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Of Our Times Comhaimseartha

Irish World Academy of Music and Dance University of Limerick Dรกmh Chruinne ร‰ireann Rince agus Ceol Ollscoil Luimnigh

Souvenir Edition


Contents

02

Introduction

03

Irish World Academy Faculty and Staff

05

Lunchtime Concert Series

15

The Tower

25

Special Events

33

Bealach / Community Cultural Pathways

37

Autumn 2011 at the Irish World Academy

33

Cónaí / Artists in Residence

45

Irish World Academy Ensembles in Residence

47

Scholarship and Award Recipients 2012

53

Scholarships

56

Clár/Irish World Academy Programmes

59

Other Programmes and Arts Offices at the University of Limerick

Jason McGuiness (fiddle) and Aisling Finnegan (Flute), members of the group Tinneas Cinn (recipients of the Meitheal Summser School Award) at an Academy lunchtime concert 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning


01

Contents


02


Introduction

The Sionna Mosaic

The Story of Sionna. Calligraphy by Des Kinney. Foyer, Irish World Academy. Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

Introduction

The Sionna Mosaic was designed by Des Kinney and is his magnum opus in this genre from the many mosaics he has created since the 1970s (some 30 of them in Dublin). Commissioned by his friend Chuck Feeney, it is the third mosaic by Kinney on the University of Limerick campus, the other two being The Song of Wandering Aengus (lobby entrance to the Board Room, Glucksman Library; and the magnificent portrayal of Seamus Heaney’s Sweeney Astray in the Atrium of the University Concert Hall). The Sionna Mosaic should be read in three sections: upper, middle, and lower. The upper section reads from left to right and shows the goddess Sionna seeking and finding the hazelnuts of wisdom; the middle section reads from right to left and shows Sionna becoming the river that will bear her name; the lower section is read from left to right and shows Sionna being swept into the sea.

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Faculty & Staff Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Dr Helen Phelan Acting Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Director, PhD Arts Practice Phone: + 353 61 202575 Email: helen.phelan@ul.ie

Dr Sandra Joyce Acting Associate Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Director, MA Irish Traditional Music Performance. Acting Director, Certificate in Music and Dance. Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie

Melissa Carty Assistant Administrator Phone: + 353 61 202590 Email: melissa.carty@ul.ie

Barbara Christie Senior Administrator Phone: + 353 61 202030 Email: barbara.christie@ul.ie

Ellen Byrne Director Media & Performing Arts Office Phone: + 353 61 202917 Email: ellen.byrne@ul.ie

David Bennis Technical Officer Phone: + 353 61 202726 Email: david.bennis@ul.ie

Ferenc Szücs Director MA Classical String Performance Phone: + 353 61 202918 Email: ferenc.szucs@ul.ie

Dr. Yonit Lea Kosovske Lecturer in Classical Piano Chamber Music Performance MA Classical String Performance Phone: + 353 61 234922 Email: yonit.kosovske@ul.ie

Mary Nunan Director MA Contemporary Dance Performance Phone + 353 61 213464 Email: mary.nunan@ul.ie

Wolodymyr Smishkewych Director MA Ritual Chant and Song Phone: + 353 61 234358 Email: vlad@ul.ie

Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin Director Irish World Academy of Music and Dance On Sabbatical

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Paula Dundon Academy Administrator Phone: + 353 61 202149 Email: paula.dundon@ul.ie


Dr Jenny Roche Lecturer in Dance BA in Voice and Dance Phone: +353 61 202798 Email: jenny.roche@ul.ie

Dr Catherine Foley Director MA Ethnochoreology MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Phone: + 353 61 202922 Email: catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

Dr Colin Quigley Director MA Ethnomusicology Phone: + 353 61 202966 Email: colin.quigley@ul.ie

Jean Downey Director Professional Diploma in Education (Music), M. Ed (Music) MA Community Music Phone: + 353 61 213160 Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Niall Keegan Director BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 20 2465 Email: niall.keegan@ul.ie

Dr Aileen Dillane Lecturer in Music BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202159 Email: aileen.dillane@ul.ie

Mats Melin Lecturer in Dance BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202542 Email: Mats.melin@ul.ie

Dr Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain Lecturer in Dance BA Irish Music & Dance Phone: + 353 61 202470 Email: Orfhlaith.nibhriain@ul.ie

Professor Jane Edwards Director MA Music Therapy

Tríona McCaffrey Acting Director MA Music Therapy Phone: + 353 61 234358 Email: Triona.mccaffrey@ul.ie

Jason Noone Acting Lecturer MA Music Therapy Phone: +TO BE CONFIRMED Jason.noone@ul.ie

Dr Óscar Mascareñas Garza Director BA Voice and Dance Phone: + 353 61 233762 Email: Oscar.mascarenas@ul.ie

On Sabbatical

Faculty & Staff

www.irishworldacademy.ie

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06

Liam O’Connor (fiddle) and Dermot Byrne (box) at an Academy lunchtime concert 2011 Photograph Š Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Lunchtime Concert Series Tuesdays and Thursdays January to April 2011 1.15 – 2.00 pm

ADMISSION FREE All Welcome

Lunchtime Concert Series

Venue: Tower Theatre Irish World Academy University of Limerick

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Student Showcase

January Tuesday 24th January Student Showcase Lunchtime Concert As part of a three-day Irish World Academy event featuring the co-founders of Compass Records, the world’s largest Irish traditional music label, BA Irish Music and Dance and MA Irish Traditional Music Performance students will showcase their talent through a number of back-to-back solo and ensemble acts.

Tuesday 31st January Traditional Music Performance

February Wednesday 1st February ‘Bewitched’ by Ian Wilson (As part of ‘Music in Healthcare Settings’ seminar) Deirdre Moynihan (soprano) & Members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra: Kenneth Rice (violin), Nichola Sweeney (violin), Joachim Roewer (viola), Malachy Robinson (bass)

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In 2010, the National Centre for Arts and Health at AMNCH hosted an exciting new residency funded by The Arts Council of Ireland. Ian Wilson was Composer-in-Residence at the stroke unit for three months. Wilson wrote a new work for Soprano (Ms Deirdre Moynihan) and String Quartet (2 violins, viola and double bass) and) based on the experiences of patients with stroke and staff in the unit. The final work is entitled Bewitched. Members of The Irish Chamber Orchestra returned to the

Deirdre Moynihan

Benjamin Bagby & Wolodymyr Smishkewych (Sequentia)

hospital following a successful residency in 2006, performing for patients and conducting open rehearsals of the composition in progress. Patients and staff in the Age Related Health Care Unit were crucial to developing this new work. The work was first performed in the hospital on Wednesday November 24th 2010 to great acclaim and the project was awarded the Arts Council Touring Award to tour this innovative performance to four diverse venues in 2011/2012, including today’s event at the Irish World Academy. Ian Wilson was born in Belfast and began composing while at University. He has written nearly one hundred works, including chamber operas, concertos, string quartets, a range of orchestral and chamber music and multi-media pieces. His compositions have been performed and broadcast on six continents, and presented at festivals including the BBC Proms, Venice Biennale and Frankfurt Bookfair and at venues such as New York’s Carnegie Hall, London’s Royal Albert and Wigmore Halls, Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw and Muziekgebouw, Vienna’s Musikverein and Tokyo’s Suntory Hall. Deirdre Moynihan - Soprano As a soprano soloist Deirdre has performed with many orchestral, choral, operatic & chamber music groups both on the International stage and throughout Ireland. Festival and recital series performances include Lyric FM Lunchtime Choice Concert Series, The Hugh Lane Gallery “Sunday’s at Noon”, Ardee Baroque Festival, Boyle Arts Festival, Living Music Festival, Waterford International Music Festival, Dublin Guitar Festival and West Cork Chamber Music Festival. Her international career includes concerts in America, Japan, Canada, Israel, Brazil, Lebanon, China and throughout Europe. She has recently performed with the R.T.É Concert Orchestra, Irish Chamber Orchestra, Crash Ensemble and Con Tempo string quartet. Deirdre holds an MA in vocal performance from The Cork School of Music and she has received a number of Bursary Awards from The Arts Council of Ireland for the continued study and performance of baroque and renaissance repertoire.

Members of The Irish Chamber Orchestra: Kenneth Rice, Violin, Nicola Sweeney, Violin, Joachim Roewer, Viola Malachy Robinson, Double Bass

Thursday 2nd February Sequentia Ensemble for Medieval Music Benjamin Bagby (director) & Wolodymyr Smishkewych Canticles for Warriors and Monks: The Germanic Roots of European Song (8th-10c) Benjamin Bagby is vocalist, medievalist, director of Sequentia (Paris) and professor for medieval music performance practice (Université de Paris, Sorbonne). He has been an important figure in the field of medieval musical performance for almost 30 years. After musical studies in the USA (Oberlin Conservatory and Oberlin College) and Switzerland (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis), he and the late Barbara Thornton formed the vocal ensemble Sequentia in 1977 in Cologne, Germany, where the ensemble was based until he moved to Paris in 2001. Sequentia's best-selling CD, Canticles of Ecstasy, has old more than 500,000 copies worldwide and was nominated for a Grammy Award as best choral recording. Apart from the research and ensemble work of Sequentia, Mr. Bagby devotes his time to the solo performance of Anglo-Saxon and Germanic oral poetry; an acclaimed performance of the Beowulf epic is an ongoing project, with performances given yearly worldwide, and a DVD production released in 2007 (see full biog, Seminar section) Spanish-Ukrainian tenor Wolodymyr Smishkewych is a native of New Jersey, USA. He has specialized in medieval song, chant, and new music since the 1990s. He is a member of Sequentia Ensemble for Medieval Music and of Paul Hillier’s Theatre of Voices, and has performed at major festivals through Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South America including BBC Proms, Regensberg Tage Alter Musik, Festival


Peadar Ó Riada

Cervantino, Edinburgh Festival, and the early music festivals of Boston, Barcelona, Utrecht, and Berkeley. He has recorded for Sony/BMG, Harmonia Mundi USA, ExCathedra, and Focus records. He is director of the MA Ritual Chant and Song at the Irish World Academy. (see full biog, special events section)

Tuesday 7th February Triúr (Martin Hayes, Peadar Ó Riada & Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh Peadar O’Riada, Martin Hayes and Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh collectively known as Triúr once again set up their recording equipment in Sean O’Riada’s cluttered study in Cul Aodha in late November 2011 and recorded 18 tracks of 20 new compositions by Peadar O’Riada. This second CD is not only a meeting of great musical minds but also a tour de force of masterful playing of inspired composition. Together they share a deep understanding of their musical heritage and their mutual respect for each other makes for ensemble playing that brings the music to a level that the listener can at once engage with. From the foot tapping polkas and reels to the delicate beauty of the airs and the courtly hornpipes and jigs the music is soulful, witty and always intimate. The ease of their playing also belies the arduous task of learning such a body of new work in a short time. The origin of Irish tune titles are often a great subject of debate for players and academics. In Peadar’s sleeve notes he tells of the source of the inspiration and the people they are dedicated to. Of special mention is the polka Maith thú Muiris (Track 5) a tribute to Muiris Ó Rocháin, founder and director of the Willie Clancy Summer School who passed away in October 2011. Collectively and without hesitation they all agreed to dedicate the album to him.

Thursday 9th February Ferenc Szücs (cello) Yonit Kosovske (harpsichord) J S Bach Viola da Gamba Sonatas

Caoimhin Ó Raghallaigh

Ferenc Szücs

Ferenc Szücs and Yonit Kosovske perform the Sonata in D major, BWV 1028 and Sonata in G minor, BWV 1029 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685–1750). These pieces form two out of the three sonatas that Bach composed for "Viola da Gamba and Obbligato Harpsichord," a unique instrumental combination seldom found throughout all of music history. These sonatas are rarely performed on cello, for which this repertoire presents an entirely new set of fingering and bowing challenges particular to the cello versus viola da gamba - the two instruments belonging to completely separate families of string instruments. Multi-dimensional in form and creative in their motivic application, these works reveal three equal voices intertwining in a multitude of ways that include thematic voice exchange, shifting roles of melody versus accompaniment, polyphonic counterpoint contrasted and integrated within ornamental arpeggiation, imitative fugal writing, and suggested dance forms. Expansive melodic gestures abound and interweave with shifting characters, varied textures, contrapuntal dialogue, and chromaticism. Highly dramatic, these sonatas are at once boldly outward and intensely personal, flamboyant and delicate, all the while demanding both technical virtuosity and poetic lyricism. Ferenc Szücs has associations with numerous orchestras, institutes and ensembles worldwide. He studied at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest and won the prestigious State Award for musical excellence. He joined the Hungarian State Orchestra while still at the Academy and subsequently was appointed as principal cellist of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Festival Orchestra, New Queens Hall Orchestra and Oxford Orchestra da Camera. He has performed in several major festivals and has given master classes in Hungary, Austria, Ireland, UK, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Turkey, Canada, China, United States and South America. His recordings are published on ASV, BMG, Arte Nova, Future Classics and Hyperion labels. He is Senior Lecturer and Director of the Master’s programme in Classical String Performance at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick. He is currently working

Dr. Yonit Kosovske

towards his doctorate with Prof. Susan Melrose at Middlesex University in London, and his research is focusing on questions of creativity and knowledge-transfer in contemporary performance practice. Dr. Yonit Kosovske has performed as a soloist and chamber artist in major cities throughout the United States, Israel, Hong Kong, Spain, Colombia and Ecuador. Holding degrees in both modern and historical keyboard instruments, she performs on harpsichord, modern piano, fortepiano, chamber organ and harmonium. Playing repertoire spanning over five hundred years, her performances have been broadcast on radio stations across the United States and featured on programs such as National Public Radio’s Performance Today, Sunday Baroque and Harmonia. She has given concerts at the prestigious Early Music Festivals in Boston, Berkeley, Bloomington, Chicago, and in Quito, Ecuador, appearing in major concert halls throughout North and South America, including the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC and Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, amongst other venues. She holds a Doctor of Music degree in Early Music and Historical Keyboards from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. From 2008 to 2010 she taught at Indiana University as an Adjunct Lecturer of Music as well as an Instructor of Piano and Harpsichord in the Pre-College Music Programs. Her most recent recordings include: ¡Ay, España Infelice! Classical and Romantic Songs from Spain with her ensemble Canto Romántico (La Douceur, 2011); La Gracieuse, French chaconnes, passacailles, & preludes for solo harpsichord (La Douceur, 2010); Solo Keyboard Works by Girolamo Frescobaldi (Focus, 2010); Haydn’s Neun kleine frühe Sonaten on fortepiano (2009); Sweelinck’s Secular Pieces (2006); Fitzwilliam Favorites (2006); and À discretion (2000). Her book "Historical Harpsichord Technique, Developing La douceur du toucher" was published in July of 2011 through Indiana University Press.

Tuesday 14th February Traditional Music Performance

Lunchtime Concert Series

Martin Hayes

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Carol McGonnell

David Fulmer

Tuesday 14th February Carol McGonnell (clarinet) David Fulmer (violin) Carol McGonnell and David Fulmer are core members of the New York based Argento Chamber Ensemble. Recently hailed by the New York Times for giving the best classical music performance of the year in New York City, Argento presents, commissions and records contemporary music on the cutting edge. Time Out NY recently hailed Irish clarinetist Carol McGonnell as “clarinet genius” and LA Times “Carol McGonnell…elastic, exacting, stupendous”. Carol has performed in the inaugural concert of Zankel Hall at Carnegie Hall and appeared with Midori in Lincoln Center's Great Performers Series. She has performed as soloist with the Ulster Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, RTE Concert Orchestra, and Ensemble Modern, the Zankel Band and the Metropolitan Museum Artists in Concert. She has been broadcast on RTE, Lyric FM, BBC, WQXR and NPR. She has performed at festivals including Marlboro, Mecklenburg, West Cork and Music in Great Irish Houses. Carol is a founding member of the Argento Chamber Ensemble. Still in his twenties, composer, violinist, and conductor David Fulmer is the winner of the 14th International Edvard Grieg Competition for Composers; the first American ever to receive this highly acclaimed award. He has also been a winner of an ASCAP Composer Award, a BMI Composer Award, and the Charles Ives Award (Scholarship) from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His award-winning Violin Concerto has been performed by major orchestras and festivals, most recently with the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra led by Matthias Pintscher. He recently joined the Argento New Music Project as violinist, conductor and composer. David received his DMA from Juilliard.

