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The Pope John Paul II Statue The government of Timor Leste (East Timor) has erected a statue of Pope John Paul II to honor the late pontiff’s moral support for the country’s self-determination. The six-meter-tall concrete statue was inaugurated on June 14 in Tasi Tolu, on the western outskirts of Dili, the same place where Pope John Paul celebrated Mass on Oct. 12, 1989, during the Indonesian occupation. source: ETAN Photo: mediatimor.tl

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Former President Jose Ramos-Horta inaugurated the statue in the presence of Archbishop Leopoldo Girelli, the Jakarta-based apostolic nuncio to Timor Leste. Around 1,000 people dressed in tais, hand-woven cloth worn as a wrap, attended the event, which included an open-air Mass filled with traditional dance and song, and an offertory procession with local food and fruits. source: ETAN Photo: mediatimor.tl

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beautiful view from the statue of Pope John Paul

Pope John Paul has brought courage and hope to the people of Timor-Leste during the Indonesian occupation. The statue of Pope John Paul in present day become a remarkable The statue of Pope John Paul located at Tacitolu, Dili. place to remember of his contribution to Timor-Leste.

Photo: mediatimor.tl

pathway to the statue of Pope John Paul

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BLK Sport has been purchased from receivers McGrathNicol by a private consortium composed of a Timor-Lestebased oil company and Fiji investors in a deal that keeps founder Tyron Brant (pictured) as CEO and allows most of the company’s staff to retain their jobs.

BLK SPORT FOUNDER TYRON BRANT REMAINS CEO UNDER NEW OWNERS and there is an opportunity to push forward, not only in Australia, but globally; and I am proud that we have been able to retain hundreds of jobs in Fiji and around the world. I am looking to double that moving forward.”

The consortium, led by Esperança Timor Oan (ETO), acquired the BLK business, brand and associated subbrands from World Rugby Specialists (WRS) for an undisclosed sum. ETO Executive Director Nilton Gusmão dos Santos says the acquisition of the Gold Coast-based business was in line with ETO’s plans to expand beyond the energy sector. It also enables the BLK brands to be separated from the financial troubles of WRS, which was placed into administration in November last year. BLK was founded by Tyron Brant (pictured) and his father Kim on the Gold Coast as Kooga, but changed its name in 2011 and moved manufacturing to Fiji in 2012. It was placed under voluntary administration in November last year after Cyclone Winston put the business out of action for nine weeks in February that year. The BLK business will be housed within a new company, BLK International. BLK International will retain the existing BLK business executive team and senior management, including Brant, who has been chief executive of BLK since 2014. BLK International will also retain the services of current BLK business chief financial officer Michael Robinson, chief operating officer Shannon Moore and most of the workforce. “BLK will continue under new ownership,” says Brant, who is the director of WRC. “BLK International expects to maintain a high level of customer service and market leading innovation and intends to better deliver product and experience for BLK’s loyal customers.” Speaking to Business News Australia, Brant says it has been a tough two months on the staff in Australia and in Fiji. “One of the most important things for me is that we can continue our work on BLK, which is a globally recognised brand and is achieving fantastic things all over the world,

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ETO Executive Director Nilton Gusmão dos Santos

The major loss to the BLK business had been its supply contracts to four AFL teams and the

Gold Coast Titans in the NRL. “Despite the clubs terminating their arrangements with BLK, BLK International is confident that it will be able to replace that lost business over the medium term once it has rebuilt confidence in the brand,” says Brant. Brant told Business says that the destruction caused by Cyclone Winston was tough to come back from. “It was hard, near on impossible, to come back from the impact of the cyclone. We spent a fair bit of money building infrastructure in Fiji and Cyclone Winston closed us down for nine weeks, which had a significant impact on revenue,” says Brant. “We were just chasing our tail; from there we weren’t able to catch up on our cash flow, or our service and delivery.” BLK Sport manufactures and supplies apparel for sporting clubs and fans worldwide, including player kits for top-tier rugby union, rugby league, soccer and netball franchises. businessnewsaus.com.au The business is one of Australia’s dominant apparel suppliers to grassroots sport, with distributors in 14 countries and more than 10,000 teams globally wearing BLK. Brant says that despite WRS being placed into administration, the BLK business had retained its grassroots sport customer base, as well as jersey supply contracts with all four of its Australian and South African Super Rugby clubs, UK’s Saracens and Ospreys rugby clubs, Ireland’s Connacht Rugby, Stade Toulousain in France, Ricoh Black Rams in Japan and Canterbury in New Zealand. The BLK business also continues to supply the Newcastle Jets in the Hyundai A-League and New Zealand’s national netball team, the Silver Ferns. source: Business News Australia

