies and diversifying the fields in which the university develops its activity, enriches, complements and can improve universities’ results. Thus, based on these latter arguments we hypothesise that:

H6:

There is a positive relation between academic diversification and the achievement of universities’ objectives.

DATA AND METHOD DATA The data used in this study come from two sources, the IUNE Observatory and from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport. IUNE (http://www.iune.es/) is an observatory, supported by public funding, that has the objective of offering updated and reliable information of the research activity conducted in the Spanish higher education system. On the other hand, we also rely on data from the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport, that on a recurrent basis publishes statistics and reports about Spanish universities. The database comprises information for the total number of public universities in Spain offering on-site education (47) for the academic year 2014/15. As 2014/15 outputs require resources from the previous years, the explanatory variables are introduced as lagged terms.

MODEL SPECIFICATION At this point it is important to define the different university objectives. From a university’s perspective, the key element of the teaching mission (T) encompasses graduating students. Traditionally, the number of graduates has been used to measure teaching outcomes (Daraio et al., 2011; Johnes, 2006). However, in absolute terms universities with hard-science schools produce fewer graduates than universities with faculties in humanities and social sciences (Agasisti and Gralka, 2019). Thus, using the number of graduates to measure teaching would yield biased results as this variable does not consider the capacity of any given university to graduate students. Alternatively, we measure the teaching mission as the number of graduates during the academic year 2014/15 relative to the total number of students enrolled in the same academic year. This ratio is calculated at the university level, and due to lack of complete information it only includes students and graduates in undergraduate programmes. By construction this variable avoids scale size effects, and represents the net flow of students, as it considers the inflow of student in the university, that is, the total number of enrolments and a term that reflects the number of students that successfully finished their studies.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

63


Concerning the research mission (R), previous works measure this activity as publications in peerreviewed journals, books and book chapters, and conference proceedings, or even take into consideration research funding, usually measured by the number of research projects funded by competitive public grants or the resulting income (Bozeman and Gaughan, 2007; Palomares-Montero and García-Aracil, 2011). Following Daraio et al. (2011) and Breschi et al. (2007), in this study we proxy research outcomes by the number of scientific papers per faculty published during 2014 in journals included in the Web of Knowledge (WoS). On the one hand, the inclusion of papers published in journals indexed in this database allows reflecting both the quantity and quality of the research carried out (Merigó and Yang, 2017). On the other hand, this indicator is a good proxy given that publication counts is the factor with the highest weight in the researchers’ evaluation processes for internal promotion purposes in Spain. Lastly, the third mission (TM) is measured by the income from R&D contracts in 2014 standardised by the total number of academic staff working at the university.

The reason for choosing this measure is that R&D contracts are more important than patents and licensing in explaining the outcomes resulting from this mission (Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2014). In fact, D’Este and Patel (2007) proved that R&D contracts are the most frequent type of interaction between universities and firms compared to the other two. The achievement of the aforementioned missions implies the access and intensive use of general and specific resources. The relation between university’s missions and the different resources analysed is portrayed in Table 1. Concerning the set of explanatory variables, descriptive statistics are presented in Table 2. Different variables are used to measure human capital, according to the mission under analysis. As previously mentioned in the conceptual framework, the teaching mission can be affected by the lecturers’ dedication in terms of students per class, that is, the average number of students per faculty member. Similar to Abbott and Doucouliagos (2003) and Taylor and Harris (2004), this variable is measured as the average number of enrolments in undergraduate degrees

Table 1. Variable definition proposed to assess. Teaching

Research

Third stream

Graduates / Students

Papers / Academic staff

R&D income / Academic staff

Students / Academic staff

PhD Faculty / Academic staff

Full time academic staff / Academic staff

Research periods / Academic staff

PhD Faculty / Academic staff Support staff / Academic staff

Experience

-

Publications (last 3 years) / Academic staff

Research projects (last 3 years) / Academic staff

Knowledge accumulation

-

Research projects (last 3 years) / Academic staff

Patents granted (last 3 years) / Academic staff

Expenditures per student

Current expenditures per academic staff

-

-

R&D income (last 3 years) / Academic staff Age of the Technology Transfer Office

Adequacy ratio

-

-

Preference ratio

Educational diversity University age

Factor

Human capital

Faculty

Financial resources Specific infrastructures University profile

64

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Total income (last 3 years) / Academic staff


HETEROGENEITY

Table 2. Descriptive statistics for the selected variables. Variable

Mean

Std. Dev.

Min

Std. Dev.

Dependent variables Graduates / Students

0.1446

0.0343

0.0854

0.3050

Papers / Academic staff

1.1080

0.5917

0.4865

3.8072

Income R&D contracts / Academic staff

5.3001

4.1038

1.1176

20.0548

Students / Academic staff

14.1638

3.0824

9.9000

28.1000

Full time academic staff (%)

0.6586

0.1258

0.2763

0.8738

69.0818

8.5171

48.7000

85.8000

Research periods / Academic staff

1.8149

0.4263

1.0000

2.8000

Support staff / Academic staff

0.6874

0.1100

0.5038

1.0647

2.2201

0.8953

0.9680

5.3991

13.6938

9.9581

1.8428

59.4206

Research projects last 3 years / Academic staff

0.1081

0.0441

0.0302

0.2982

Patents granted last 3 years / Academic staff

2.3344

1.2588

0.6496

5.4389

6,521.5740

1,262.8160

3053.0000

9,312.0000

27,000.0000

16,300.0000

65,00.0000

7,6000.0000

23.8936

4.4293

13.0000

36.0000

Adequacy ratio

71.7302

14.7834

15.2600

96.8400

Preference ratio

158.9434

65.7741

63.8100

367.5000

3.6287

0.9130

1.0900

4.7900

139.4255

220.3767

17.0000

797.0000

Explanatory variables Human capital components 1. Faculty

PhD Faculty (%)

2. Experience Papers last 3 years / Academic staff R&D incomeb last 3 years / Academic staff 3. Knowledge accumulation

Financial resources Expenditure per studenta Current expenditures per academic staffa

Specific infrastructure TTO age (years)

University profile

Education diversity (Herfindahl index) University age (years)

For some variables, the number of observations varies due to the presence of some missing values. a Expressed in thousands of euro b As already discussed, note that this variable can also be considered as a financial resource.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

â&#x20AC;˘

TEC EMPRESARIAL

65


during the academic year 2013/14 per faculty in the same period. Aiming at exploring differences in graduation rates (student success or failure) do to faculty member time and tenure status (Jacoby, 2006; Kezar and Sam, 2010), an additional variable is introduced expressed as the proportion of full-time faculty relative to total faculty members. Similar to Martín (2006), the human capital factor for the research mission is measured as the proportion of faculty with a PhD degree. Through this variable we aim at incorporating a quality criterion (holding a PhD) linked to a greater academic productivity in terms of publication counts. Besides, we also account for the external validation of the research conducted by faculty members. In particular, we proxy it through the number of research periods awarded by the Spanish National Agency of Quality Assessment and Accreditation in the last three years per total faculty (Palomares-Montero and García-Aracil, 2011). Previous experience—the second dimension of human capital—is proxied by the number of publications in the last three years relative to the total faculty working at the university. This variable controls for size differences in terms of faculty, while it indirectly incorporates the presence of organisational designs related to research groups, which gradually can establish synergies, exploit externalities and create cooperative patterns among the group members. Lastly, knowledge stock is measured through the number of research projects participated by academics during the past three years. These projects, either with a national or an international scope, have a competitive basis and entail some funding for the development of the research activities detailed in the project. The establishment of university-industry R&D partnerships requires some guidance and help—due to the administrative work related to securing intellectual property rights and confidentiality—but also qualified researchers and preferable, with a background in such partnerships. Thus, the first two variables refer to the proportion of faculty holding a PhD degree and the ratio of non-academic staff relative to academic staff. Experience is captured through the income obtained from R&D contracts (last 3 years) with respect to total academic staff. Accumulated knowledge is represented by previous experience in research projects (3 years) relative two total academic staff. Moreover, some studies indicate

66

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

that university patenting stimulates future third stream activities (Sánchez-Barrioluengo, 2014). Accordingly, we also include a variable with the number of patents awarded by the Spanish Office of Patents and Trade Marks (OEPM) in the last three years per academic staff. As for the access to financial resources, we use expenditures per student for the teaching mission and the current expenditures per academic staff to explain research activities (Daraio et al., 2011). In the case of third mission activities, we use the same variable used to represent previous experience, that is, income from R&D contracts from the last three years. Financial resources emerging from R&D may be understood as those derived from specific fundraising activities (such as public or private contracts). These revenues are typically reinvested and used to finance new third mission activities (Caldera and Debande, 2010). According to our conceptual framework, infrastructures are expected to facilitate the effective achievement of university’s activities. Concerning the presence of specific infrastructures that accelerate new R&D contracts, we included TTOs (Aragonés-Beltrán et al., 2017). Given that all Spanish universities have a TTO, we account for these infrastructures by considering their age since foundation (Caldera and Debande, 2010). The last factor in our model considers the profile of the university. For the teaching mission two ratios are included: the adequacy ratio (percentage rate of new entries by pre-enrolment in first option with respect to the total number of new entries by pre-enrolment) and the preference ratio (the number of students preenrolled in first option compared to the total number of places offered). Lastly, we also control by university age and academic diversity. Spanish universities offer different degrees which can be catalogued in five groups: humanities studies, social sciences, experimental sciences, medical sciences and engineering studies. As stated in section 2, the distribution of academic degrees is heterogeneous among universities and this diversification may have an influence on the different university missions. To account for this diversity, and following McMillan and Chan (2006) we use the Herfindahl index (HHI) calculated as HHI=∑ j=1sj , where s is the proportion of academic degrees offered by each university in the jth disciplinary category. The academic degrees considered for universities


HETEROGENEITY

are those offered during the academic year 2014/15. To facilitate the interpretation of the results for this variable, we use the inverse value of this factor. The model specification used to corroborate our hypotheses has the following form:

[1] ƒ(T,R,TM)i = α0 + β1HumanCapitali + β2Financial Resourcesi + β3Infrastructuresi + β4 Seniorityi + β5 Academic Spreadi + εi

Equation (1) implies that the objective function of the ith university comprises teaching (T), research (R), and third mission activities (TM). For all the missions, the linear regression is the econometric technique chosen.