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Catherine Redding & Michael Quinn

Fionnuala Moynihan

Timea Béres

Thursday 16th February

Thursday 23rd February

Catherine Redding (voice) Michael Quinn (piano) L’heure exquise – A recital of French song

Fionnuala Moynihan (piano) Haydn Piano Sonatas

Experience an enchanting journey through the world of French song, from the belle époque to the 1930s. Featuring exquisite melodies by Fauré, Hahn, Ravel and Poulenc, L’heure exquise will transport you to a realm of moonlit terraces and smoky Parisian cafés, passionate encounters and imagined landscapes. Catherine Redding and Michael Quinn have performed together for a number of years, and share an interest in both French repertoire and the intimate medium of the song recital, with its unique marriage of poetry and music. Bringing together a wealth of international experience in opera, oratorio and chamber music, Catherine and Michael are eager to share with audiences their interpretations and love of this art form.

Fionnuala Moynihan was the first person to be awarded a doctorate in Music Performance from the Royal Irish Academy of Music and Dublin City University. In 2001 she received her Honours Bachelor of Music degree from the Birmingham Conservatoire where she graduated with the Graduate award for pianists and the prestigious Weingarten scholarship enabling her to commence her studies at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest. She studied at the Paris Conservatoire from 1999–2000. Fionnuala currently teaches piano performance and chamber music at Queens University, Belfast and at the Royal Irish Academy of Music. Fionnuala is widely accepted as one of Ireland’s leading pianists and performed the Complete Piano Sonatas of Mozart in the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin, in a series of five recitals which ran from February to June 2010. She was awarded the John Field Prize at the 2009 AXA Dublin International Piano Competition and has given Field recitals in Ireland, Warsaw and Moscow. February 2012 sees the beginning of another monumental project in which she will perform the Complete Piano Sonatas of Haydn with Irish pianist Peter Tuite in the Hugh Lane Gallery, Dublin. Today’s recital will feature some of Haydn’s most celebrated piano sonatas.

Dublin-based Canadian soprano Catherine Redding, described as ‘warm, clear and impeccably controlled’ (The Irish Times), has performed internationally in opera, oratorio and recital. She studied voice performance at the Royal Academy of Music, London and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Catherine has been broadcast on Lyric FM, and is featured as a soloist on award-winning Canadian composer Christopher Tyler Nickel’s CD, Rain. Michael Quinn has performed throughout Ireland and internationally as accompanist, soloist and ensemble player. He studied piano, organ and harpsichord in Dublin, The Hague and London, and is a music graduate of Trinity College Dublin. Michael co-founded the contemporary ensemble Dublin Sound Lab with Fergal Dowling in 2008.

Tuesday 21st February Traditional Music Performance

Programme: Sonata in C minor Hob. XVI : 20 – Haydn Sonata in E minor Hob. XVI : 34 – Haydn

Tuesday 28th February Traditional Music Performance


Gerry O’Connor

March Thursday 1st March Timea Béres (soprano) Alessio Del Monte (piano) Arias by Francesco Paolo Tosti This concert performance is featuring arias from the Italian composer Francesco Paolo Tosti (1846-1916) who was a celebrity singer of his time, teacher of Margherita di Savoia, Queen of Italy and singing master to the Royal Family and professor at Royal Academy of Music in London. His light and expressive songs are characterized by natural melodies and sweet sentimentality. Timea Béres (soprano) Hungarian, graduated as a Music teacher in 2006. She studied Composition with Istvàn Fekete-Györ, and Voice with Ildikò Hegedüs in Hungary and with Marianna Ciraci and Stella Lee in Milan, Italy. She participated in various musical projects and events in Hungary, the USA and Italy, such as conducting the Chorus of College Jòzsef Eötvös di Budapest, composing music for short films and giving concerts for Touring Club, Milan and for the Lutheran Church of Budapest. Currently she is a member of the professional choir Immanuel in Milan and continues her voice studies, specialising in Chamber Music and in the Romantic repertory. Alessio Del Monte (piano) born in Milan, studied Piano at the Civic School of Music of Milan with Andrea Di Renzo and attended Harmony and Counterpoint at the Milan Conservatory with Pippo Molino.

Liv O’Donoghue (Rex Levitates - Dance Company in Residence at Irish World Academy) Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Cathal McConnell

Tuesday 6th March Gerry O’Connor (fiddle) & Cathal McConnell (flute/song) (This concert will be followed by the launch, by singer and flute player Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh, of ‘I Have Travelled This Country’, a collection of 123 songs from Cathal McConnell’s extensive repertoire, edited by Gerry O’Connor) Flute player, tin whistler and singer Cathal McConnell is one of the best-loved performers in the world of Traditional Music today. A true character in every sense of the word, McConnell's free spirit and mercurial stage presence have helped make The Boys of the Lough one of the most popular and longest-running acts on the folk circuit. For his contribution to traditional singing Cathal was awarded the Gaelic Language Television (TG4) Award winner Singer of the Year in 2010. He has featured on over forty albums with many of these receiving top awards as well as Grammy (USA) and Deutsch Schallplattan (Germany) nominations. Gerry O’Connor from Dundalk Co Louth, is one of Ireland's most outstanding fiddle players. His family has played fiddle for at least four generations and Gerry is able to draw on this wealth of music learned from his mother Rose O'Connor and also from hand-written manuscripts passed down through the family. His unique personal style and renowned fluid bow-hand combined with technical virtuosity have brought him to concert stages throughout the world. He is a founding member of the band Skylark, recording four albums them and touring Europe for 10 years. He is also a founder-member of Lá Lugh, and that band’s album The Brighid's Kiss was voted traditional album of the year 1996. In October 2004 he released an album entitled

Journeyman with twelve carefully crafted tracks celebrating the rich musical heritage of the great master musicians of the last century. “I Have Travelled This Country” is a collection of 123 songs from Cathal McConnell’s extensive repertoire. Cathal sings each song in its entirety and the texts and notes to all the songs is included. Many of the songs in this collection owe their existence to Cathal's extensive private research and collecting activities in the 1960s. Cathal's choice of material and his recorded output of obscure and high quality primary source material over the years will demonstrate that he is an Irish traditional musician with a keen awareness of a good song and hitherto undeveloped melody.

Lunchtime Concert Series

Timea Béres

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Amanda Markwick

Kate Ellis

Rebecca Carroll

David Szabó

Tuesday 20th March

Thursday 8th March

Tuesday 13th March

Amanda Markwick (baroque flute) Ferenc Szücs (cello) Yonit Kosovske (harpsichord) Musique du Roi

Traditional Music Performance

Traditional Music Performance

Tuesday 13th March

Turn your ear to the refined and poetic music of the courts of French kings Louis XIV and Louis XV. Focusing on one of the most in-vogue instruments of the time, la flûte traversière, this program highlights the rich variety of music heard at the unrivalled court of Versailles. Jacques Martin Hotteterre’s ornamentations of popular airs de cour lead into a sophisticated suite from François Couperin’s Concerts Royaux. Jean-Henry D’Anglebert’s lush Préludes non measurés for harpsichord are distinctly French, while Michel Blavet’s flute sonatas find a balance between the French and Italian styles - a perfect example of the desired goûts-réunis of the early 18th century. Historical flutist Amanda Markwick is joined by the Irish World Academy faculty members Dr. Yonit Kosovske on harpsichord and Ferenc Szücs on cello.

Students of UCC School of Music with Students of the Irish World Academy's BA Irish Music & Dance

Wednesday 21st March

Amanda Markwick (Baroque Flute). Mesmerized by the pure, almost vocal sound of the flute since she first heard it as a child, Amanda Markwick has since made that fascination her own reality, playing historical flutes and earning such encouraging feedback as “beautifully flowing, colourful tones” and “you play a golden sound”. In her journey through musical refinement, Amanda has received Bachelors and Masters degrees from both Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, U.S.A, and the Koninklijk Conservatorium in The Hague, the Netherlands. Thanking the thoughtful guidance of her teachers Barbara Kallaur, Kate Clark, Wilbert Hazelzet, and Barthold Kuijken, Amanda has since become a sought-after collaborator in chamber music and orchestral work. Based in Berlin, Germany, she performs regularly throughout the United States and Europe.

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Rex Levitates Dance Company

(see Ferenc Szücs & Yonit Kosovske biogs, Feb 9th)

This special lunchtime features traditional music students from the Music Department, University College, Cork and students from the BA Irish Music and Dance in a collaborative performance. This is a reprise of a collaborative performance at the Aula Maxima, UCC last September.

Thursday 15th March Kate Ellis (cello) Kate Ellis is a dedicated chamber musician, as passionate about World Music as she is about New Music. She is a prize-winning graduate of the Royal Irish Academy of Music and studied at the Purcell School and junior department of the Royal College of Music in London. She has premiered many new works for solo cello. Kate is cellist with the Crash Ensemble and performs and tours with Gavin Friday, the Karan Casey band and Yurodny and is also a core member of the ensemble Tarab. She is co-curator of Dublin's newest monthly music salon, Kaleidoscope. Now in it's second year, Kaleidoscope has established itself as one of the most exciting regular cultural events in Dublin. In 2011 she was appointed musician-inresidence at the Cork Opera House working as co-curator of The Reich Effect, a festival marking the 75th year of Pulitzer Prize winner Steve Reich. She is continuing her residency throughout 2012 with a series of solo concerts and collaborations with other Irish and International musicians. Her performance at the Irish World Academy will feature an eclectic mix of music written for Solo Cello and Electronics.

Students of the MA Contemporary Dance and Rex Levitates Dance Company (Venue: Dance Studio IW2-25) This showcase performance provides an opportunity to see extracts from original ensemble works created by choreographer Liz Roche. The works will be performed by students of the MA Contemporary Dance Performance and members of Rex Levitates Dance Company. Liz is currently choreographer-inresidence at the Irish World Academy and also Artistic Director of Rex Levitates.

Thursday 22nd March Rebecca Carroll (violin) David Szabó (piano) Music by Edward Grieg Rebecca Carroll holds a BA (Hons) in Music from WIT and is currently in her second year of the MA in Classical Strings here at the Academy. She has studied violin with Teresa Costello and Una Kindlon and is currently a student of Prof. Mariana Sirbu. A member of the Waterford Concert Orchestra, Rebecca also plays regularly with many ensembles and groups around the country both on violin and piano. She holds an ALCM Diploma in Piano Performance and in 2009 received the Bridget Doolan Memorial Award for High Achievement and Excellence at WIT. David Szabó graduated with honours from the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest, as a piano teacher and chamber artist. He was price winner in several competitions in Hungary as a pianist as well as an accompanist. He gave concerts in numerous cities in Hungary and in Ireland. Since 2011 David has been studying at the Irish World Academy of Music and


Contemporary Dance Students

Dance on MA in Piano Performance with Dr Yonit Kosovske. Rebecca and David will perform Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 3 in C minor by Norwegian composer Edvard Grieg.

Tuesday 17th April

Tuesday 27th March

Thursday 19th April

Traditional Music Performance

Students of the MA Contemporary Dance Performance

April Tuesday 3rd April Traditional Music Performance

Tuesday 10th April Traditional Music Performance

Thursday 12th April LUCENARIUM (MA Ritual Chant & Song) Students of the MA Ritual Chant & Song Featured with Lucernarium Directed by Wolodymyr Smishkewych Nexus: Between Heaven and Earth Presented by Lucernarium and featuring the current year’s students of MA Ritual Chant and Song, this first Nexus concert of the Locus+Nexus series will incorporate medieval monody, polyphony, and chant from the Western European tradition as well as global song traditions. The underlying theme of Nexus concerts is the musical exploration of intersections, crossingsover, cross-pollinations, connections and bridges. The premier Nexus concert will present music bound together by the theme of the intersection between Heaven and Earth, including the lives of saints, the concept of mystical union with the Divine, and the intercession of divine beings.

Traditional Music Performance

This programme features a number of original ensemble works selected from those created specifically for the students throughout the year by choreographers Charles Linehan, Liz Roche, Mairead Vaughan and a short voice/dance work choreographed by Mary Nunan and Oscar Mascarenas. In addition the programme also features extracts of solo choreographies created by the students

Tuesday 24th April Traditional Music Performance

final performances at a lunchtime concert of dance which represents some of their work throughout the year. This work they have either choreographed themselves, produced in collaboration with guest choreographers, or learned from invited tutors on the programme. These guests and tutors include, Dr Olive Beecher, Dr Catherine Foley, Breandán de Gallaí, Katarina Mojzisova, Mairéad O’Connor, and Michael Ryan. Solo and ensemble dance pieces will feature in the concert and will represent traditional and also contemporary Irish dance repertoire which challenges the boundaries of Irish traditional dance.

May Tuesday 1st May Traditional Music Performance

Tuesday 8th May

Lunchtime Concert Series

LUCENARIUM

Traditional Music Performance

Thursday 10th May MA Irish Traditional Dance Final Performances MA Irish Traditional Dance Final Performances Teresa Donohoe and Tereza Bernardova of the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programme will present their

Theresa Donohoe MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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A regular series of public gatherings in The Tower Theatre and Foyer of the Irish World Academy on the banks of the River Shannon at the University of Limerick. Celebrating creative ways of thinking, being, and performing, The Tower hosts the poetic and the practical across academic disciplines and arts practices.

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BA Voice and Dance student, Dorota Gola from Poland performing during BaVaD Immersion Week, Autumn 2011 Photograph Š Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

The Tower

Gatherings are usually on Wednesdays beginning at 4pm and ending at 5.30pm.

ADMISSION FREE All Welcome

The Tower

A Gathering of Artists and Scholars

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Leah Bernini

Tríona McCaffrey

January Wednesday 24th January Navigating the Industry: Compass Records and Irish Traditional Musicians in the Marketplace Speakers: Garry West (Compass Records, USA) Leah Bernini (Irish World Academy, UL)

Chair: Dr Colin Quigley (Irish World Academy, UL) Compass Records Group, the world’s largest Irish Traditional/ Celtic music record label, was co-founded by husband-wife team Garry West and Alison Brown in 1994. Both internationally acclaimed jazz musicians, West and Brown created the label when they grew dissatisfied with the music industry. Now a powerful Nashville-based independent label, Compass primarily features artists from Americana, bluegrass, ‘world’, ‘Celtic’, Irish trad, jazz, and folk genres. Since 2006, Compass acquired iconic Irish trad labels Green Linnet Records and Mulligan Records, making it the largest Irish/Celtic label in the world. Compass is home to artists like Martin Hayes, Liz Carroll, John Doyle and Karan Casey, bands such as Altan, Dervish and Solas, and several Irish World Academy graduates, including Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh and members of Beoga.

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In this seminar, Garry West and Leah O’Brien Bernini (Irish World Academy PhD candidate) will discuss unique considerations for Irish traditional artists while navigating the commercial music industry. Chaired by Dr. Colin Quigley Ethnomusicology), this seminar will feature West’s perspective on traditional music and the music industry, informed by his roles as Compass’ CEO, head of Artist & Repertoire (finding, signing, and developing artists), a producer and artist. West will then offer practical advice for students who dream of

Jason Noone

Julie Tiernan

becoming professional Trad artists. An open Q&A session will follow the seminar. Leah O’Brien Bernini is an American-born Irish fiddle player and dancer, currently pursuing her PhD in Ethnomusicology at the University of Limerick. Coming from a performance background, Leah received her Bachelor of Music in Commercial Music Performance (violin) and Music Business from Belmont University in Nashville (2009). While in Nashville, she interned at the largest Irish/Celtic record label, Compass Records. Following graduation, she moved to Limerick to pursue Masters in both Irish Traditional Music Performance (2010) and Ethnomusicology (2011). Her doctoral research is concerned with identity, capitalism, and the creative process of professional Irish traditional musicians and the music industry. Garry West is founder director, along with his wife Alison Brown, of Compass Recordes. Founded in 1994 Compass is a new breed of roots-music label: eclectic, sophisticated, and artist-friendly. Called “one of the greatest independent labels of the last decade” by Billboard Magazine, Compass Records has provided a thriving haven of creativity for artists and a reliable beacon of quality for music fans. Its 2006 acquisition of the Green Linnet catalog and the 2008 acquisition of the seminal Mulligan Records label has made Compass the place to go for Celtic and roots music.