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Government focuses on the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals Minister of State and of the Presidency of the Council of Ministers and Official Spokesperson for the Government of Timor-Leste The Prime Minister, H.E. Dr. Rui Maria de Araújo, along with with the leaders of Brazil, Columbia, Germany, Liberia, South Africa, Sweden, Tanzania and Tunisia, has written to the incoming Secretary-General of the United Nations, on behalf of the High-Level Group in support of the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. The letter, sent on the 30th of December, congratulates H.E. Mr. António Guterres, on his election, declares the commitment of the group to help maintain “political support” for implementation, speaks of concrete actions being carried out domestically by members and calls for “the effective and universal implementation of the Agenda 2030” to be a “top priority” in the Secretary-General’s “tenure at the helm of the Organization” The Sixth Constitutional Government is committed the implementation of the new United Nations Agenda with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals [SDGs]. In September 2015 the Council of Ministers

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passed a resolution recognizing the importance of the SDGs, committing to working towards their achievement and establishing a SDG Working Group, led by the Office of the Prime Minister. In New York at the launch of the 2030 Agenda Timor-Leste stepped up into an important role championing implementation as a part of the High-Level Group.

The World Food Program has applauded the increased funding in the 2017 State Budget toward nutrition, especially for mothers and children. Spokesperson, Minister of State Agio Pereira, noted “Timor-Leste played an important role in shaping the development of the SDGs and is continuing through the High–Level Group to call for global implementation.

Since that time efforts have been made to prioritize the goals for implementation in Timor-Les- At the same time we are working domestically te, integrate them into planning and to provide a to integrate the goals into our own planning prostrong monitoring framework to assess progress. cesses, fund for accelerated progress and monitor to accurately assess our achievement. The SDGs The Working Group is in the process of harmoniz- are at the core of a better development paradigm ing the 2030 Agenda with Timor-Leste’s national where all seek to ensure that ‘no one is left bedevelopment framework, the Strategic Develop- hind’. ment Plan 2011-2030. Timor-Leste made some encouraging progress in The Working Group has recommended that the the former MDGs, now we are working hard to Government focuses on goals in various stages ensure we achieve much more in the period of with the initial focus on goals 2 [nutrition and this new agenda, which covers 2015-2030.” food security], 4 [education] and 9 [infrastructure ENDS component]. source: timor-leste.gov.tl

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Presidency of the Council of Ministers Sixth Constitutional Government

............................................................................................................................................................................................ Dili, January 18th, 2017 Press Release

National holidays in 2017 The public holidays with a fixed date and variable date for 2017, determined by the Law n.10/2005 of 10th of August, are: a) 1st of January – New Year’s Day (fixed date public holiday) b) 3rd of March – Veterans Day (fixed date public holiday) c) 14th of April – Holy Friday (variable date public holiday) d) 1st of May – World Labour Day (fixed date public holiday) e) 20th of May – Restoration of Independence Day (fixed date public holiday); f) 15th of June – Corpus Christi (variable date public holiday); g) 26th of June – Idul Fitri (variable date public holiday); h) 30th of August – Popular Consultation Day (fixed date public holiday); j) 1st of September – Idul Adha (variable date public holiday); j) 1st of November – All Saints Day (fixed date public holiday); k) 2nd of November – All Souls Day (fixed date public holiday); l) 12th of November –National Youth Day (fixed date public holiday); m) 28th of November – Proclamation of Independence Day (fixed date public holiday); n) 7th of December – Memorial Day (fixed date public holiday); o) 8th of December – Day of Our Lady of Immaculate Conception and Timor-Leste Patroness (fixed date public holiday); p) 25th of December – Christmas Day (fixed date public holiday). q) 31st of December – National Heroes Day (fixed date public holiday). The Law n. 10/2005, of 10th of August, determines national public holidays, official commemorative dates and the granting of days-off, and has been amended by Law n. 3/2016, of 25th of May, to recognise key historical dates of the Timorese Struggle for National Liberation. ENDS

source: timor-leste.gov.tl

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The National Flag is rectangular and is formed by two isosceles triangles, the bases of which are overlapping. One triangle is black and its height is equal to one-third of the length overlapped to the yellow triangle, whose height is equal to half the length of the Flag. In the centre of the black triangle there is a white star of five ends, meaning the light that guides. The white star has one of its ends turned towards the upper right end of the flag. The remaining part of the flag is red. Yellow - the traces of colonialism in Timor-Leste's history; Black - the obscurationism that needs to be overcome; Red - the struggle for national liberation; White - peace. in "Constituição da República Democrática de Timor-Leste", Parte 1, Artigo 15º @ http://timor-leste.gov.tl