CLUSTER ANALYSIS Cluster analysis is a technique that allows identifying groups of observations with different behavioural paths, given the presence of specific variables that are expected to influence the sampled units (Everitt, 1980). For this study, four variables are chosen. Specifically, we select the three dependent variables used in the previous analysis (i.e., flow of graduates relative to total students, publications per academic staff, and R&D contracts’ income per academic staff) as well as the variable capturing academic diversity as a way to control for heterogeneity. A non-hierarchical cluster analysis (K-means) is run. An efficient optimisation of the within-cluster homogeneity and between-cluster heterogeneity implies that the number of clusters has to be specified prior the estimation. To corroborate the number of clusters and the validity of our analysis we first computed the Calinski and Harabasz (1974) statistic. This index is obtained as B(k)/k-1 , where B(k) and W(k) are the between W(k)/n-k and within-cluster sums of squares, with k clusters and a sample size of n observations. Since the betweencluster difference should be high, and the within-cluster difference should be low, a largest CH(k) value indicates the best clustering. We compute this index after a nonhierarchical cluster analysis, in order to compare the resulting CH(k) values to alternative number of clusters. CH(k)=

RESULTS FIRST STAGE ANALYSIS: INDIVIDUAL ANALYSIS OF UNIVERSITY’S MISSIONS Before to comment the results it is important to note that we tested whether disturbances emerging from the different model specifications are normally distributed. The normal probability plots of the residuals obtained for the different regressions support the normality assumption of disturbance terms. The Shapiro-Wilk test was also performed and further corroborated the normality of the residuals. Table 3 shows the results of the regression models. Concerning the teaching mission, our results reveal that from the different variables used to proxy human capital, the only one that helps explain the flow of students is the proportion of full time academic staff, which seems to have a positive influence. This finding supports the current normative framework which asks for, at least, 60% of the academic staff being full time employed. The rationale behind this requirement is that full-time academic staff is expected to be more available for students and respond to their demands. This does not mean that part-time are not necessary, on the contrary, they can complement full time academic staff bringing their expertise from the industry world. However, theoretical fundamentals are typically taught by staff with an academic orientation, who are expected to be at the front end of science. Results also signal that students’ flow increases with the adequacy rate. This means that if students are admitted in their first option, the likelihood of finishing within the expected time is higher. In other words, it seems that when students enrol in the academic degree they applied for, they are more committed with their studies. Future studies should further investigate this effect and examine the role of motivational factors to explain this result. Lastly, education diversity is also found to be significant. This result is consistent with our initial intuition that some disciplines such as medicine or engineering are typically more complex, and therefore, students might require some extra years to finish their studies —institutions with a lower academic diversity are those offering studies in such disciplines— therefore, we can conclude that broadening the academic portfolio increases the flow of graduates relative to total students. As for the research mission, results do support our argument that both experience and knowledge

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

67


Table 3. Regression results: Determinants of each university’s mission. Teaching Variables

Graduates / Students

Research

Third stream

Papers / Academic staff

R&D income / Academic staff

Human capital components 1. Faculty Students / Academic staff Full time academic staff (%)

0.0007 (0.0013) 0.0806 * (0.0445)

PhD Faculty (%) 0.0256 (0.1042) 0.2098 (0.2664)

Research periods / Academic staff Support staff / Academic staff

-0.1648 *** (0.0597) -10.5447 *** (3.8293)

2. Experience 0.2478 *** (0.0598)

Papers last 3 years / Academic staff

0.2558 *** (0.0803)

R&D incomeb last 3 years / Academic staff 3. Knowledge accumulation Research projects last 3 years / Academic staff

6.7967 *** (1.9262)

Patents granted last 3 years / Academic staff

31.8485 *** (11.2315) 0.8532 * (0.4747)

Financial resources Expenditure per studenta

0.0030 (0.0059) 0.0201 ** (0.0082)

Current expenditures per academic staffa

Specific infrastructure -1.1627 (1.9214)

TTO age (years)

University profile 0.0005 ** (0.0002) 0.0001 (0.0001)

Adequacy ratio Preference ratio Education diversity (Herfindahl index)

0.0072 * (0.0040)

0.0910 ** (0.0392)

1.1666 (0.8866)

University age (years)

-0.0005 (0.0032)

-0.0272 (0.0224)

0.0726 (0.2907)

Intercept

-0.0113 (0.0421)

-0.9579 (0.3280)

14.2301 ** (7.0136)

F – test

5.22 ***

57.51 ***

7.22 ***

R squared

0.2656

0.9216

0.6053

RMSE

0.0319

0.1800

2.9261

47

47

44

Observations

Robust standard errors adjusted by heteroskedasticity are presented in brackets. For some variables, the number of observations varies due to the presence of some missing values. *, **, *** indicate significance at the 10%, 5%, and 1%, respectively.

68

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


HETEROGENEITY

accumulation positively influence research results, yet, the first dimension of human capital —faculty— does not seem to have an impact. Another key finding is that financial resources do have a positive and a significant effect on research outputs, validating our hypothesis. These results imply that both experience and funding are relevant for generating new publications. This argument particularly holds true for universities with a broad academic diversity.

conduct this type of analysis. On the contrary, knowledge stock and experience do positively shape third mission results (similar results as in the research model). A logical interpretation is that these two dimensions help creating a more fertile setting for the development of new activities. Both projects and patents might bring contacts with companies, which might later materialise in new universityindustry R&D partnerships. Previous experience in R&D contracts also has a positive effect. As noted earlier, this variable also accounts for the financial resources available for the establishment of new third mission activities. Thus, income from R&D contracts can drive future knowledge transfer activities as the incentives linked to potential extraordinary revenues could represent an important motivation for both the institutions and their faculties. Our results are, however, not in accordance with hypotheses 3, 4 and 5, as neither specific infrastructures nor the profile of the university helps maximising third mission outcomes. Nevertheless, it is worth stating that when relaxing the robust condition in the regression analysis, the academic diversity variable became significant (p-value=0.082).

In the case of the third mission, we observe a negative effect of the first dimension of the human capital factor. The rationale behind this result might be twofold. A plausible interpretation is that the activity conducted by non-academic staff seems not to alleviate the workload of academic staff, suggesting misalignments in the capacity planning of the workforce or alternatively, that contracts with firms are easily reached if lead by academic staff. Future research should examine this effect in more detail and investigate the specific tasks conducted by nonacademic staff and their impact on research activities. The proportion of academics holding a PhD also impacts negatively. Future works should elaborate on this issue and investigate the profile of the researchers involved in third mission activities, as our results seems to indicate that faculty engaged in R&D contracts are in a weaker contractual position. In this sense, it is of paramount importance the existence of favourable policies that encourage engagement in third mission activities. Unfortunately, due to data limitations we were not able to

SECOND STAGE ANALYSIS: CLUSTERING UNIVERSITIES From our data, the number of clusters that maximises the CH(k) index is 6 (pseudo-F value=87.97). Therefore, the final non-hierarchical cluster asks for a six-ways division. A

Table 4. Results of the discriminant analysis. True Groups

Classification

Observations

1

2

3

4

5

6

Group 1

10 (100.00%)

10 (100.00%)

10 (100.00%)

10 (100.00%)

10 (100.00%)

10 (100.00%)

10

Group 2

0 (0.00%)

11 (91.67%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

1 (8.33%)

0 (0.00%)

12

Group 3

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

3 (100.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

3

Group 4

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

6 (100.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

6

Group 5

0 (0.00%)

3 (37.50%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

5 (62.50%)

0 (0.00%)

8

Group 6

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

0 (0.00%)

8 (100.00%)

8

TOTAL

10 (21.28%)

14 (29.79%)

3 (6.38%)

6 (12.77%)

6 (12.77%)

8 (17.02%)

47

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

69


Tabla 5. Descriptive statistics for the selected variables.

Full time academic staff (%)

Adequacy ratio

Education diversity

Income R&D contracts / Academic staff

Papers published / Academic staff

Graduates / Students

1.926

0.646

63.566

3.979

4.083

0.932

0.132

0.029

0.557

0.092

23.170

0.995

0.533

0.301

0.028

Std. Dev.

1.693

0.102

2.065

0.675

75.893

3.774

2.676

0.995

0.149

Mean

3.344

0.986

0.020

0.415

0.113

11.031

0.512

0.273

0.207

0.012

Std. Dev.

35.000

25.148

2.515

0.139

2.701

0.688

74.603

3.900

16.908

1.355

0.151

Mean

0.111

9.849

6.414

1.228

0.029

0.785

0.133

20.885

0.547

2.727

0.442

0.015

Std. Dev.

68.817

0.705

128.000

28.238

3.669

0.141

2.541

0.599

76.593

2.338

9.900

1.278

0.136

Mean

4240.01

3.381

0.097

214.304

16.306

1.568

0.025

0.960

0.180

9.860

1.261

1.569

0.522

0.029

Std. Dev.

90.00

2,135.50

71.975

0.650

103.375

6.492

2.301

0.074

1.705

0.696

68.890

3.579

1.734

0.758

0.155

Mean

19.19

100.50

2,335.11

10.158

0.058

165.475

1.646

0.891

0.030

0.493

0.140

10.456

0.716

0.279

0.201

0.067

Std. Dev.

40.13

222.50

5148.13

69.600

0.681

238.125

17.258

2.056

0.134

2.914

0.646

73.806

3.889

6.521

1.628

0.147

Mean

33.40

113.96

3,708.48

8.495

0.190

297.895

6.072

1.011

0.075

1.521

0.139

9.406

0.556

0.434

1.122

0.029

Significant explanatory variables

Volume (size)

Std. Dev.

Papers (3 years) / Academic staff 0.093 1.396

7.943

188.463

0.747

11.059

5699.00

144.53

23.88

6

Research projects (3 years) / Academic staff 2.500 3.624

115.083

0.092

61.300

345.72

301.00

40.40

5

Patents granted (3 years) / Academic staff 11.341

272.584

0.681

6.997

2,453.00

10.60

74.17

4

R&D income (3 years) / Academic staff 156.700

0.098

67.820

2957.62

127.67

14.64

3

University age 0.702

10.237

3,409.75

140.18

24.67

2

Support staff / Academic staff 70.160

1225.56

164.42

11.43

1

PhD Faculty (%)

2,613.60

56.52

21.08

Mean

Papers (3 years)

125.70

25.98

Groups

Research projects (3 years)

34.50

Dependent variables

Patents (3 years)

1,567.88

26,029.25

3,732.75

684.49

13,116.66

1,653.85

24,152.60 2278.38

11,329.73

1,210.08

977.54

33,818.88 1,986.56

15,475.00

596.27

1,836.01

3,330.45 3,301.83

11,259.26

729.18

864.69

6,398.00 488.40

24,103.67

652.44

1,114.45

46,044.77 1,750.00

2,452.20

1,508.35

731.17

60,587.50 2,548.03

11,489.00

69.21

2,081.73

5,810.20 3,149.17

16,248.03

691.83

158.10

23,419.33 1,012.56

20,995.58

953.84

938.70

17,090.53 2422.20

6,437.32

1,093.04

1,346.10

14,799.67

Graduate students

17,929.60

303.66

1,636.38

8,520.49

Students

939.31

451.47

15,744.90

Support staff (FTE)

1,363.13

Income from R&D contracts (3 years)

Academic staff (FTE)

VOL 13 - No. 3

â&#x20AC;˘

TEC EMPRESARIAL

70


HETEROGENEITY

discriminant analysis was also run to further validate our cluster analysis. Results presented in Table 4 indicate that our approach is appropriate. Table 5 presents the average values for the different variables of interest by groups. Universities in cluster 1 have a diversified strategy. They seem to prioritise all the missions at the same intensity, however, score the lowest outputs in all the dimensions. Taking into account the region where they are settled in, it seems that they are trying to cover regional needs. This intuition is further confirmed by the diversity of the academic offer. However, this broad strategy does not seem to help them in achieving outstanding results. Universities in clusters 2 and 5 behave similarly, performing pretty well in the teaching mission. Universities comprised in these groups have chosen a strategy where students are placed at the centre, being clearly oriented towards academic goals. A more detailed analysis reveals that universities in cluster 2 are large, and concentrate a high number of students enrolled in their preferred studies. The weakest point is in third mission outputs. This low performance is also observed in universities in cluster 5, yet the main difference relies in that universities in this later cluster are somewhat less efficient as it can be deduced when looking at both the relative and the total number of research and third mission outputs despite having highly qualified academic staff. We therefore conclude that their extremely biased academic orientation might lead to an inefficient allocation of resources for the simultaneous development of third mission activities. An opposite performance is that shown by universities in cluster 3, being these institutions the most efficient ones on average. Although we are not explicitly testing efficiency models, considering the number of academic staff, universities from this group are doing a good job in terms of the use of their resources, as key indicators (e.g. total number of research projects, publications, patents and income from R&D contracts) when standardised by total academic staff are higher compared to those from universities in other clusters. Nevertheless, when considering only volume, the average number of outputs is low, due to the small size that characterise universities in cluster 3. These findings suggest that their success may rely on a reduced but highly skilled workforce that enables

these institutions to take full advantage of their knowledge stock and experience through an efficient use of resources. The common feature that characterises universities in cluster 4 is specialisation. Three out of the four technical universities located in Spain belong to this group. The other three included in this group have a strong focus on health and medical sciences. As suggested by previous works (McKelvey and HolmĂŠn, 2009) universities with such a profile tend to outperform in terms of research and third mission activities, while the flow of graduates relative to total number of students is low. These universities are pledging their resources and commitment to the creation of knowledge with potential commercial applications and its subsequent valorisation in the marketplace. Note, however, that because these universities are also considerably big (in terms of total number of students and staff), when standardising research and third mission results by total academic staff, their performance is similar to that of universities in cluster 3. Another distinctive feature of cluster 3 is that despite the average adequacy ratio is high, the graduation rate is low. This result is not surprising. Students willing to enrol in such disciplines do not do so as a second or third option, but as first choice. Nevertheless, such studies are typically more difficult and usually imply completing the degree with an extra academic year. Lastly, universities in cluster 6 seem to excel in the research mission. As found in the regression stage analysis, this performance is explained by a solid experience and accumulated knowledge in research projects and publishing. In terms of income from R&D projects they are ranked third, meaning that the research experience is somewhat transferred to the marketplace. Yet, the historical record of patents is considerably low. Another common characteristic is its size (large) and a diversified academic offer.