February Wednesday 1st February Music in Healthcare Settings – Exploring models of working. Music in Healthcare Settings – Exploring models of working. This seminar poses the question of how best to use music in healthcare settings, exploring models of working and the role of an orchestra in hospital. It will be explored from the

perspectives of community music, music therapy and arts in health practice, with discussion and audience participation encouraged

Speakers: Tríona McCaffrey, Acting Director Music Therapy (Chair) Jason Noone, Music Therapist Julie Tiernan, Community Musician (Irish World Academy) Hilary Moss, Director of Arts and Health, AMNCH

About the speakers: Tríona McCaffrey is Acting Course Director of the MA Music Therapy Programme at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick. She has worked as a music therapy practitioner at Mayo Mental Health Services in the areas of Psychiatry of Old Age, Community Mental Health and, Recovery. She has considerable experience of supervising trainee music therapists and has first-hand experience of establishing a full-time music therapy position. She is an active campaigner for the State Registration and Recognition of Music Therapy in Ireland. Her research interests lie in music therapy and mental health particularly in that of the service user experience which she is investigating in her doctoral research. Jason Noone is a graduate of the MA Music Therapy at the Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick, with a background in psychology and special education. Currently he works in the fields of neurological rehabilitation, developmental disapbilty and physical disability. He has conducted research into sensory integration, a developing area of music therapy. He is acting lecturer in Music Therapy at the Irish World Academy for the 2011. Julie Tiernan Since graduating from the MA in Community Music at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Julie Tiernan’s work has taken her all over the world. As community musician she has worked in Australia, the United States of America, England, The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland in a range of community settings. This includes work with


Benjamin Bagby

ethnic minorities, victims of violence, young mothers, disability, prisoners and young offenders. She has extensive experience in working with the Traveller community and young offenders. Much of Julie’s work in Ireland has been closely linked to the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick and has been at the forefront of several long-term community music projects with the Nomad project. Julie also teaches on the MA course in Community Music and the BA course in Irish Music and Dance. Julie’s doctoral research in Community Music at the Irish World Academy, under the supervision of Professor Jane Edwards, is focused on the impact of outreach and access programmes. Hilary Moss is Director of Arts and Health at The Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Incorporating the National Children’s Hospital, Dublin. She has an MBA in Health Services Management and is a Music Therapist with particular experience working with older people and in mental health services. She is currently studying for a PhD in the School of Medicine, Trinity College Dublin. The Music and Health Research Group at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick, was formed in 2009 to provide a focus for research activities relating to music in healthcare both ationally and internationally. The group comprises of experts in the field of music therapy, community music and music psychology who research a broad range of music and health related topics. The National Centre for Arts and Health exists to improve patient care and to promote the benefits of the arts in health. The centre aims to improve the hospital experience for patients, to explore the therapeutic potential of the arts, to build positive links with the local community and to make the arts accessible to patients who cannot access traditional arts venues. The centre also offers consultation and advice to services establishing arts and health programmes and regularly gives presentations on its work, within both medical and arts settings.

Instrumentarium miniatures from the Escorial manuscript of the Cantigas de Santa Maria

Thursday 2nd February The enduring influence of Orientalism in modern performances of medieval Iberian song. Several 13th century manuscripts contain musical notation for more than 400 of the Cantigas de Santa Maria of King Alfonso X el sabio (‘the Learned’) of Castile and Leon, whose court is thought to have been a political and cultural oasis where Christians, Jews and Muslims co-existed peacefully. Beginning in the late 20th century and continuing to this day, performance traditions of these famous Marian miracle-songs have evolved which might give today’s listener the impression that we know exactly how these canticles once sounded. But how much do we really know, and how much is the product of Orientalism, received opinion and our modern projections on an imagined medieval Iberian culture of tolerance and multiculturalism?

Speaker: Benjamin Bagby (Université de Paris, Sorbonne) Chair: Wolodymyr Smishkewych (Irish World Academy) Dr. Sandra Joyce Dr. Colin Quigley

About the speakers: Benjamin Bagby is vocalist, medievalist, director of Sequentia (Paris) and professor for medieval music performance practice (Université de Paris, Sorbonne). He has been an important figure in the field of medieval musical performance for almost 30 years. After musical studies in the USA (Oberlin Conservatory and Oberlin College) and Switzerland (Schola Cantorum Basiliensis), he and the late Barbara Thornton formed the vocal ensemble Sequentia in 1977 in Cologne, Germany, where the ensemble was based until Mr. Bagby – following Ms. Thornton’s tragic death in 1998 – moved to Paris in 2001.

In 1981, the ensemble released the first of many recordings which encompass the entire spectrum of medieval musical practice. Many of these recordings – including the complete works of Hildegard von Bingen (7 CDs) have received awards: the Deutsche Schallplattenpreis (for Vox Iberica, 1993), two Netherlands Edison Awards (for Hildegard von Bingen recordings, 1987 and 1998), a French Disque d'Or (1996), the CHOC of Le Monde de la Musique (2002) and Diapason d'Or (1995 and 1999). Sequentia's best-selling CD, Canticles of Ecstasy, has sold more than 500,000 copies worldwide and was nominated for a Grammy Award as best choral recording. Apart from the research and ensemble work of Sequentia, Mr. Bagby devotes his time to the solo performance of Anglo-Saxon and Germanic oral poetry; an acclaimed performance of the Beowulf pic is an ongoing project, with performances given yearly worldwide, and a DVD production released in 2007. As a guest lecturer and professor, he has taught courses and workshops at – among others – the Schola Cantorum Basiliensis, Harvard University, the Autunno Musicale (Como, Italy), the Modus Centrum (Oslo), Amherst Early Music (Tufts University), Wellesley College, the University of Texas at Austin. In 2003 he was awarded a Fortieth Anniversary Fellowship by the Religion and the Arts Initiative (Center for the Study of World Religions, in conjunction with the Music Department) of Harvard University. Since 2005 Bagby has been on the music faculty of the Université de Sorbonne / Paris IV, teaching in the master’s programme for medieval music performance. He is married to the Croatian singer and musicologist Katarina Livljanic.

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Hilary Moss

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Doreen Rao

Wednesday 8th February

Conducting and Teaching Choral Music in a Changing World Workshop with Doreen Rao, Conductor and Master Teacher Theatre One, 2.30-5pm in association with Aspiro Choir and The Association of Irish Choirs.

Internationally acclaimed choral conductor, Doreen Rao will offer a free workshop to choral music singers, conductors and students at the Irish World Academy, Theatre One. Appointed in 2008 as Music Director and Conductor of the Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus, Doreen Rao holds the Cameron Baird Conductors Chair working in close collaboration with the Grammy Award winning Maestro JoAnn Falletta and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra. In this position, she prepares the Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus for numerous concerts and performance collaborations with the BPO and leads the Chorus’ newly inaugurated Buffalo Sings! a community concert series committed to artistic excellence and social change through creative programming, audience participation and educational outreach.

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In addition to guest conducting engagements worldwide, Doreen Rao served as Director of Choral Programs and as the Elmer Iseler Chair in Conducting at the University of Toronto from 1988-2010. From the time of her appointment she founded and conducted the MacMillan Singers, developed and directed the Faculty of Music’s graduate program in choral conducting, and from 2005-2010, served as Artistic Director of the International Bach Festival in collaboration with the eminent Bach scholar and conductor Helmuth Rilling, the International Bachakademie (Stuttgart) and the Toronto Symphony Orchestra.

Brian Lawler

In addition to Rao’s teaching and performance life, she serves as Choral Advisor and Editor for Boosey & Hawkes’ Choral Music Experience series – an award winning choral repertoire dedicated to artistic integrity and cultural diversity. This, and the CME Institute for Choral Teacher Education (professional conducting courses for choral directors and music educators) grew out of Rao’s demonstrated commitment to emerging American composers and her dedication to the on-going professional development of choral music educators. The Institute’s certification program has grown internationally with courses and festivals now offered in the US, Canada, UK and Ireland. Committed to both music performance and music education, Rao’s professional interest focuses squarely on the dual values of quality musical experience for artists and audiences, and the social responsibility of choruses to engage and inspire their communities through meaningful programming and concert projects relevant to life in the world today.

Wednesday 15th February The Céilí Band Tradition Speakers: Brian Lawler Niall Keegan (Irish World Academy, UL) Dr Aileen Dillane (Irish World Academy, UL) Chair: Dr Sandra Joyce (Irish World Academy, UL) Brian Lawler: The Golden Era of Ceili Music and Dance 1955 - 1970. This talk will explore Brian's involvement with the Ardellis ceili band from the 1950s to the 1970s. He will also give a brief history of the evolvement of group Irish dancing from the 16th century to the present day, going on to discuss the role of the Gaelic League and the Catholic Church in Irish dancing,


Aileen Dillane

as well as contributing factors which led to the arrival of the Golden Era. His talk will be interspersed with audio examples of some of his field interviews as well as the different types of ceili bands of the period. He will conclude by addressing some of the factors which led to the decline in the popularity of ceili dancing. Niall Keegan: Ceili Bands in London in the 1980s – The Legacy Across the Water. Being an Irish traditional musician in London in the 1980s was a complex and conflicted matter. First and second generation Irish, as well as English who came to this music had to constantly negotiate many conflict-ridden social, cultural and political terrains. For some Irish traditional musicians, an important expression of their musical identities was through the dance, or céilí bands, they performed in. This paper will examine two such bands who were successful in engaging the world of competitive céilí band culture, but were extremely different in nature. The Thatch Céilí Band was primarily made up of first generation musicians, who represented for many the last vestiges of the heyday of 1950s and 1960s Irish traditional pub music culture. The St.Colmcille's Céilí Band was exclusively made up of teenage second generation musicians, negotiating the imagined worlds of post-punk England and traditional music culture (in his introduction to a performance of the band replayed on the TV programme 'Come West Along the Road', presenter Nicholas Carolan makes specific mention of the band members' ‘big hair’!). Such bands are prime examples of what Appadurai terms the ‘works of imagination’ (1996, 146) as they are involved in the ‘spaciotemporal production of locality’ (ibid, 180). However, the locality produced is neither authentic nor hybrid, but one creatively allowing identity to flow from one construct to many others, with the minimum of conflict or contradiction, in contexts noted for both.

Aileen Dillane: “Mighty Lift and Drive”: Music, Dance, and the Creation of Effervescence at an Irish Ceilí This paper looks at a specific instance of Irish traditional music performance, a rural ceilí in West Limerick. The focus is on the ten-piece Allow Ceilí Band, a group of traditional musicians put in the service of a variety of pre-designated set-dancing forms in a disciplined and demanding night of ceili dancing. Drawing upon Feld and Keil’s notion of groove (1995), and adapting Durkheim’s idea of participatory effervescence (1912), I examine how The Allow musicians seek to meet the expectations of a particular mobile community of dancers while negotiating their own performance needs. For the dancers, the success of a night is determined by musicians ‘lifting’ the dancers with ‘driving’ music. Such expectations may place pressure upon the musicians to conform to a particular dance aesthetic, ostensibly limiting individual musical creativity. However, an energized dancing crowd confers upon the musicians that truly ‘move’ its members, a real sense of power. Through perceived authenticity and rootedness, the musicians in turn reconnect with the dance tradition in a very physical and visceral way. The resultant music literally ‘moves’ the participating dancers while, in turn, the dancing feet ‘sound’ back the music through rhythmic articulation. This recursively constituted, creative act is revealed as a powerful participatory experience pulsing with real and imagined cultural meaning for musicians and dancers alike. Further, it critiques the idea of ‘creativity’ in Irish Traditional (Dance) Music which, in recent years, has focused more on melodic variation and tunes settings for listening, and not dancing, contexts.

About the Speakers: Brian Lawler project entitled The Golden Era of Ceili

Music and Da1955-1970, in conjunction with the Irish Traditional Music Archive, Merrion Square, Dublin. During the period 1999 to 2004, he recorded interviews with 70 people associated with the period, including Céilí band founders and members, promoters, dancers and radio personnel, obtaining some 42 hours of recorded material. All the edited recordings are available to the public in ITMA. RTE Radio 1 broadcast two one-hour programmes on the project, which was supported by the Arts Council, in 2008. As founder of the Ardellis Céilí Band, he was actively involved with the band throughout that period. He has put together a talk on the project which consists of a review of the work, and includes short extracts from some of the field interviews, and also some samples of the music of the period. He gave a presentation on the project in the John Burns Library in Boston College in 2005. Niall Keegan was born in the south east of England and began playing Irish traditional flute at an early age amongst the community of first and second generation musicians in and around London. He completed an MA at University College Cork in 1992 with the submission of a thesis entitled The Words of Traditional Flute Style. He is course director of the BA Irish Music and Dance at the Irish World Academy He has given occasional lectures and taught instrumental classes at the Music Dept. of University College, Cork and University College, Galway, Sibelius Academy, Dublin Institute of Technology, Newcastle University, Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama among others. He has performed extensively throughout the country and abroad in a variety of contexts and venues, including the Royal Albert Hall, Barbican, Project Arts Centre in Dublin, the University of Limerick Concert Hall, The He has been on the committee of the Folk Music Society of Ireland and director of the University of Limerick based projects

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Niall Keegan

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Margaret Harper

Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain

Nomad (aimed at honouring the music cultures of the traveling peoples at the University), Niall was formerly co-director of the Sionna Festival of European Traditional Music, and the Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance at the Irish World Academy. He has been guest director of the Adult Folkworks sumerschool in Durham, England. He is the author of articles concerning issues of style and literacy in traditional Irish music and editor of the online journal for Irish music and dance, Inbhear. Dr. Aileen Dillane is Lecturer in Music at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. Aileen plays piano and flute and performs Irish traditional music and popular music. She is a member of the Templeglantine Ceilí band, All-Ireland senior ceili band winners, 2010. She also occasionally fills in with the Allow and the Dreenagh Ceili Bands. Her interests include ethnomusicological theory and practice, performance studies, critical and cultural theory, ethnicity and identity, music and urbanism, landscape and memory, music and affect. She was a Fulbright scholar and Century Fellow at the University of Chicago where she received her PhD in Ethnomusicology. Aileen is co-editor of Morrissey: Fandom, Representations, Identities (Intellect 2011).

Wednesday 22nd February Performance/Text/Context Speakers:

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Professor Margaret Harper (Professor of Contemporary Writing in English, University of Limerick) Dr Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain (Irish World Academy, UL) Dr. Tríona Ní Shíocháin (School of Languages, Literature, Culture and Communication, UL) Dr Colin Quigley (Irish World Academy, UL) Dr Michael Griffin (English Studies, University of Limerick) Dr Aileen Dillane (Irish World Academy, UL)

Tríona Ní Shíocháin

Chair Name required here Music, dance, and poetry have much in common. From the reference to a musical instrument (the lyre) in the generic term ‘lyric’ poetry, to the metaphor of feet from dance used to measure poetic metre, to the chanting of traditional poetry or the setting of poems as song lyrics in many cultures, links between these forms of expression are rich and various. However, academic study often lacks terms and concepts that put them into common frames of reference. This seminar will explore a way to think productively about these different disciplines using the ideas of ‘text’ and ‘performance’. ‘Text’ is a rich term, not just in obvious literary and musical ways (meaning the work) but with expansive meanings in linguistics and post-structuralist thought generally, particularly in terms of meaning being constantly negotiated, deferred, and reinterpreted. ‘Performance’ includes theoretical notions of articulating, staging, evoking, giving/sharing, and entraining, alongside the practical considerations of how a performance ‘text’ exists in time and space, in the moment of expression (voice, body, gesture, declamation) as well as on a page or in electronic format. Led by Prof. Margaret Hills Harper, this interdisciplinary group of researchers will inaugurate an ongoing series of symposia with this seminar housed within the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance regular seminar series. It will feature short presentations on these concepts of performance/text/context as they relate to each researcher’s area of concentration. This will be followed by a workshop on Thursday, expanding on the previous day’s presentations and tracing connections and crossovers in terms of the larger questions the presentations and their discussions generate. On Friday there will be various performance-related events, including in a lecture by singer and critic Lillis O Laoire, with the three-day series culminating in a reading by poet and musician Ciaran Carson.