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Embassies in Timor-Leste

Australia

Tel: 332 2111 Fax: 332 2247

Brazil

Tel: 332 4203 - 332 1728 Fax: 332 2247

Brunei Darussalam

Tel: 331 0351 - 331 3288 Fax: 331 5151

China

Tel: 332 5163 Fax: 332 5166

Cuba

Tel: 332 2246 / 58

European Commission

Tel: 3311580 Fax: 3311581 / 1582

Indonesia

Tel: 331 7107 - 331 1109 Fax: 332 3684

Japan

Tel: 332 3131 / 2 Fax: 332 3130

Malaysia

Tel: 332 1804

Fax: 332 1805

South Korea

Tel: 332 1635

Fax: 332 3636

New Zealand

Tel: 3310 087

Fax: 332 4982

Philippines

Tel: 331 0407 / 8

Portugal

Tel: 3312533 / 4 / 5 / 6 Fax: 331 2526

Sahrawi Arab Holy See

Tel: 331 0147 Tel: 331 1478

Fax: 331 1479

Thailand

Tel: 331 0609

Fax: 332 2179

United States of America Tel: 332 4684 TRAVEL MEDIA TIMOR | www.mediatimor.tl

Fax: 331 3206

As far as administrative division is concerned, Timor-Leste is split into 13 districts: Bobonaro, Liquiçá, Díli, Baucau, Manatuto and Lautém on the north coast; Cova-Lima, Ainaro, Manufahi and Viqueque, on the south coast; Ermera and Aileu, the two landlocked districts; and Oecussi-Ambeno, the enclave in Indonesian territory. The borders determining the 13 districts have been more or less the same since the last years of Portuguese administration. Each district comprises one capital city and various subdistricts whose number can vary between three and seven, with an average of five subdistricts per district. Demographically, Dili is the district where the majority of the population is concentrated, while Aileu registers the lowest population rate, although its area is superior to Dili’s.

SUBDISTRICTS

The 13 districts are subdivided into 67 sub-districts, with one designated as the capital, and administrative subdivisions – the so-called sukus (villages) – which vary between 2 and 18 per subdistrict. The largest subdistrict is Lospalos, in Lautem, with an area of 635 km², while Nain Feto in Dili is considered to be the smallest, with 6 km². Fatululik, one of the smallest subdistricts, is the less populated with approximately two thousand inhabitants. The subdistricts which present higher demographic rates are the ones belonging to the district of Dili, specifically those surrounding the national capital. @ http://timor-leste.gov.tl

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A thirteenth century chapel made almost entirely from wood without a single nail The Borgund Stave Church is a sight for the inquisitive and for those who structure called the ‘scissor beams’: two steeply angled supporting structures love witnessing the marvel of human ingenuity; a stave church in the cross each other in the form an X which has a broader bottom and a narrow village of Borgund in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway, it has been the center of top span. many studies and visits by the ‘informed’ tourists. At the bottom of the X shape – right at its very lower end – there are supThe church is officially classified as a triple nave stave church of the so- ports of the truss to make sure it doesn’t collapse. called Sogn type of architecture. Norway has in total 28 extant stave churches out of which Borgund Stave is perhaps the most preserved and located at a perfect serene location. The stave church doesn’t see any more religious services, as for a long time this has been a museum overseen by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Norwegian Monuments. As far the origin story of the Borgund Stave Church goes, it is believed that it was built sometime between 1180 and 1250 CE, however, the church has since undergone a number of restorations and additions. A set of vertical wooden blocks makes the most of its walls, which are called the ‘Stave,’ hence the name ‘stave church’. Ground sills connect the four corner posts together which rest on a sound stone foundation. Other staves amazingly rise from these ground sills. Each of these staves was meticulously grooved and notched along the sides so that they lock into each other forming a strong sturdy wall. The Borgund stands tall on a basilica plan; hence the side aisles are reduced with an added apse and chancel. In some cases, extra stability is provided to the X structure by running a large The central nave of the structure is raised which is demarcated on four beam through the bottom of its truss support. sides by an arcade. An Ambulatory surrounds the platform and into the apse and chancel, which were added sometime in the 14th century. As it has been thought that in its original form the ceiling had large boards on the outside, running along its length, very similar to the composition of A porch which is an additional ambulatory covers the exterior of the build- the roof beneath it. However, in the later restorations and additions, wooden ing and is sheltered by the overhanging shingled roof. shingles started appearing, and these scissor beams became synonymous to a typical stave church. The floor plan of this church is no different than the central plan which is doubled shelled Greek cross along with an apse which then attached on The Borgund Stave Church does have the charm that it was built to convey, one end in place of the fourth extended arm. Perhaps the most mesmer- however, a large number of internal fittings have, over the years, been izing feature of the church is its ceiling which is held up with a wooden removed or replaced. source: thevintagenews.com

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AGRICULTURE IN TIMOR-LESTE Timor-Leste

Timor-Leste is a small, tropical, half-island nation with a population of approximately 1.1 million, of whom over 63% (Census, 2010) are engaged in crop production.

tation (SOSEK, 2007).