DISCUSSION AND IMPLICATIONS Universities are organisations with a clear long-term strategic planning, and their contributions to society typically become observable a couple of years after their implementation. Universitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; missions and structures are nowadays in the spotlight, being redefined in an attempt

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

â&#x20AC;˘

TEC EMPRESARIAL

71


to fulfil both social and labour market demands and, at the same time, perform more efficiently by making the most of their scarce resources. Aiming at targeting potential strategies and factors that lead to an improved use of resources and capabilities of universities when addressing their objective function, in the first part of this study we have analysed the impact that universities’ internal resources have on the achievement of teaching, research and third mission activities. There is a wide array of outputs that can be used to measure universities’ performance. Nevertheless, and given the scope of this empirical analysis, we have assessed each university objective individually. Consistent with the literature, the selected output variables refer to critical objectives that universities try to achieve: the number of graduates in relation to the number of enrolments (as a proxy for teaching activities), average number of papers published in scientific journals indexed at WoS database per academic staff (for basic research), and the average income from R&D contracts per academic staff (to proxy third stream activities). Based on the findings, we can conclude that human capital factors (H1) are particularly relevant specifically when they are measured in terms of experience and knowledge accumulation. Both dimensions represent the experience or background that a HEI has in a specific field. In terms of policy making this implies that human capital is critical for universities when it comes to achieve their objectives. Therefore, appropriate policies should be designed in order to retain researchers with projection and experience. However, it is important to note that, in Spain, to carve out an academic career is a long-term race. Due to the economic downturn in 2008, young researchers

The findings underline the heterogeneity of Spanish universities: while some universities focus more on formation (teaching) goals, other universities excel at disseminating knowledge through different scientific outputS 72

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

find it difficult to secure their job position once they have obtained their PhD. With the current scheme, universities invest—in terms of money, time and resources—in training assistant researchers (those pursuing a PhD). However, assistant researchers mostly go to the job market once they finish their formation and they often find a position in another (public or private) university. This is an example of brain drain problems in public universities. If expertise and knowledge accumulation are catalysts for the achievement of HEIs’ outputs, universities should redesign their internal policies and promotion schemes in order to ensure that knowledge stock will be sustained over time. Hypothesis two (H2) was partially confirmed. Our findings support that third-mission activities offer an economic platform to develop new university-industry partnerships. We can interpret this result as evidence that good teaching records are reliant on other factors. In this case, it would be interesting for future studies to examine the role played by motivations. Results do not support that experienced TTOs help achieve third mission objectives (H3). TTOs are expected to bridge the gap between universities and companies, however, based on our results, it seems that there is still a long way to go, at least in Spain, before academics could really benefit from the advantages of having an experienced office performing this tasks. A different interpretation might be that perhaps the issue is not that much on how old—expertise—the TTO is, but on the people working in it and the know-how and capabilities they can bring to help researchers better commercialise their research results. Another plausible interpretation is that only a small proportion of researchers are aware of the existence of a TTO at their university and the services provided. Besides, TTO awareness is greater among academic workers who possess experience as entrepreneurs, have conducted research in engineering, medicine, or life sciences, have closed research and consulting contracts with industry partners, and/or have occupied postdoctoral positions. Lastly, the profile of the university seems to have a different influence depending on the mission under analysis. The flow of graduates per total students is higher when students have the chance to study what they applied for. However, this implies that universities with a high proportion of students that did not choose that


HETEROGENEITY

university should develop some additional strategies (i.e. international mobility offer, extra-curricular activities) that motivate students to be part of the university community and therefore, more easily engage and commit with their studies. In terms of the academic diversity our results confirm the recent works of Moed et al. (2011), Curi et al. (2015), and Foltz et al. (2012), who posit that when specialisation is too strong, it is more difficult to develop new capabilities and research at the interface of different fields, and that the efficient exploitation of resources diminishes. As for the effect of the age of the university, we can conclude that this hypothesis is rejected. It is, however, remarkable the negative effect when assessing research outputs, which seems to signal that in order to improve the outcome it is not only necessary investing in the promotion and specialisation of the workforce, but also in attracting new talent that can energise and bring new ideas. To this end, it is of paramount importance to make universities more attractive (Di Paolo and Mañé, 2016). A system of grants, awards and public recognitions or an economic policy that facilitates the dissemination of the results are some initiatives in which universities might engage in order to capture new and qualified researchers.

Table 6 summarises the main results in relation to the different models and hypotheses tested. The results of the cluster analysis underline the heterogeneity of Spanish universities. While some universities seem to focus on supporting regional goals (cluster 1), other universities excel either at teaching activities (clusters 2 and 5) or at disseminating knowledge through publications (cluster 6). This latter path suggests that although they have the means to transform this knowledge into marketable results, they are probably lacking institutional support. These universities could implement specific policies and programmes in order to create an enabling knowledge transfer culture that allow exploiting all the knowledge stock they already have. On the other hand, universities in cluster 4 are already taking advantage of the natural spillovers that arise from the adoption of an entrepreneurial culture. Consequently, they base their strategy on their capacity to transform their different resources, accumulated knowledge and make use of their previous experience to get involved in more profitable university-industry R&D partnerships. Lastly, universities in group 3 are those that, despite not having

Tabla 6. Validation of hypotheses. Teaching

University Objectives Research

Third Stream

Partially accepted (b>0)

Rejected (b=0)

Rejected (b<0)

Experience

-

Accepted (b>0)

Accepted (b>0)

Knowledge accumulation

-

Accepted (b>0)

Accepted (b>0)

Rejected (b>0)

Accepted (b>0)

Accepted (b>0)

-

-

Rejected (b=0)

Partially accepted (b>0)

-

-

Rejected (b=0)

Rejected (b=0)

Rejected (b=0)

Accepted (b>0)

Accepted (b>0)

Rejected (b<0)

Hypothesis

Factor Faculty

H1

H2

Financial resources

H3

Specific infrastructures

H4 H5 H6

University’s profile

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

73


the best environmental conditions and resources, are doing an efficient use of resources, in terms of teaching, research and third mission objectives.

CONCLUDING REMARKS In a knowledge-driven society where different stakeholders demand more transparency in the autonomous governance of public institutions, universities are trying to find an appropriate balance between their three core missions, assuming new roles and responsibilities that could potentially lead to the modernisation of their governance structures and operations. In this context, the study of the ways through which universities align their resources in relation to the achievement of their multiple objectives has become a critical research issue. In this study we have brought further insights on this specific topic linked to the management of universities. Despite many theoretical developments can be found pointing out the factors and mechanisms that help explain universities’ performance, little empirical evidence is provided in the literature addressing the issue of heterogeneity among HEIs, and thus, comparing universities with appropriate peers. In order to bridge this theory and research gap, we first embarked on the analysis of the different roles played by universities and their underlying objectives. Second, we have identified different performance pathways. To do this, we have considered the Spanish public university sector. These universities are characterised by a high degree of heterogeneity which can be explained by economic and geographic differences, by changes in the environment that condition their behaviour, and by their dissimilar speed of adaptation to these environmental changes. Following the works of Hazelkorn (2005) and Temple (2009), our results give empirical evidence about the existence of specialised institutions concentrated on specific competences, and that this characteristic helps explaining their teaching, research and knowledge transfer performance. Thus, the observed differences in the paths followed by universities to address their objective function suggest that universities use various strategies to engage regional needs.

74

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Although we believe this work to provide useful insights to the analysis of universities, there are some limitations that open up new research lines. First, the empirical application considers a specific country (Spain). Future studies might consider expanding the geographical scope. Second, due to data availability, only public universities are examined. In this sense, comparison of public and private universities might undoubtedly bring new perspectives and determine whether the presence of shareholder-driven objectives and a different financial structure condition universities’ performance. Third, although it was possible to create reliable variables to assess universities’ performance, further studies might consider the inclusion of other variables.

References Abankina, I., Aleskerov, F., Belousova, V., Gokhberg, L., Kiselgof, S., Petrushchenko, V., Shvydun, S., Zinkovsky, K. (2016) ‘From equality to diversity: Classifying Russian universities in a performance oriented system’, Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 103: 228–39. Abbott, M., and Doucouliagos, C. (2003) ‘The efficiency of Australian universities: A data envelopment analysis’, Economics of Education Review, 22/1: 89–97. Abramo, G., D’Angelo, C. A., and Pugini, F. (2008). The measurement of Italian universities’ research productivity by a non parametric-bibliometric methodology. Scientometrics, 76(2), 225. Agasisti, T., Barra, C., and Zotti, R. (2016) ‘Evaluating the efficiency of Italian public universities (2008– 2011) in presence of (unobserved) heterogeneity’, Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, 55: 47–58. Agasisti, T., and Bonomi, F. (2014) ‘Benchmarking universities’ efficiency indicators in the presence of internal heterogeneity’, Studies in Higher Education, 39/7: 1237–55. Agasisti, T., & Gralka, S. (2019). The transient and persistent efficiency of Italian and


HETEROGENEITY

German universities: A stochastic frontier analysis. Applied Economics, 1-19. DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2019.1606409. Agasisti, T., and Johnes, G. (2015) ‘Efficiency, costs, rankings and heterogeneity: The case of US higher education’, Studies in Higher Education, 40/1: 60–82. Agasisti, T., and Wolszczak-Derlacz, J. (2015) ‘Exploring efficiency differentials between Italian and Polish universities, 2001–11’, Science and Public Policy, 43/1: 128-42. Anderson, T. R., Daim, T. U., and Lavoie, F. F. (2007) ‘Measuring the efficiency of university technology transfer’, Technovation, 27/5: 306–18. Aragonés-Beltrán, P., Poveda-Bautista, R., and Jiménez-Sáez, F. (2017) ‘An in-depth analysis of a TTO’s objectives alignment within the university strategy: An ANP-based approach’, Journal of Engineering and Technology Management, 44: 19–43. Aryee, S., Walumbwa, F. O., Seidu, E. Y. M., and Otaye, L. E. (2016) ‘Developing and leveraging human capital resource to promote service quality: Testing a theory of performance’, Journal of Management, 42/2: 480–499. Berbegal-Mirabent, J., Lafuente, E., and Solé, F. (2013) ‘The pursuit of knowledge transfer activities: An efficiency analysis of Spanish universities’, Journal of Business Research, 66/10: 2051–9. Berbegal-Mirabent, J., Sánchez García, J. L., and Ribeiro-Soriano, D. E. (2015) ‘University-industry partnerships for the provision of R&D services’, Journal of Business Research, 68/7: 1407–13. Bozeman, B., and Gaughan, M. (2007) ‘Impacts of grants and contracts on academic researchers’ interactions with industry’, Research Policy, 36/5: 694–707. Breschi, S., Lissoni, F., and Montobbio, F. (2007) ‘The scientific productivity of academic inventors: New evidence from Italian data’, Economics of