About the Speakers: Margaret Mills Harper is Glucksman Professor of Contemporary Writing in English at the University of Limerick, Ireland. She specialises in modern and contemporary literature in English, from Ireland, the U.S., and the Anglophone world. In addition to numerous essays, she is the author of Wisdom of Two (Oxford 2006), on the occult collaboration between W. B. Yeats and his wife George Hyde Lees, and The Aristocracy of Art (LSU Press 1990), examining the autobiographical fictions of James Joyce and Thomas Wolfe. She has co-edited two of the four volumes of Yeats’s “Vision” Papers (Macmillan 1992 and 2001). With Professor Catherine Paul, she has edited Yeats's philosophical treatise A Vision (1925) and is now preparing the second version of that book, A Vision (1937), for The Collected Works of W. B. Yeats (Scribner 2008). Dr. Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain lectures on the BA in Irish Music and Dance at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. In 2010 Orfhlaith completed her doctoral thesis at the University of Limerick. Her research interests include Irish Dance amongst the Diaspora and examining creative processes in the context of Competitive Irish Solo Step Dance. She is a registered Irish Dance teacher T.C.R.G. and adjudicator A.D.C.R.G. with An Coimisiún le Rinci Gaelacha. She has traveled extensively to workshops and Step Dance Competitions throughout Europe and North America as a tutor from the renowned Scoil Rince Ui Ruairc and dance accompanist. She completed a residency at Williams College MA where she was employed as guest artist in dance. Orfhlaith is currently vice- chairperson of Dance Research Forum Ireland and treasurer of ICTM Ireland. She has authored a book entitled The Terminology of Irish Dance. Dr. Tríona Ní Shíocháin (Lecturer in Irish, School of Languages, Literature, Culture and Communication, UL) specialises in 18th and 19th century Gaelic poetry, and oral poetry and song. She received her primary degree in Irish


Dr Colin Quigley is Course Director and Senior Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at UL. His research interests are in European and European-American traditions of music and dance. He has published key studies on both as found in Newfoundland, Canada. He began work in east central Europe following 1989 and curated the 1999 Smithsonian Institution Folklife Festival ‘Gateways to Romania’ exhibit. He continues his investigation of traditional music/dance of the Carpathian Basin, currently focussing on the highly politicized character of its performance. Dr. Michael Griffin is a graduate of NUI-Galway and Balliol College, University of Oxford. He worked at Southern Illinois University and the University of Notre Dame before returning to Ireland to teach English Studies at UL in 2003. He has published widely on eighteenthcentury studies, utopian studies, and Irish writing in English. He has a particular interest in the poets Laurence Whyte and Oliver Goldsmith, whose works demonstrate an informed concern with music and musical performance.

Dr. Aileen Dillane is Lecturer in Music at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. She was a Fulbright scholar and Century Fellow at the University of Chicago where she received her PhD in Ethnomusicology. She is co-editor of Morrissey: Fandom, Representations, Identities (Intellect 2011). Aileen plays piano and flute and performs Irish traditional music and popular music. Her interests include ethnomusicological theory and practice, performance studies, critical and cultural theory, ethnicity and identity, music and urbanism, landscape and memory, music and affect.

March Wednesday 1st March Migrating Song Speakers: Síle Denvir (NUI Galway) Eamonn Costello (Irish World Academy, UL) Róisín Ní Galloglaigh (Irish World Academy, UL) Dr Sandra Joyce (Irish World Academy, UL) Michael Hackett (Irish World Academy, UL)

Chair: Niall Keegan (Irish World Academy, UL) Music and song do not respect cultural and physical boundaries – they are constantly on the move, constantly in flux, reacting within various social, economic and political environments. Songs are mediated in many performative contexts and can reflect changing ideas and attitudes within community settings and beyond.

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and Music from UCC (2002), where she was also awarded a doctorate (2008) for her research on the work of 19th century oral poet, Máire Bhuí Ní Laeire, funded by the IRCHSS. Her interests include literature, oral theory, oral composition and transmission, the relationship of music to words in sean-nós singing, creativity and performance, liminality and play. She is also a whistle player and singer. Her forthcoming Bláth’s Craobh na nÚdar: Amhráin Mháire Bhuí (2012, Coiscéim) is a multi-text edition of the songs of Máire Bhuí Ní Laeire, including cultural and historical interpretation and theoreticisation, and analysis of music and verse through the lens of performance.

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Síle Denvir

Éamonn Costello

The papers in this panel will address the movement of song repertoire thorough different traditions and genres, musically and geographically. They will examine how versions of individual songs, such as ‘The Bonny Boy’ and ‘Tá mé mo Shuí’, reflect how they are imagined in different places, in different social and cultural contexts, and by different singers. They also address the social function of song in participatory and presentational contexts, generated in different physical terrains. This reflects the way certain song genres have been culturally and geographically appropriated and framed over time. Ideas of origin, arrangement, performance and mediation, particular to the location of songs and genres addressed in the individual papers, are explored by the five speakers. Síle Denvir – Abstract ‘Tá mé i mo shuí ó d’éirigh an ghealach aréir …’ The song ‘Tá mé i mo shuí’ has travelled the length and breadth of Ireland over centuries. Indeed, it has migrated to the international stages of ‘world music’ since the 1960s with groups such as Skara Brae, Clannad, and at a later stage Altan singing their accompanied interpretations or versions of the song internationally. This paper will examine the road the song has taken from its anonymous roots in a community of Irish speakers to the modern setting of the international stage. The song is related to many other songs in Irish such as ‘Amhrán Rinn Mhaoile’, ‘Péarla Deas an Chúil Bháin’, ‘An Lachóigín Bhán’ and ‘Buachaill ón Éirne’.

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The anonymous nature of some of our older Irish language songs has lent itself to the creation of various versions of these songs. With the standardisation of Irish language song, firstly in written form and latterly in recorded form, has the creative and compositionary nature of Irish language songs been lost? What effect has the globalisation of traditional Irish language songs had on the singing tradition? With all the challenges of globalisation, is it possible to balance the old and the new? This paper will examine multiple versions of the song ‘Tá mé i mo shuí’ with these questions in mind.

Róisín Ní Galloglaigh

Sandra Joyce

Éamonn Costello – Abstract Until thirty years ago Sean-nós singing was one of the main forms of participatory music in the Conamara Gaeltacht. However, in the past twenty years, local Country and Western groups have increasingly taken on the function sean-nós once served in this community. Country, or "Tír agus Thiar" ('country and west') bands in Conamara perform locally written contemporary Irish language song, usually played in strict waltz time to facilitate dancing, and the majority of those who frequent ‘Country’ events are there to dance. Turino (2008) proposes that communal "musiking", like this, is not only important but essential for facilitating humane and socially conscious communities. By framing Sean-nós as 'high Gaelic art', Irish romantic cultural nationalists appropriated Sean-nós from the Gaeltacht community, re-framing it as presentational music for the national stage at events such as An Oireachtas. If ‘musiking’ together is essential for maintaining socially conscious communities, then, by reframing sean-nós in this way, it is inevitable that it would be replaced by some other form of music within the Gaeltacht. My paper will explore how the act of endeavouring to preserve traditional music can contribute to its re-framing from participatory to presentational, which, ironically, can lead to the demise of the ‘tradition’ as vernacular music. Róisín Ní Galloglaigh – Abstract The Mediation & Migration Of ‘An Binsin Luachra’ ‘An Binsin Luachra’ or ‘The Bunch of Rushes' is played as a slow air, and appears in various dance collections as a reel, a jig and a hornpipe. It is also a song, sung both in Irish and English, and many different versions exist in both languages. All versions hold the common motif of seduction and virginity. The reworking of this song has led to its inclusion in many cultures as part of their own traditional song and dance canons. The migration of this song has led to its appearance in collections from Quebec, New Brunswick, New York, Dorset and Suffolk from the early 1800s until 2005. It is included in

Michael Hackett

the broadside collections of Lucy Broadwood and Sabine Baring Gould. In Ireland it is to be found in the repertoires of Joe Heaney, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh and Padraig Ó Catháin sung in Irish; English language versions are sung by Paddy Tunney, Rita Gallagher and Bridget Geary. Song does not recognise or respect regional or linguistic divisions. Through analysis of some of the variants of this song and of its melody we can discuss the process of mediation with relation to social function. Perceptions and expectations of the tradition are ever changing and influenced by media, technology and capitalism. How do we engage with traditional song in contemporary society? How do we perceive traditional song within the existing canons? What does it say about these perceptions when two Carna singers present two different versions of the same song? Sandra Joyce – Abstract 'No End to its Growing...’: ‘The Bonny Boy’ and Songs in Motion This paper will address how the song 'The Bonny Boy' reflects changing performance and cultural contexts as it travels through different musical genres. Versions of this song are to be found throughout the English speaking world, and claimed by different traditions. Issues of gender, identity and place will be examined across cultural terrains that are often imagined to be widely different, such as Joe Heaney's version as an icon of sean-nós song; Larry Cunningham's showband version; Benjamin Britten's classical arrangement; as well as versions from Scottish and Appalacian traditions. In this context we can re-examine concepts of difference, authenticity and nationality when considering this song as it walks through the oral imaginations of different singers. This allows us to reassess the paradigms that structure our understanding of song traditions, and the songs themselves, as fluid and imagined elements of socio-economic and political processes. Michael Hackett - Abstract The Migratory Pathways of Social Singing.


The song text above celebrates a social singing movement that has gained in momentum and popularity in Ireland over the past three decades. It is a musical movement that owes much to the folk music revival of the 1970s, out from which the “everyman voice” was reclaimed by amateur singers and performers resulting in the establishing of a network of singing sessions and clubs across Ireland. These singing events maintain links to rural community céilís and the impromptu pub sing-songs of pre-urbanised Ireland (Morgan 1973, Glassie 2006) but what sets this musical phenomenon apart is that it is framed within the context of social and participatory singing amongst cohorts who share an interest in this ‘invented tradition’ and promoting the activity of singing within the community. However, this community of social singers is not always delineated by geographical boundaries and singers and their songs will often travel and performing at various events; parish to parish, county to county sharing songs, learning songs and furthering the movement. Songs as agents of social, cultural and political action have long been associated with movements seeking change in the hegemonic order, the civil rights movement & anti-war movements in the U.S are two examples. Where the Irish social singing phenomenon differs however is that it offers an accessible alternative to presentational musical forms – the goals of the movement are the songs themselves and the autonomous, egotistical and pleasurable enjoyment that is gained by their performance. In this paper I will discuss the social singing movement and the unifying sense of communitas

gained by performers and listeners alike gained by their continued affiliation to this performance phenomenon. My observations of this social song movement has been gathered over the course of three years of fieldwork and participant observation of singing sessions across Ireland culminating in my recently completed MA thesis – ‘Singing Our Place: Local Songs and Performance of Place in Irish.

About the Speakers: Síle Denvir is a sean-nós singer and harpist from the Connemara Gaeltacht. She received her BA in music and Irish from NUI Maynooth and continued with her studies at the University of Limerick where she completed the Graduate Diploma in Music Education and the MA in traditional Irish music performance. She also holds an MA in Irish from NUI Galway and her masters thesis, Ciarán Ó Fátharta – Amhráin was published by Cló Iar-Chonnachta in 2008. Síle teaches Irish, music, singing and harp, and has worked as a lecturer and tutor at NUI Galway and the University of Limerick. She is also a member of the traditional Irish music group Líadan and has performed on numerous occasions with The Chieftains. She is currently undertaking a PhD at the University of Limerick focusing on the restructuring, reinterpretation and performance of Irish and Scottish Gaelic traditional song in a contemporary setting. Éamonn Costello is from An Cheathrú Rua in the Conamara Gaeltacht. He plays button accordion and uilleann pipes, and he has guested on collaborations with a number of musicians and groups, including: Mactíra (2000), Frozen Fish: 6-pack (2006), and Papua Merdeka: Tribal Songs of Love and Freedom (2004). In 2010, along with Cathal Clohessy, from Limerick, on fiddle, he released a critically acclaimed duet album of traditional music called 'Bosca Ceoil and Fiddle'. He holds a BA in Irish Music and Dance from the

University of Limerick and an MA in Ethnomusicology from University College Cork. He is a PhD candidate at the Irish world Academy, University of Limerick, where he lectures and is also researching the aesthetics of Sean-nós song. A native of Co. Meath, Róisín Ní Galloglaigh has spent most of her life between the west of Ireland and Spain. In 2011 she was awarded her degree in Irish Music and Dance from the University of Limerick where she specialised in Traditional Irish song. She now works as a song tutor at the university and for her local Comhaltas group. She uses her passion for song research to enrich her performances and understanding of the songs. Dr Sandra Joyce is a singer and bodhrán player from Tuam, Co. Galway. She is currently Course Director of the MA Irish Traditional Music Performance at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick and, at the same institution, she was previously the founder-director of the BA Irish Music and Dance. She has just completed her PhD, entitled Transforming Carolan, which examines the processes that have caused the reimagination of harper / composer Turlough Carolan over the past three hundred years. Michael Hackett is a former student of the BA in Irish Music & Dance who has recently completed his MA thesis in ethnomusicology titled Singing Our Place – Local Songs and the Performance of Place in Irish Balladry” - His primary focus is social singing and the popular tradition of unaccompanied singing in Ireland. He is a ballad singer who performs regularly at singing sessions throughout Ireland. He is presently conducting preliminary PhD research into the social significance of ballads of the GAA.

The Tower

“Well come all my friends and listen to this tale I wish to tell ‘Bout how there’s all these singing clubs going strong in Clare quite well Songs, recitations and tall yarns spun several nights a week All kinds of entertainment no matter what you seek”

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Amanda Markwick

Timothy D. Taylor

Wednesday 7th March The Baroque Flute and the Irish Traditional Flute, a Conversation Speakers: Amanda Markwick (Berlin, Germany) Niall Keegan (Irish World Academy, UL)

Chair: Dr Yonit Kosovske (Irish World Academy, UL) What are the similarities and differences between early music embodied by historically-informed practices, and Irish traditional music? Where are there overlaps between the two fields, and where do they part ways? In a well-rounded, open conversation, historical flutist Amanda Markwick and Irish traditional flutist Niall Keegan join in a discussion about the practices of their fields. Conversation topics will include written versus aural tradition, ornamentation, articulation, embouchure, concept of sound, and the question behind playing music from centuries past. Audience participation is encouraged, for this unique discussion will certainly prove to be interesting and relevant to musicians in multiple fields. This seminar will include musical demonstrations through interactive live performance.

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Amanda Markwick received both a double Bachelor’s degree (Modern Flute/French Language and Literature) and a Master’s degree (Early Music) from the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, U.S.A. Awarded a Huygens scholarship by the Dutch Ministry for Education, Culture, and Science, to attend the Koninklijk Conservatorium in the Hague, the Netherlands, Amanda completed her studies in Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical flutes with Kate Clark, Wilbert Hazelzet, and Barthold Kuijken. Currently based in Berlin, Germany, Amanda has since become a sought-after collaborator in chamber music and orchestral work, performing regularly throughout the United States and Europe. She is an active member of

several chamber music ensembles. With Barcelona Barroc, she recently gave chamber music concerts in the Netherlands, Spain, and Sweden. With Prima Prattica, a mixed consort focusing on Renaissance music, she has toured in England, Germany, and the Netherlands. With Ensemble Eloquentia and The Royal Windplayers, she performs chamber music of the Classical period, while with Trio Delta, she explores the contrasts between early Romantic and twentieth-century music. As a member of Il Sussurro, she explores the quiet and nuanced colours of the early Classical flute in combination with clavichord. (See Niall Keegan biography, Seminar February 15th)

April

Wednesday 11th April Music and Neoliberal Capitalism While capitalism has been dominant for centuries in the west, apart from the work of Theodor Adorno and a smattering of others, it has seldom been studied in any thoroughgoing way with respect to music. This presentation examines the latest phase of capitalism, commonly called neoliberal capitalism, and its ramifications for the production and consumption of music. The cultural industries have been powerfully affected, increasingly treated as any other business producing commodities, which has had mind-numbing effects for workers in these industries. Marketing has become increasingly important, with star musicians increasingly treated as brands; some mus icians now seek to co-brand themselves with other consumer goods. Also, the cultural industries are driven by the “conquest of cool,” a pursuit, and ideology, so powerful that traditional cultural hierarchies are breaking down. Finally, the plethora of musical goods available for consumption today has necessitated new cultural

intermediaries whose job it is to sift through all this music, as well as new software applications that help users do the same thing.