Seeds of Life is assessing the impact of climate on agriculture and the implications of climate To address this deficit rice imports of around change for Timor-Leste. 100,000 t yr-1 are required. Considering that average global maize yields are of the order of 5 t ha-1 there appears to be considerable scope for increasing maize and other crop 58% of Timor-Leste’s population experiences yields in East Timor. reduced growth as a result of malnutrition,

Timor-Leste became independent in 1999, but it still suffers from of the decades-long struggle to achieve this. During 2008 more than half of the nation’s rural population lived below the poverty line of US $0.88 per day. However, Timor-Leste is currently ranked 6th Timor-Leste has a monsoonal climate with a on The Economist Intelligence Unit’s list of dry season from around May to October and a fastest growing economies. wet season from November to April.

Climate Change

Crops

A typical farming household in Timor-Leste is unable to derive a wide diversity of food crops and animals. Agriculturally this mountainous country lies midway between the Javanese rice culture and the Melanesian root-based culture. With features from both directions, its staple foods are the grains maize (Zea mays L.) and rice (Oryza sativa L.) and the root crops – sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L. (Lam.)) and cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) , peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), and various vegetables, fruits, spices and tree crops.

Nutrition

placing it among the worst in the world from a nutritional perspective.

Furthermore, 38% of people in Timor-Leste suffer from anaemia: a decreased number of red blood cells often caused by iron deficiency. Anaemia can have severe health consequences.

The high mountain range running down the length of the island has a big impact on the Fixing Timor-Leste’s nutrition deficiencies will climate. Along the south coast there is a birequire a multi-sectoral approach, but Seeds modal wet season allowing two crops to be of Life is doing its bit by taking steps to furplanted during the wet season. ther integrate nutrition into its food security efforts. Climate change predictions indicate an increase in temperature of around 1.5⁰C and an increase in rainfall of around 0 – 10% over the next 50 years. The Seeds of Life (SoL) within the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MAF), directly adIt is predicted that there will be a greater in- dresses this national problem by improving crease in rainfall in the higher altitudes where food security through increasing the producthe rainfall is higher. Storm events and heat tion of all five major food crops (maize, rice, waves are predicted to intensify. sweet potato, cassava and peanuts)

Seeds of Life

source: seedoflife.org

Agronomy

Maize and other rainfed crops are usually grown in mixtures in homestead plots or in “slash and burn” fields, often on sloping land, this is usually using farmer recycled seed and no inputs of chemical fertilizer or pesticide. Crops are usually grown without even organic manure, with crop nutrition being reliant on recycling of crop residues or natural vegetation and weeds. Yields are low with national averages of 2.2 t ha-1, while world averages are around 5 t ha1. Last year maize is estimated to have been cultivated on about 37,000 ha and produced 80,000 t yr-1. Further to the problem of low maize yields and production, there are considerable storage losses of maize, mainly attributable to maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais).

Food Insecurity

Most farming families suffer from food insecurity producing insufficient cereal staples of maize and/or rice to last a full 12 months. In most farming households, the maize deficit period can range from 1 to 9 months and households are required to purchase maize or rice or rely on foraging from the natural vege-

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OVERVIEW

Travel Media Timor magazine is an English magazine, distributed every month to the Dili’s public places and Bali, Indonesia.

POINTS OF DISTRIBUTION

DILI: Timor Plaza, Banks, Restaurants, Coffee Shop, Hotel, Supermarket, Travel Agency BALI: Spice Island Restaurant ( Pantai Berawa - Canggu, Ubud and Kuta )

BENEFITS ADVERTISE AT TRAVEL MEDIA TIMOR MAGAZINE 1. Reach the global market in Dili and Bali

Travel Media Timor Magazine distributed every month to the Dili’s public places and Bali for FREE. The distribution schedule is every Monday each week.

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Travel Media Timor Magazine has a responsive website; www.mediatimor.tl which allowed anyone around the world to read the magazine online and its MOBILE FRIENDLY! Which you can access the website on your smart phone! That’s means that your advert will be seeing by million people around the world not just in Timor-Leste.

3. Social Media (Facebook)

Travel Media Timor Magazine has a social media community at Facebook page; www.facebook.com/travelmediatimor which has reaches 15K follower and still count. By advertise at Travel Media Timor magazine your advert automatically will be publishing at our social media for FREE and it definitely will grow your business market.

4. High Quality Print

Travel Media Timor Magazine prints in A4 size magazine, full color and glossy! The high quality print makes the advertisement on Travel Media Timor magazine looks elegant and stands out, which could represent your business better.

for Advertising Inquiry: Phone: +670 7731 8853 Email: sales@mediatimor.tl Website: www.mediatimor.tl Address: Pantai Kelapa, Dili, Timor-Leste

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EX QG FALINTIL Taibessi, Dili, Timor-Leste

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TRAVEL MEDIA TIMOR FEBRUARY 2017