Innovation and New Technology, 16/2: 101–18. Caldera, A., and Debande, O. (2010) ‘Performance of Spanish universities in technology transfer: An empirical analysis’, Research Policy, 39/9: 1160–73. Calinski, T., and Harabasz, J. (1974) ‘A dendrite method for cluster analysis’, Communications in Statistics Theory and Methods, 3/1: 1–27. Carlsson, B., and Fridh, A.-C. (2002) ‘Technology transfer in United States universities - A survey and statistical analysis’, Journal of Evolutionary Economics, 12/1-2: 199–232. Chinta, R., Kebritchi, M., and Elias, J. (2016) ‘A conceptual framework for evaluating higher education institutions’, International Journal of Educational Management, 30/6: 989–1002. Curi, C., Daraio, C., and Llerena, P. (2015) ‘The productivity of French technology transfer offices after government reforms’, Applied Economics, 47/28: 3008–19. D’Este, P., and Patel, P. (2007) ‘University-industry linkages in the UK: What are the factors underlying the variety of interactions with industry? ’, Research Policy, 36/9: 1295–13. Daraio, C., Bonaccorsi, A., Geuna, A., et al. (2011) ‘The European university landscape: A micro characterization based on evidence from the Aquameth project’, Research Policy, 40/1: 148–64. Daraio, C., Bonaccorsi, A., and Simar, L. (2015) ‘Rankings and university performance: A conditional multidimensional approach’, European Journal of Operational Research, 244/3: 918–30. Del-Palacio, I., Sole, F., and Berbegal, J. (2011) ‘Which services support research activities at universities? ’, The Service Industries Journal, 31/1: 39–58. Di Paolo, A., and Mañé, F. (2016) ‘Misusing our talent? Overeducation, overskilling and skill underutilisation among Spanish PhD graduates’, The Economic and Labour Relations Review, 27/4: 432–52.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

75


Everitt, B. (1980) Cluster analysis (2nd ed.). London: Heineman Educational Books Ltd. Fischer, D., Jenssen, S., and Tappeser, V. (2015) ‘Getting an empirical hold of the sustainable university: A comparative analysis of evaluation frameworks across 12 contemporary sustainability assessment tools’, Assessment and Evaluation in Higher Education, 40/6: 785–800. Foltz, J. D., Barham, B. L., Chavas, J.-P., and Kim, K. (2012) ‘Efficiency and technological change at US research universities’, Journal of Productivity Analysis, 37/2: 171–86. García-Aracil, A., and Palomares-Montero, D. (2010) ‘Examining benchmark indicator systems for the evaluation of higher education institutions’, Higher Education, 60/2: 217–34. Grimaldi, R., and Grandi, A. (2005) ‘Business incubators and new venture creation: An assessment of incubating models’, Technovation, 25/2: 111–21. Hazelkorn, E. (2005) University research management: Developing research in new institutions. Paris: OECD. Hazelkorn, E. (2009) ‘Rankings and the battle for world-class excellence: Institutional strategies and policy choices’, Higher Education Management and Policy, 21/1: 1–22.

76

Johnes, G., and Ruggiero, J. (2017) ‘Revenue efficiency in higher education institutions under imperfect competition’, Public Policy and Administration, 32/4: 282–95. Johnes, J. (2006) ‘Measuring teaching efficiency in higher education: An application of data envelopment analysis to economics graduates from UK Universities 1993’, European Journal of Operational Research, 174/1: 443–56. Kezar, A., and Sam, C. (2010) Understanding the new majority of non-tenure-track faculty in higher education: Demographics, experiences, and plans of action. ASHE Higher Education Report (Vol. 36). Kongar, E., Pallis, J. M., and Sobh, T. M. (2010) ‘Non-parametric approach for evaluating the performance of engineering schools’, International Journal of Engineering Education, 26/5: 1210–9. Landry, R., Amara, N., and Ouimet, M. (2007) ‘Determinants of knowledge transfer: Evidence from Canadian university researchers in natural sciences and engineering’, Journal of Technology Transfer, 32/6: 561–92. Light, G., and Calkins, S. (2015) ‘The experience of academic learning: Uneven conceptions of learning across research and teaching’, Higher Education, 69/3: 345–59.

Ho, S. S.-H., and Peng, M. Y.-P. (2016) ‘Managing resources and relations in higher education institutions: A framework for understanding performance improvement’, Educational Sciences: Theory & Practice, 16/1: 279–300.

Martín, E. (2006) ‘Efficiency and quality in the current higher education context in Europe: An application of the data envelopment analysis methodology to performance assessment of departments within the University of Zaragoza’, Quality in Higher Education, 12/1, 57–79.

Huggins, R., Johnston, A., and Stride, C. (2012) ‘Knowledge networks and universities: Locational and organisational aspects of knowledge transfer interactions’, Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 24/7-8: 475–502.

McKelvey, M., and Holmén, M. (2009) European universities learning to compete: From social institution to knowledge business. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Jacoby, D. (2006) ‘Effects of part-time faculty employment on community college graduation rates’, The Journal of Higher Education, 77/6: 1081–03.

McMillan, M. L., and Chan, W. H. (2006) ‘University efficiency: A comparison and consolidation of results from stochastic and non-stochastic methods’, Education Economics, 14/1: 1–30.

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


HETEROGENEITY

Merigó, J. M., and Yang, J.-B. (2017) ‘A bibliometric analysis of operations research and management science’, Omega, 73: 37–48. Moed, H. F., de Moya-Anegón, F., López-Illescas, C., and Visser, M. (2011) ‘Is concentration of university research associated with better research performance?’, Journal of Informetrics, 5/4: 649–58. Muscio, A. (2010) ‘What drives the university use of technology transfer offices? Evidence from Italy’, Journal of Technology Transfer, 35/2: 181–202. Olivares, M., and Wetzel, H. (2014) ‘Competing in the higher education market: Empirical evidence for economies of scale and scope in German higher education institutions’, CESifo Economic Studies, 60/4: 653–80. Palomares-Montero, D., and García-Aracil, A. (2011) ‘What are the key indicators for evaluating the activities of universities?’, Research Evaluation, 20/5: 353–63.

Temple, P. (2009) ‘Teaching and learning: an entrepreneurial perspective’, In Entrepreneurialism in universities and the knowledge economy (pp. 49–62). Maidenhead: Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press. van der Ploeg, F., and Veugelers, R. (2008) ‘Towards evidence-based reform of European universities’, CESifo Economic Studies, 54/2: 99–120. Wolszczak-Derlacz, J. (2017) ‘An evaluation and explanation of (in)efficiency in higher education institutions in Europe and the US with the application of two-stage semi-parametric DEA’, Research Policy, 46/9: 1595–605. Wonglimpiyarat, J. (2016) ‘The innovation incubator, University business incubator and technology transfer strategy: The case of Thailand’, Technology in Society, 46: 18–27.

Sánchez-Barrioluengo, M. (2014) ‘Articulating the three-missions in Spanish universities’, Research Policy, 43/10, 1760–73. Shattock, M. (2009) Entrepreneurialism in universities and the knowledge economy. Maidenhead: Society for Research into Higher Education and Open University Press. Shin, J. C., Toutkoushian, R. K., and Teichler, U. (2011) University rankings. Theoretical basis, methodology and impacts on global higher education (Vol. 3). New York: Springer Science & Business Media. Taylor, B., and Harris, G. (2004) ‘Relative efficiency among South African universities: A data envelopment analysis’, Higher Education, 47/1: 73–89. Taylor, J., and Miroiu, A. (2002) Policy-making, strategic planning, and management of higher education. Papers on Higher Education. Bucarest.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

77


Foto tomada de: https://es.wikiloc.com • fabiantiezo

EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA DE LOS CANTONES EN COSTA RICA: ANÁLISIS DEL ÍNDICE DE COMPETITIVIDAD CANTONAL BASADO EN MODELOS FRONTERA NO-PARAMÉTRICOS

EFFICIENCY ASSESSMENT OF COSTA RICA’S COUNTIES: A NON-PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS OF THE COUNTY COMPETITIVENESS INDEX

78

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


This study employs a Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) model with a single constant input to scrutinize the competitive efficiency of Costa Rican counties for the year 2016. By using the seven dimensions (pillars) of the County Competitiveness Index (ICC) as outputs of the proposed non-parametric production function, the efficiency results indicate that, on average, Costa Rican counties can improve their competitive efficiency 56.84%. The findings suggest that the configuration of competitive pillars has significant implications for efficiency assessments. For more developed regions with urban agglomerations, competitive pillars related to infrastructure, employment, quality of life and innovation are relevant policy priorities shaping competitive efficiency; while employment and quality of life indicators are the main pillars explaining the competitive efficiency in less developed regions. The County Competitiveness Index is a valuable instrument to monitor counties’ competitive performance, and the proposed analytical approach −i.e., DEA model− may offer useful information to policy observers on what strategic actions can help to optimize resource allocation policies and, subsequently, county competitiveness.

ABSTRACT

EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

KEYWORDS: Regional competitiveness, index numbers, ICC, data envelopment analysis, public policy

Manuel Araya Solano

PALABRAS CLAVE: Competitividad regional, números índice, ICC, eficiencia cantonal, data envelopment analysis, políticas de apoyo

Candidato a Doctor. Escuela de Administración de Empresas, Instituto Tecnológico de Costa Rica. manarsolcr@gmail.com

RESUMEN

Este estudio emplea un modelo de Análisis Envolvente de Datos (DEA) con un único input constante para analizar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses para el año 2016. Los resultados de eficiencia, como frutos del análisis de las siete dimensiones (pilares) del Índice de Competitividad Cantonal (ICC) como outputs de la función de producción no-paramétrica propuesta en este trabajo, indican que, en promedio, los cantones costarricenses pueden mejorar su eficiencia competitiva un 56,84%. Además, los resultados sugieren que la configuración de pilares competitivos tiene importantes implicaciones para la evaluación de eficiencia. En provincias relativamente más desarrolladas, que presentan aglomeraciones urbanas, los pilares competitivos relacionados con las infraestructuras, el empleo, la calidad de vida y la innovación, son las principales prioridades en el diseño de políticas de apoyo que explican el resultado de la eficiencia competitiva; mientras que los indicadores de empleo y calidad de vida son los principales pilares que explican la eficiencia competitiva en las provincias menos desarrolladas. El ICC es un instrumento valioso para monitorear el desempeño competitivo de los cantones, mientras que el enfoque analítico propuesto basado en un modelo DEA puede ofrecer información útil a los observadores de políticas de apoyo que permita identificar qué acciones estratégicas pueden ayudar a optimizar las políticas de asignación de recursos y, como resultado, la competitividad de los cantones.