Speaker: Professor Timothy D. Taylor (University of California Los Angeles) Chair: Dr Colin Quigley (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) About the Speaker: Timothy D. Taylor is a Professor in the Departments of Ethnomusicology and Musicology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is the author of Global Pop: World Music, World Markets (Routledge, 1997), Strange Sounds: Music, Technology and Culture (Routledge, 2001), and Beyond Exoticism: Western Music and the World (Duke, 2007), and numerous articles on various popular musics, classical musics, and social/cultural theory. His interests include globalization, technology, race, ethnicity, consumption, tourism, and gender. He has received a fellowship from the National Humanities Center, as well as a junior fellowship and the Charles A. Ryskamp Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies. His collection of history writings, Music, Sound, and Technology in America: A Documentary History of Early Phonograph, Cinema, and Radio, co-edited with Mark Katz and Tony Grajeda, is currently in press with Duke University Press. He has recently completed a book, The Sounds of Capitalism: Advertising, Music, and the Conquest of Culture, to be published by the University of Chicago Press, and is currently working on a book entitled Capitalism, Music, and Social Theory. His article The Commodification of Music at the Dawn of the Era of Mechanical Music, published in Ethnomusicology in 2007, was awarded the Jaap Kunst Prize by the Society for Ethnomusicology in 2008. He is an avid performer of Irish traditional music on the flute and can be heard regularly at sessions in southern California.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Special Events

Special Events

Seán Ryan. Irish World Academy performance 2011. Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Robbie McMahon

Michelle Mulcahy

February Wednesday 29th February, 6pm Theatre One, Irish World Academy Robbie McMahon: ‘Last Night as I Lay Dreaming’ - Film Showing ‘Last Night As I Lay Dreaming’ explores the life and songs of traditional singer Robbie McMahon from Spancilhill Co. Clare who is credited with bringing the folk song 'Spancilhill’ to a worldwide audience. The film documentary charts the significant contribution Robbie McMahon has made to the world of singing down through the years, both through his own compositions and his unique interpretation of traditional songs. “There is no doubt that Robbie McMahon is a Legend” says Frank Whelan of the Cois na hAbhna Archive, who produced the film. “Anyone who knows Robbie or has had the good fortune to hear him sing will have to agree with that. In this piece we’ve tried to honour the man as best we can, which is not an easy thing to do because there is so much to Robbie McMahon. There’s Robbie the singer, of course, but then there’s Robbie the songwriter, a genius for the comic turn of phrase. Then there’s Robbie the entertainer, because he’s a great showman and of course as anyone around Spancilhill will tell you, there’s Robbie the great neighbour and friend!”

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Directed by Ray Conway, the film is set against the backdrop of community life in rural Ireland, ‘Last Night As I Lay Dreaming’ features captivating performances from 'The King Of Spancilhill' himself along with contributions that set his achievements in a wider context, highlighting the important role the singer and songwriter has traditionally played in their local communities, recording significant events and keeping that memory alive for future generations.

The film will be followed by talks from the film’s director & producer Ray Conway & Frank Whelan, as well as from Irish World Academy Ethnomusicology graduate Michael Hackett and song collector Mick Scanlan. Mick Scanlan: Singer, Songmaker and long time friend of Robbie McMahon, Mick Scanlan was one of the founding members of the now defunct ‘Nenagh Singers Circle’. He has been involved in the singing session tradition for over 30 years and remains an integral member of the network of singing sessions that now exist in his native Co Clare, Tipperary and through the midlands of Ireland. He is renowned for his own satirical compositions some of which he has recorded on his CD “Mick Scanlan - In His Own Words Director - Ray Conway A native of Ennis, Co.Clare, Ray has written, produced and directed for theatre, film, video and radio. His documentary film, 'Last Night As I Lay Dreaming', the story of traditional singer Robbie McMahon of Spancilhill, featured at the Galway Film Fleadh 2010 and has since screened to full houses all over Ireland and in Melbourne, Australia. Producer - Frank Whelan Originally from west Clare, Frank runs the Traditional Music Archive at the Cois na hAbhna Regional Centre in Ennis. Over the years, the Archive has gathered music song and stories from around county Clare and issued several CDs of material from their wide collection. 'Last Night As I lay Dreaming' is Frank's first venture into the world of documentary film making. Ethnomusicologist - Michael Hackett has recently completed his MA thesis in ethnomusicology titled, “Singing Our Place: Local Songs and the Performance of Place in Irish Balladry”. His primary research focuses on the social singing phenomenon. Through his ethnographic work in Spancilhill Michael has spent many hours in the company of the ‘bard of Spancilhill’ himself, Robbie McMahon. He is a ballad singer who performs regularly at singing session and festivals throughout Ireland.

March Thursday 8th March, 8pm Theatre One, Irish World Academy Michelle Mulcahy in Concert Michelle Mulcahy in Concert Michelle Mulcahy is considered to be one of the most adroit and creative harpers in Ireland today. “Her revolutionary style on the harp is scintillating-played with power and panache, no concession to the complexity of the instrument, confirming her as one of the most significant musicians redefining harp at present’- The Living Tradition. Although considered to be one of the most accomplished multi-instrumentalists in Irish music her harp playing conveys a deep knowledge of the history and pulse of traditional music. ‘Accordingly she brings a unique fluid phrasing and use of ornamentation to the instrument which is nothing short of revolutionary in contemporary Irish Harp music’- Mick Moloney. Although Michelle’s melodic style has been described as ‘stunningly beautiful’ one of the most striking elements to her musical style is her approach to accompaniment, as Bill Whelan stated ‘she accompanies herself in a unique way so that at times she sounds like two harpists, or a harpist and a guitar playing at one which is something truly remarkable’. She is a regular performer and tutor worldwide and has toured extensively in Europe, United States, Canada, China, Australia and Vietnam. Michelle has three highly acclaimed albums recorded by American record label Shanachie and Irish record label Cló- Iar Chonnachta. She also featured as a soloist on Bill Whelan’s Connemara Suite which was performed with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and subsequently recorded with Tara Records. She was awarded the prestigious TG4 Young Musician of the Year in 2006 and was also awarded Female Musician of the Year in 2005 at the Live-Ireland awards in the United


ACADEMOS

States. She is currently working on her solo harp album which will be released later this year by record label Cló Iar-Chonnachta. Michelle is also currently a PhD student of the Arts Practice program at the University of Limerick. Tickets: €10/€8

Phone: 061 202917

Thursday 13th March, 8pm Italian & Spanish Baroque Music Concert at All Saints Church, Castleconnell Co Limerick Faculty, students, and alumni from the Irish World Academy perform a vocal and instrumental chamber concert featuring composers of the Italian and Spanish Baroque period. Joining them is guest artist Eamon Sweeney, historical guitar player. They will be presenting works by Monteverdi, Merula, Marini, Castello, Uccellini, Cazzati, Pachelbel, Marin, and Arañés. Tickets available at the door.

Wednesday 21st March, 8 pm Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy Selections from the Ordo Virtutum of Hildegard of Bingen Abbess Hildegard of Bingen's liturgical drama Ordo Virtutum, or 'Order of the Virtues', is perhaps the earliest medieval musical drama, and to date the only one attributable in both text and music. Most likely performed circa 1152 and written a year or two prior, it may have been performed by the nuns at the convent of St. Rupertsberg at the church dedication there. The Ordo Virtutum tells of the struggle of a human soul, Anima, between the influence of the Virtues and the Devil. Impatient Anima would reach heaven by circumventing life, but is reminded by the Virtues that she must first live out life as a mortal. The cunning Devil takes advantage of the situation and entices Anima, but by the end of the Ordo, the repentant Soul returns to the Virtues. Together, they bind the Devil and sing praises to God.

Alison Rose

Students of the current year's MA Ritual Chant and Song programme, together with singers and instrumentalists from other programmes in the Irish World Academy, will present an abbreviated version of the Ordo Virtutum, highlighting the travels of Anima, the admiration of the Virtues by the Patriarchs and Prophets, the snarls of the Devil, and the final, glorious acclamation of God.

19th & 20th April ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings Limerick and Dublin Performances of Membra Jesu nostril patientis sanctissima by Deiterich Buxtehude Thursday 19th, April St Mary’s Cathedral Limerick, Friday 20th April, Christ Church Cathedral Dublin, Soloists: Alison Rose, soprano Pauline Graham, soprano Duncan Brickenden, countertenor Wolodymyr Smishkewych, tenor Antonio Santos, baritone The Irish World Academy's classical chamber ensemble ACADEMOS performs Dieterich Buxtehude's extraordinary 17th-century masterpiece Membra Jesu nostri patientis sanctissima ("The most holy limbs of our suffering Jesus.") Known as the first Lutheran oratorio, it is constructed as a cycle of seven cantatas, the text of which is thought to be attributed to the 13th-century poet Arnulf of Louvain. The poem Salve mundi salutare (or "Rhythmica oratio" ) addresses Jesus in the first person and incorporates visceral verses from the Bible that correspond to different parts of the body: feet, knees, hands, side, breast, heart, and face. Joining Academos will be guest vocal soloists: Alison Rose, Pauline Graham, Duncan Brickenden, Wolodymyr Smishkewych and Antonio Santos. Evening performances take place on April 19 at St.

Pauline Graham

Mary's Cathedral in Limerick and April 20 at Christ Church Cathedral in Dublin. Tickets will be on sale at the University of Limerick Concert Hall box office. Soloist biographies: Alison Rose (Soprano) Alison Rose is currently on the Masters programme at the Royal Academy of Music, where she studies with Ryland Davies and Audrey Hyland. She graduated from the Royal Northern College of Music with First Class Honours. At the RNCM she was awarded the Brigitte Fassbaender Award for Lieder and the Claire Croiza Prize for French Song and was awarded the 2011 Elena Gerhardt Lieder Prize at the Academy. Operatic roles have included Servilia- La Clemenza Di Titio, Barbarina-Le Nozze Di Figaro (cover) and La Princesse- L’Enfant et les Sortilege (cover), all for RNCM Opera. Concert engagements have included Bach’s Cantata 151 with the RNCM Chamber Orchestra conducted by Nicholas Kraemer, Handel’s Messiah and Samson, Saint- Saëns Oratorio de Noël and Haydn’s Harmoniemesse. She has performed several times for the Yorke Trust, including performances of Handel’s Dixit Dominus and Israel in Egypt and Bach’s Magnificat. Recent and forthcoming engagements include Mendelssohn’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream with the Manchester Camerata conducted by Douglas Boyd, a performance of Handel’s Gloria for Soprano and Strings, and Mahler Symphony No 4 at the Two Moors Festival. Alison’s studies are generously supported by a Maidment Scholarship administered by the Musicians Benevolent Fund and the William Gibbs Religious and Educational Trust. Pauline Graham (Soprano), from Ayrshire, Scotland, studied at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow and continued her vocal studies at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, The Netherlands. She is currently undertaking doctoral studies in Renaissance vocal music at UCD. Pauline has worked with conductors such as Ton Koopman, Konrad Junghänel and Paul McCreesh. Her operatic roles include Susanna and Cherubino in Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro,

Special Events

Ordo Virtutum

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Duncan Brickenden

Wolodymyr Smishkewych

Despina (Così Fan Tutte), Grilletta in Haydn’s Lo Speziale, and Lieschen in a staged version of J.S. Bach’s Coffee Cantata. Solo concert work has taken her all over Europe and has included Monteverdi’s Selva Morale e Spirituale in Cremona, Italy and Bach’s Mass in B minor with Ton Koopman. She has performed and recorded with the Amsterdam Baroque Choir and Orchestra. She has also made a recording with Musica ad Rhenum, directed by Jed Wentz, with whom she performed at the Utrecht Early Music Festival. She has worked with many Irish ensembles including Ensemble eX and Resurgam and has also appeared as a soloist at the National Concert Hall. Pauline has a particular interest in Baroque and Medieval vocal repertoire and is co-founder of the medieval-music ensemble Morisca. Duncan Brickenden (Countertenor) Duncan Brickenden began his musical career as a boy soprano at St. Mary’s Cathedral, Limerick where he later became their organ scholar from 2003-2005. He is currently completeing a Bachelor of Music performance degree at the DIT Conservatory of Music where he has won prizes both as an organist and singer. Duncan studied singing with Emmanuel Lawler for two years and is currently with Colette McGahon-Tosh and repetiteur, Roy Holmes. He also takes occasional lessons with Eric von Ibler at the Schola Cantorum of Edinburgh. Alongside his vocal studies, Duncan studied organ Peter Sweeney. From September, he will continue his studies for a Masters degree at the Royal Academy of Music, London with Michael Chance

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Wolodymyr Smishkewych (Tenor) Spanish-Ukrainian tenor Wolodymyr Smishkewych is a native of New Jersey, USA. He has specialized in medieval song, chant, and new music since the 1990s. He received his training in voice performance from Rutgers University (BM 95, MM 98) and is currently a candidate for the doctorate in voice performance from Indiana University. A sought-after pedagogue in medieval, contemporary, and world vocal music, he has lectured at universities in the United States, South America, Canada, and Europe. He recently joined the faculty

Antonio Santos

BLAS Summer School Seminar

of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick, Ireland as director of the MA in Ritual Song and Chant. He is a member of Sequentia Ensemble for Medieval Music and of Paul Hillier’s Theatre of Voices, and has performed at major festivals through Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South America including BBC Proms, Regensberg Tage Alter Musik, Festival Cervantino, Edinburgh Festival, and the early music festivals of Boston, Barcelona, Utrecht, and Berkeley. He has recorded for Sony/BMG, Harmonia Mundi USA, ExCathedra, and Focus records. Active as a researcher as well as a performer, he writes, records, and creates video about singing, ethnomusicology, instrument building and organology, and music & nature. Antonio Santos (Baritone) Antonio Santos, a soloist and chamber artist, has performed in Spain, France, Germany, Portugal, Ireland, Colombia, Brazil and the United States with international touring groups such as Symphonic Orchestra of Burgos, Early Music Academy of Salamanca University (Spain), Indiana University Baroque Orchestra, Lipzodes, Concentus, ¡Sacabuche!, El Fénix de los Ingenios (USA), Musica Poetica (Holland) and Musica Ficta (Colombia). He is a founding member of ensembles Vox Reflexa and Canto Romántico with Dr. Yonit Kosovske (fortepiano). His operatic performances include Purcell´s Dido & Aeneas, Scarlatti´s Tigrane, Händel´s Giulio Cesare and Rossini´s Italian girl in Algeirs. He also took part in Music Festivals such as Boston Early Music Festival, Bloomington Early Music Festival (winning Best Recital of the Year, 2009, USA), Festival Música de Londrina, Festival Internacional de Música Colonial Brasileira e Música Antiga (Brasil), Aix-en-Provence Lyric Festival (France), and Festival Internacional de Santander (Spain). Mr. Santos has been performed under the direction of Maestros Gary Wedow, Jacques Ogg, Stanley Ritchie, Nigel North and Gabriel Garrido. He has studied with Richard Levitt, Paul Elliott, David Mason and Dr. Robert Harrison.