ARTÍCULO RECIBIDO: 09 / 07 / 2019 ARTÍCULO ACEPTADO: 07 / 10 / 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL VOL. 13 NO. 3, PP. 78-92

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

79


INTRODUCCIÓN

E

ste trabajo se centra en el análisis de números índice diseñados para evaluar la competitividad a nivel cantonal en Costa Rica. Desde una perspectiva económica, es incuestionable que el funcionamiento de la administración pública tiene un efecto sobre el desempeño económico y social a nivel local. Las administraciones locales −en el caso de Costa Rica, municipios− se enfrentan a distintas condiciones ambientales de naturaleza social, demográfica, económica, política, financiera, geográfica e institucional, entre otras. Estos factores ambientales pueden tener un gran impacto en los niveles de eficiencia empresarial (Balaguer-Coll, Prior y Tortosa-Ausina, 2007; Narbón-Perpiñá y De Witte, 2018). En términos generales, los esfuerzos académicos orientados a medir la competitividad territorial mediante números índice enfatizan el carácter sistémico de este constructo. A escala global, el referente es el Foro Económico Mundial (www.weforum.org) a través de su medida de competitividad a nivel país creada en 1979 (Global Competiveness Index, GCI). En este sentido, este foro define competitividad “como el conjunto de instituciones, políticas y factores que determinan el nivel de productividad de un país” (WEF, 2017, pp. 317). De forma similar, en otros ámbitos se han realizado esfuerzos a nivel país para generar números índice que permitan conocer la calidad del marco institucional que da soporte a la actividad emprendedora (Acs, Autio y Szerb, 2014; Acs, Szerb, Lafuente y Lloyd, 2019), y estimar cómo el ecosistema emprendedor afecta la productividad de los países (Lafuente, Szerb y Acs, 2016; Lafuente, Acs, Sanders y Szerb, 2019). A pesar del creciente interés por la competitividad territorial, los académicos reconocen las dificultades para operacionalizar este constructo a nivel de país (NarbónPerpiñá y De Witte, 2018). En aplicaciones prácticas, la mayoría de estudios utiliza números índice (i.e. agregación de distintas variables) para equipar a los responsables de la formulación de políticas públicas con medios para comprender la contribución de distintos aspectos territoriales a su competitividad.

80

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

En el caso concreto de Costa Rica, Ulate, Madrigal, Ortega y Jiménez (2012) proponen un índice de competitividad cantonal que incluye treinta y ocho variables agrupadas en siete pilares competitivos. El ICC tiene propiedades muy atractivas que avalan su capacidad para medir la competitividad cantonal, donde destaca la inclusión de elementos económicos, demográficos, así como de gestión municipal en el cómputo del índice. Con frecuencia, académicos y analistas de políticas públicas utilizan números índice para clasificar y hacer comparaciones entre territorios. Los méritos del índice ICC residen en su poder comunicativo, así como en su capacidad para condensar mucha información relevante que puede utilizarse para implementar políticas específicas que ayudan a mejorar el nivel de competitividad cantonal en el país. A pesar de la validez y la capacidad informativa de los números índice (incluido el índice ICC), identificar el número índice ideal es una tarea difícil y algunas veces controvertida. Los números índice compilan un conjunto de variables individuales en un solo indicador para proporcionar una medida del constructo multidimensional analizado (Cherchye, Moesen, Rogge y Puyenbroeck, 2007). Sin embargo, evaluar la competitividad territorial mediante la elaboración de perfiles cantonales basados en el promedio de los siete pilares o subíndices que forman el ICC puede ofrecer material limitado para fines analíticos. En este sentido, el resultado del ICC apunta al grado de logro del output deseado (competitividad), bajo el supuesto de pesos fijos (w) e independientes de la configuración de los siete pilares (y) que forman el índice para cada cantón (i), esto es: ICCi = Σwkiyi ˅ wki = 1/7. Esto implica que el índice analizado no da una indicación del valor máximo que el índice puede alcanzar en un determinado cantón. A pesar de la validez del ICC, la selección de los pesos para cada subíndice es un reto importante en la construcción de números índice y es a menudo fuente de debate a la hora de evaluar los resultados (Grupp y Schubert, 2010; Liu, Zhang, Meng, Li, y Xu, 2011). Los territorios, cantones incluidos, tienen diferentes dotaciones de factores de producción y la distribución heterogénea de estos factores productivos condiciona las elecciones de políticas asociadas con la asignación de recursos en la economía a través de las políticas


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

públicas. En el caso concreto del ICC, para cada cantón, los siete pilares probablemente evolucionan en diferentes direcciones, por lo que el análisis del ICC bien podría no ser suficiente para analizar la competitividad cantonal en Costa Rica. Por lo tanto, los cantones con diferentes prioridades de políticas de apoyo e inversión pueden lograr el mismo resultado para cualquier subíndice, y la heterogeneidad de las variables del ICC puede oscurecer la evaluación general de los resultados de competitividad cantonal. Por lo tanto, en el contexto de este estudio, es relevante preguntarse cómo cambiarían los resultados del análisis del ICC cuando se toma en consideración la configuración de los siete subíndices. Además, y debido a que la importancia relativa de los subíndices que forman el ICC varía de un cantón a otro, es necesario generar un análisis que tenga en cuenta las distintas prioridades de política pública a la hora de evaluar el desempeño competitivo cantonal. Para responder a estas preguntas, el objetivo principal de este estudio es analizar el nivel de eficiencia competitiva cantonal mediante la aplicación de técnicas de eficiencia no paramétricas, esto es el Análisis Envolvente de Datos (DEA por sus siglas en inglés: Data Envelopment Analysis), con el fin de incorporar en el análisis las variaciones relacionadas con la mayor disponibilidad de recursos que caracteriza los ecosistemas cantonales. Contrariamente a los enfoques paramétricos (e.g., frontera estocástica o modelos de regresión), la naturaleza flexible de los modelos DEA, que no impone supuestos sobre la función de distribución de los datos observados, es especialmente atractiva para modelar la tecnología que dibuja la competitividad cantonal en un contexto donde se busca optimizar múltiples outputs (Ray, 2004). La aplicación empírica emplea los resultados del ICC para los ochenta y un cantones costarricenses en 2016. El análisis propuesto en este trabajo ofrece una vía para analizar la competitividad cantonal en presencia de prioridades y debilidades competitivas, que son idiosincráticas a cada cantón. La sección 2 detalla la composición del ICC. La sección 3 describe la metodología empleada en el estudio (Análisis Envolvente de Datos, DEA), mientras que la sección 4 presenta los resultados. La sección 5 concluye presentando las conclusiones e implicaciones del trabajo.

Este estudio emplea un modelo de Análisis Envolvente de Datos (DEA) con un único input constante para analizar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses para el año 2016 EL ÍNDICE DE COMPETITIVIDAD CANTONAL El ICC es una medición que han realizado la Escuela de Economía y el Observatorio de Desarrollo de la Universidad de Costa Rica desde el año 2006, que mide el desempeño relativo de la actividad económica realizada en el espacio geográfico de cada uno de los 81 cantones del país; el cantón N° 82 es Río Cuarto de Alajuela, que fue creado con la Ley N° 9440 del 20 de abril de 2018 y no aparece aún en las mediciones realizadas. El objetivo principal del ICC es medir la competitividad de los cantones de Costa Rica de acuerdo con el resultado, en el espacio cantonal, de las decisiones empresariales, familiares y de los gobiernos a escala cantonal y nacional (Ulate et al., 2012). El ICC está compuesto originalmente por treinta y ocho variables que, a su vez, son agrupadas en siete pilares (y): 1) entorno económico, 2) desempeño del gobierno local, 3) acceso y calidad de la infraestructura, 4) clima empresarial, 5) clima laboral, 6) capacidad para manejar conocimientos complejos, y 7) calidad de vida. De acuerdo con Ulate et al. (2012), las variables que componen el ICC tienen escalas de medición diferentes y, por eso, sus valores se estandarizan −esto es, toman valores entre cero y uno− y luego se promedian entre las variables que componen cada subíndice para calcular su valor final. Finalmente, para cada cantón (i) se obtiene el valor del índice de competitividad cantonal como un promedio aritmético de los valores de los siete pilares ICCi = Σwkiyi ˅ wki = 1/7. En la tabla 1 se presentan los siete pilares y las variables que conforman cada uno de ellos. A continuación, se presenta una descripción de los siete pilares o subíndices que forman el ICC, según Ulate et al. (2016).

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

81


Tabla 1. Pilares y variables del ICC de Costa Rica Pilares

Variables 1.1. Tasa de crecimiento del consumo eléctrico total

1. ECONÓMICO

1.2. m2 de construcción por km2 1.3. Egresos municipales per cápita 1.4. Exportaciones totales por trabajador 2.1 Ingresos municipales per cápita 2.2 Gasto municipal no administrativo per cápita 2.3 Grado de dependencia de transferencias del sector público

2. GOBIERNO

2.4 Días para conceder patentes comerciales 2.5 Participación en elecciones municipales vs. presidenciales. 2.6 Gasto en red vial por km de red vial cantonal 2.7 N° de evaluaciones de impacto ambiental por permiso de construcción 3.1 Porcentaje de red vial pavimentada 3.2 Viviendas con acceso a electricidad por km2 3.3 Porcentaje de viviendas con acceso a agua potable

3. INFRAESTRUCTURA

3.4 Porcentaje de viviendas con teléfono fijo 3.5 Porcentaje de viviendas con Internet 3.6 Cobertura y calidad de red móvil 2G * 3.7 Cobertura y calidad de red móvil 3G * 3.8 Porcentaje de desempeño de descarga global 3G * 4.1. Índice de competencia

4. CLIMA EMPRESARIAL

4.2. N° de entidades financieras por km2 4.3. Índice de concentración de actividades 4.4. Porcentaje de empresas exportadoras 5.1. Cobertura inglés en primaria 5.2. Cobertura educación secundaria

5. CLIMA LABORAL

5.3. Matrícula terciaria 5.4. Población económicamente activa 5.5. Especialización del trabajador en servicios e industria 5.6. Tasa de crecimiento del empleo formal versus P.E.A 6.1. Concentración de las exportaciones en alta tecnología

6. CAPACIDAD DE INNOVACIÓN

6.2. Porcentaje matrícula terciaria en ciencias y tecnología 6.3. Porcentaje de escuelas y colegios con Internet 7.1. Tasa de mortalidad por infecciones 7.2. N° de establecimientos de entretenimiento por cada 10 mil habitantes

7. CALIDAD DE VIDA

7.3. Tasa de mortalidad por homicidios 7.4. Habitantes por EBAIS 7.5. Robos y asaltos a personas por cada 10 mil habitantes 7.6. Esfuerzo municipal en mitigación ambiental

* Tecnología disponible en 2016 y años anteriores, variables sujetas a actualización. Fuente: Elaboración propia a partir de Ulate et al. (2016).

82

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

PILAR ECONÓMICO - La proximidad a un mercado grande y creciente son dos variables importantes que explican la concentración de la actividad económica y la mayor productividad de una región, sus beneficios están asociados a costos de transporte relativamente menores, pero también al aumento en la disponibilidad y variedad de bienes, servicios e insumos para la producción. Para monitorear el dinamismo y acceso a un mercado local y externo, se utilizaron las siguientes variables: la tasa de crecimiento del consumo eléctrico total, los egresos municipales per cápita (egresos municipales menos la inversión del gobierno local), los metros cuadrados de construcción por km2 y las exportaciones por trabajador. Sin duda alguna, habría sido importante considerar el flujo de transacciones entre cantones, pero no es una información que esté disponible. Asimismo, las exportaciones de servicios, por turismo o por servicios empresariales, tampoco están disponibles por cantón de origen. Finalmente, las exportaciones de café, por cantón de origen, se incorporaron solo en los últimos años. PILAR GOBIERNO - El gobierno local es el gestor de los bienes públicos del cantón. Tiene autonomía en el ámbito político, tributario, administrativo y normativo. Con respecto al primer ámbito, los ciudadanos son quienes eligen sus representantes. En el ámbito tributario, las municipalidades tienen la posibilidad de crear, modificar, exonerar, eliminar los tributos municipales con autorización legislativa. Desde el punto de vista administrativo, tienen autonomía para decidir sobre su presupuesto, sus programas y planes locales. Desde el punto de vista normativo, los gobiernos locales no pueden variar la legislación nacional referida al movimiento de bienes, personas y empresas, ni pueden establecer sus propias barreras legales o políticas, como sí lo podría establecer el Gobierno nacional. No obstante lo anterior, las municipalidades pueden decidir sobre su propio ordenamiento en los ámbitos de su competencia. Es decir, otorgar autorizaciones y gastar en infraestructura, servicios y bienes públicos locales de acuerdo con sus criterios de ordenamiento territorial. Además, los gobiernos locales coordinan, planifican y gestionan ante el Gobierno central el desarrollo de proyectos e infraestructura pública, y deben velar por lo que sucede en su territorio.