BLAS Summer School Session

April April 2012 IPEDAM Erasmus Funded “New Ethnochoreologists” Seminar IPEDAM Erasmus Funded “New Ethnochoreologists” Seminar Since 2003, Dr Catherine Foley and students of the MA Ethnochoreology programme at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance have attended the University of Trondheim, Norway, to participate in the New Ethnochoreologists” ten-day intensive Erasmus funded programme. In April, 2012, Dr Catherine Foley, Mats Melin, Dr Orfhlaith Ni Bhriain, Dr Colin Quigley and students of both the MA Ethnochoreology programme and the MA Ethnomusicology programme will again participate in the programme in Norway.

June/July June 25th to July 6th Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance Now in its sixteenth year, the Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance is an internationally accredited summer school hosted annually by the Irish World Academy, offering tuition from Ireland’s best-known traditional singers, musicians and dancers, including Dónal Lunny, Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, John Carty, Siobhán Peoples, Martin Hayes, Karan Casey, Colin Dunne, Breandán de Gallaí and many more. The summer school includes tuition, masterclasses, lectures, lunchtime and evening concerts, céilis and sessions. On-campus accommodation is provided in some of the


University of Limerick’s new state-of-the-art student villages. For further information on Blas, see www.blas.ie or contact director Ernestine Healy at ernestine.healy@ul.ie

July 23rd – 29th July The 27th Symposium of the International Council for Traditional Music’s Study Group on Ethnochoreology

For further information please see the Symposium’s website at www.ethnochoreologysymposiumlimerick.ie or contact Dr Catherine Foley: Tel: + 353 61 202922; email: Catherine.E.Foley@ul.ie

John Carthy in teaching mode. Academy 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Special Events

The 27th Symposium of the International Council for Traditional Music’s Study Group on Ethnochoreology The International Council for Traditional Music (ICTM) is an NGO (non-governmental organization) in formal consultative relations with UNESCO. Its aims are to further the study, practice, documentation, preservation and dissemination of traditional music and dance, including folk, popular, classical and urban music and dance of all countries. The 27th Symposium is dedicated to two selected themes, which will form the focus of the presentations and discussions. The themes are: Dance and Place; and Dance and Festival. Local Organizing Committee: Dr Catherine Foley (Chair), Dr Colin Quigley, Mats Melin, and Dr Orfhlaith Ni Bhriain.

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President Micheal D. Higgins visits the Irish World Academy, December 2011

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Staff and Students of the Irish World Academy perform for President of Ireland Michael D. Higgins and Sabrina Higgins. Academy Foyer. December 2011. Photograph Š Maurice Gunning


"The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance is the version of globalisation that makes the heart lift. In these broken and threatening times it is wonderful for one to come and hear not just the expression but the excellence of the human spirit contained in the rendering of music, the nature of the voice and in movement... It is the best version of our future that we might possibly aspire to."

Lunchtime Concert Series

President of Ireland, Michael D. Higgins

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Bealach

MA Contemporary Dancer Performance Left to right: Katherine O'Malley, Siobhan Ni Dhuinnin, Lisa Vogel, Grant McLay, Selma Daniels and Daniel Howe. Choreography: Liz Roche Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

Bealach

Community Cultural Pathways at The Irish World Academy

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The Marie Duffy Foundation

National Dance Archive of Ireland

Arioso Arioso is a collaboration between the MA in Music Therapy at the Irish World Academy and the Association of Irish choirs, which is also based at the University of Limerick. The project seeks to encourage parents to use singing, chanting, and rhymes to interact with their babies from birth to 18 months of age. The youngest participant in the programme started at two weeks of age. The group leaders are Professor Jane Edwards and Clara Hutchinson. Jane is the author of the edited book Music Therapy and Parent-Infant Bonding published with Oxford University Press in 2011.

New Bilateral Agreement with Széchényi University of Györ, Hungary A new Bilateral Agreement for Erasmus Teacher Mobility had been initiated between the University of Limerick and Tibor Varga Intitute of Music at Széchényi University of Györ in Hungary. Ferenc Szüücs, Senior Lecturer at the Irish World Academy and Course Director for the MA in Classical String Performance programme visited Tibor Varga Institute last September holding cello masterclasses. Ferenc also gave a live performance of Haydn’s Cello Concerto with Anima Musicae Chamber Orchestra at Széchényi University. There had been a number of students in recent years coming from Tibor Varga Institute to complete their Master’s programme at the Irish World Academy and future co-operation is expected between the two universities.

The Marie Duffy Foundation at the Irish World Academy

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The Marie Duffy Foundation was established in June 2011 to provide financial assistance and support to aspiring dancers, musicians and choreographers so they may fulfil their dreams in the world of Irish Dance. Irish Dance is constantly changing and evolving and it is the aim of the Foundation to identify and

support the creative and inspirational individuals who will be at the cutting edge of dance and music excellence in the years ahead. Marie Duffy is arguably one of the greatest ambassadors for Irish Dance and Culture that the world has ever known. A renowned teacher, adjudicator, examiner and choreographer of many years’ standing, she has brought, and continues to bring, a wealth of experience, integrity and personal commitment to all her areas of influence. She has always illuminated the correct pathway, whether it was through her unrivalled competitive career with both Inis Ealga and the Marie Duffy Academy of Irish Dancing, or her ground- breaking work with Lord of the Dance, Feet of Flames and Celtic Tiger. Together with her husband Mike, she has now established the Marie Duffy Foundation, an independent private company registered in the UK. As a non-profit making organisation, its net income will be used solely to provide financial support to individuals, groups of individuals and/or educational establishments who will be shaping the future of Irish Dance. To stimulate new innovation in dance choreography, the Marie Duffy Foundation announced the Marie Duffy Foundation Excellence Award for Irish Dance Music Composition. This award is valued at one thousand five hundred euro (€1500). The aim of this award is to promote the composition of original and innovative works of Irish Dance Music for our rich dance culture. It is hoped that the winning entry will be absorbed into Irish Dance competitions and be a lasting legacy to both the composer and the Foundation. A panel of music and dance experts adjudicated the eleven compositions at a Gala Evening held at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance on November 23rd and the winning composition was The Vanishing Lake , composed by Francis Ward. The foundation is also offering an annual award to final year dance students of the BA Irish Music and Dance to the value of 1000 euro. The inaugural dance bursary will be awarded in May 2012.

The National Dance Archive of Ireland The official opening of the National Dance Archive of Ireland (Cartlann Náisiúnta Damhsa na hÉireann) by Mr Jimmy Deenihan, T.D., Minister of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, took place in November 2011, hosted at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The Archive is the first of its kind in Ireland and is the most comprehensive in the country. It holds a number of old photographs, letters, newspapers cuttings and programmes from private collections, which would not have been accessible to the public before now. Commenting on the launch of the archive, Minister Deenihan said “All aspects of Ireland’s dance history can be found on this wonderful archive which highlights the broad range of styles and genres of this diverse art form. The National Dance Archive of Ireland will raise the profile of dance at home and abroad and will give us all a greater sense of how dance in Ireland has developed in the past and how it may evolve in the future. What makes this project so exciting is that those involved in dance can donate materials and contribute to the archive’s database on an on- going basis. Such an interactive resource will ensure that everyone can experience and enjoy the richness, diversity and uniqueness of dance in Ireland.” The Archive is home to over forty collections of dance generously donated by individuals, companies and dance organisations. Over 5,000 dance items, spanning a period of over 100 years, of diverse multimedia materials in the form of print and audio-visual, are stored in the Archive. Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, Director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick, commented on the range of dance collections within the Archive: “The establishment of the National Dance Archive of Ireland at the University of Limerick, is a direct follow on from the inspired and inclusive vision of Dance Research Forum Ireland, across ballet, contemporary, traditional, popular and world dance genres.”


Caption ? Can this be edited to a single line?

The Archive is housed in the Glucksman Library at the University of Limerick and works in partnership with Dance Research Forum Ireland, the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and the Arts Council. It is committed to collecting, preserving, digitizing and cataloguing multimedia dance material, and to providing access and guidance to the collections; these include traditional dance, social dance, contemporary dance, ballet, urban dance and world dance. The National Dance Archive is an important public resource for dance education and research. It is a living Archive that forges links with dancers, scholars, choreographers, companies and organisations of dance in the wider community. For further information on the National Dance Archive of Ireland see www.nationaldancearchiveireland.ie telephone + 353 61 202690 or email: ndai@ul.ie

Sanctuary/Irish Chamber Orchestra Global Song Programme In September, 2008, SANCTUARY embarked on a Global Song programme with Presentation Primary School, Limerick. One of the most multicultural schools in the city, Presentation Primary has a strong commitment to multicultural education and integration through the arts. The global song programme, facilitated by Kathleen Turner (Education Officer, Irish Chamber Orchestra) and students from the MA Ritual Chant and Song at the Academy, culminated in a performance of song, movement, art and readings by the children. In 2009, the Irish Chamber Orchestra came on board as partners in the initiative and a new global song programme commenced in September, 2009. Targeted at the youngest classes, it will include weekly sessions in global song and culminate in a final performance which will feature members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra SANCTUARY also works in partnership with the Intercultural Office at Doras Luimní towards the coordination of cultural events such as annual celebration for Ghandi Day (International Day of

Step-Up: Dance Project

Non-Violence). In Autumn 2011 the programme also organised an event to raise awareness around the Karen refugee camps on the Burmese / Thai border through a celebration of the music of the Karen harp. SANCTUARY, funded by the Higher Education Authority, is an Irish World Academy outreach project, which seeks to build bridges between higher education and refugee, asylum seeking and new migrant communities in Ireland. Since its inception in 2001, Sanctuary has hosted six international world sacred music festivals, bringing musicians from Zimbabwe, South Africa, Senegal, Nigeria, Greece, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Croatia, Vietnam and Tibet to Limerick. Sanctuary works in partnership with Doras Luimní, the support group for refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in Limerick. World Carnival was initiated by the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and SANCTUARY. The Irish Chamber Orchestra joined World Carnival in 2009, to deliver a music project in Presentation Primary School, Sexton Street, Limerick. Presentation Primary School is one of the most culturally diverse in the country, with 17 different nationalities in attendance. Through World Carnival ICO Education Officer Kathleen Turner implements a world song programme for 120 children in Junior Infants to Second Class. The pupils learn songs from across the world, from Ghana to Poland. The project culminates in a day of workshops for all pupils, followed by a carnival concert when the community joins the school to celebrate diversity through music. Further information: Dr Helen Phelan, Phone: + 353 61 202575, Email: Helen.phelan@ul.ie

Step Up Dance Project at the Irish World Academy The Step-Up: Dance Project will continue this year, running from July 2nd to August 26th, at the Irish World Academy. The project provides a unique professional

development opportunity for young Irish contemporary dancers who have recently completed their professional training. The dancers will create two new contemporary dance pieces with one Irish and one international choreographer over an eight-week period. These pieces will be performed at the Irish World Academy, Limerick, DanceHouse, Dublin and The Firkin Crane, Cork. Step-Up: Dance Project is realised through a partnership between the Arts Council, Dance Ireland and the University of Limerick. Members of the steering committee for Step-Up: Dance Project are Mary Nunan (Chair), Dr. Jenny Roche and Paul Johnson (Chief Executive Dance Ireland). Davide Terlingo oversees the project on behalf of the Arts Council. Dr. Victoria O'Brien is the Project Leader for 2012. Victoria.O’Brien@ul.ie

Maoin Cheoil an Chláir Maoin Cheoil an Chláir was set up through Rural Resources Development in 1993. Designed by Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, in consultation with Fr Harry Bohan and Clare Music Council, MCC is a music school which caters equally for classical and traditional usic. The school acts as a potential model for other similar music schools in other local authority areas throughout Ireland. IN partnership with the Vocational Education Committee of Co Clare and with the assistance of Clare County Council and Ennis Urban District Council, MCC is a local cooperative model serving the needs of County Clare through its headquarters in the 18th century Erasmus Smith School building, owned by the Sisters of Mercy in Ennis. MCC has a special relationship with the Irish World Academy, with two of its faculty on the Board (chaired by Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, with Irish World Academy director of the Muisc Education Programmes, Jean Downey. The director of Maoin Cheoil is Hans Böller, a graduate of the Academy’s Ritual Chant and Song Programme. Further information on Maoin Cheoil an Chláir: 065 6841774.

Bealach

Sanctuary / Irish Chamber Orchestra Maoin Cheoil an ChláirMa-

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E-MOTIONAL Bodies and Cities The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance/ MA Contemporary Dance Performance are participants in EU funded programme, called E-MOTIONAL Bodies & Cities, a two-year mobility and artistic exchange dance programme involving artists and managers from six European countries – Romania, Cyprus, Ireland, Latvia, United Kingdom, and Turkey. The aim of the programme is to identify, nurture, attract and sustain talent and creativity at the European level, by connecting artists and dance managers from countries participating in the project through mobility grants, residencies, fellowships, artistic research and performance co-production and exchange. Professional development and artistic experiment represent pillars of the project. The E-Motional Bodies and Cities artist-in-residence is Sergiu Matis (see biography in Artists-in-Residence section) E-MOTIONAL Bodies & Cities is a co-operation between Gabriela Tudor Foundation (RO, initiator & lead organiser), Dance Ireland, Dublin Dance Festival (IE), The Association of the Professional Dance Choreographers of Latvia (LV), Dance House Lemesos (CY), and body > data > space (UK), as co-organisers; and ArtistNe(s)t Network of Artists-in-Residence Centres / “George Apostu” Cultural Centre in Bacau, and the National Dance Centre in Bucharest (RO), The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, and the University of Limerick (IE), Rialto Theatre, Limassol (CY), and CATI Dans – Contemporary Dance Artists Association, Istanbul (TR), as associated partners. This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. For more information see www.e-motional.eu

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ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings ACADEMOS is the graduate string orchestra of the MA Classical String Performance Programme at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Established in 2008, ACADEMOS has toured internationally each year as an integral part of its educational programme. Each orchestra member is a fulltime registered postgraduate student on the two-year MA Classical String programme at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick and is tutored by internationally acclaimed visiting professors: Dr Bruno Giuranna (Viola), Mariana Sirbu (Violin), and Michael Wolf (Double Bass), with tuition from Course Director, Ferenc Szücs (Cello) and Dr Yonit Kosovske (Piano, Harpsichord and Historical Performance Practice). Each year, students present one or more concerts with ACADEMOS, the programme's primary performing ensemble. ACADEMOS performs as both a larger chamber orchestra, as a collegium, and in smaller chamber groups, at times on its own as well as in partnership with other degree programmes from the Irish World Academy, with members of the Academy's faculty and with prestigious guest artists. Previous concerts have included collaboration with members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra, in residence at the University of Limerick. ACADEMOS takes its name from the early Akademia, just outside the walls of ancient Athens where there was a sacred grove of olive trees dedicated to the goddess of wisdom Athena and other immortals. This sacred site was called Hekademia, and later Akademia. By the beginning of the 6th century BCE, it was linked to an Athenian hero, a legendary "Akademos." After a lapse during the early Roman occupation, the Akademia was reestablished as a society of Platonists' successors. From antiquity to modern times, the concept of an Academy has been associated with a gathering of scholars, philosophers and artists for the purpose of cultivating the mind, of focused learning and personal development.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Autumn 2011

Performance at Hunt Museum as part of the CLAUSTRUM concert series by 'Cantoral', under artistic director Catherine Sergent, October, 2011. Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

Autumn 2011 at the Irish World Academy

at the IRISH WORLD ACADEMY

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Autumn 2011 at the IRISH WORLD ACADEMY

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Cónaí

Guest artists Sarah Moffatt (baroque violin) and Eligio Luis Quinteiro (historical lute and guitar) collaborate on a programme of classical-era duos for violin and guitar on the Irish World Academy lunchtime concert series. Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Cónaí

Artists-in-Residence at The Irish World Academy

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Sergiu Matis

Sergiu Matis

Dancer-in-Residence Berlin based Sergiu Matis will be the second E-MOTIONAL artist at the Irish World Academy. He will be in residence for two weeks in February. Born in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, he studied dance between 1991 and 2000 in the Liceul de Coregrfie in his home city and subsequently in the Akademie des Tanzes in Mannheim, Germany, as a Fellow of the Birgit Keil Dance Foundation. His profession career began at the Tanztheater Nurnberg, where he worked with various dancers and choreographers, including Daniela Kurz, Stijn Celis, Catherine Guerin and Rodolfo Leoni, amongst others. He also took workshops with William Nadylam at the Peter Brooke Company and Duccio Bellugi-Vannuccini (Theatre du Solei) and at the Compagnie Alias in Geneva. He has been based in Berlin since 2008, working with Colette Sadler-Stammer Productions and in a production by the Sasha Waltz Company.

The Irish Chamber Orchestra Working with Artistic Partner Jörg Widmann, the Irish Chamber Orchestra has gained a remarkable reputation as a fresh and vibrant force on the Irish and international music scene. Under the leadership of Katherine Hunka, the orchestra is recognised as one of Ireland’s world-class cultural assets. In the past the orchestra has toured with success across Europe, Australia, South Korea, China, and Singapore. Most recently, the orchestra completed an 8-city US tour in October/November 2011 as part of the Imagine Ireland/A Year of Irish Arts in America 2011, with world-renowned pianist, Leon Fleisher.

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The orchestra collaborates with some of the world’s finest musicians: recent concerts with Gérard Korston, Alison Balsom, Steve Mackey and Jörg Widmann have garnered critical acclaim. The orchestra also has warm relationships with celebrated artists including Steven Isserlis, Stephen Hough, Pekka Kuusisto and Sinead O’ Connor.

The Irish Chamber Orchestra

The ICO excels in a diverse repertoire ranging from classical to modern day masterpieces and new commissions. Leading Irish composers who have worked with the orchestra include John Kinsella, Mícheál Ō Súilleabháin, Bill Whelan and Elaine Agnew. Outside the concert hall, the Irish Chamber Orchestra stimulates minds and hearts with vitality unmatched by other ensembles. It offers music as an instrument of social change, introducing children to music, creativity, innovation, understanding and openness, thus helping them to reach their full potential as individuals. The Irish Chamber Orchestra is resident at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick and is funded by the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

Irish Chamber Orchestra Spring 2012 Programme: FEBRUARY 2012 WORLD PREMIÈRE Irish Chamber Orchestra Gábor Takács-Nagy Conductor Daniel Bates Oboe Liszt Beethoven Jean Francaix Kinsella

Angelus! Prière Aux Anges Gardiens Symphony No. 4, Op. 60, B-flat Major Suite for Oboe and Orchestra The Flower Clock Symphony No. 10 (World Première)

Thursday 9 February University Concert Hall, Limerick @ 8pm Saturday 11 February RDS Concert Hall, Dublin @ 8pm

MARCH 2012

LYRICAL LANDSCAPES

Irish Chamber Orchestra Joana Carneiro Conductor Allison Bell Soprano Mahler

Rheinlegendchen (from Lieder aus Des Knabe Wunderhorn or Humoresken) No. 7. Copland Appalachian Spring Suite Schoenberg Pierrot Lunaire Rachmaninoff Vocalise Beethoven Symphony No. 6 Pastorale, Op. 68, F major Thursday 29 March University Concert Hall, Limerick @ 8pm Saturday 31 March RDS Concert Hall, Dublin @ 8pm

APRIL 2012 CLASSIC CLARINET Irish Chamber Orchestra Jörg Widmann Principal Guest Conductor/Clarinet Widmann Mozart Widmann Mendelssohn Thursday 19 April Saturday 21 April

Freie Stücke Clarinet Concerto, KV 622, A Major Fantasie for Solo Clarinet Symphony No. 1, in C minor, Op. 11 University Concert Hall, Limerick @ 8pm RDS Concert Hall, Dublin @ 8pm

How to book Limerick: Dublin:

Tel: 061 331549 Tel: 0818 719 300 Ticketmaster €20, €18 conc. and €10 students

www.irishchamberorchestra.com


Rex Levitates Dance Company

Rex Levitates

Based in Dublin, Rex Levitates Dance Company produces a diverse range of innovative dance activities yearly from theatre based or site specific performances and touring. Supported by the Arts Council as a Regularly Funded Organisation and also by Culture Ireland, Rex Levitates has been going from strength to strength in the last year. The Company has been commissioned by the Dublin Dance Festival and has performed at Judson Memorial Church New York and the Centre for Performance Research Brooklyn, Massachusetts International Festival of Art, Cúirt Festival Galway, Kilkenny Arts Festival and The Edinburgh Fringe Festival. In previous years the company has also performed in the South Bank Centre London, The Playhouse Liverpool, Le Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris, The Irish Arts Festival Beijing 08, and he Meet in Beijing Festival 2004. Rex Levitates was co founded in 1999 by sisters Liz Roche and Jenny Roche and is presently under the artistic direction of choreographer Liz Roche. An artistically ambitious and resourceful arts organization, they deliver their program with consistency, originality and an attention to detail and this has led to their steady expansion since 1999. The company is known for its own particular brand of contemporary dance which has been created through an on-going working relationship between Liz Roche and a core group of exceptional dancers and artistic collaborators. Rex Levitates’ residency at Irish World Academy, from March 12th-23rd is in conjunction with the MA in Contemporary Dance Performance. A studio showing of works, choreographed by Liz Roche and performed by the Company and the MA Contemporary Dance students will take place in IW2-25 on Wednesday 21st March at 1.15. Admission is free and all are welcome.

Masumi Seki / MA Classical String Performance (current student from Japan) Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Cónaí

Dance Company-in-Residence

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Lucernarium.s autumn 2011 Locus+Nexus Series Concert: “Pilgrimage and Place”. From left, Jaimee Jensen-McDaniel (MARCS), Vlad, Carolyn Dike (MA Ethnomus), Siobhán Maguire (MARCS), Dorota Gola (BAVAD). Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Irish World Academy Ensembles

Irish World Academy Ensembles

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CANTORAL

CANTORAL Vocal Ensemble CANTORAL is an all female chant ensemble, specialising in Western plainchant and early polyphony, with a particular interest in medieval Irish repertoire. The ensemble was formed in 2008 at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick and had its first international appearance in March, 2009 at the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. Other highlight performances include Imbolc, a programme of chant and Irish language song for St. Bridget premiered in New York in 2010, as well as a programme for the Galway Early Music Festival entitled …sed diabolus irrisit (‘…but the devil laughed’) in the same year. More recently, Cantoral sang for the Dalai Lama’s visit to the University of Limerick in April, 2011 and as part of the Cloughjordan Music Festival in June, 2011. The Artistic Director of CANTORAL, Catherine Sergent, is an acclaimed Paris-based singer who has performed and recorded extensively with several early music ensembles. Catherine is a chant tutor for the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme at the Academy. The singers in CANTORAL are graduates, doctoral students and members of faculty at the Irish World Academy from Ireland, France, the United States and Mexico. CANTORAL has also produced two ‘daughter’ ensembles, which feature the same singers, but specialise in distinctive repertoire. These are directed by Sydney Freedman and Olivia Cantoral, two students on the Arts practice PhD programme. These ensembles form an integral part of their doctoral work.

Lucernarium

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Lucernarium is the dedicated ensemble of the MA programme in Chant and Ritual Song, and is dedicated to exploring the vocal music repertoires of Western

HIBERNIA

ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings

chant, medieval monophonic and polyphonic song, and choral song traditions from around the globe. Lucernarium also performs music of the Renaissance as well as contemporary choral music whose aesthetic is oriented towards the early- and world-song sound worlds. As part of the MARCS programme's Lexus+Nexus concert series, Lucernarium performs several times a year during the regular term and rehearses twice a week. A required ensemble for students in the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme, Lucernarium is also open by audition to other students at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the University of Limerick, as well as to interested members of the community. For more information, or to arrange an audition, please contact Course Director Wolodymyr Smishkewych at vlad@ul.ie.

Hibernia Vocal Ensemble HIBERNIA is a cross-disciplinary ensemble directed by Óscar Mascareñas that focuses on the performance of early music repertoires within the realm of contemporary practice. It is currently formed by students of the BA Voice and Dance (BAVAD) and former MA Ritual Chant and Song students, some of which are undertaking doctoral research at the Academy. The ensemble has recently begun to work in close collaboration with a dancer to develop new choreosonographies, that is, pieces that use movement and sound to investigate the multiple possibilities of expression that dwell within the human body. HIBERNIA's premiere took place at the Galway Early Music Festival in May 2010. More recently, it presented the results of a three-month research project at a performance in Glenstal Abbey. The ensemble is currently working on the recording of the programme 'Songs for An Age of Sorrow', which includes Gregorian chant and other medieval repertoires. Some preview tracks can be downloaded from www.oscaromg.com/hibernia.

ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings ACADEMOS is the graduate string orchestra of the MA Classical String Performance Programme at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. Established in 2008, ACADEMOS has toured internationally each year as an integral part of its educational programme. Each orchestra member is a fulltime registered postgraduate student on the two-year MA Classical String programme at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick and is tutored by internationally acclaimed visiting professors: Dr Bruno Giuranna (Viola), Mariana Sirbu (Violin), and Michael Wolf (Double Bass), with tuition from Course Director, Ferenc Szücs (Cello) and Dr Yonit Kosovske (Piano, Harpsichord and Historical Performance Practice). Each year, students present one or more concerts with ACADEMOS, the programme's primary performing ensemble. ACADEMOS performs as both a larger chamber orchestra, as a collegium, and in smaller chamber groups, at times on its own as well as in partnership with other degree programmes from the Irish World Academy, with members of the Academy's faculty and with prestigious guest artists. Previous concerts have included collaboration with members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra, in residence at the University of Limerick. ACADEMOS takes its name from the early Akademia, just outside the walls of ancient Athens where there was a sacred grove of olive trees dedicated to the goddess of wisdom Athena and other immortals. This sacred site was called Hekademia, and later Akademia. By the beginning of the 6th century BCE, it was linked to an Athenian hero, a legendary "Akademos." After a lapse during the early Roman occupation, the Akademia was reestablished as a society of Platonists' successors. From antiquity to modern times, the concept of an Academy has been associated with a gathering of scholars, philosophers and artists for the purpose of cultivating the mind, of focused learning and personal development.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Scholarship and Award Recipients 2012

Scholarship and Award Recipients 2012

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Matthew Saunders

Francis Ward

Merit Bursary Award from the International Education Division, University of Limerick The Merit Bursary is awarded to undergraduate students in recognition of their excellent results for 2010/11 academic year. Each student will receive a bursary and a certificate in recognition of their achievement which will be presented to them by Prof. Paul McCutcheon, Vice President Academic and Registrar.

Recipients: Courtney Jay Hajime Takahashi Luis Sanchez Alyssa Porter

Any photos of these people available

Bachelor of Arts in Irish Music and Dance Bachelor of Arts in Irish Music and Dance Bachelor of Arts in Irish Music and Dance Bachelor of Arts in Irish Music and Dance

University of Limerick Foundation International Entrance Scholarship This scholarship is awarded to two American undergraduate students who achieved excellent grades in their High School Diploma. Each student will receive a bursary of €2,000 from the UL Foundation and a certificate in recognition of their achievement which will be presented by the Vice President Academic and Registrar, Prof. Paul McCutcheon, VPAR

Recipient: Matthew Saunders BA Irish Music and Dance

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Marie Duffy Foundation Excellence in Irish Dance Music Composition 2011 Recipient: Francis Ward Francis Ward learned to dance firstly with the Royal Tara School of Irish Dance within the Festival Irish Dance tradition in Co. Antrim, beginning at age eight. He began playing tin whistle and piano at age twelve, and was providing musical accompaniment at Irish dance festival competitions at age sixteen. It is at this early stage where his interest for composition began, composing original set dances for use with the Festival Dance Teachers’ Association. Notable set dance compositions of Francis’ include Haunting the Castle, Aoibhell the Fairy Woman, and Deirdre’s Lament. These were composed as far back as 1998 (at age 15) and having being absorbed into the Festival Dance tradition are performed regularly today at their competitions. Francis went on to learn Irish dance within An Coimisiún le Rincí Gaelacha with the Reid School of Irish dance in Belfast, taking his TCRG exam at age 20, and later performing as a dancer with Riverdance – The Show and bands such as Altan and Cherish the Ladies. He also began to provide musical accompaniment at An Coimisiún feiseanna, including the All Ireland and World Irish Dance Championships. He completed both the BA in Irish Music and Dance and the MA in Ethnomusicology at the Irish World Academy and has also held positions at the University of Limerick as Lecturer in Music and Dance, lecturing on the BA Irish Music and Dance. He is now pursuing PhD research entitled ‘The Effect of New Technologies on the Transmission of Irish Traditional Music’ and is holder of the prestigious Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) Government of Ireland Research Scholarship.

Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) Award Recipient: Francis Ward ‘The Effect of New Technologies on the Transmission of Irish Traditional Music’ This work recognises the growing presence of new forms of technology, principally the internet, in the Irish music tradition and seeks to identify the uses of such technology, and as a result, document the divergent transmission processes. The Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) funds world-class research in the humanities and social sciences, including Law and Business Studies. Its primary strategic objective centres on building an expertise-driven research system in order to enhance Ireland's innovation capacity and skills base in a rapidly-changing global environment where knowledge is key to economic, social and cultural development. IRCHSS is further committed to facilitating the integration of Irish researchers in the humanities and social sciences within the European Research Area.

Is there a better version of this logo available?


Fulbright Scholarship Recipients: Dominique Dodge Harper and singer Dominique Dodge grew up in northern NH and holds a BA Honours in Scottish Music from the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. Her love of traditional music has been shaped by her time in Scotland and Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where she teaches harp for the Gaelic College summer school. Her 2006 solo album is comprised of rhythmic, artfully arranged dance tunes and songs in Gaelic and Scots. She has 10 years of teaching, performing and recording experience in Europe and North America. Dominique is delighted to have been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to attend the University of Limerick’s Masters in Irish Traditional Music Performance in 2011/2012.

Dominique Dodge

Ciara Glasheen is an Irish World Academy graduate. She was selected for a Fulbright Award 2011-2012 and invited to continue her study through a Master of Music degree, specialising in oboe performance and pedagogy at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The presentation was made yesterday at the US Embassy in Ireland by John Hennessy-Niland, Deputy Chief of Mission. Ciara recently completed a Graduate Diploma in Education (Music) at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, UL and is an accomplished oboist.

Ciara Glasheen

Scholarship and Award Recipients 2012

Ciara Glasheen

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Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship 2011 – 2012 Recipient: Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell has been awarded an IRCHSS Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship (2011-12) to prepare her doctoral dissertation for publication. She completed her doctoral thesis on the history of the Irish harp and its patronage from 1790-1845 at the University of Limerick in 2009 and her current research project, entitled Custodians of Culture: Essays on the Social, Political, Musicological and Cultural History of the Irish Harp from 1790 to 1900, will be completed at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance under the mentorship of Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin. Assessed by an expert International peer review panel (from outside the Irish academic community), this fellowship is valued at €31,745 per annum and is aimed at candidates who have completed their PhD not more than five years previously.

Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell

Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Arts Award Recipient: Joanna Hyde A native of Colorado, USA, Joanna Hyde received the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s 2011 Graduate Arts Award to pursue graduate studies in music. She was selected as one of 10 scholars from across the country by a panel of distinguished arts professors and professionals based on criteria including artistic and/or creative merit, academic achievement, and a breadth of interests and activities. Joanna began studying classical violin at the age of six, and shortly thereafter expanded her musical endeavours to American fiddling styles such as old time, Texas swing, and bluegrass. Studying and performing alongside her musician brothers as she grew up, Joanna spent several summers attending various folk music camps and conferences throughout the USA, during which she fell in love with Irish traditional music. She graduated with a BA in Music from Colorado College in 2009, receiving the Music Department awards for academic achievement as well as excellence in instrumental music. Joanna is thrilled to be a part of the MA in Irish Traditional Music Performance programme at the University of Limerick.