Con el propósito de monitorear su desempeño en algunos de los ámbitos anteriores, se consideraron variables como la capacidad de recaudación del gobierno local, medida por los ingresos per cápita y el grado de dependencia de los ingresos del municipio de las transferencias del Gobierno central. La capacidad del gobierno local para gestionar los bienes y servicios locales es medida por el gasto no administrativo per cápita y el gasto en la red vial por kilómetro de red cantonal. La eficiencia para responder las gestiones de los residentes ante la municipalidad se mide con la variable de número de días para obtener una patente comercial, la cual se obtiene mediante encuesta directa a todos los municipios del país. En el año 1998 se modificó la legislación para elegir el alcalde y representantes ante el concejo municipal con el propósito de conceder una mayor autonomía política a los gobiernos locales. La variable denominada participación en las elecciones de alcalde versus las presidenciales busca monitorear qué tanto ejercen los ciudadanos del cantón esa autonomía política. Finalmente se incluye una variable que aproxima el grado de complejidad ambiental de los permisos que tramitan las municipalidades al relacionar el número de evaluaciones de impacto ambiental con el número de permisos de construcción otorgados por la municipalidad. PILAR INFRAESTRUCTURA - Este pilar monitorea las facilidades que tiene el cantón con respecto a la movilidad, la comunicación y el acceso a las tecnologías de información que tienen las personas y empresas residentes en el cantón. Como indicador de las facilidades de movilización terrestre, se utiliza el porcentaje de la red vial que está pavimentada. La disponibilidad de electricidad y agua potable son factores básicos para la ubicación de las viviendas y las actividades económicas. Además, este pilar cuantifica tanto el acceso a las tecnologías anteriores −electricidad y telefonía fija− como a las nuevas tecnologías de la información representadas por cuatro variables: el porcentaje de viviendas con acceso a internet, la cobertura y calidad de la red de telefonía móvil tanto 2G como 3G y el desempeño de descarga global 3G. Las tres últimas variables se van a modificar y actualizar en las próximas mediciones.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

83


PILAR CLIMA EMPRESARIAL - Este pilar le da seguimiento a variables relacionadas con la complejidad, variedad y exigencia del entorno económico que enfrentan las empresas ubicadas en el cantón. La variable “índice de competencia” mide el grado de competencia entre las empresas industriales y de servicios para conseguir un trabajador en su respectivo cantón. Este índice es relativo al promedio nacional porque compara la relación de patronos entre la PEA del cantón versus la misma relación a nivel nacional. Si supera la unidad, hay una relativa mayor competencia en el cantón. Es una adaptación del indicador de competencia que utilizan Glaeser, Kallal, Scheinkman y Shleifer (1992, p. 1142). La proximidad con otros agentes económicos mejora la productividad y las relaciones con el resto del mundo amplían el ámbito de las destrezas requeridas para producir los bienes y servicios que se exportan. Asimismo, la diversidad de actividades económicas que se llevan a cabo en el cantón facilita el intercambio y aumentan la posibilidad de aprovechar las externalidades que se puedan generar en el cantón. La disponibilidad de servicios empresariales se aproxima con la variable que cuantifica el número de entidades financieras por km2, establecidas en el cantón. Para medir la diversidad de actividades presentes en el cantón, se utiliza el índice de concentración de actividades de Herfindahl. Para cuantificar este índice, se utiliza el Directorio de Establecimientos que elabora el INEC. La importancia relativa de las empresas exportadoras presentes en el cantón se mide como proporción del número de empresas (patronos) totales del cantón. PILAR CLIMA LABORAL - Este pilar les da seguimiento a seis variables, tres de ellas se refieren al potencial educativo de la fuerza laboral, porque miden la cobertura de inglés en primaria, la cobertura de educación en secundaria y la matrícula en la educación universitaria estatal. La cuarta variable se refiere al tamaño de la oferta laboral, pues utiliza la población económicamente activa del cantón. La quinta variable aproxima la destreza de esa oferta laboral al medir la especialización relativa de los trabajadores del cantón en actividades de servicios como comercios, hoteles, educación y en industria. Si el valor de la variable es alto significa que, dado el tamaño del cantón, hay una concentración de trabajadores en estos sectores, y si

84

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

es bajo significa que los trabajadores del cantón se especializan en las demás actividades económicas, principalmente agrícolas. La sexta variable mide el dinamismo de la demanda local de empleo formal al monitorear el crecimiento del empleo formal con respecto a la variación de la población económicamente activa del cantón. PILAR CAPACIDAD DE INNOVACIÓN - Este pilar busca medir el potencial que tiene el cantón para difundir, transmitir y manejar conocimientos complejos eventualmente aplicados a la producción, pero no pretende medir la actividad de innovación en sí misma porque esta información no está disponible. Ese potencial se mide con tres variables. La primera cuantifica el grado de concentración de exportaciones en alta tecnología que se originan dentro del cantón. Esta variable refleja qué tan sofisticados son los conocimientos que se aplican en dicha producción y, por ende, en el potencial para transmitirlos hacia otras industrias o sectores productivos. La segunda y tercera variables buscan cuantificar la capacidad del recurso humano local para adquirir, procesar y aprovechar las externalidades de un conocimiento más sofisticado. Esta capacidad se monitorea mediante la matrícula de las universidades estatales en ciencias y tecnología que provienen del cantón respectivo, y del porcentaje de escuelas y colegios con acceso a internet en ese cantón. PILAR CALIDAD DE VIDA - Este pilar busca cuantificar el desempeño de variables que podrían valorar las personas al decidir el lugar adonde vivir. Está compuesto por seis variables. La primera se refiere a la salud de sus habitantes, a saber, tasa de mortalidad por infecciones por 10 mil habitantes. La segunda variable mide la importancia de la oferta local de establecimientos para el esparcimiento y entretenimiento, la cual contabiliza el número de establecimientos dedicados a estas actividades y ubicados en el cantón por cada diez mil habitantes. El tercer indicador mide la mortalidad por homicidio por cada cien mil habitantes. La cuarta variable mide el número de habitantes por EBAIS y busca monitorear el acceso a servicios de salud. La quinta variable es una tasa del número de robos y asaltos a personas por cada diez mil habitantes. La sexta variable cuantifica el esfuerzo municipal en mitigar problemas ambientales


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

del cantón. Algunos problemas que podrían generar las aglomeraciones, especialmente urbanas, contribuyen a deteriorar la vida en común de un cantón, por eso se incluyen algunas variables, las cuales más bien le restan a la calidad de vida si su valor aumenta. Ese es el caso de la tasa de robos y asaltos cometidos a personas, la tasa de homicidios y la tasa de mortalidad por infecciones. Las características que valoran las familias no necesariamente coinciden con aquellas que valora una empresa. El ICC no explica la causa subyacente a los resultados de competitividad cantonal. Ese no es el objetivo del índice, sino más bien busca revelar los resultados alcanzados a partir de las decisiones de múltiples actores comparado con los alcanzados en el resto de los 81 cantones del país. El seguimiento al desempeño relativo busca promover, entre las autoridades respectivas, la formulación de preguntas y el establecimiento de prioridades para identificar posibles soluciones que permitan impulsar el desarrollo de cada territorio, según la evolución relativa de su perfil económico. La lectura del ICC es sencilla: el ICC oscila entre 0 y 1 y el índice muestra la posición relativa del cantón, con respecto a los 81 cantones, en cada uno de los pilares y en cada una de las variables que lo conforman. (Ulate et al., 2012). A partir del análisis de los datos del ICC para 2016 empleados en este estudio, la tabla 2 muestra los

resultados de competitividad por provincia. En la tabla se observa que la competitividad promedio de los 81 cantones costarricenses es de 0,3369, lo que significa que, para ser completamente competitivos, los cantones deben mejorar el ICC en 0,66 puntos del índice. Además, se observa que la provincia de Heredia muestra el mayor nivel de competitividad cantonal (medido por el ICC), seguido de la provincia de San José en casi todos los subíndices competitivos. Por el contrario, las provincias de Limón y Puntarenas muestran los niveles de competitividad más bajos, así como el mayor número de debilidades competitivas (menor valor en muchos subíndices).

MÉTODO: ANÁLISIS ENVOLVENTE DE DATOS (DEA) CON UN ÚNICO INPUT CONSTANTE En este estudio se emplea un modelo de análisis envolvente de datos (Data Envelopment Analysis, DEA) desarrollado por Charnes, Cooper y Rhodes (1981), basado en funciones distancia de Shepard (1970) con el objetivo de evaluar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses en 2016. DEA es un método no paramétrico que, a partir de los datos observados, aproxima la

Tabla 2. Índice de Competitividad Cantonal en provincias de Costa Rica (2016) ICC

Economía

Empresas

Gobierno

Empleo

Infraestructura

Innovación

Condiciones de Vida

San José

0,3975

0,3588

0,3523

0,2800

0,4979

0,5375

0,4805

0,2752

Alajuela

0,3179

0,2770

0,2374

0,2468

0,4395

0,3643

0,3742

0,2863

Cartago

0,3481

0,2770

0,2610

0,1674

0,4550

0,5032

0,5055

0,2677

Heredia

0,4133

0,4233

0,3906

0,2467

0,5065

0,6603

0,5094

0,1562

Guanacaste

0,3015

0,2949

0,1560

0,3330

0,3412

0,3064

0,2356

0,4431

Puntarenas

0,2621

0,2881

0,1449

0,2944

0,3415

0,2732

0,1555

0,3374

Limón

0,2425

0,3006

0,2497

0,1946

0,3670

0,1894

0,2197

0,1763

TOTAL

0,3369

0,3210

0,2643

0,2614

0,4317

0,4241

0,3701

0,2857

Provincia

Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC, 2016.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

85


verdadera (pero incierta) tecnología mediante la estimación de modelos de programación lineal que no imponen ninguna restricción sobre la distribución muestral (Cooper, Seiford y Zhu, 2011; Grifell-Tatjé y Lovell, 2015). El principal supuesto teórico de un modelo DEA es que, en un periodo determinado (t), las unidades de análisis (en nuestro caso, cantones: i) emplean un vector de x=(x1,...,x J)ϵR+ inputs para producir un conjunto de y=(y1,...,yM)ϵR+ outputs, y que este vector de inputs y outputs forman la tecnología a modelar (T): T t = {(x,y,t):x produce y en el periodo t }. En el contexto de este estudio, el siguiente programa lineal computa, para cada cantón (i), la función de distancia orientada hacia el output empleada para evaluar la eficiencia competitiva de los 81 cantones de Costa Rica: Dt(1,yt)=inf(θ>0:(1, yt/ θ)ϵ T t), donde T t es la tecnología analizada: T t= {Σi=1 λ i yi,m, m=1,...,M, Σi=1 λ i xi,j ≤1,j=1, λ i >0, i=1, ...,81}. La tecnología (T) del modelo DEA empleado en este trabajo se caracteriza por mostrar rendimientos constantes de escala, ser una función homogénea de grado +1, y por ser convexa en y, el coeficiente θ es el término de ineficiencia computado para cada cantón i. Para los cantones eficientes (sobre la frontera de eficiencia) θ=1, mientras que para cantones ineficientes θ>1(θ−1 es el nivel de ineficiencia). El término λ i es el vector de intensidad (pesos virtuales) usado para formar las combinaciones lineales de eficiencia de los cantones (N=1,…,81). Es importante destacar que, implícito a la tecnología descrita anteriormente, está el supuesto que los vectores de inputs (x) y outputs (y) son observables. Sin embargo, en muchas ocasiones los vectores de inputs u outputs no siempre son observables. En el contexto de los modelos no paramétricos, existen dos principales motivos para evaluar la eficiencia de un conjunto de unidades a través de modelos DEA sin un vector de inputs explícito. Primero, algunos problemas analíticos no requieren datos de inputs u outputs, y el análisis de eficiencia basado en las mejores prácticas o los objetivos de los encargados del diseño de políticas de apoyo se convierte en el objetivo del análisis. Ejemplos de estos problemas incluyen el análisis de las unidades de seguridad vial (Odeck, 2006), el desempeño olímpico de los países (Soares de Mello, Angulo-Meza y Branco da Silva, 2009) y el análisis del nivel de alcance de los objetivos del protocolo de Kyoto (Lo, 2010). Segundo, en algunas aplicaciones los outputs son variables agregadas o