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Ciara Glasheen


FONCA (National Fund for the Arts, Mexico) Recipient: Olivia Cantoral Olivia Cantoral is currently undertaking the PhD Arts Practice at the Irish World Academy. Her research interrogates her own musical practice as well as early music performance, taking the 14th century Spanish musical manuscript Codex Las Huelgas as her subject matter. The work she conducts marries musicology with performance practice, building a bridge between the performing of the repertory in Codex Las Huelgas by skola ix – the Irish World Academy-based female vocal ensemble- and her confidence for a creative historical musicology.

Olivia Cantoral

The FONCA (National Fund for the Arts, Mexico) is an institution created in 1989 as required by the Mexican government whose aims are to provide a financial structure that may support the artistic production, to strengthen and promote culture, and to preserve the cultural heritage of the country. Accordingly, it runs different programs destined to fulfil such objectives, such as the ‘Scholarships to Study Abroad’ which allow Mexican artists and researchers to develop their personal practice thus fostering cultural diversity and excellence in professional artistic performance. On the other hand, the government of Ireland through the Mexican Office for International Affairs offers two scholarships every year to Mexican students who wish to carry out postgraduate studies in Ireland. The grants cover all the areas of knowledge.

Roche Continents – Youth, Arts, Science Scholarship Recipient: Niamh Phelan is a Community Music MA student with a formal background in mathematics and music education. She was recently awarded the Roche Continents Scholarship 2011 and jetted off to Salzburg, Austria to reap the rewards. Niamh is a professional violin teacher and enjoys performing an extensive range of genres. In September 2010, Niamh was appointed as a scholar for the Sing out with Strings 2010/11 outreach programme in conjunction with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and the IWAMD. Niamh also had the opportunity to attend Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance with the help of the Paul Brady Blas Bursary

Niamh Phelan

Roche Continents – Youth! Arts! Science!” is a project grown from a partnership between Roche and the Salzburg Festival. 100 students from across Europe are selected to participate in this exceptional challenge. To be eligible to apply, one has to be a student (undergraduate, doctoral candidate or post-doc) aged 20 to 29 from the life sciences, chemistry, the fine arts or music. Roche is well known for promoting culture in novel settings, and Roche Continents is an example of this commitment. Participants attend concerts and talks by guest speakers, and are given the opportunity to join discussions with artists as well as take part in group workshops, exploring the common ground of innovation and creativity in the arts and science.

Scholarship and Award Recipients 2012

Niamh Phelan

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Conor McCarthy

Orchestra Position in France for Irish World Academy Recipient: Academy Graduate Conor McCarthy Double bass player Conor MacCarthy had been offered a position in France in the Orchestre National du Capitole de Toulouse. Conor is a graduate of the MA in Classical String Performance programme at the Irish World Academy and we congratulate him on this wonderful achievement. Graduates of the MA in Classical String Performance programme are currently employed in teaching positions up to third level Ireland and abroad or members of professional ensembles and orchestras including the BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, Camerata Ireland, Con Tempo String Quartet, Concerto Malaga, Győr Philharmonic, Irish Chamber Orchestra, Kuala Lumpur Symphony Orchestra, National Symphony Orchestra of Ireland, Prague Chamber Orchestra, RTE Concert Orchestra, and the Stradivari String Quartet.

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Caption Required Caption Required Photograph Š Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Scholarships at the Irish World Academy

Scholarships at the Irish World Academy

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The Stepping Stones Scholarships

The Trustees of Muckross House Scholarship for the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Programme Through Dr Catherine Foley’s connection with Muckross House since 1979 as a collector of Irish traditional music, song and dance, the Trustees of Muckross House have awarded for a number of years a scholarship to the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programme. The 2011/12 recipients are Teresa Donohoe and Tereza Bernardova. Further information and application queries should be directed to: Dr Catherine Foley, Director MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance. Phone: + 353 61 202922. Email: Catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

Stepping Stones Scholarship A new scholarship fund has been made available for post-graduate study at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. The Stepping Stones Scholarships target international post-graduate students with a demonstrable record in a performance and/or academic specialisation relevant to a programme of study at the Academy. Priority will be given to:

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applicants experiencing demonstrable financial challenge

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applicants from parts of the world underrepresented at the Academy

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applicants with projects that resonate with the spirit of the Stepping Stones initiative: equality of arts practices, an interdisciplinary vision, and desire to build bridges between arts practices

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applicants for programmes with a higher number of available places

The first cohort of Stepping Stones scholars come from five different countries and will participate in seven different programmes. These include: Ron Mc Daniel Catherine John Sabrina Ng Rui Ting Elizabeth Painter Colin Botts

USA USA Singapore USA USA

Daniel Howe

Canada

Lisa Vogel

USA

Masumi Seki Amelia Thornton Aramhv Vazquez Jaimee Jensen Carolyn Dike

Japan USA Mexico USA USA

MA in Community Music MA in Community Music MA in Community Music MA in Ethnochoreology MA Irish Traditional Music Performance MA Contemporary Dance Performance MA Contemporary Dance Performance MA Classical Strings MA Classical Strings MA Classical Strings MA Ritual Chant & Song MA Ethnomusicology

Further information and application queries should be directed to : Dr Helen Phelan, Associate Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Phone: + 353 61 202590 Email: helen.phelan@ul.ie www.irishworldacademy.ie

The Marie Duffy Foundation Award for excellence in Dance Performance at the University of Limerick. The Marie Duffy Foundation in association with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick is pleased to announce the establishment of the Marie Duffy Excellence Award in Dance Performance. This bursary, which has been introduced for the first time this year, is valued at one thousand (1000) euro and will acknowledge excellence in Irish dance performance by final year undergraduate students of the BA Irish music and Dance. The recipient of the new Irish Dance bursary will be selected by the course board in consultation with the external examiner. Students will apply for consideration for the award and illustrate how the award will be used to develop their artistic practice. This will be a factor in the recommendation of the award. The principal criteria for assessing the award will be the creative output of the student. The inaugural bursary will be awarded in May 2012. Further information and application queries should be directed to : Dr Orfhlaith NĂ­ Bhriain, Lecturer in Dance, BA Irish Music & Dance. Phone: + 353 61 202470. Email: orfhlaith.nibhriain@ul.ie


Paul Brady Blas Summer School Scholarship

Applications are invited in writing for Blas 2011 and should be made to Ernestine Healy, Director, B las International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick or email ernestine.healy@ul.ie. Applicants should be over 17 and should include a sample recording of their music and/or dance. See www.blas.ie for further information.

Paul Brady and Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Scholarships at the Irish World Academy

The Paul Brady Blas Scholarship provides €20,000 in funds over three years, providing 25 places for deserving musicians on the Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, which takes place annually in June at the Irish World Academy. The Paul Brady Blas Summer School scholarship recipients will benefit from master classes and tuition from some of Ireland's most respected traditional musicians and dancers. The first Paul Brady Blas Scholarships were awarded in June 2010 where recipients spent two weeks at the Academy, receiving tuition from tutors including Dónal Lunny, Martin Hayes, John Carty, Derek Hickey, Colin Dunne, Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, Siobhán Peoples, Ernestine Healy, Niall Keegan, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh and many more.

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Clár

Programmes at the Irish World Academy BA Irish Music and Dance Niall Keegan, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202465 Email: niall.keegan@ul.ie

BA Voice and Dance

M. Ed (Music) Grad. Dip Education (Music)

Ferenc Szucs, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202918, Email: ferenc.szucs@ul.ie

Jean Downey, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213160, Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Dr Óscar Mascareñas Garza, Course Director Phone: +353 61 233762 Email: oscar.mascarenas@ul.ie

MA Community Music

MA Music Therapy

MA Contemporary Dance Performance

Professor Jane Edwards, Course Director. Phone: + 353 61 213122 Email: jane.edwards@ul.ie

MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Dr Catherine Foley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202922 Email:catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

MA Irish Traditional Music Performance Sandra Joyce, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie

MA Ritual Chant and Song Wolodymyr Smishkewych, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 234743 Email: Wolodymyr.smishkewych@ul.ie

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MA Classical String Performance

Jean Downey Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213160 Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Mary Nunan, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213464, Email: mary.nunan@ul.ie

MA Ethnochoreology Dr Catherine Foley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202922, Email:catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

MA Ethnomusicology Dr Colin Quigley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202966, Email: colin.quigley@ul.ie

Phd Arts Practice Dr Helen Phelan, Course Director Associate Director, Irish World Academy Phone: + 353 61 202575 Email: Helen.phelan@ul.ie

Certificate In Music and Dance Sandra Joyce, Acting Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Clár

Clár

Programmes at The Irish World Academy

Caption required Caption required Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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The Irish World Academy continues to have a very strong international student profile and since its inception in 1994, has included students from the following countries: EU: Austria Belgium Czech Republic Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy Netherlands Norway Poland Romania Slovakia Spain Sweden UK

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NON EU: Australia Brazil Canada China Chile Colombia Georgia Indonesia Israel Japan Malaysia Mexico Nepal New Zealand Nigeria Russia Singapore South Africa Taiwan USA Vietnam


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Other Programmes and Arts Offices at the University of Limerick

The Graduate Diploma in Dance is a one-year, part time programme of study. The Graduate Diploma in Dance enables participants to acquire the necessary skills to teach at Leaving Certificate Physical Education level by focusing on the aesthetic/artistic/dance components of such a certificate. The emphasis is on participants’ own professional development. Students who satisfy the University’s entrance requirements for transfer to a master’s degree may be considered for admission to the master’s programme. The object of the programme is to interested teachers with a unique opportunity to develop appropriate dance education skills, the course aims to promote dance culture and develop greater participation in the art of dance in Ireland. Course director: Brigitte Moody, Department: Physical Education and Sport Sciences. Phone: + 353-61-202807, Email: Brigitte.moody@ul.ie

Faculty of Science and Engineering: The Centre for Computational Musicology & Computer Music Ma/Msc in Music Technology The Master's Degree in Music Technology is a 12-month intensive course that is designed specifically for musicians from all disciplines. The course is aimed at graduates who are interested in combining technological competence with artistic endeavour. Director: Nicholas Ward, nicholas.ward@ul.ie Phone: 061 234246 www.csis.ul.ie

Faculty of Science and Engineering: The Interaction Design Centre (IDC) MA in Interactive Multimedia The MA in Interactive Multimedia is a 12-month intensive course that is designed specifically for art and design graduates who are interested in pursuing studies, which combine technological competence with design/artistic endeavour. The convergence of computer and media technologies offers unique opportunities for design/artists to exploit their potential in new areas, across a wide range of activities, such as recording, multimedia, software, broadcasting and education. Director: Mikael Fernström, Phone: + 353 61 202606, Email: mikael.fernstrom@ul.ie www.csis.ul.ie

Arts Offices At The University Of Limerick The Association of Irish Choirs Founded in 1980, The Association of Irish Choirs (formerly Cumann Náisiúnta na gCór) is a national resource organisation, funded by The Arts Council, to support and promote excellence in choral music throughout Ireland. The Association fulfils its function as a national resource organisation by providing information and advice to choirs and conductors and by presenting a range of programmes and activities designed to respond to the needs of Association members, the wider choral community and the public. The Association of Irish Choirs moved its administrative offices from Cork City to the University of Limerick in February 2010. University of Limerick is home to a number of arts organisations with which the Association hopes

and intends to collaborate including the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the Irish Chamber Orchestra and the University Concert Hall. The Association intends to play its part in student life while also contributing to the artistic life of the city and its surrounds. In addition to providing for the needs of the choral sector, AOIC is also the producing and parent organisation of the Irish Youth Choir. In June 2010, following nationwide auditions, 98 young singers and 50 instrumentalists between the ages of 18 and 28 benefited from the IYC and NYOI summer residential programme of training, rehearsals and concerts here at University of Limerick. The Irish Youth Choir also offers opportunities for young conductors to develop their skills through the Conductor in Training initiative, run in conjunction with the National Chamber Choir, and by offering masterclass opportunities during the IYC week. Founded in 1982, IYC members have gone on to form the backbone of musical life in this country and beyond as conductors, choir founders, singers, teachers and musicians. They include singer Julie Feeney, soloists Mairéad Buicke and Bridget Knowles, conductors Bernie Sherlock and Niall Crowley, to name but a few. In August 2010, The Association of Irish Choirs presented its 30th Annual Choral Conducting Summer School, attended by 60 conductors, teachers, students, choral enthusiasts and musicians at the newly opened Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The course was delivered on 5 levels; beginner to advanced designed to address the needs of conductors of all levels. AOIC also presented a number of workshops and masterclasses as part of the Annual Choral Conducting Summer School. For further information, contact AOIC aoic@ul.ie or Liz Powell, CEO at 061 234823 or Liz Kelly, General Manager on 061 202715 for further information.

Other Programmes and Arts Offices

Faculty of Education and Health Sciences: Graduate Diploma/Master of Arts in Dance (Part Time)

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Other Programmes and Arts Offices (contd) at the University of Limerick

University of Limerick Arts Officer: Patricia Moriarty Phone + 353 61 20 2130 patricia.moriarty@ul.ie

University of Limerick Visual Arts Officer: Yvonne Davis Phone + 353 61 21 3052 Yvonne.davis@ul.ie

Irish Language Office/Aonad na Gaeilge Deirdre Ni Loinsigh, Stiúrthóir na Gaeilge Phone: 061 213 463 Deirdre.niloingsigh@ul.ie Ciara Considine, Marketing/Admin Phone: 061 234 754 ciara.considine@ul.ie

Department of Music, Mary Immaculate College

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Mary Immaculate College, Limerick was founded in 1898 and became a recognised college of the National University of Ireland in 1974 before being academically integrated with the University of Limerick in 1991. The College occupies a mature campus on the South Circular Road in the suburbs of Limerick City and student enrolment currently stands at 3,000. The Department of Music offers music for the B.Ed and BA (Liberal Arts) programmes as well as a taught MA in Music Education and other postgraduate degrees to doctoral level by research (Graduate Assistantships @ €7,000 p.a. plus fee waiver available). Regular choral and chamber concerts (see website) are a vital part of the life of the Department. There are close ties and many cross-campus ventures with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. MIC has now opened its new 500-seater performing arts venue, the Lime Tree Theatre.

Faculty Dr. Gareth Cox (Head of Department) Dr. Paul Collins Dr. Michael Murphy Gwen Moore Ailbhe Kenny Dr Karen Power (Music Technician) Colette Davis (Staff Accompanist) Departmental Enquiries: Secretary: +353 61 204507 e-mail: musicinfo@mic.ul.ie Website: www.mic.ul.ie


Further information on the Irish World Academy’s courses, concerts, seminars and special events: Phone: + 353 61 202917/ Fax: + 353 61 202589 Email: ellen.byrne@ul.ie www.irishworldacademy.ie

Maurice Gunning has been working as Photographerin-Residence with the Irish World Academy since 2004. Concentrating on fine art documentary photography as well as specialising in dance, music and theatre photography, Maurice has worked with many of the leading traditional & classical musicians and contemporary dancers. He received his MFA from the University of Wales in 2009 after several months documenting the Argentine Irish community of Buenos Aires. This work has been exhibited in the UK and in Buenos Aires in 2010 with support from Culture Ireland. Working with funding from the Irish Heritage Council over the past three years on a project dealing with Ireland’s Traditional Boating Heritage has culminated in the first showing of this work in the Cultural Centre, Athens and the Hunt Museum Limerick. A new collection of work opened in Dance House, Dublin in 2011. A new direction into cinematography saw Maurice’s first documentary on the Chilean Miners being broadcast on RTE in 2011, this documentary received a worldwide distribution deal with Off the Fence Distribution. Commissions for CD artwork and design are also incorporated into his commissioned work. The photographs throughout this book are examples of his work documenting events at the Irish World Academy as well as the exhibition throughtout the academy building. For further information see; www.mauricegunning.com info@mauricegunning.com

Front Cover: Colin Dunne in his internationally acclaimed show Out Of Time. Irish World Academy, Theatre 1, 2011. Back Cover: Three members of the Karen community visiting the Academy for a performance and seminar on Karen culture in 2011. The Karen are the largest ethnic minority group in Burma and have a community in Mayo since 2007 as a result of a refugee resettlement programme'. This event was made possible through the Irish World Academy SANCTUARY programme.



Comhaimseartha / Of Our Times: Spring/Summer 2012