86

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

números índice (por ejemplo, PIB per cápita), y los datos no permiten distinguir los niveles de inputs necesarios para producir los outputs. Ejemplos de este tipo de problema incluyen el análisis de cifras macroeconómicas (Cherchye, Moesen y Van Puyenbroeck, 2004), el Índice de Desarrollo Humano (Despotis, 2005) y el Índice de Vida Mejor de la OCDE (Mizobuchi, 2014). El análisis presentado en este estudio cae dentro de la última categoría de problemas económicos. Los cantones costarricenses pueden desplegar una amplia gama de inputs y adoptar diferentes políticas para mejorar su competitividad. De esta forma, en modelos como el nuestro donde los elementos de un número índice (Índice de Competitividad Cantonal) son el output analizado y los inputs específicos vinculados a estos outputs son difíciles de identificar, el uso de modelos DEA con un único input constante resulta adecuado para evaluar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses, con respecto a la frontera de mejores prácticas. En consecuencia, con base en el trabajo de Lovell y Pastor (1999) y la contribución de, entre otros, Liu et al. (2011) y Karagiannis y Lovell (2016), el modelo propuesto para evaluar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses emplea un único input constante (x) −el cual es un vector de 1’s (J=1) para todos los cantones (i×1)−, mientras que el vector de outputs incluye los siete subíndices o pilares del Índice de Competitividad Cantonal (ymϵ M˄M=7) descritos en la tabla 2: economía, gobierno, clima empresarial, clima laboral, infraestructura, capacidad de innovación y condiciones de vida. Para efectos de cómputo, se empleó el software EMS (Efficiency Measurement System) para generar los coeficientes de eficiencia de los 81 cantones costarricenses.

RESULTADOS ÍNDICE DE COMPETITIVIDAD CANTONAL Y EFICIENCIA ESTIMADA: CONFIGURACIÓN GEOGRÁFICA La figura 1 muestra la configuración geográfica de la competitividad cantonal y del nivel de eficiencia cantonal. Desde una óptica descriptiva, los resultados indican que existe una fuerte relación entre ambas variables, de forma


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

que los cantones más competitivos muestran menores niveles de ineficiencia, y viceversa. El resultado del coeficiente de correlación entre el índice de competitividad cantonal y el nivel de eficiencia estimado mediante el modelo DEA confirma la relación entre ambas variables: -0,7249 (p-value < 0,0000). De esta forma, los resultados del modelo de eficiencia competitiva (DEA) reflejan en muy buena medida la competitividad cantonal en Costa Rica. En línea con el objetivo de este trabajo, el ICC es una valiosa herramienta disponible para los encargados del diseño de políticas públicas y, a partir de los datos del ICC, los resultados del modelo DEA propuesto pueden complementar el ICC ya que ofrecen una visión más amplia acerca de qué pilares son más importantes (prioridades) a la hora de determinar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones. El detalle de este análisis se presenta en la Figura 1.

EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA DE LOS CANTONES DE COSTA RICA A continuación, se presentan los resultados del análisis de eficiencia competitiva a partir de las estimaciones realizadas mediante el modelo DEA presentado en la Sección 3. La tabla 3 presenta los resultados del ICC por

provincia (tabla 2) y además introduce los resultados de ineficiencia medida por el DEA. Como se indicó anteriormente, de la comparación del ICC y los resultados de ineficiencia competitiva, se observan bastantes similitudes en términos de ranking, pero, además, se observan algunas diferencias. En primer lugar, la provincia de San José muestra el mayor nivel de eficiencia competitiva (1,3051) siendo la segunda en el ICC, y el resultado del modelo DEA indica que, para alcanzar la frontera de eficiencia competitiva y ser plenamente eficiente, los cantones de esta provincia deben mejorar su competitividad en promedio 30,51%. En el caso de la provincia de Heredia (la más competitiva según el ICC), los resultados del modelo DEA la ubican en tercera posición provincial e indican que, en promedio, los cantones de esta provincia pueden aumentar 38,29% sus pilares competitivos para ser eficiente y alcanzar la frontera de competitividad cantonal. En segundo lugar, es interesante que la provincia de Cartago (tercera según el ICC) es ligeramente más eficiente que Heredia (provincia con el promedio de cantones más competitivos según el ICC); sin embargo, el resultado para el primer y tercer cuartil indican que los cantones de Heredia están más concentrados en tramos de alta eficiencia, respecto a la distribución de los cantones de Cartago. En tercer lugar, Alajuela y Guanacaste ocupan

Figura 1. Índice de Competitividad Cantonal (izquierda) y nivel de eficiencia (derecha) para los cantones costarricenses en 2016

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

87


como el peso virtual de cada uno de los subíndices del ICC.

posiciones bastante similares, Alajuela es más competitivo (cuarta posición) pero Guanacaste lo supera ligeramente en eficiencia; la provincia de Alajuela es muy heterogénea de acuerdo con su desviación estándar. En cuarto lugar, los resultados del modelo DEA coinciden con los del ICC al posicionar a las provincias de Limón y Puntarenas como las regiones con cantones más ineficientes; sin embargo, en el caso del modelo DEA, Limón aparece como la provincia con cantones más ineficientes, y su resultado (2,2241) sugiere que, para alcanzar la frontera de eficiencia competitiva y ser plenamente eficiente los cantones de Limón, deben mejorar su competitividad en promedio un 122,41% y un 89,69% en el caso de los cantones de Puntarenas.

Según los resultados del modelo DEA, los cantones de la provincia de San José son, en promedio, los más eficientes (tabla 4), y estos resultados son fruto sobre todo de la fortaleza mostrada en tres pilares competitivos: infraestructuras, empleo y condiciones de vida. En el caso de las provincias con el segundo (Cartago) y tercer (Heredia) nivel de eficiencia más alto, los resultados indican la heterogeneidad en las fortalezas (prioridades) competitivas. En el caso de los cantones de la provincia de Cartago, las fortalezas competitivas se centran en los pilares de innovación, empleo y condiciones de vida, mientras que, en los cantones de Heredia, las fortalezas competitivas se concentran, en promedio, en los pilares de infraestructura, empleo y economía (tabla 4). Los resultados del modelo DEA indican que, en promedio, los cantones de estas dos provincias deben priorizar una cantidad relativamente baja de pilares competitivos para maximizar su eficiencia competitiva: Cartago = 2,63 subíndices y Heredia = 2,60 subíndices.

Los empresarios locales y los encargados del diseño de políticas públicas realizan combinaciones de los recursos disponibles de diversas maneras según la tecnología disponible en procura de maximizar sus objetivos, y uno de los resultados de estos procesos es la productividad competitiva a nivel local. Los resultados presentados en la tabla 4 profundizan el análisis de eficiencia al mostrar la composición de la eficiencia competitiva de las provincias según los pilares del ICC, 2016. La tabla presenta, para cada provincia, el número de subíndices (pilares competitivos) que deben priorizarse para alcanzar la máxima eficiencia competitiva posible según la disponibilidad de recursos a nivel local, así

Por el contrario, dos resultados deben resaltarse en el caso de los cantones de la provincia de Limón. Por un lado, los cantones de esta provincia deben, en promedio, priorizar la menor cantidad de pilares competitivos si se desea optimizar su eficiencia competitiva (2,33). Por otra parte, la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones de Limón

Tabla 3. Eficiencia competitiva de los cantones de Costa Rica, visto por provincia (2016) ICC

Ineficiencia (DEA)

Desviación Standard

Q1

Q3

Obs.

San José

0,3975

1,3051

0,2776

1,0696

1,4788

20

Alajuela

0,3179

1,6938

0,7154

1,2351

1,7384

15

Cartago

0,3481

1,3725

0,2091

1,2450

1,5276

8

Heredia

0,4133

1,3829

0,5259

1,0910

1,3644

10

Guanacaste

0,3015

1,5013

0,3634

1,3345

1,6524

11

Puntarenas

0,2621

1,8969

0,7394

1,3676

2,3089

11

Limón

0,2425

2,2241

0,4759

1,9884

2,4340

6

TOTAL

0,3369

1,5684

0,5639

1,1948

1,6706

81

Provincia

Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC 2016

88

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

tipo telaraña. En cada figura (figuras 2, 3, y 4) se presentan los resultados de cada pilar competitivo del ICC para cada cantón analizado (Cartago, El Guarco y Turrialba), así como los resultados para con los cantones que constituyen el grupo de benchmarks según la estimación generada por el modelo DEA propuesto en este estudio. Como se indicó anteriormente, estos benchmarks representan el grupo de cantones eficientes con las mejores prácticas en los pilares analizados, y deben ser tomados en cuenta por empresarios, así como por los responsables de generar políticas públicas, incluidos los gobiernos locales.

se explica principalmente por la priorización de los pilares asociados al empleo y condiciones de vida, mientras que los pilares relacionados con infraestructura y empresas no son factores determinantes de la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones de esta provincia.

IDENTIFICACIÓN DE LAS MEJORES PRÁCTICAS PARA LOS CANTONES DE COSTA RICA La medición de eficiencia competitiva derivada del modelo propuesto tiene otra característica de gran importancia y utilidad, esto es la posibilidad de definir benchmarks cantonales, los cuales representan las mejores prácticas de acuerdo con el ranking obtenido de los 81 cantones y según las características particulares de los pilares de cada cantón. Estos benchmarks representan el conjunto de referencia −formado por los cantones eficientes− que puede ser empleado como espejo por los demás cantones (ineficientes) para generar información valiosa que permita determinar, de forma más acertada, cuál podría ser la priorización de políticas de apoyo que permita alcanzar niveles superiores de eficiencia competitiva.

De los resultados del modelo DEA −reflejados en la figura 2−, vemos que los cantones de San José y Alajuela son el conjunto de referencia (benchmark) del cantón central de Cartago. En este caso, los resultados indican que el cantón central de Cartago se beneficiaría más si adopta políticas similares a las que actualmente realiza el cantón central de San José en materia de condiciones económicas, clima empresarial, gobernanza, infraestructura y estilo de vida, y si, además, emula las prácticas del cantón de Alajuela en el pilar de clima laboral. Además, se observa que el cantón de Cartago es fuerte en el pilar de capacidad de innovación.

A continuación se presenta, a manera de ejemplo, el análisis de benchmarks para tres cantones de la provincia de Cartago. Para facilitar la visualización de los resultados, estos se presentan mediante una gráfica de

El cantón de San Pedro de Montes de Oca (provincia de San José) es el benchmark a seguir en el caso del cantón de El Guarco (figura 3). Al respecto, la administración de El Guarco podría beneficiarse si sigue las prácticas

Tabla 4. Configuración de la eficiencia competitiva por provincias Eficiencia DEA

N° de Pilares

Economía

Empresas

Gobierno

Empleo

Infraestructura

Innovación

Condiciones de Vida

San José

1,3051

2,75

0,0270

0,0340

0,0995

0,2120

0,2870

0,1490

0,1925

Alajuela

1,6938

2,80

0,0360

0,0000

0,0587

0,4153

0,0933

0,0753

0,3207

Cartago

1,3725

2,63

0,0188

0,0000

0,0225

0,2463

0,1675

0,3400

0,2050

Heredia

1,3829

2,60

0,1100

0,0000

0,0130

0,1870

0,5470

0,0950

0,0490

Guanacaste

1,5013

2,73

0,0318

0,0073

0,1045

0,2218

0,1245

0,0473

0,4645

Puntarenas

1,8969

3,00

0,1064

0,0000

0,1073

0,2455

0,0845

0,0200

0,4364

Limón

2,2241

2,33

0,0817

0,0000

0,0983

0,5583

0,0000

0,0617

0,2000

TOTAL

1,5684

2,73

0,0536

0,0094

0,0753

0,2815

0,2006

0,1098

0,2704

Provincia

Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC, 2016.

SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

89


implementadas en el cantón de San Pedro de Montes de Oca en casi todos los pilares analizados. En el caso del cantón de Turrialba (figura 4), las mejores prácticas a replicar son las implementadas en el cantón central de San José en materia económica, clima empresarial y laboral, gobernanza e innovación. Además, conviene destacar la relevancia de seguir los pasos de la administración del cantón de Hojancha en lo relativo al pilar de condiciones de vida.

DISCUSIÓN Y CONCLUSIONES Figura 2. Benchmarks del cantón central de Cartago Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC 2016

Figura 3. Benchmarks del cantón de El Guarco

Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC 2016

Este estudio emplea el ICC 2016 para analizar la eficiencia competitiva de los cantones costarricenses mediante un modelo no-paramétrico (DEA) con siete outputs y un input constante que permite estimar el nivel de eficiencia competitiva cantonal, permite identificar los factores (subíndices) más determinantes (prioridades) a la hora de explicar la eficiencia competitiva cantonal, e identifica cuáles cantones tienen las mejores prácticas. El ICC es una excelente herramienta que permite comparar el desempeño relativo de los cantones de acuerdo con sus factores de producción, sus instituciones y la implementación de políticas públicas en su territorio geográfico. La utilidad del ICC, como en todos los índices compuestos, radica en su capacidad para identificar áreas de mejora a lo interno de los cantones y permite hacer comparaciones con los otros cantones a partir de la generación de un ranking de posiciones que permite definir benchmarks con las mejores prácticas disponibles. Sin embargo, falta considerar la calidad de las combinaciones de los recursos o factores de producción que se realizan en el proceso productivo de la economía calculando la productividad y comparando la eficiencia. En este sentido, el aporte de este trabajo consiste en evaluar la eficiencia cantonal en el marco de competitividad demarcado por el ICC, con el fin de determinar la calidad del proceso productivo de la economía cantonal así como y las prioridades que deben ser acometidas para mejorar la eficiencia competitiva, esto bien puede ser el ingrediente para definir una Hoja de Ruta para emprender la importante tarea del desarrollo local.

Figura 4. Benchmarks del cantón de Turrialba

Fuente: Elaboración propia, a partir del ICC 2016

90

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Costa Rica presenta, en la actualidad, una estructura de economía dual: por un lado, están los cantones donde se ubican las zonas francas con un desempeño altamente competitivo, dinámico e innovador; en contraste con la economía tradicional que muestra estancamiento, tiene altos costos y es poco competitiva. Esta situación hace necesario cambiar el abordaje que se le ha dado a los problemas estructurales que arrastra la economía tradicional del país desde hace varias décadas como la pobreza que está por encima del 20%, el desempleo que en 2019 es del 12%, la economía informal


EFICIENCIA COMPETITIVA

que se estima representa el 45% de la actividad económica (INEC Costa Rica: http://inec.cr), así como la ineficiencia de la burocracia estatal. Un replanteamiento requiere de nuevas herramientas y mayor tecnología para analizar los problemas, así la eficiencia competitiva DEA que hemos planteado permite no solo un abordaje novedoso, sino que sus resultados serán útiles para abonar hacia una “Nueva Administración Pública” que genere el sendero del desarrollo cantonal y nacional. Esta investigación es de utilidad para al menos tres actores que son protagonistas del desarrollo local o cantonal. En primer lugar, las instituciones encargadas de diseñar la política pública, las Municipalidades en lo cantonal y las instituciones autónomas que coordinan la planificación e implementación de políticas a nivel nacional, como el IFAM, la Contraloría y la Unión de Gobiernos locales. La información y conclusiones generadas en este trabajo permiten realizar una identificación precisa de las variables y pilares competitivos que deben priorizarse para generar un mayor impacto en el desarrollo cantonal, y así mejorar su desempeño en la gobernanza que les ha sido encomendada. En segundo lugar, esta investigación es útil para los empresarios, cámaras empresariales e instituciones de fomento al desarrollo, como las Zonas Económicas Especiales, porque pueden detectar con mayor facilidad las oportunidades de inversión en los territorios geográficos y así promover el crecimiento económico y la generación de empleo. Finalmente, este trabajo introduce oportunidades de investigación para la academia, porque, al ser este un estudio pionero en la identificación de la eficiencia competitiva territorial, permite introducir metodologías y análisis que permitirán, a futuros investigadores, contribuir con el objetivo de promover mayor prosperidad y bienestar social. Sin embargo, como toda investigación, tiene limitaciones que están determinadas por la disponibilidad de la información, la cual es del año 2016; la publicación del ICC de los años posteriores permitirá ir desarrollando la trayectoria de la eficiencia competitiva cantonal en una serie de tiempo, lo cual permitirá determinar tendencias y detectar prácticas y políticas que deben ser fomentadas para alcanzar un mejor desarrollo local. Las oportunidades de investigación no se limitan a los cantones en particular, y hay diversas posibilidades como, por ejemplo, hacer análisis para corredores o regiones geográficas, tanto a nivel de pilar competitivo o variable individual a potenciar

o subsanar; también por tipo de actividad productiva, por características demográficas o psicográficas, todo esto si la información está disponible. Los resultados del estudio relativos a eficiencia competitiva, pilares a priorizar y benchmarks para cada cantón están disponibles a solicitud de los interesados. Sería un valor agregado para el investigador poder colaborar con Municipalidades o instituciones gubernamentales mediante la exploración de oportunidades de aplicación práctica del conocimiento aquí generado.

Referencias Acs, Z., Autio, E. y Szerb, L. (2014). National systems of entrepreneurship: Measurement issues and policy implications. Research Policy, 43(3), 476-494. Acs, Z., Szerb, L., Lafuente, E. y Lloyd, A. (2019). Global Entrepreneurship and Development Index 2018. Springer International Publishing (SpringerBriefs in Economics). Doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-03279-1. Balaguer-Coll, M., Prior, D., y Tortosa-Ausina, E. (2007). On the determinants of local government performance: A two-stage nonparametric approach. European Economic Review, 51(2), 425-451. Charnes, A., Cooper, W. y Rhodes, E. (1981). Evaluating program and managerial efficiency: an application of data envelopment analysis to program follow through. Management Science, 27(6), 668-697.

Los resultados de eficiencia, como frutos del análisis de las siete dimensiones (pilares) del Índice de Competitividad Cantonal (ICC) como outputs de la función de producción no-paramétrica propuesta en este trabajo, indican que, en promedio, los cantones costarricenses pueden mejorar su eficiencia competitiva un 56,84% SEPTIEMBRE - DICIEMBRE, 2019

TEC EMPRESARIAL

91


Cherchye, L., Moesen,W. y Van Puyenbroeck, T. (2004). Legitimately diverse, yet comparable: On synthesizing social inclusion performance in the EU. Journal of Common Market Studies, 42, 919-955. Cherchye L., Moesen W., Rogge N. y Puyenbroeck T. (2007). One market, one number? A composite indicator assessment of EU internal market dynamics. European Economic Review, 51(3), 749-779. Cooper, W., Seiford, L. y Zhu, J. (2011). Handbook on data envelopment analysis (2°ed.). New York: Springer. Despotis, D. (2005). A reassessment of the human development index via data envelopment analysis. Journal of the Operational Research Society, 56, 469-480. Glaeser, E., Kallal, H., Scheinkman, J. y Shleifer, A. (1992). Growth in cities. Journal of Political Economy, 100(6), 1126-1152. Grifell-Tatjé, E. y Lovell, C. (2015). Productivity Accounting: The Economics of Business Performance. New York: Cambridge University Press. Grupp, H. y Schubert, T. (2010). Review and new evidence on composite innovation indicators for evaluating national performance. Research Policy, 39, 67-78. Karagiannis, G., y Lovell, C. (2016). Productivity measurement in radial DEA models with a single constant input. European Journal of Operational Research, 251(1), 323-328. Lafuente, E., Acs, Z., Sanders, M. y Szerb, L. (2019). The global technology frontier: productivity growth and the relevance of Kirznerian and Schumpeterian entrepreneurship. Small Business Economics, in press, doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/ s11187-019-00140-1. Lafuente E., Szerb L. y Acs Z. (2016). Country level efficiency and national system of entrepreneurship: a data envelopment analysis approach. Journal of Technology Transfer, 41(6), 1260-1283. Liu, W., Zhang, D., Meng, W., Li, X. y Xu, F. (2011). A study of DEA models without explicit inputs. Omega, 39, 472-480. Lo, S. (2010). The differing capabilities to respond to the challenge of climate change across annex parties under the Kyoto protocol. Environmental Science & Policy, 13, 42-54. Lovell, C. y Pastor, J. (1999). Radial DEA models without inputs or without outputs. European Journal of Operational Research, 188(1), 46-51. Mizobuchi, H. (2014). Measuring world better life frontier: A composite indicator for OECD better life index. Social

92

TEC EMPRESARIAL

VOL 13 - No. 3

Indicators Research, 118, 987-1007. Narbón−Perpiñá, I. y De Witte, K. (2018). Local governments' efficiency: a systematic literature review-part II. International Transactions in Operational Research, 25(4), 1107-1136. Odeck, J. (2006). Identifying traffic safety best practice: An application of DEA and Malmquist indices. Omega, 34, 28-40. Ray, S. (2004). Data envelopment analysis: theory and techniques for economics and operations research. New York: Cambridge University Press. Shepard, R. (1970). The Theory and Cost of Production Functions. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Soares de Mello, J., Angulo-Meza, L. y Branco da Silva, B. (2009). A ranking for the Olympic games with unitary input DEA models. IMA Journal of Management Mathematics, 20, 201211. Ulate, A., Madrigal, G., Ortega, R. y Jiménez, E. (2012). Índice de competitividad cantonal, 2006-2011, (2 ed.) Disponible en: http://www.icc.odd.ucr.ac.cr/docs/ICC-OdD-2012.pdf. Ulate, A., Mayorga, B., y Alfaro, J. (2016). Índice de Competitividad Cantonal. Disponible en: https://www.ucr. ac.cr/medios/documentos/2017/icc-odd-2006-2016.pdf. World Economic Forum (2017). The Global Competitiveness Report 2017-2018. World Economic Forum, Geneva, Switzerland. Disponible en: http://www3. weforum.org/docs/GCR2017-2018/05FullReport/

Profile for mediosdepromocioncontacto

TEC_EMPRESARIAL_ Vol13_Num3FINAL  

TEC_EMPRESARIAL_ Vol13_Num3FINAL  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded