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Autumn

An F贸mhar


Contents 02

Introduction

04

Irish World Academy Faculty and Staff

07

Lunchtime Concert Series

15

Seminar Series

23

Special Events

36

Spring and Summer 2011 at the Irish World Academy

39

Bealach / Community Cultural Pathways

41

Cónaí / Artists in Residence

45

Irish World Academy Ensembles in Residence

47

Irish World Academy Scholarship and Award Recipients 2011/2012

51

Scholarships

55

Research

57

Clár / Irish World Academy Programmes

59

Other Programmes and Arts Offices at the University of Limerick


Contents Participants in the joint Irish World Academy / Dance Ireland / Arts Council Step Up: Dance Project, July 2011 Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

01


Introduction The Sionna Garden In 2009 as part of the construction of the Irish World Academy building on the campus of the University of Limerick, a garden in the Japanese Zen style was commissioned by the University from Robert Ketchell and a team from Nordon Landscapes. The garden that resulted is described here by its creator, Robert Ketchell.

Introduction

In the Japanese garden two elements stand out as essential: stone and water. The word for landscape, in both the Chinese and Japanese languages, uses the same written characters (san, 山 and sui, 水, in Japanese). The Eastern garden frequently uses stones as a metaphor for ‘mountains’. The word for ‘landscape’ is made of the combination of the two characters, sansui (山水). The mountain symbolically represents the axis mundi of the Universe, and thus defines the spiritual centre. It is an interesting characteristic of the difference between the Western and Eastern garden, that in the East stones are frequently set vertically, whereas in the Western garden the emphasis is more inclined to the horizontal plane.

02

The mountain, as a yang element, ascends heavenward, the movement both physically and visually is upward. The mountain reaches up towards the heavens. The mountain consecrates that which it rises from, and its presence allows us to aspire to recognise the sacred. To Eliade the mountain as axis mundi, connects and supports heaven and earth, it acts as a bridge between the sacred and mundane worlds. “A sacred place constitutes a break in the homogeneity of space; this break is symbolised by an opening through which passing from one cosmic region to another is made possible.” In the Japanese garden the image of a stone and that of ‘mountain’ are interchangeable. Water, a yin element in Eastern cosmology, is the polar opposite of the mountain. The movement is from heaven to earth, from the mountain to the sea. Water has been associated with the sacred since man developed consciousness.

“The waters symbolise the universal sum of virtualities: they are fons et origo, ‘spring and origin,’ the reservoir of all the possibilities of existence; they precede every form and support every creation.” Water has no form of itself and is undivided. In China, as well as Japan, the dragon is a potent image, and the dragon which resided in water is associated with the flow of cosmic energy which arises from the interaction of the yin and yang elements. In the context of the Zen karesansui garden the implication of movement is a congruent, essential, balancing quality. It plays a significant role in which the garden connects and communicates with the viewer. The seven standing stones in The Sionna Garden symbolise the hazelnut trees that according to the mythology of the goddess Sionna, stood guard over the Pool of Wisdom. They may also be read as the slopes of the Cuilcagh Mountain that form the source of the River Shannon, which eventually flows past the Irish World Academy, reaching both an end and a new beginning at the Shannon estuary past Limerick city. According to the myth, the pool contained salmon that ate the Hazelnuts of Wisdom when they fell into the water, and these Salmon of Wisdom acquired a pink spot on their flank when they did so. A spring or source in Japan is one of the most sacred of places and almost invariably there would be a consecrated structure mounted over or near its site. The same can be said in many landscapeorientated spiritual traditions and this was certainly also the case in native Celtic belief, where springs were held in special regard. In the early consideration of the garden I had seen the visual plane being more or less flat, stretching away from the viewer, with the primary visual focus of the garden to be seen from the ground floor foyer, but also from above. In a Zen garden, the stone arrangement forms the skeleton of the garden, each stone being set with particular attention to every detail in respect of how the stone grouping works together as a whole. As the garden construction got underway, and one developed a more intimate feeling for the space,

I decided to bring the Sionna triad of stones closer to the front of the composition. This then led to deciding to raise the rear of the garden - in effect to tilt the picture plane, as this would help to bring the whole garden closer to the viewer. All the while, a garden creator is balancing his own ideas/ego against what he perceives to be the request of the stones and other materials. The garden that emerges from this process is a compromise between those two poles. In part the training and development of a traditional Japanese gardener lies in developing an aesthetic sensitivity towards the materials one uses: the earth, space, rocks and plants. The Japanese garden, unlike its Western counterpart, is not primarily a horticultural exercise: in spirit it is perhaps closer to sculpture and owes of a great deal to the design concerns of Chinese landscape painting. Above all, any creative work needs to ‘belong’ to the place where it exists. Many of the principles of the Japanese karesansui garden are of a universal nature in that they can communicate with a viewer even when reinterpreted outside of its native cultural weave. Many cultures have developed a particular sensitivity to the landscape that supports them, and in this, Ireland is no different to Japan. All gardens, of either the Western or Eastern traditions are rooted in, and derived from, the expression of the state of Paradise. In both China and Japan, landscape was recognised as a cultural metaphor for spiritual aspiration and wholeness. The Zen karesansui garden is an intense distillation of the notion of landscape, and thus it enables the viewer to form a direct connection with the gestalt of landscape as representing an ideal state of Being. In creating gardens with this awareness one is simply continuing a multi-millennia old practice that has occupied societies across the world regardless of being separated by time or space. Robert Ketchell

Sansui Garden Design London


Robert Ketchell has had twenty-five years of experience of the gardens of Kyoto where he originally studied as an apprentice to a Master Gardener Susumu Kobayashi, with whom he studied for three and a half years. He was also a Research student at Kyoto University, under Professor Makoto Nakamura, which enabled him to study the historical and philosophical basis of the garden tradition. The experience of studying landscape gardening in Japan was a life-changing one, as it opened doors of perception, intuition and awareness. Since that time over twenty years ago, he has continued to visit Kyoto and study Japanese gardens. Currently chairman of the Japanese Garden Society (based in the UK), he is also an author, lecturer and documentary film maker. He has created gardens in the UK, Europe and the USA and is now senior director of Sansui Garden Designs in London.

The Zen Garden at the Irish World Academy Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

03


Faculty & Staff

Faculty & Staff

04

Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin Director Irish World Academy of Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202590 Email: melissa.carty@ul.ie

Dr Helen Phelan, Associate Director Irish World Academy of Music and Dance Director, PhD Arts Practice Acting Director, MA Ritual Chant and Song Phone: + 353 61 202575 Email: helen.phelan@ul.ie

Paula Dundon Academy Administrator Phone: + 353 61 202149 Email: paula.dundon@ul.ie

Barbara Christie Administrator, Director’s Office Phone: + 353 61 202030 Email: barbara.christie@ul.ie

Ellen Byrne Director Media & Performing Arts Office Phone: + 353 61 202917 Email: ellen.byrne@ul.ie

David Bennis Technical Officer Phone: + 353 61 202726 Email: david.bennis@ul.ie

Ferenc Szücs, Director MA Classical String Performance Phone: + 353 61 202918 Email: ferenc.szucs@ul.ie

Dr. Yonit Lea Kosovske Lecturer in Classical Piano Chamber Music Performance MA Classical String Performance Phone: + 353 61 234922 Email: yonit.kosovske@ul.ie

Mary Nunan Director MA Contemporary Dance Performance Phone + 353 61 213464 Email: mary.nunan@ul.ie

Wolodymyr Smishkewych MA Ritual Chant and Song Phone: + 353 61 234358 Email: Wolodymyr.smishkewych@ul.ie

Dr Jenny Roche Lecturer in Dance BA in Voice and Dance Phone: +353 61 202798 Email: jenny.roche@ul.ie

Melissa Carty Assistant Administrator Phone: + 353 61 202590 Email: melissa.carty@ul.ie


Dr Catherine Foley Director MA Ethnochoreology MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Phone: + 353 61 202922 Email: catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

Dr Colin Quigley Director MA Ethnomusicology Phone: + 353 61 202966 Email: colin.quigley@ul.ie

Jean Downey, Director Graduate Diploma in Education (Music) M. Ed (Music) MA Community Music Phone: + 353 61 213160 Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Niall Keegan, Director BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 20 2465 Email: niall.keegan@ul.ie

Dr Aileen Dillane Lecturer in Music BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202159 Email: aileen.dillane@ul.ie

Mats Melin Lecturer in Dance BA Irish Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202542 Email: Mats.melin@ul.ie

Dr Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain Lecturer in Dance BA Irish Music & Dance Phone: + 353 61 202470 Email: Orfhlaith.nibhriain@ul.ie

Dr Sandra Joyce, Director MA Irish Traditional Music Performance Acting Director, Certificate in Music and Dance Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie

Professor Jane Edwards Director MA Music Therapy Phone: + 353 61 213122 Email: jane.edwards@ul.ie

Tríona McCaffrey Lecturer MA Music Therapy Phone: + 353 61 234358 Email: Triona.mccaffrey@ul.ie

Dr Óscar Mascareñas Garza Director BA Voice and Dance Phone: + 353 61 233762 Email: Oscar.mascarenas@ul.ie

www.irishworldacademy.ie

05


Wolodymyr Smishkewich

Dr Jenny Roche

Dr Yonit Lea Kosovske

David Bennis

Barbara Christie

New Faces at the Academy 2011 Wolodymyr Smishkewich Course Director MA Ritual Chant and Song Spanish-Ukrainian tenor Wolodymyr Smishkewych is a native of New Jersey, USA. He has specialized in medieval song, chant, and new music since the 1990s. He received his training in voice performance from Rutgers University (BM 95, MM 98) and is currently a candidate for the doctorate in voice performance from Indiana University. A sought-after pedagogue in medieval, contemporary, and world vocal music, he has lectured at universities in the United States, South America, Canada, and Europe. He recently joined the faculty of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick, Ireland as director of the MA in Ritual Song and Chant. He is a member of Sequentia Ensemble for Medieval Music and of Paul Hillier’s Theatre of Voices, and has performed at major festivals through Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South America including BBC Proms, Regensberg Tage Alter Musik, Festival Cervantino, Edinburgh Festival, and the early music festivals of Boston, Barcelona, Utrecht, and Berkeley. He has recorded for Sony/BMG, Harmonia Mundi USA, ExCathedra, and Focus records. Active as a researcher as well as a performer, he writes, records, and creates video about singing, ethnomusicology, instrument building and organology, and music & nature.

Faculty & Staff

Dr Jenny Roche Lecturer in Dance, BA Voice and Dance

06

Dr. Jenny Roche is a dance artist who has worked as a contemporary dancer since the early 1990s performing with a wide range of choreographers in Ireland and internationally, including Michael Keegan-Dolan (Ire), Janet Smith (UK), Rosemary Butcher (UK), Jodi Melnick (NYC), John Jasperse (NYC), Yoshiko Chuma (NYC) and in work by Dominique Bagouet, re-staged by Les Carnets Bagouet (France). She has danced for Daghdha Dance Company, Dance Theatre of Ireland, Irish Modern Dance Theatre, Cois Ceim and was a founder member of Fabulous Beast Dance Theatre. She co-founded Rex Levitates Dance Company with her sister, choreographer Liz Roche in 1999 and has performed extensively with the company,

most notably in the Meet in Beijing Festival, China, in 2006 and the Baryshnikov Arts Centre, NYC, in 2011. In 2001, she completed her Master's degree in Dance Performance at the Irish World Academy and in 2009 she received her doctoral award from Roehampton University, London. Her thesis title was Moving Identities: Multiplicity, Embodiment and the Contemporary Dancer and her area of research continues to be the dancer's creative practice within choreographic processes. From 2007 to 2011, she was Dance Adviser to the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

Dr Yonit Lea Kosovske Lecturer in Classical Piano Chamber Music Performance MA Classical String Performance Dr. Yonit Kosovske has performed as a soloist and chamber artist in major cities throughout the United States, Israel, Hong Kong, Spain, Colombia and Ecuador. Holding degrees in both modern and historical keyboard instruments, she performs on harpsichord, modern piano, fortepiano, chamber organ and harmonium. Playing repertoire spanning over five hundred years, her performances have been broadcast on radio stations across the United States and featured on programs such as National Public Radio’s Performance Today, Sunday Baroque and Harmonia. She has given concerts at the prestigious Early Music Festivals in Boston, Berkeley, Bloomington, Chicago, and in Quito, Ecuador, appearing in major concert halls throughout North and South America, including the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, Millennium Park in Chicago, Illinois, the Teatro Nacional Sucre in Quito, Ecuador, and Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco, amongst other venues. She holds a Doctor of Music degree in Early Music and Historical Keyboards from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where she studied with Elisabeth Wright. She has given master classes in both North and South America. From 2008 to 2010 she taught at Indiana University as an Adjunct Lecturer of Music as well as an Instructor of Piano and Harpsichord in the Pre-College Music Programs. Her most recent recordings include: ¡Ay, España Infelice! Classical and Romantic Songs from Spain with her

ensemble Canto Romántico (La Douceur, 2011); La Gracieuse, French chaconnes, passacailles, & preludes for solo harpsichord (La Douceur, 2010); Solo Keyboard Works by Girolamo Frescobaldi (Focus, 2010); Haydn’s Neun kleine frühe Sonaten on fortepiano (2009); Sweelinck’s Secular Pieces (2006); Fitzwilliam Favorites (2006); and À discretion (2000). Her book "Historical Harpsichord Technique, Developing La douceur du toucher" was published in July of 2011 through Indiana University Press. Her duo Canto Romántico had its European debut in Spain in August of 2011 of its programme "Love in Times of War and Peace," a literary and musical collaboration for voice, fortepiano, and Romantic guitar. In June of 2011, Dr. Kosovske joined the faculty of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance as a Lecturer in Classical Piano Chamber Music Performance. With an enormous passion for teaching and performing, she looks forward to collaborating on future projects with musicians, dancers, writers and artists from diverse backgrounds and cultural traditions.

David Bennis Technical Officer David has recently joined the Irish World Academy after previous University engagements with the Department of Sports Science and The Materials and Surface Science Institute. He has a background in engineering, music and the sciences, combining these in his current support role with the Academy. He is also a classical guitarist and completed an MA in Classical String Performance at the Irish World Academy in 2008.

Barbara Christie Administrator, Director’s Office Barbara Christie has worked at the University of Limerick since 1986, firstly as an administrator in the College of Business, then in the accommodation office. She was PA to the UL Vice President Administration for ten years till 2010 and spent eight months at the Medical School prior to moving to the Academy as Directors Office Administrator in April 2011.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Lunchtime Concert Series

September to December 2011

Angelina Carberry (banjo) and Killian Vallely (pipes), lunchtime concert, spring 2011 Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

Venue: Tower Theatre Irish World Academy University of Limerick

ADMISSION FREE All Welcome

07


Sarah Moffatt

Eligio Luis Quinteiro

September Tuesday 20th September Traditional Music Performance

Thursday 22nd September Sarah Moffatt (violin) & Eligio Luis Quinteiro (guitar)

Lunchtime Concert Series

Sarah Moffatt was born in Dublin and studied violin at the Royal Irish Academy of Music, later specialising in periodinstrument performance at the RAM (London), and graduating with numerous prizes including the RAM’s highest award for a final recital. As a specialist in period-instrument performance she has performed and recorded with all the major periodinstrument ensembles in the UK and Spain, in music from the renaissance to the romantic era. She has been broadcast as soloist on RTÉ lyric fm, BBC Radio3, Radio Catalunya and Radio Nacional de España.

08

Eligio Luis Quinteiro, from Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, studied classical guitar with Olímpiades García and Joaquín Prats, and in 1997 he moved to London to study Early Music at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. As a specialist in basso continuo he has performed and recorded with the leading early music ensembles in the UK and Spain. He is in great demand as soloist and accompanist of baroque song (on lute and theorbo) and romantic lieder (on romantic guitar). Eligio Luis is artistic director of the ensembles Capilla Cayrasco and Camerata Cayrasco. The programme will consist of duos for violin and guitar from the classical era, by composers such as Pierre Porro and Mozart.

Softday

Tuesday 25th September Traditional Music Performance

Tuesday 27th of September Softday Softday – the art-science collaboration of artist Sean Taylor and computer scientist Mikael Fernström has been selected as one of the top entries to the prestigious project EUROPE – A SOUND PANORAMA. Ten European sound artists were selected to present compositions made up of acoustic impressions of a European venue or landscape and rendered in artistic form. The overall project aims to produce a sound composition, which conveys an impression of the particularities of different parts of Europe. The acoustic artwork EUROPE – A SOUND PANORAMA will be the result of an intercultural exchange on how Europe is perceived. Softday were one of ten artists selected from 186 submissions from 25 European countries. Their participation in the project will see them travel to Karlsruhe, Germany in October 2011. They will perform their work in a live concert recorded by Deutschlandradio Kultur and distributed to all European radio stations. Softday’s winning submission was based on a composition titled Marbh Chrios / Dead Zone, a project which addresses issues of climate change in County Donegal. Marbh Chrios / Dead Zone was commissioned by Donegal County Council in 2010 as part of the Lovely Weather Donegal Artists Residencies, a ground breaking art & science project. In developing Marbh Chrios / Dead Zone Softday converted scientific and environmental data into music and sonifications that were then performed and recorded in Mooney’s Boatyard, Killybegs in November 2010. The environmental data was sourced though dialogues with scientists from Met Eireann and the Marine Institute of Ireland as well as with marine scientists in the US and Sweden. Softday also collaborated with Aquafact, a specialist company

Michael Joyce

Sabine Ducrot

based in Galway who carry out detailed Marine surveys. The performance of Marbh Chrios / Dead Zone involved a number of local Donegal performers including the Donegal Youth Orchestra; St.Catherines Marching Band and the Softday Céilí band. The performance also combines live performance by Softday featuring electro-acoustic sounds based on field recordings.

Thursday 29th September Traditional Music Performance

Thursday 29th September 29 Sabine Ducrot (flute) Michael Joyce (piano) Flautist Sabine Ducrot has appeared as a soloist with some of France’s leading orchestras including the Orchestre de Paris and the Orchestre de Radio France. She has performed at major international venues including the Salle Pleyel and the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris. She has recorded and performed live broadcasts for French and Irish radio and television. Aged 13, she won the French ‘Young Musician of the Future’ competition on flute. The following year she won the same competition on piano. She subsequently studied both piano and flute at the Paris Conservatoire, the first student in the history of the conservatoire to be accepted in two separate principal instruments. She is a prize-winner in many international competitions including the Maria Canals (Barcelona), Jean-Piere Rampal and Vierzon international flute competitions, the Chopin (Majorca), Claude Kahn and Wurmser international piano competitions and the Brussels European Young Musician competition where she won prizes in both flute and piano. Prior to moving to Ireland she was principal flautist of the Orchestre Philharmonique de France and professor of flute at the Conservatoire National de Region in Paris. She currently lives in Cork where she lectures in flute and piano at CIT Cork School of Music.


Sougata Roy Choudhury

Zsuzsa Berényi

Michael Joyce began his piano studies at the Cork School of Music with Dr Bridget Doolan and Jan Čáp. He studied piano performance with Professors Nerine Barrett and Renate Kretschmar-Fischer at the Hochschule für Musik in Detmold, Germany, graduating with a first class honours degree. He then worked as a teaching assistant at Yale University while pursing a Master of Music degree with pianist Peter Frankl. He has performed as a collaborative pianist in recitals throughout Ireland and internationally at venues including the RDS in Dublin, Maggio Musicale in Florence and Wigmore Hall in London. He has made numerous recordings for RTÉ radio and has performed with tenor Robert Craig, violist Nobuko Imai, violinists Catherine Leonard, Keith Pascoe and Héloïse Geoghegan, cellists Pavel Gomziakov and Gerard Peregrine and pianist Ciara Moroney. Michael currently lives in Cork where he freelances and works as an accompanist at CIT Cork School of Music.

October Tuesday 4th October Traditional Music Performance

Wednesday 5th October Indian Concert Sougata Roy Choudhury (Sitar) Sougata Roy Choudhury is a master of the sarod, a fretless stringed "lute" with metallic fingerboard played with the musician's fingernails and sounded by a coconut shell plectrum. He is part of a new generation of Classical Indian Musicians, trained by great masters in a traditional manner from an early age, who are bringing their music out of India. Sougata has had a big impact on bringing the sarod in particular to popularity in the west. He has performed in many

Pál Banda

festivals and concert halls in France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Ireland and has a growing number of both Indian and international students. His students travel from all over the world to take talim (intensive study) with him in Kolkata. Today’s concert will be followed by a seminar on Indian Classical Music at 2.30 pm.

London and Budapest. Future plans include concerts with the Marmara Trio in Istanbul, Bonn, Gent and Strasbourg as well as another chamber concert with pianist Gábor Csalog in Hungary. His cello is by T&L Carcassi, 1752.

Tuesday 12th October

Thursday 6th October

Traditional Music Performance

Zsuzsa Berényi (violin) Pál Banda (cello)

Thursday 13th October

Zsuzsa Berényi studied the piano at the Bartok Specialist Music School and received a first class degree at the Liszt Academy of Music in Hungary in 2006, studying with Laszlo Denes and professor Denes Zsigmondy. From the age of 15, Zsuzsa took masterclasses with renowned players Andras Schiff and Gyorgy Kurtag; she also studied with Denes Zsigmondy, with whom she toured and recorded the late Mozart Sonatas. She has toured the UK with various chamber music ensembles, regularly playing in London, Buckingham, Axminster and Cambridge among other places. Pál Banda was born into a musical family in Budapest. He began learning cello at the age of 9 and went on to study at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music with his father, Ede Banda as well as with György Kurtág and Ferenc Rados. A British council Scholarship took him to Prussia Cove where he pursued further studies with Ralph Kirshbaum. In 1982 Pál received a commendation on the Moscow International Tchaikovsky Competition and the following year won the 1st prize on the Popper Competition at the Liszt Academy, Budapest. In 1983 he became Principal Cello in the Camerata Academica, Salzburg and as a soloist he has performed in his native Hungary (for Radio and TV) as well as France, Holland, Belgium, Denmark, Austria and UK and Singapore, and was one of the directors of the Paxos International Festival from 1999-2004. He is also regularly invited as an adjudicator. Last year he played on recitals in Amsterdam, Paris, Brussels,

Common Ground Debbie Diamond (violin), Yonit Kosovske (harpsichord), Ferenc Szucs (cello) with Anna Yepes (dance) As part of the Baroque Intensive (see ‘Special Events section, page 27), this programme features instrumental chaconnes and passacaglias from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by composers in Italy, Austria, and Bohemia: Veracini, Bertali, Schmelzer and Biber. While musicologists have argued the differentiation of these two musical genres, at times the passacaglia and chaconne are indistinguishable, as seen in the descending tetrachord of the Schmelzer Chaconne in D major and the similar four-note bass pattern of the Biber Passacaglia in G minor, both of which will be played on this programme. Emerging in sixteenth century Spain, both the passacaglia and chaconne (Italian: ciaccona) made their way into hundreds of compositions throughout much of Europe. Their popularity as a musical device was due in part to the fact that as a ground bass it was especially suited for variation over a repeated and short harmonic progression, lending itself to imaginative decoration, ornamentation, and melodic invention. Performing on this concert are Debbie Diamond (Baroque violin), Ana Yepes (Baroque dance), Dr. Yonit Kosovske (harpsichord), and Ferenc Szucs (cello).

09


Debbie Diamond

Yonit Kosovoke

Lunchtime Concert Series

Debbie Diamond is originally from Toronto, Canada. She received her Masters degree in Historical Performance from the University of Toronto (1993) where she studied with Jeanne Lamon. She continued her studies of Baroque violin with Stanley Ritchie at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music in Bloomington, Indiana. As a soloist, she has given recitals in Canada, the United States, Israel, Germany and the United Kingdom. From 1996–1999 she was the leader of the Jerusalem Baroque Orchestra and a member of the Jerusalem Consort. She was also founder, leader and artistic director of Ensemble Nuance, a six-member chamber ensemble that gave a regular concert series in Jerusalem, as well as Barock ‘n’ roll, a chamber group that specialised in combining Baroque and rock music. While living in Jerusalem, Debbie was also a regular member of the Israeli Irish band Black Velvet. Since moving to London, Debbie has performed regularly with the English Baroque Soloists and L’Orchestre Romantique et Revolutionnaire.. In 2005 she performed as a guest violinist with the chamber group Red Priest. She has also been a regular member of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment since 1999, and has worked for eminent conductors including Franz Bruggen, Ivan Fischer, Sir Roger Norrington and Sir Simon Rattle.

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Dr. Yonit Kosovske (see biography, ‘New Faces at the Academy’ page 6) Ferenc Szücs has performed in over fifty countries and has associations with numerous orchestras, institutes and ensembles worldwide. He studied at the Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest and won the prestigious State Award for musical excellence. He joined the Hungarian State Orchestra while still at the Academy and subsequently was appointed as principal cellist of the BBC Symphony Orchestra, London Festival Orchestra, New Queens Hall Orchestra and Oxford Orchestra da Camera. He has performed in several major festivals and has given master classes in Hungary, Austria, Ireland, UK, Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Turkey,

Ferenc Szucs

Anna Yepes

Canada, China, United States and South America. His recordings are published on ASV, BMG, Arte Nova, Future Classics and Hyperion labels. He is Senior Lecturer and Director of the Master’s programme in Classical String Performance at theIrish World Academy, University of Limerick. He is currently working towards his doctorate with Prof. Susan Melrose at Middlesex University in London, and his research is focusing on questions of creativity and knowledge-transfer in contemporary performance practice. Paris-based dancer and choreographer Ana Yepes was born in Spain. Following a degree at the Madrid Conservatory, she studied musical analysis and harmony with Nadia Boulanger in Paris and at the Conservatory of Fontainebleau. She continued her studies in early music at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague, and gained an “Early Dance Teacher” diploma at the Guildhall School of Music in London, as well as a degree in dance at the Sorbonne where she studied with Francine Lancelot. Her creations have included Eclats Baroques (Baroque Dazzlers, 2007), Fiesta (2005) – a South American Baroque music and dance performance, Donaires (2004) – a performance based on Spanish Baroque dance from the time of Cervantes and Les Danses du Roi (2003) – based on French Baroque dances from the court of Louis XIV. She collaborates frequently with organisations such as the Royal Opera of Covent Garden, l’Opéra National de Paris, l’Opéra de Montpellier and the New York City Opera. She is a permanent member of the Trio Narciso Yepes, which specializes in early music and dance from Spain.

Tuesday 18th October Traditional Music Performance

Joze Kotar

Luca Ferrini

Wednesday 19th October Joze Kotar (clarinet) Luca Ferrini (piano) Jože Kotar became principal clarinettist of the RTV Slovenia Symphony Orchestra in 2007 after serving in that role at the Slovenian Philharmonic Orchestra for 12 years. He is also a tenured professor at the Academy of Music in Ljubljana. As a soloist, chamber musician and member of various chamber ensembles, Kotar performs in Slovenia as well as throughout Europe, the USA and South America. He is a member, co-founder and artistic director of the Slovenian Clarinet Orchestra and a member of the Ariart Wind Quintet. Since 2010 he has been conductor and artistic director at the Trbovlje Workers Band. Luca Ferrini, from Trieste Italy, studied piano, harpsichord, organ and organ composition and graduated with distinction from the music conservatories in Trieste and Udine. Over the last twenty years he has been playing concerts on all three instruments in Europe and elsewhere. His repertoire ranges from the Renaissance to contemporary music. In addition to 17 CD recordings, he has made numerous radio recordings with a variety of European broadcasting companies. His currently works in Slovenia as professor of piano and harpsichord at the Koper Art Gymnasium and piano accompanist at the Academy of Music in Ljubljana. In their first Irish tour Jože Kotar and Luca Ferrini will present mainly contemporary music by Irish and Slovenian composers, as well as works written especially for the duo, which will receive their first performance at today’s event.


Thursday 20th October Canto Romántico

Canto Romántico

Canto Romántico is a voice and keyboard duo devoted to Iberian Romantic music from the early nineteenth century. Its founding members are Spanish baritone Antonio Santos and pianist Dr. Yonit Kosovske. Their musical interest is focused on Spanish and Portuguese composers such as Rodríguez Ledesma, Sor, Garcia, Iradier, Portugal and others, written between 1800 and 1850. Performing on both modern and historical instruments, they concertize as a duo and in collaboration with guest vocalists and guitarists to explore historical performance practices of this period. In August of 2011, Canto Romántico debuted its new programme "The Battle of Elviña, a Love Story" throughout northwestern Spain. The duo has performed in the United States, Colombia, and Spain. Presenting songs for voice and piano from their various recital programmes, this lunchtime concert is Canto Romántico's first performance in Ireland.

Tuesday 25th October Traditional Music Performance

Thursday 27th October Rex Levitates Dance Company Fast Portraits… A singular moment captured from diverse dancing perspectives. Inspired by the realistic observations of the true human condition by artists Bill Viola and Caravaggio, through Fast Portraits, Rex Levitates explore the layers of emotion and memory that infuse captured images and transfer them into movement. The company will also present Solo Portrait, a new short film choreographed and performed by Liz Roche, directed by Project Arts Centre director Willie White with music by Denis Roche. The company is delighted to be in residence at UL in association with the MA in Contemporary Dance from Monday 24th – Thursday 27th October One of Ireland’s leading contemporary dance companies, Rex Levitates Dance Company have matured to form a sophisticated, highly developed dance ensemble led by Choreographer Liz Roche. Liz is choreographer-in-residence at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at University Limerick and is a former recipient of the Peter Darrell Choreographic Award, Bonnie Bird U.K. New Choreography Award and the Jane Snow Award 2002. “Liz Roche…one of the most thought-provoking Irish choreographers around” “…elegantly crafted choreography that’s confident in its understatement…will undoubtedly reward repeated viewings” (The Irish Times) For more information visit www.rexlevitates.com.

Rex Levitates Dance Company Photograph © Philippe Mathys

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Tinneas Cinn

Cantoral

Thursday 3rd November

November Tuesday 1st November Tinneas Cinn

Lunchtime Concert Series

The Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, based in the Irish World Academy, led a collaboration with the Meitheal Summer School for a number of co-operative projects for 2011. Under the auspices of Blas, a 'Paul Brady Blas Scholarship' was awarded to a 2011 Meitheal student - enabling him/her to attend Blas 2012. The second aspect of the collaboration saw Deirdre Millane being chosen to spend a week on the BA in Irish Music and Dance programme, attending lectures, workshops & ensemble classes where she will get an opportunity to learn from the lecturers as well as other students. The final element of the collaboration awarded the group Tinneas Cinn a performance slot at one of the lunchtime concerts held at the Irish World Academy of Music & Dance. Today's concert features the group Tinneas Cinn, who hail from Sligo, Galway and Waterford. Having formed during the early stages of 2011, this young group of musicians who range from the ages of 14-17, have recently performed in The National Concert Hall in Dublin and at the Tuam Traditional Festival. Tinneas Cinn are: Conor Broderick (Piano), Roisin Broderick (Concertina/vocals), Martin Mulligan (fiddle), Jason McGuinness (fiddle), & Aisling Finnegan (flute).

Cantoral (Vocal Ensemble) ‘CLAUSTRUM’ This concert is inspired by the notion of CLAUSTRUM. In a monastic sense, the ‘claustrum’ or ‘cloister’ is an enclosed space, often with covered walkways, within which one can move freely in prayer or contemplation. For this concert, the ACADEMY building serves as the cloister within which the audience is encouraged to move about or sit in contemplation as CANTORAL chants into the foyer space. CLAUSTRUM also refers to a part of the brain which has been associated with our ability to integrate sensory perception, allowing us, for example, to experience smell, sound and vision simultaneously, and not as distinct sensory experiences. CLAUSTRUM is an invitation to have lunch, drink a coffee, sit and relax, contemplate or stroll around the Academy building against the backdrop of a chanted soundscape. CANTORAL is an all female chant ensemble, specialising in Western plainchant and early polyphony, with a particular interest in medieval Irish repertoire. The ensemble was formed in 2008 at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and has since performed internationally in Paris and New York, as well as at several Irish festivals including the Galway Festival of Early Music and the Cloughjordan Festival of Music. In April, 2011, CANTORAL was honoured to perform for his holiness the Dalai Lama during his visit to the University of Limerick.

Tuesday 8th November Traditional Music Performance

Irish traditional fiddler Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh workshop, Spring 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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ACADEMOS

Thursday 10th November ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings (Theatre 1) Directed by Yonit Kosovske "La Folia" is the theme of this lunchtime concert performed by Academos, the graduate chamber orchestra of the MA Classical String Performance at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. La Folia, also known as Folies d'Espagne, appeared in Renaissance Portugal, Spain, and Italy as a popular melody and harmonic framework over which variations were to be played or sung, eventually making its way into France and throughout much of Europe. Its specific origin is unclear, but we know it was often associated with a dance for shephards, peasants, or young girls who would dance wildly in a "folly." Often in D minor, the tune starts simply as a stately sarabande (a non-fast triple meter dance with an emphasis on beat two), intensifying by way of variations as the piece progresses. Skillfully crafted into Johann Sebastian Bach's secular cantata BWV 212: Mehr hahn en neue Oberkeet (often referred to as the "Peasant Cantata,") La Folia has been used by hundreds of composers for diverse vocal and instrumental arrangements. Faculty harpsichordist Dr. Yonit Kosovske leads Academos in their La Folia performance of Andrea Falconieri(o)'s Folia "Echa Para Mi Señora Doña Tarolilla De Carallenos," Francesco Geminiani's Concerto Grosso No. 12 (arranged from Corelli's op. 5 no. 12), and a transcription for Concerto Grosso of Antonio Vivaldi's Trio Sonata op. 1 no. 12.

Tuesday 15th November Traditional Music Performance

MA Contemporary Dance

Thursday 17th November MA Contemporary Dance (Theatre 1) Throughout this first Semester students of the MA in Contemporary Dance Performance at the University of Limerick have been investigating a range of different approaches to creating and performing original choreographic works. As part of this process four choreographers, Charles Linehan, Mary Nunan, Liz Roche and Mairead Vaughan have created and/or directed original ensemble and solo choreographic works with the students. In addition the students also collaborated with students of the MA Music Technology in order to create dance/music compostitions. The process was mentored by Mary Wycherley and today’s lunchtime programme will feature a number of the above works.

Irish Traditional Dance

Thursday 24th November

Students of the MA Ritual Chant & Song Featured with Lucernarium Directed by Wolodymyr Smishkewych ‘Locus: Pilgrimage and Dwelling-place’ Presented by Lucernarium and featuring the current year’s students of MA Ritual Chant and Song, this first concert of the Locus series will incorporate medieval monody, polyphony, and chant from the Western European tradition as well as global song traditions. The underlying theme of Locus concerts is the musical exploration of place and movement: sacred or secular place, homeland and foreign land, traveling or staying put. The premier Locus concert will present music bound together by the concept of dwelling-place, departure from home, and pilgrimage.

Tuesday 22nd November Irish Traditional Dance Performance Students of the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programme will present a lunchtime concert of dance which represents some of their work throughout the autumn semester. This work they have either choreographed themselves, produced in collaboration with guest choreographers, or learned from invited tutors on the programme. These guests and tutors include, Dr Olive Beecher, Dr Catherine Foley, Breandán de Gallaí, Katarina Mojzisova, Mairéad O’Connor, and Michael Ryan. Solo and ensemble dance pieces will feature in the concert and will represent traditional and also contemporary Irish dance repertoire which challenges the boundaries of traditional Irish dance.

Students of the MA Ritual Chant & Song

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Grad Dip Music Education student Máire Íde de Bhal, lunchtime concert performance, Spring 2011

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Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Seminar Series

Venue: Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy 2.30 – 5 pm

ADMISSION FREE All Welcome

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September Friday 23rd September

Seminar Series

An Unsettled People: The Culture, Arts and Politics of the Karens

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Burma is a country of vast ethnic diversity consisting of approximately 15 different ethnic groups. The largest ethnic minority group living in the mountain ranges of eastern Burma and northwestern Thailand at present is the Karen. The Karen make up approximately 7% of the total Burmese population of 47 million. There are over 7 million Karen in Burma, and over 400,000 in Thailand. Karen speaking people are divided into two-sub groups- the Skaw and the Pwo spread mainly on the Burma frontier with Thailand. What the Karen people aspired to have was a Karen state within Burma, a subdivision of the areas where they formed the majority of the population similar to what had been granted to the Shan, Arakanese and Chin ethnic groups within Burma. However thousands of political and economic migrants flee Burma for Thailand every year due to the increasingly dangerous conditions of living for its poverty stricken people there. The State Development and Peace Council (SPCD) is Myanmar’s repressive ruling military junta whose aim is to bring all ethnic groups under their control. Members of certain ethnic groups are particularly at risk - especially the Karen, who live in areas of conflict between the military and rebel fighters. The Karen people were subject to mass forced relocations, the destruction of their villages and economies, and even forced labor back in their homeland. Many of these people have fled across the Thai border and are now living in refugee camps which were set up by the Thai military around twenty five years ago. Mae Sot is a town in Western Thailand that shares a border with Myanmar (Burma) and is a mainland gateway containing a substantial population

of Burmese refugees and economic migrants. Approx 70 kilometres north of Mae sot lies a UN administered refugee camp where refugees have been fleeing persecution in Myanmar for over 25 years.Up to 200,000 Karen have been driven from their homes during decades of war, with 120,000 more refugees from Burma, mostly Karen, living in refugee camps on the Thai side of the border. It is clear that the current situation in Burma is unsustainable but the present ruling military junta has a firm and powerful grip over Burma, a situation that has resulted in catastrophic consequences for not only Burmans but also ethnic minority groups. What is crucial for the Karen community is the survival of their own cultural traditions within these refugee camps; traditions which include dance, costume, storytelling and music.

Speakers: Decha Tangseefa (Thammasat University, Bangkok) Dr Mick Moloney (New York University) Michelle Mulcahy (Irish World Academy, UL) Hugh Baxter (Burma Action Ireland) Raphassa Olanwat (University of Phayao, Thailand) Decha Tangseefa is a former director of the PhD Program, Faculty of Political Science, Thammasat University, Bangkok. His research interests are political theory and philosophy, critical international studies, and cultural studies, especially relating to displaced peoples. Every semester during the last three years, he also spent time teaching at a college in a “temporary shelter area,” the Thai state’s name for a refugee camp, along the Thai-Burmese border zones. He is leading an umbrella research project entitled Streams of Knowledge along the Thai-Burmese Border Zones: Multiple Dimensions of People, Capital and Culture, involving researchers from five countries.


Decha Tangseefa

Dr Mick Moloney

Mick Moloney combines the careers of professional musician, folklorist, musicologist, teacher and arts presenter and advocate. He holds a Ph.D. in folklore and folklife from the University of Pennsylvania. He has taught ethnomusicology, folklore and Irish studies courses at the University of Pennsylvania, Georgetown University and Villanova University and currently teaches at New York University in the Irish Studies Program and the Music Dept. In 2008 he won the Golden Dozen Award for teaching excellence at NYU. He is an accomplished singer as well as an instrumentalist and possesses a vast storehouse of songs and instrumental pieces from the Irish and Irish-American tradition. He is the author of Far From the Shamrock Shore: The Irish American Experience in Song, published by Crown Publications/Random House in 2002 with an accompanying CD on Shanachie Records. He has recorded and produced over sixty albums of traditional music and acted as advisor for scores of festivals and concerts throughout America. He has served on National Endowment for the Arts panels and task forces and hosted three nationally syndicated series of folk music on American Public Television.. In 1999 he was awarded the National Heritage Award from the National Endowment for the Arts – the highest official honor a traditional artist can receive in the United States. His latest two internationally acclaimed CD’s McNally’s Row of Flats and If It Wasn’t For the Irish and the Jews, explore songs of the nineteenth and early twentieth century popular stage in America. McNally’s Row of Flats was named the best album of the year by the Irish Echo in 2007 and If It Wasn’t For the Irish and the Jews won the Irish Livies award for best Irish album of the year in 2007 and 2009 respectively.

Flute tutor Kevin Crawford workshop at the Blas Summer School, July 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Michelle Mulcahy is one of Ireland’s most talented and gifted multi-instrumentalists in Irish traditional music today and is considered to be one of Ireland’s most adroit and creative harpers. “Her revolutionary style on the harp is scintillatingplayed with power and panache, no concession to the complexity of the instrument, confirming her as one of the most significant musicians redefining harp at present’ (The

Michelle Mulcahy

Hugh Baxter

Living Tradition). She is a regular performer and tutor worldwide and has toured extensively in Europe, United States, Canada, China, Australia and Vietnam. She has three highly acclaimed albums recorded by American record label Shanachie and Irish record label Chló-Iar Chonnachta. She was awarded the prestigious TG4 Young Musician of the Year in 2006 and was also awarded Female Musician of the Year in 2005 at the Live-Ireland awards in the United States. She has recently recorded with Bill Whelan and the Irish Chamber Orchestra on his highly acclaimed Connemara Suite album. She completed a BA in Music in UCC and progressed on to postgraduate study at the University of Limerick where she graduated with a first class Master’s degree in Ethnomusicology and in the following year in Music Education. She is now currently pursuing PhD studies in Arts Practice at the Irish World Academy University of Limerick where her research topic explores the symbolic, affective and performative realm of harp practice in relation to the Irish and Karen Harp Traditions. Hugh Baxter is a Chartered Telecommunications Engineer and Management Consultant with over twenty years experience working in Asia, Africa and Americas. He has a BA and MA in Engineering from University College Dublin, an MA in Media from Bangkok University and an MSC in Comparative Politics from the London School of Economics. He worked as a consultant to Telephone Organization of Thailand for ten years and in 1988, became involved in assisting Burmese refugee students who had fled to Thailand, working as a voluntary Project Coordinator for Prospect Burma, an educational trust set up by the Aris family for Burmese students. He was chairman of Burma Action Ireland from 2004 to 2005 and remains a member of the organisation.

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Sougata Roy Choudhury

Mattu Noone

Raphassa Olanwat, former head of the Social Development Program, School of Liberal Arts, University of Phayao, north of Thailand, is now an independent scholar. Her research interests lie in the nexus of people and space. The former are the displaced, especially the Karens; the latter is the Thai- Burmese borderland. As well as teaching in a temporary shelter area for a semester, she has been a team member of the research project Streams of Knowledge along the Thai-Burmese Border Zones.

Dr Aileen Dillane (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) For today’s seminar, we have an opportunity to hear a sitar concert from Sougata Roy Choudhury followed by a discussion with his Irish sarod disciple Mattu Noone (Irish World Academy) and sitar player Dara O'Brien (University College Cork). Situating self-ethnography against the backdrop of Indian Classical Music practice today, they will explore the positioning of self in experiencing a musical Other, as both musicians and ethnomusicologists.

Mattu Noone has been learning Indian Classical music on the sarod since 2004. He is a senior student of Sougata Roy Chowdhury from Kolkata. He teaches introduction workshops in Ireland and has performed in India, Australia, Taiwan and Europe. Mattu is also a founding member of the fusion group The Bahh Band who released their debut album to critical acclaim in 2010. He has recently completed an MA in ethnomusicology at the

Raga's Many Roads: Contemporary North Indian Classical Music This seminar brings together a master of North Indian Classical Music with two of its outstanding Irish performers to explore the international exchange that characterizes this musical genre.

Speakers: Sougata Roy Choudhury Mattu Noone (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) Dara O’Brien (University College Cork)

Chair:

Seminar Series

Mattu will present a short film We Are Nocturnal Animals on the music scene in Kolkata, and elements from his MA thesis, ‘North Indian Classical music and the Kolkata Experience: the phenomenology of the foreign phenomenon’. Dara will be speaking in relation to his doctoral research subject, ‘From Surrender to Transportation: The philosophy and ideology of raga improvisation in Hindustani music’. Sougata Roy Choudhury is a master of the sarod, a fretless stringed "lute" with metallic fingerboard played with the musician's fingernails and sounded by a coconut shell plectrum. A disciple of the great masters of the North Indian Classical tradition, he began to study the sarod under the guidance of the late Dhyanesh Khan and later his elder brother Ustad Ashish Khan. He is part of a new generation of Classical Indian Musicians, trained by great masters in a traditional manner from an early age, who are bringing their music out of India. He has been a major contributor to bringing the sarod into popularity in the west. He has performed in many festivals and concert halls in France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Ireland and has a growing number of both Indian and international students. His students travel from all over the world to take talim (intensive study) with him in Kolkata and he is recognised for his unique ability to teach the fundamentals of Indian music to foreigners as well as drawing audiences into the intricacies of raga through his nuanced performances.

Wednesday 5th October

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Dr Aileen Dillane

Irish World Academy, where his research focused on the transformative experiences of learning music from another culture and in particular how Indian Classical music can alter perceptions about both musical and non-musical experience. He is currently exploring links between Irish traditional and Indian classical musical forms. Dara O’Brien studied Western music in Newcastle College, UK, Indian Classical music in North India and ethnomusicology at the Irish World Music Centre, Limerick. He is currently undertaking a PhD in the area of Indian classical music at the School of Music and Theatre, University College Cork. Aileen Dillane is Lecturer in Ethnomusicology, BA in Irish Traditional Music and Dance. Her doctoral dissertation, Sound Tracts, Songlines, and Soft Repertoires: Irish Music Performance and the City of Chicago was from the University of Chicago 2009. She is a flute and piano player with interests in ethnomusicological theory and practice, critical and cultural studies and traditional, ethnic, and popular musics of Ireland, USA and Australia.

Wednesday 12th October

Between Worlds: Ornamentation and Improvisation in Music and Dance of the Baroque and Irish Traditional Experience As part of ‘Baroque Intensive’, the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance is hosting this seminar, which will include talks and demonstrations by Debbie Diamond (baroque violin), Ana Yepes (baroque dance), Sandra Joyce (traditional Irish song and bodhrán) and Niall Keegan (traditional Irish flute). A question and answer session will follow the guest presentations.


Dr Byron Dueck

Dr Colin Quigley

Wednesday 19th October Music, Migration, Mobility

A lecture by Dr. Byron Duek, co-editor of Migrating Music (2011) a collection of essays newly published by Routledge. This is the second in a series of Ethnomusicology Seminars on the theme of Musics on the Move planned for the coming year

Respondents: Dr. Colin Quigley and Dr Aileen Dillane, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick At the present moment of heightened concern, even panic, regarding immigration, it seems appropriate to reflect critically on the role music plays in cross-cultural encounters (not least because music is so often thought to open up spaces of conviviality and mutual understanding). The subject of this seminar is 'migrating music' - namely the movement of musics and musicians into new cultural contexts. On the one hand, we will explore the music of migrants: that is to say the musics that people bring with them to new places, and the ways that these signify in new cultural contexts. On the other hand, we will consider the movement of music: the ways musical practices and technologies move from one culture to another. Here a key question will concern the appeal of migrating music: why do 'foreign' musics seem attractive, and why are they appropriated? The seminar will explore migrating musics in both North American and European contexts. Migrating Music considers the issues around music and cosmopolitanism in new ways. Whilst much of the existing literature on ‘world music’ questions the apparently world-disclosing nature of this genre – but says relatively little about migration and mobility – diaspora studies have much to say about the latter, yet little about the significance of music. In this context, this book affirms the centrality of music as a mode of translation and cosmopolitan mediation, whilst also pointing out the complexity of the processes at stake within it.

Dr Finola O’Kane Crimmins

Éamonn Costello

Migrating music, it argues, represents perhaps the most salient mode of performance of otherness to mutual others, and as such its significance in socio-cultural change rivals – and even exceeds – literature, film, and other language and image-based cultural forms. Irish World Academy Ethnomusicologists Colin Quigley and Aileen Dillane will respond to Dr. Dueck's presentation drawing on their research in Ireland, North America and Eastern Europe. Byron Dueck teaches at the Royal Northern College of Music across undergraduate, postgraduate and research degree programmes, in analysis, history, and ethnomusicology. He was previously University Fellow in Music at the Open University (2007–10) and Coordinator of Musicology at Columbia College Chicago (2005–07). He studied ethnomusicology at the University of Chicago, where his doctoral research focused on public performances of First Nations and Métis music and dance in the western Canadian city of Winnipeg.

Dr Anna Ryan

Dr Sandra Joyce

Wednesday 26th October Space, Identity and the Authentic Speakers: Dr Finola O’Kane Crimmins (University College Dublin School of Architecture) ‘Patrick Pearse and his Magic Lantern Box; The Formation of Ireland's National Landscape and Architectural Identity through the lens of a 1916 Revolutionary’ Éamonn Costello (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) ‘Performing Sean-nós is performing the Gaeltacht!’ Dr Anna Ryan (School of Architecture, University of Limerick) ‘Landscape: from stasis to mobility’

Chair: Dr Sandra Joyce (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick

Colin Quigley is Course Director and Senior Lecturer in Ethnomusicology at the Irish World Academy. His research interests are in European and European-American traditions of music and dance. He has published on both as found in Newfoundland, Canada. Close to the Floor (1985) examined the traditional dancing of the province’s small fishing communities, Music from the Heart (1995), the creative process of an outstanding French-Newfoundland fiddler. He began work in east central Europe following 1989 and curated the 1999 Smithsonian Institution Folklife Festival ‘Gateways to Romania’ exhibit.

Dr Finola O'Kane Crimmins’ research covers aspects of the designed landscape history of Ireland, with a particular interest in the cultural, philosophical and aesthetic dimensions of this history. The history of Irish tourism and the manner in which it has harnessed key sites and monuments to represent and define Ireland's many identities, is the current focus of her research. A book of essays entitled Georgian Dublin and co-edited with Gillian O'Brien was published in October 2008. In 2001 she was awarded the National University of Ireland's Post-doctoral Fellowship in the Sciences. In 2004 she was appointed lecturer in architecture and conservation at UCD.

Aileen Dillane is Lecturer in Ethnomusicology, BA in Irish Traditional Music and Dance. Her doctoral dissertation, Sound Tracts, Songlines, and Soft Repertoires: Irish Music Performance and the City of Chicago was from the University of Chicago 2009. She is a flute and piano player with interests in ethnomusicological theory and practice, critical and cultural studies and traditional, ethnic, and popular musics of Ireland, USA and Australia.

Éamonn Costello is from An Cheathrú Rua (Carraroe) in the Connemara Gaeltacht. His plays the button accordion and the uilleann pipes, and has guested on collaborations with a number of musicians and groups, including: Mactíra (2000), Frozen Fish (6-Pack, 2004), and Papua Merdeka: Tribal Songs of Love and Freedom (2004). In 2010, along with Cathal Clohessy from Limerick he released a critically acclaimed duet album called Bosca Ceoil and Fiddle. He holds a B.A in Irish

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Sharon Maxwell

Dr Catherine Foley

Music and Dance from the University of Limerick and an M.A in Ethnomusicology from University College Cork. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Irish World Academy, where he also lectures on various postgraduate and undergraduate courses. His PhD thesis is concerned with the aesthetics of sean-nós song, and the role cultural nationalism plays in influencing this aesthetic. Anna Ryan is an architect and geographer, graduating with a B.Arch. from University College Dublin in 2000 and with a PhD in Geography from University College Cork in 2008. She formerly worked with Grafton Architects, taught part-time at UCD School of Architecture, and since 2007 is a full-time lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Limerick. Her book, Where Land Meets Sea: coastal explorations of landscape, representation and spatial experience, is being published by Ashgate this year.

Seminar Series

Dr. John Morrissey graduated from Trinity College Dublin with a first class degree in Natural Science, majoring in Geography, in 1996. After travelling for a year, he moved to England in 1997 to pursue his doctorate at the University of Exeter, having been awarded an ESRC scholarship. His PhD research in historical geography focused on the political and cultural geographic dimensions of colonialism and resistance in early modern Ireland, and presented a postcolonial critique of contemporary English colonial discourse and practice. After completing his PhD, John taught at Exeter for a year before coming to the department in 2001.

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November Monday 14th November Archiving Dance Speakers: Dr László Felföldi, Folk Dance Department, Institute for

Musicology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary.

collections, to local authority and business archives in both England and Scotland.

‘Dance Archives in a Changing World: the Case of the Budapest Collection’.

Abstract: The presentation will cover the formation and history of the National Resource Centre for Dance. It will provide an overview of the Archive and focus on a few of the collections that are held there, for example the Rudolf Laban Archive. It will also look at some of the recent projects that the archive has been involved in especially where the archive is being used in teaching and learning.

Sharon Maxwell, National Resource Centre for Dance, University of Surrey. ‘The History and Archives of the National Resource Centre for Dance (NRCD) at the University of Surrey, England’ Dr Catherine Foley, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. ‘Dance, Culture and Representation: the National Dance Archive of Ireland (NDAI)’ Dr László Felföldi is Director of the Folk Dance Department of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Musicology, home to one of the largest archives of filmed traditional dance in the world. He has conducted field work throughout Hungary, its neighbouring countries, and among finno-ugric peoples in Russia. He has authored many articles in both Hungarian and English in academic journals and edited numerous works such as the definitive Dance Heritage of Hungary and its Minorities (1997). He is currently very active in the domain of Intangible Cultural Heritage management, and is Chair of the International Council for Traditional Music’s Study Group on Ethnochoreology. Abstract: The presentation will focus on traditional dancing in Hungary and the filmed materials within the collections of the Budapest Archive. Sharon Maxwell has been the NRCD and Shepard Archivist at the University of Surrey, Guildford, since 2008. She graduated from Liverpool University with an MA in Archives and Records Management in 2000 and was awarded registered membership of the Archives and Records Association in 2006. Sharon has worked in a variety of archives from university and special

Dr Catherine Foley designed and is Course Director of both the MA in Ethnochoreology and the MA in Irish Traditional Dance Performance at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick; she also supervises doctorate research in dance (academicbased and practice-based) at the Academy. Catherine has conducted fieldwork in traditional music, song and dance in Ireland. She was the Founding Chair of Dance Research Forum Ireland, an inclusive, interdisciplinary, and international society of dance; she continues to work on its board of directors. She is the Project Leader of the National Dance Archive of Ireland. She is an academic, a performer, and a choreographer. She has published articles in refereed journals such as Dance Research Journal and Dance Research, and has edited a number of dance volumes. She has performed, lectured, and given dance and music workshops in different countries in Europe, Scandinavia, and the United States. Abstract: The 21st century has been witness to a rapidly changing world; Ireland has been no exception. Ease of travel, technological advancements, information saturation through the World Wide Web, and multiculturalism are all characteristics of our Western world. This emphasises the importance of the establishment of archives that preserve, record, and represent cultural


Mary Goetze

phenomena as windows into the past and doorways into the future. This presentation examines one archive, the recently established National Dance Archive of Ireland (NDAI): its emergence, its vision, and some of its collections as representative of diverse dance artists, dance communities, and dance scholars, past and present, working in Ireland and further afield. Together, they represent and give a taste of the vibrant, creative, and dynamic dance energies and cultures of Ireland and its diaspora.

Wednesday 16th November

Choral Practice: Singing with the World Mary Goetze’s professional activities centre around choral music, multiculturalism, teacher education and children’s singing. She holds degrees from Oberlin Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, and the University of Colorado. In 2007, Dr. Goetze retired from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music where in addition to teaching, she founded the University Children’s Choir and the International Vocal Ensemble (IVE). IVE sang songs from outside the western art tradition. During her tenure with IVE, Dr. Goetze developed methods of introducing songs aurally and visually using technology. The series of DVDs entitled Global Voices is an outgrowth of her work with IVE. As a clinician, author and conductor, she educated teachers about children’s voices, and through her synthesis of research, musical composition and choral work, she played a role in the spread of children’s choirs across the United States. Her numerous compositions and arrangements can be found in the Mary Goetze Choral Series published by Boosey & Hawkes. She is the co-author of a recent publication- Educating Young Singers: A Choral Resource for Teacher-Conductors,

and two series books, Share the Music and Spotlight on Music. Her dissertation entitled "Factors Affecting Accuracy in Children's Singing" was named Outstanding Dissertation of 1985 by Music Educators National Conference and Council for Research in Music Education. She was named Outstanding Hoosier Musician by the Indiana Music Educators Association and Outstanding Educator of the Year by the Organization of American Kodaly Educators. She has received a Distinguished Teaching Award from Indiana University as well as a Distinguished Alumnus Awards from the University of Colorado College of Music and Oberlin Conservatory of Music, and was assumed the R. L. Jones Distinguished Professorship at East Carolina University School of Music for the Fall semester of 2005.

Speaker: Dr. Mary Goetze, Professor Emerita of Music, Jacobs School of Music, University of Indiana

Panel Members: Rosaleen Molloy, Director, Music Generation Liz Powell, CEO, Association of Irish Choirs Dr. Wolodymyr Smishkewych Course Director, MA Ritual Chant and Song, Irish World Academy

Chair: Dr. Helen Phelan, Associate Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance

Niamh Dunne, lunchtime concert, Spring 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Rosaleen Molloy

Liz Powell

Seminar Series

Rosaleen Molloy Rosaleen Molloy was appointed Director of Music Generation in June 2010. A former student of Wexford School of Music and a graduate of the Music and Education Departments of University College Cork, Rosaleen has over fifteen years’ experience working in the field of music education in Ireland – as a secondary school teacher, an instrumental and vocal teacher, a choral and orchestral conductor, a music specialist in primary schools and as an in-service trainer. Previous posts include Project Director of the Arts in the Classroom Initiative, Founder/Director of the County Wexford Children’s Choir Programme, and County Arts Officer for Wexford County Council. A skilled choral music education specialist, Rosaleen studied conducting at the Choral Music Experience Institute USA from 1996–2002 and has pioneered many groundbreaking initiatives in music education which combine commissioning, education and participation.

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Liz Powell Liz Powell, CEO of Association of Irish Choirs (AOIC), is a practicing musician and choral conductor with a full and varied career as an arts manager behind her. A UCC B Mus. Graduate, she has worked in the Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon and in the arts funded sector with Irish Baroque Orchestra and Association of Irish Choirs. She conducts DIVA VOCES and the newly formed UL Choral Society. She is an experienced change manager and project manager with a track record in transforming and re-invigorating organisations. She has overseen the transformation of AOIC as the national resource organisation for choirs and choral music and has worked closely with sister organisation, The National Chamber Choir towards developing the choral sector in Ireland. Since her appointment as CEO in 2008, AOIC has seen a rapid growth in membership of over 500 choirs and individuals from all over Ireland, the growth and development of Irish Youth Choir (and the newly formed

Wolodymyr Smishkewych

Irish Youth Chamber Choir) as well as a responsive education programme of workshops and classes with now Annual International Choral Conducting Summer School. Wolodymyr Smishkewych Spanish-Ukrainian tenor Wolodymyr Smishkewych is a native of New Jersey, USA. He has specialized in medieval song, chant, and new music since the 1990s. He received his training in voice performance from Rutgers University (BM 95, MM 98) and is currently a candidate for the doctorate in voice performance from Indiana University. A sought-after pedagogue in medieval, contemporary, and world vocal music, he has lectured at universities in the United States, South America, Canada, and Europe. He recently joined the faculty of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick, Ireland as director of the MA in Ritual Song and Chant. He is a member of Sequentia Ensemble for Medieval Music and of Paul Hillier’s Theatre of Voices, and has performed at major festivals through Europe, the USA, Canada, Australia, and South America including BBC Proms, Regensberg Tage Alter Musik, Festival Cervantino, Edinburgh Festival, and the early music festivals of Boston, Barcelona, Utrecht, and Berkeley. He has recorded for Sony/BMG, Harmonia Mundi USA, ExCathedra, and Focus records. Active as a researcher as well as a performer, he writes, records, and creates video about singing, ethnomusicology, instrument building

Dr. Helen Phelan

Dr. Helen Phelan Dr Helen Phelan is the current Associate Director of the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and the programme director of the PhD programme in Arts Practice. For ten years, she directed the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme and conducted the programme ensemble, Lucernarium. She is the director of the Sanctuary initiative which works with new migrant communities on educational and cultural initiatives and from 2001-2006 was director of the Anáil Dé / Breath of God Festival of World Sacred Music.

and organology, and music & nature.

Singer/songwriter Paul Brady workshop at the Academy’s Blas Summer School, July 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Special Events

Venue: Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy 2.30 – 5 pm

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Dr Victoria O’Brien

Iarla O Lionáird

September Thursday, 8th September 5.30pm Book Launch: A History of Irish Ballet from 1927 to 1963 By Dr Victoria O’Brien Published by Peter Lang International Academic Publishers ISBN 978-3-03911-873-1 pb This work presents a detailed study of the five key ballet organisations that operated in Ireland between 1927 and 1963: the Abbey Theatre School of Ballet, the Abbey School of Ballet, the Sara Payne School and Company, the Irish Ballet Club and the National Ballet School and Company. By examining a previously neglected dimension of Irish artistic life, this study aims to provide a greater appreciation of the various roles that ballet has played in the development of Irish cultural activity. It records the rich interaction between the different dance artists and movements and their collaborators across the entire spectrum of Irish artistic endeavour, including Cecil ffrench Salkeld, F. R. Higgins, Mainie Jellett, Patrick Kavanagh, J. F. Larchet, Louis le Brocquy, Elizabeth Maconchy, Donagh MacDonagh, Brinsley MacNamara, Micheál Mac Laimmóir, Norah McGuinness, A. J. Potter, Lennox Robinson, Michael Bowles, Mary Devenport O'Neill, Anne Yeats and W. B. Yeats. This book breaks significant new ground for an area in which little published information exists. The author pieces together research on the schools and companies from interviews, ballet programmes, playbills, libretti, scores, memoirs, contemporary press reviews, literary articles and photographs, to form a fascinating narrative of the under-researched world of Irish ballet. The book’s author, Dr Victoria O’Brien trained at the Irish National College of Dance and is a graduate of the Northern School of Contemporary Dance and the Laban Centre. Her PhD research focused on the history of early twentieth-century Irish ballet and was completed at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick, where she continues to lecture and holds the position of Development Officer at the National Dance Archive of Ireland.

Thursday 15th September 1.15 pm Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy AN INTERVIEW WITH IARLA Ó LIONÁIRD An opportunity to hear Iarla O Lionáird talk with Mícheal Ó Súilleabháin about the process of creating his new solo album Foxlight, which forms part of his PhD Arts Practice Research at the Irish World Academy The interview will be followed that evening by a performance of this new material at the Belltable Arts Centre Limerick at 8pm.

Special Events

PhD Arts Practice student at the Irish World Academy Iarla O'Lionáird is to release his new solo album Foxlight on Realworld Records in late September 2011. Ó Lionáird grew up and learned his craft in the musical heartland of Cúil Aodha in the West Cork Gaeltacht. From his iconic early recording of the vision song Aisling Gheal while still a boy, through many recordings, Ó Lionáird has established himself both as a masterful exponent of sean nós song and as a pioneer in its renewal and development.

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HIs latest, Foxlight, while rooted in certain traditions, it is also unclassifiable and is one of Ó Lionáird's most organic records to date. Instrumentation and layers are embedded in each song, but ultimately it's about Ó Lionáird's exquisite, sonically unique voice. Foxlight is produced by Leo Abrahams and all eleven songs are imbued with a sense of time and place, of connections and myths. From ancient rhythms to modern electronics, Ó Lionáird's exceptional voice is the fulcrum around which everything pivots. Always an artist on his own journey Ó Lionáird signed to the prestigious Realworld label in the mid 1990s and went on to make several ground-breaking recordings with the multi million selling Afro Celt Sound System, receiving two Grammy nominations. Solo albums Seven Steps to Mercy (1997) and Invisible Fields (2005) brought widespread acclaim confirming him as one of contemporary music's most ambitious singers and recording artists.

"One of the most dramatic voices in contemporary music." The Guardian


MORRISSEY

Dr Michael Moloney

Friday, September 16th Book Launch: MORRISSEY: Fandom, Representations and Identities Edited by Eoin Devereux (Head of Department, Department of Sociology, University of Limerick), Aileen Dillane (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) and Martin J. Power (Department of Sociology, University of Limerick. Published by Intellect Books: Bristol and Chicago. A major new book of essays edited by three University of Limerick lecturers attempts to explain the many complexities of iconic singer Morrissey. Published by Intellect Books, Morrissey: Fandom, Representations and Identities edited by Eoin Devereux, Aileen Dillane and Martin J. Power examines in detail the work of one of the most influential songwriters of our time. The book copperfastens UL's growing reputation in the analysis of popular culture. Dr. Eoin Devereux, Head of Department at University of Limerick's Department of Sociology explained "The book's subject has remained an anti-establishment and outspoken figure who has fought to bring controversial social issues to the forefront of our minds. Morrissey has used his music and his fame as vehicles for social change, singing and speaking out on a variety of issues: including class discrimination, ethnicity, sexuality, vegetarianism and animal rights, delivering his message in velvet sound-bytes and provocative performances." The book's chapters examine a diverse number of themes ranging from Morrissey's representation of working-class life; his own fan devotion concerning James Dean to painstaking analyses of songs such as 'Speedway' and 'You Have Killed Me'. The Irish launch of this important book will take place at The Songs That Saved Your Life (Again) 2011: A Celebration of Morrissey which will be held at Dolan's Warehouse, Limerick on September 16th at 7.30pm. The event will be University of Limerick's third Morrissey event and it will feature a panel discussion on Morrissey's contribution to popular culture; a live performance by Morrissey's favourite tribute act These Charming Men as well as a screening of the Indonesian version of video-artist Phil Collins' The World Won't Listen. Panellists will include journalist Len Brown (author of the best-selling book Meetings With Morrissey) and contributors Rachel Brett and John Baker. Tickets at €12.50 may be booked from dolans.ie or uch.ie

Friday, September 23rd 10am

Dr. Michael Moloney (New York University) “If it wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews”: Exploring Irish and Jewish Historic Musical links and Influences on Vaudeville and Early Tin Pan Alley in America Dr. Mick Moloney, New York University’s Professor of Music and Irish Studies, is the pre-eminent scholar of Irish-American music from the past two centuries. In recent years he has been preoccupied with documenting this music from 1880 to 1920, a time when vaudeville and Tin Pan Alley flourished with the fertile contributions of Irish and Jewish songwriters, theatrical producers, and music publishers. Taking its title and inspiration from a catchy song composed in 1912 by William Jerome (real name: William Flannery) and Jean Schwartz, “If It Wasn’t for the Irish and the Jews” is an engrossing, entertaining, and insightful examination of this cross-pollination in a bygone era of U.S. cultural history. Former Broadway luminaries such as George M. Cohan (Irish ancestral surname: Keohane), Eddie Foy (real name: Edwin Fitzgerald), Norah Bayes (born Norah Goldberg), Tony Hart, Ed Harrigan, and Ada Jones populate Dr. Moloney’s talk on the nimble wit, socioeconomic observation, exuberant rhythms, melodic charm, and sentimental appeal pulsing through this under-appreciated chapter of American musical history. Anyone interested in Irish and Jewish studies, theater, music, and U.S. history will find this presentation provocative and fascinating. MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance student Ashlene McFadden performing at an Ireland Funds event at the Academy, June 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Dr. Decha Tangseefa

Denis Ryan

Friday, September 23rd 11am (In association with The Department of Politics and Public Administration and the Institute for the Study of Knowledge in Society) Dr. Decha Tangseefa: ‘Living in war zones ‘inside’ of Burma’ Decha Tangseefa is a former director of the PhD Program, Faculty of Political Science, Thammasat University, Bangkok. His research interests are political theory and philosophy, critical international studies, and cultural studies, especially relating to displaced peoples. Every semester during the last three years, he also spent time teaching at a college in a “temporary shelter area,” the Thai state’s name for a refugee camp, along the Thai-Burmese border zones. He is leading an umbrella research project entitled Streams of Knowledge along the Thai-Burmese Border Zones: Multiple Dimensions of People, Capital and Culture, involving researchers from five countries.

Friday, 30th September Hup! 1.10 pm Aula Maxima, UCC The first concert in our FUAIM Autumn 2011 series, Hup! celebrates the vitality of Irish traditional music and dance at University College Cork and the University of Limerick. Following the success of the inaugural UCC-CSM recital in the FUAIM Spring 2011 series, we are delighted to present this exciting concert which features some of the best current UL and UCC student traditional musicians and dancers. Hup! is scheduled as part of the Cork Folk Festival.

October Monday October 10th 5pm Special Events

Ryan’s Fancy – A Reception to Mark the Donation of an audio-visual Archive by Denis Ryan

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Denis Ryan was born in Newport, County Tipperary moving to Toronto Canada in 1969. He formed the critically acclaimed group Ryan’s Fancy, after which an acclaimed television series was named. Based in Halifax, Nova Scotia since 1980, his career as a musician and television host has spanned more than forty years. He has performed all over the world, appearing in over two hundred television shows in both Ireland and Canada and has recorded thirteen albums. In early 2011, Ryan’s Fancy released their 40th Anniversary Collection. 1983, Ryan’s Fancy disbanded and Denis has since been working in the investment business. He is involved with numerous community projects, including serving as the national chairman of the fundraising committee of the Darcy McGee, Chair of Irish Studies at St. Mary’s University and as Governor of Saint Francis Xavier University. In 1994, he received an honorary Doctor of Letters from St. Mary’s University in Halifax. He was the founder of Nova Scotian Crystal, Canada’s only mouth-blown, hand-cut crystal manufacturer. This event marks the donation by Denis Ryan to the Glucksman Library at the University of Limerick through the Irish World Academy of a digital copy of his personal audio-visual archive. The main archive materials are deposited at the University of Cape Breton whose Institute of Cape Breton Studies has an ongoing ten year history of creative student and faculty exchange with the Irish World Academy.


Ana Yepes

Debbie Diamond

October 11th to 13th

Baroque Intensive: Historical Performance Practice to Inform, Guide, and Inspire For three days in October the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance will present master classes, workshops, and a lunchtime performance of classical music from the Baroque period. Irish World Academy students training in classical and Irish traditional music and dance will have the opportunity to explore Baroque violin and Baroque dance with guest artists Debbie Diamond and Ana Yepes. Participants will learn historical performance practices as they relate to string bowing techniques, stylistic features of period instruments, gesture, dance, tempo, rhetoric, vibrato, tuning, improvisation, and ornamentation. In addition, there will be an interactive seminar entitled "BETWEEN WORLDS: Ornamentation and Improvisation in Music and Dance of the Baroque and Irish Traditional Experience." Seminar presentations will be given by Debbie Diamond, Ana Yepes, and Irish World Academy of Music and Dance faculty Niall Keegan (Irish traditional flute) and Sandra Joyce (Irish traditional song and bodhrán). The Baroque Intensive will culminate with a Thursday lunchtime chamber concert "Common Ground." The programme will include nstrumental music and dance and will feature chaconnes and passacaglias from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Events from the Baroque Intensive are part of ongoing instruction in historical performance practice that aims to inform, guide, and inspire the students not only in their own practice of early and later repertoires, but also in preparation for their Academos "La Folia" lunchtime concert in November.

Schedule:

Tuesday, October 11th Baroque Violin masterclasses Debbie Diamond,

9:30–1:00 Open masterclass on Baroque solo string repertoire 2:30–5:00 Open masterclass on Baroque chamber music repertoire As part of the Baroque Intensive, string players studying in the MA in Classical Strings Performance, MA in Irish Traditional Music Performance, and BA in Irish Music and Dance will perform in an all-day open masterclass with Baroque violinist Debbie Diamond. Students will share and be coached on their performances and works-in-progress of solo and chamber compositions from the Baroque tradition of seventeenth - and eighteenth-century Europe. Together with Ms. Diamond, they will explore historical performance practice as it relates to period instruments, rhetoric, gesture, context, bowing techniques, vibrato, tuning, improvisation, and ornamentation, amongst other topics. Questions from the audience members are strongly encouraged. Step Up: Dance Project participant Ryan O’ Neill, July 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Wednesday, October 12th

9:30am –1:00pm Baroque Dance Workshops Ana Yepes Students and faculty from all programmes at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance are invited to take part in Baroque dance workshops with Ana Yepes. Open to participants of varying skill levels, these workshops will explore dance steps, floor patterns, gesture, and the historical context of the minuet, sarabande, courante, gavotte, and gigue. Class participants are encouraged to wear comfortable clothing, dance shoes, or socks. Audience observation is free and open to the public.

Special Events

Wednesday, 12th October 2:30pm – 5:00pm SEMINAR BETWEEN WORLDS: Ornamentation and Improvisation in Music and Dance of the Baroque and Irish Traditional Experience.

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As part of the Baroque Intensive, the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance will host a seminar entitled "BETWEEN WORLDS: Ornamentation and Improvisation in Music and Dance of the Baroque and Irish Traditional Experience." Presentations will include talks and demonstrations by Debbie Diamond (Baroque violin), Ana Yepes (Baroque dance), Sandra Joyce (traditional Irish song and bodhrán), and Niall Keegan (traditional Irish flute). A question-and-answer session will follow the guest presentations. The seminar is free and open to the public.

Adam Scheck, double bass, MA Classical String Performance student, lunchtime concert Spring 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Baroque Intensive Week

Thursday, October 13th 1:15 pm Lunchtime concert: "Common Ground" Venue: Theatre 1 As part of the Baroque Intensive, this programme features instrumental chaconnes and passacaglias from the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries by composers in Italy, Austria, and Bohemia: Veracini, Bertali, Schmelzer and Biber. While musicologists have argued the differentiation of these two musical genres, at times the passacaglia and chaconne are indistinguishable, as seen in the descending tetrachord of the Schmelzer Chaconne in D major and the similar four-note bass pattern of the Biber Passacaglia in G minor, both of which will be played on this programme. Emerging in sixteenth century Spain,both the passacaglia and chaconne (Italian: ciaccona) made their way into hundreds of compositions throughout much of Europe. Their popularity as a musical device was due in part to the fact that as a ground bass it was especially suited for variation over a repeated and short harmonic progression, lending itself to imaginative decoration, ornamentation, and melodic invention. Performing on this concert are Debbie Diamond (Baroque violin), Ana Yepes (Baroque dance), Dr. Yonit Kosovske (harpsichord), and Ferenc Szucs (cello).

Wednesday, 12th October

Tower Theatre, Irish World Academy

1.10 - 1.50pm

The Music & Health Research Group invites you to participate in a lunchtime seminar on Singing for Health and Well Being as part of National Choral Singing Week / World Mental Health Week 2011. Many people report that they enjoy singing and believe it benefits their mental health. This practical seminar will discuss some of the ways this topic has been researched and will present some findings as well as some workshop elements enjoyable for all. Presented by Professor Jane Edwards, TrĂ­ona McCaffrey, Liz Powell (CEO Association of Irish Choirs), music therapy students, and guests.

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Alan Foley

Patricia Crosbie

Piedra-Alba Perez-Alcantara

Mary Nunan

November Monday, November 14th

5.30 pm The National Dance Archive of Ireland Cartlann Náisiúnta Damhsa na hÉireann

The Official Opening of the National Dance Archive of Ireland by Minister Jimmy Deenihan T.D., Minister for Arts, Heritage, and the Gaeltacht at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick To celebrate the opening, short dance performances illustrating some of the material within the Archive will be given by Patricia Crosbie, Alan Foley, Catherine Foley, Mary Nunan, and Piedra-Alba Perez-Alcantara. The National Dance Archive of Ireland (NDAI) at the Glucksman Library, University of Limerick, was founded in late 2009, in response to proposals by Dr Catherine Foley, Founding Chair of Dance Research Forum Ireland, to both the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the Glucksman Library, University of Limerick, and jointly to the Arts Council, for the establishment of a National Dance Archive at the University of Limerick. In 2008, The Arts Council/An Chomhairle Ealaíon awarded funding to Dance Research Forum Ireland for a feasibility report to be undertaken and in 2009 it provided the National Dance Archive with initial two-year funding for the set-up phase of the Archive. The Archive at the Glucksman Library, University of Limerick, works in partnership with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, Dance Research Forum Ireland, and the Arts Council. The National Dance Archive is the most comprehensive archive in Ireland devoted to the collection, preservation and promotion of dance, and is accessible by all. It chronicles dance in Ireland in all its manifestations (contemporary dance, traditional step dancing, set dancing, ballet, social dance, urban dance, and world dance) and conveys an understanding of the different processes and practices of creating, performing and writing about dance in Ireland. The Archive helps to raise the profile of dance in Ireland and internationally, and also provides a greater understanding and appreciation for how dance has developed in this country in the past, in the present day and into the future. Dance in Ireland is a valuable cultural resource; the National Dance Archive of Ireland offers all genres of dance the opportunity to gain visibility and to be appreciated in its historicity. Also, it provides an important resource for research and educational purposes.

Special Events

The Official Opening of the National Dance Archive will be preceded by a seminar on Archiving Dance at 14.30 in the Tower Theatre

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For further information about the National Dance Archive of Ireland or about the Official Opening of the Archive please contact either Dr Catherine Foley: Tel. + 353 61 202922; email: Catherine.E.Foley@ul.ie; or Dr Victoria O’Brien; Email: Victoria.Obrien@ul.ie; or Ellen Byrne: Tel: + 353 61 202917; Email: Ellen.Byrne@ul.ie


November 20th to December 3rd E-MOTIONAL Bodies and Cities at the Irish World Academy The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance/ MA Contemporary Dance Performance are participants in EU funded programme, called E-MOTIONAL Bodies & Cities, a two-year mobility and artistic exchange dance programme involving artists and managers from six European countries – Romania, Cyprus, Ireland, Latvia, United Kingdom, and Turkey. The aim of the programme is to identify, nurture, attract and sustain talent and creativity at the European level, by connecting artists and dance managers from countries participating in the project through mobility grants, residencies, fellowships, artistic research and performance co-production and exchange. Professional development and artistic experiment represent pillars of the project. E-MOTIONAL Bodies & Cities is a co-operation between Gabriela Tudor Foundation (RO, initiator & lead organiser), Dublin Dance Festival (IE), The Association of the Professional Dance Choreographers of Latvia (LV), Dance House Lemesos (CY), and body > data > space (UK), as co-organisers; and ArtistNe(s)t Network of Artists-in-Residence Centres / “George Apostu” Cultural Centre in Bacau, and the National Dance Centre in Bucharest (RO), Dance Ireland, The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, and the University of Limerick (IE), Rialto Theatre, Limassol (CY), and CATI Dans – Contemporary Dance Artists Association, Istanbul (TR), as associated partners. For more information see www.e-motional.eu The Irish World Academy would like to thank the UL Foundation for supporting its involvement in E-MOTIONAL Bodies and Cities.This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This communication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

Turkish dance workshop at the Academy, April 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Special Events

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‘Out of Time’ Colin Dunne’s solo show


Monday 28th November Once Off Productions Presents Out of Time Created and performed by Colin Dunne, Theatre One, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick Creation and choreography Direction Sound Design Film Design

Colin Dunne Sinéad Rushe Fionán de Barra Sean Westgate

Lighting Design New Music Recorded Music Produced by

Colin Grenfell Ian McDonnell Martin Hayes and Denis Cahill Maura O’Keeffe

“A remarkably uplifting and extraordinarily moving memoir in motion”. Irish Independent “There have been few, if any, more eloquent or effective debates that have taken place on the subject of what constitutes the nature of Irish step dancing”. Irish Independent “‘Intimate, sincere and funny”. Irish Times Irish World Academy dancer-in-residence Colin Dunne returns to Ireland with his solo dance show following a critically acclaimed international tour. Combining dance, sound design, film and spoken commentary, Out of Time is a fascinating insight into Dunne’s private world as a dancer rooted in the Irish step dance tradition. Using live digital sound processing his footwork is then looped, layered and distorted to create an evocative sound score as he is accompanied on stage by archival film images of dancers from the 1930’s onwards - including himself as a ten year old boy. Intimate, personal and provocative, Out of Time is both an unsentimental homage to Irish step-dance and a bold statement of Dunne’s personal and artistic relationship with a tradition that has shaped his life. Following a two week sold out run at The Barbican in London in 2009, Dunne was nominated for a Laurence Oliver Award (outstanding achievement in dance) and a UK Critics Circle Award (best male dancer) Perhaps best known for his performances and choreography for Riverdance, Colin Dunne has been forging a new creative path since his time as artist in residence at the University of Limerick in 2001/2. He also appeared in Fabulous Beast’s production of The Bull at the Dublin Theatre Festival 2005, bite07 and at Berlin Festspiele in a role which saw him nominated for a UK Critics Circle Spotlight Award (male artists; modern dance). He recently acted as choreographer for the new Thomas Kilroy play, Christ Deliver Us! at The Abbey Theatre. RUNNING TIME: approx 60 mins, no interval. OUT OF TIME was originally commissioned by Glór Irish Music Centre, Co. Clare and supported by the Arts Council/An Comharaile Ealaion, Clare County Council, Daghdha Dance Company and Green Hippo. Out of Time continues to be supported by Culture Ireland internationally and by Green Hippo. The Irish Tour is supported by The Arts Council/ An Comharaile Ealaion.

Tickets: €15/€12 from 1890 61 61 61

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Sharon Lyons

Sean Ó Riada

December Saturday 3rd December 2011, 8pm ADVENTUS Catholic University Church, Our Lady Seat of Wisdom, 87a St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2 Adventus is a concert of music celebrating the anticipation of the season of Advent and the joy of Christmas. Drawing on repertoire from the dawn of Christianity, through the golden age of Bach and Handel and arriving at contemporary classics, this concert will include the all-female chant ensemble, Cantoral along with guest musicians and singers under the musical directorship of Owen C. Lynch, a highly respected musician, singer and arranger with Sharon Lyons as soloist. Sharon Lyons is a doctoral student on the PhD Arts Practice programme at the Irish World Academy. This concert showcases the vast domain of repertoire available in the Catholic liturgical tradition and forms the basis for her doctoral investigation entitled What is the relationship between Ritual, Repertoire and the Singing Voice in contemporary Irish Catholic worship? Sharon completed her Bachelor of Music Education Degree in Trinity College Dublin in 2006. She progressed on to postgraduate study at the University of Limerick where she graduated with a first class Master’s degree in Chant and Ritual Song in 2007. Sharon has received numerous awards and scholarships over her years of studies including that of a Fulbright Scholarship in association with the U.S. Government to study music in the US for the summer of 2007 as part of the Fusion Arts Programme. She is resident cantor and musician at St. Mary’s Pro-Cathedral, Marlborough Street, Dublin, together with University Church where this concert is being performed. Sharon’s voice has been described as ‘ethereal with beautiful soul and warmth’. She invites you to this wonderful evening of seasonal music in the idyllic surroundings of Catholic University Church. Tickets priced €8 (€5 concession). All proceeds will be donated to a selected charity. For more information please contact Sharon on 0852882835.

December 10th Special Events

School of Music & Drama, University College Cork Ó Riada Revisited

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Sean Ó Riada (1931 - 1981) made a major contribution to Irish music, both traditional and classical, in Ireland and across the world. Following his premature death, a number of key sustainable music and music education movements have grown directly out of his influence. Now, 40 years after his death and 80 years after his birth, the School of Music and Drama at University College Cork (Dr Mel Mercier, Head of School) and the Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick (Professor Mícheál O Súilleabháin, Director) come together to revisit this cultural phenomenon. Mercier and Ó Súilleabháin will head up a lively panel of speakers and performers throughout the day-long event in what will be both a historic celebration and critical evaluation of Ó Riada. Run in association with the 2011 Cork Folk Festival, the event precedes a headline concert in Triskel Arts Centre at 8pm featuring music associated with Sean Ó Riada performed by Mícheál O Súilleabháin with Mel Mercier and guests.


July 2012 23rd – 29th July, 2012 The 27th Symposium of the International Council for Traditional Music’s Study Group on Ethnochoreology Call for Proposals The International Council for Traditional Music (ICTM) is an NGO (non-governmental organization) in formal consultative relations with UNESCO. Its aims are to further the study, practice, documentation, preservation and dissemination of traditional music and dance, including folk, popular, classical and urban music and dance of all countries. The 27th Symposium of the ICTM’s Study Group on Ethnochoreology invites proposals for consideration for its Symposium. The Symposium is dedicated to two selected themes, which will form the focus of the presentations and discussions.

The themes are: Dance and Place; and Dance and Festival. Closing date for receipt of proposals is Thursday, 30th October, 2011. Local Organizing Committee: Dr Catherine Foley (Chair), Dr Colin Quigley, Mats Melin, and Dr Orfhlaith Ni Bhriain. For further information please contact Dr Catherine Foley: Tel: + 353 61 202922; email: Catherine.E.Foley@ul.ie

ICTM Conference Newfoundland The Irish World Academy of Music and Dance was well represented at this years ICTM International Conference held at Memorial University, St. Johns, Newfoundland July 12th-19th. Four faculty members took part in a variety of presentations ranging from roundtable discussions and panel presentations to workshops in music and dance. Dr. Colin Quigley chaired a number of sessions and also presented a fiddle workshop. Dr. Aileen Dillane represented the Irish World Academy discussing traditional music programmes in third level institutions. This panel also featured Dr. Christopher Smith, external examiner for the BA Irish music and dance. Dr. Orfhlaith Ni Bhriain presented on Irish dance among the diaspora and also represented ICTM Ireland at the committee meeting. Mats Melin presented on the ICTM Ireland panel and also gave several percussive step dance workshops. The group also participated in a multitude of music and dance sessions. The conference was attended by almost 500 delegates from all over the world. Dance workshop at the Academy's Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, July 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Bealach Community Cultural Pathways at the Irish World Academy

Irish World Academy dancer-in-residence and tutor Jean Butler conducting a workshop, April 2011 Photograph Š Maurice Gunning

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Inaugural Step Up: Dance Project at Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick Limerick The inaugural Step Up: Dance Project took place between July 4th and August 14th at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The overall aim of the project, the first of its kind in the country, was to create bridge between contemporary dance education and professional contemporary dance practice in Ireland. It provided six of Ireland’s most talented young contemporary dancers (Chrissie Ardill, Deirdre Griffin, Karen Gleeson, Lucia Kickham, Roisin Laffan and Ryan O’Neill) with the opportunity to work under the direction of established guest choreographers (Charles Linehan and Luke Murphy) to create and perform a programme of contemporary dance works. Step-Up: Dance Project was developed as a joint initiative between the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance and the Arts Council and was run in partnership with Dance Ireland. Members of the steering committee for Step-Up: Dance Project were Mary Nunan (Chair), Dr. Jenny Roche and Paul Johnson (Chief Executive Dance Ireland). Davide Terlingo oversaw the project on behalf of the Arts Council. The project was managed by Dr. Jenny Roche.

Bealach

Sanctuary/Irish Chamber Orchestra Global Song Programme

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In September, 2008, Sanctuary embarked on a Global Song programme with Presentation Primary School, Limerick. One of the most multicultural schools in the city, Presentation Primary has a strong commitment to multicultural education and integration through the arts. The global song programme, facilitated by Kathleen

Turner (Education Officer, Irish Chamber Orchestra) and students from the MA Ritual Chant and Song at the Academy, culminated in a performance of song, movement, art and readings by the children. In 2009, the Irish Chamber Orchestra came on board as partners in the initiative and a new global song programme will commence in September, 2009. Targeted at the youngest classes, it will include weekly sessions in global song and culminate in a final performance which will feature members of the Irish Chamber Orchestra

Step Up: Dance Project

Sanctuary also works in partnership with the Intercultural Office at Doras Luimní towards the coordination of cultural events such as annual celebration for Ghandi Day (International Day of Non-Violence). This year, we are also organising an event to raise awareness around the Karen refugee camps on the Burmese / Thai border through a celebration of the music of the Karen harp. SANCTUARY is also working with Doras towards a concert to celebrate their 10th anniversary, featuring Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, the Irish Chamber Orchestra and guests. Sanctuary, funded by the Higher Education Authority, is an Irish World Academy outreach project, which seeks to build bridges between higher education and refugee, asylum seeking and new migrant communities in Ireland. Since its inception in 2001, Sanctuary has hosted six international world sacred music festivals, bringing musicians from Zimbabwe, South Africa, Senegal, Nigeria, Greece, Russia, Norway, Sweden, Croatia, Vietnam and Tibet to Limerick. Sanctuary works in partnership with Doras Luimní, the support group for refugees, asylum seekers and migrants in Limerick. Further information: Dr Helen Phelan, Phone: + 353 61 202575, Email: Helen.phelan@ul.ie

Indian tabla workshop by Rajesh Malviya at the Academy, September 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

ConaĂ­ Artists in Residence at the Irish World Academy

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Anna Dubrovska

Anna Dubrovska

Rex Levitates

Dance Artist-in-Residence

Dance Company-in-Residence

Latvian Artist Anna Dubrovska will be the first E-MOTIONAL artist-in-residence at the Irish World Academy. Anna will be in residence from November 20th until December 3rd 2011. Born in Riga 1985, she entered the Latvian Academy of Culture in 2003 majoring in the contemporary dance choreography course (under the direction of Olga Zhitluhina). She became interested in video-dance genre while being a 4th year student, and in 2007 she presented her final diploma work as a 30min long choreography film “Ruins”. She got a Master degree in Audiovisual Arts in 2009. Since that time Anna is working as independent freelanced choreographer and director and has participated in various projects and theatrical performances, giving master classes in video-dance and contemporary technique. A winner of international Choreographic Captures competition in Germany (2008 and 2010) and received a nomination as the best student film in Lielais Kristaps Festival (Latvia 2009), with her short films.

Based in Dublin, Rex Levitates Dance Company produces a diverse range of innovative dance activities yearly from theatre based or site specific performances and touring. Supported by the Arts Council as a Regularly Funded Organisation and also by Culture Ireland, Rex Levitates has been going from strength to strength in the last year. We have been commissioned by the Dublin Dance Festival and have performed at Judson Memorial Church New York and the Centre for Performance Research Brooklyn, Massachusetts International Festival of Art, Cúirt Festival Galway, Kilkenny Arts Festival and The Edinburgh Fringe Festival. In previous years the company has also performed in the South Bank Centre London, The Playhouse Liverpool, Le Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris, The Irish Arts Festival Beijing 08, and the Meet in Beijing Festival 2004. The company was co founded in 1999 by sisters Liz Roche and Jenny Roche and is presently under the artistic direction of choreographer Liz Roche. An artistically ambitious and resourceful arts organization, we deliver our program with consistency, originality and an attention to detail and this has led to our steady expansion since 1999. The company is known for its own particular brand of contemporary dance which has been created through an on-going working relationship between Liz Roche and a core group of exceptional dancers and artistic collaborators. Rex Levitates’ residency at Irish World Academy, from Oct 24th to 27th is in conjunction with the MA in Contemporary Dance Performance. Studio showings, open rehearsals and discussions throughout the week with performance of Fast Portraits on October 27th at 1.15pm in Theatre 1.

Conaí

www.annadubrovska.blogspot.com

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Liz Roche

Rex Levitates

Liz Roche Choreographer in Residence Born in Dublin in 1975, Liz is a graduate of London Contemporary Dance School and the College of Dance, Dublin. She is co-founder and Artistic Director of Rex Levitates Dance Company Dublin. Her work for the company has been performed throughout Ireland and at the South Bank Centre London, Baryshnikov Arts Centre and Judson Memorial Church New York, Meet in Beijing Festival and Centre Culturel Irlandais, Paris. Liz has also choreographed for Opera de Nice, Opernhaus Zurich, Rossini Opera Festival, National Opera of Korea, Wexford Festival, Liceu Barcelona and Opera Ireland and also in theatre at The Gate and the Abbey Theatre. As a dancer she has worked with many of the leading Irish contemporary dance companies and with Rosemary Butcher (UK) and John Jasperse (US), performing at such prestigious events as the Montpelier Dance Festival, Paris Biennale ’99 and Impulse Dance Festival and Viennale 2003. Liz is the first choreographer to be invited to take up the position of choreographer-in-residence at the Irish World Academy. This year as part of her residency she will undertake intensive periods of studio-based research, with the MA Contemporary Dance students, towards the creation/ rehearsal of a new choreographic work.


Donal Lunny

Martin Hayes

Donal Lunny

Martin Hayes

Musician-in-Residence

Musician-in-Residence

Donal Lunny continues his residency at the Irish World Academy for a second academic year. The first traditional musiclinked member of the Irish Arts Council-sponsored Aosdána, Donal Lunny has been a central thread in the tapestry of Irish traditional music in its most creative interactive modes over a generation. He was one of the founding members of Planxty in 1971, playing and arranging countermelodies and harmonic structures which became the signature of that band. Their albums included ‘Cold Blow and the Rainy Night’ and ‘The Well below the Valley’. In 1975, he joined another seminal Irish group, the Bothy Band, producing four of their albums in four years. When Planxty reformed in 1980, he produced their three following albums before finally forming Moving Hearts with some of his former Planxty band-mates. Moving Hearts was a hybrid band, incorporating contemporary folk music, jazz and other influences with elements of rock. Donal has also composed for stage and television including the soundtrack for ‘Eat the Peach’ (1985) and ‘This is my Father’ (1997). His residency at the Irish World Academy to date has included intensive week-long workshops with students of the Academy’s BA and MA Irish Traditional Music Performance, leading to concert performances where he was joined by these students in the new Irish World Academy building, as part of the Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance. His residency continues for the 2011/2012 academic year where he will continue to interact with students of the performance programmes at the Academy, as well as with Blas Summer School students.

Martin Hayes is regarded as one of the most extraordinary talents to emerge in the world of Irish traditional music. He has recorded two acclaimed solo albums, Martin Hayes (1993) and Under the Moon (1995) on the Green Linnet label, as well as several critically-acclaimed albums with his long-time musical partner, guitarist Dennis Cahill. He is the Artistic Director of the Masters of Tradition Festival held in August each year at Bantry House in Co Cork, where Ireland’s most distinguished traditional musicians are invited to play in a chamber music setting. A native of Feakle in east county Clare, he has been based in Connecticut in the United States for several years but remains grounded in the music he grew up with and learned from his late father, P. Joe Hayes, the leader of the Tulla Ceilí Band. His most recent project is The Gloaming, a new ensemble which includes fiddle player Caoimhín Ó Raghallaigh, singer Iarla Ó Lionáird, guitarist Dennis Cahill and American keyboard player Thomas Bartlett. His residency at the Irish World Academy has included masterclasses with students of the MA and BA programmes in Irish traditional music, as well as two seminars, one on the topic of East Clare fiddle music, the second on the innovative innovative Irish fiddle player from Dublin (1912 to 1988). Martin’s residency also includes tutoring on the Academy’s annual Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance.

Colin Dunne

Colin Dunne Dancer in Residence Colin Dunne has been named an Artist-in-Residence at the Irish World Academy for 2011. He joins Liz Roche of Rex Levitates Dance Company, and Jean Butler as a further member of the growing team of internationally acclaimed dancers and choreographers associated with the Academy. This comes at a time when the Academy is establishing itself in its new home with a generous suite of dance floors and performance theatres, and when An Chomhairle Ealaíon/The Arts Council new STEP UP national dance programme has been completed, with the Irish World Academy as a supporter. Colin Dunne is a leading figure in the world of traditional Irish dance who has made the cross over into contemporary dance and theatre. Best known internationally for his performances and choreography in Riverdance and Dancing on Dangerous Ground, he has been forging a new creative path since his previous time as artist in residence at the Academy, where he completed an MA in contemporary dance in 2002. In 2007 he was nominated for a UK Critics Circle National Dance Award (best male: modern dance) for performances in Fabulous Beast Dance Theatre’s The Bull at The Barbican in London. More recently, Colin was nominated for the 2009 UK Critics Circle National Dance Award (Best Male Dancer) and also received a nomination for the 2010 Laurence Olivier Award (outstanding achievements in dance) for his one-man show Out of Time: ‘He is master of his stage, a fascinating presence and a mesmerising performer’ (Dancing Times, London). The Academy is proud of its historical association with Colin Dunne and the supportive part it has played in the facilitation of the emergence of his singularly creative voice. His show, Out of Time, continues to gain international attention and the Academy looks forward to staging it on November 28th in Theatre One at the Irish World Academy.

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The Chieftains

Irish Chamber Orchestra

The Chieftains

Irish Chamber Orchestra

The Chieftains continue their iconic association with the Irish World Academy through their annual UCH concert, interacting with up to 80 student musicians and dancers from the Academy programmes. Their performance at last year’s opening of the new Irish World Academy building was spectacular and provided the educational context for the innovative and passionate student interactive performances.

In 1995 the Irish Chamber Orchestra (ICO) moved from east coast to west, following an invitation from Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin to become part of the emerging Irish World Academy at the University of Limerick. At the same time the musicians were offered regular contracts, attracting the country's finest string players back to Ireland. The orchestra has been resident at the university ever since, and in 2008 opened its own state of the art building on campus, with studio, rehearsal rooms and offices. Outside the concert hall the orchestra takes an active role in the wider community - working in marginalised communities to promote engagement in education and using music as a tool to increase self-confidence, enhance leadership skills and encourage creative problem solving.

Conaí

The Irish Chamber Orchestra is funded by the Arts Council of Ireland/An Chomhairle Ealaíon.

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Irish World Academy Ensembles

‘Noctú’ choreographed by Academy PhD Arts Practice student Breandán de Gallaí, performed at the Academy, June 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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CANTORAL

Irish World Academy Ensembles

CANTORAL Vocal Ensemble

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CANTORAL is an all female chant ensemble, specialising in Western plainchant and early polyphony, with a particular interest in medieval Irish repertoire. The ensemble was formed in 2008 at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick and had its first international appearance in March, 2009 at the Centre Culturel Irlandais in Paris. Other highlight performances include Imbolc, a programme of chant and Irish language song for St. Bridget premiered in New York in 2010, as well as a programme for the Galway Early Music Festival entitled …sed diabolus irrisit (‘…but the devil laughed’) in the same year. More recently, Cantoral sang for the Dalai Lama’s visit to the University of Limerick in April, 2011 and as part of the Cloughjordan Music Festival in June, 2011. The Artistic Director of CANTORAL, Catherine Sergent, is an acclaimed Paris-based singer who has performed and recorded extensively with several early music ensembles. Catherine is a chant tutor for the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme at the Academy. The singers in CANTORAL are graduates, doctoral students and members of faculty at the Irish World Academy from Ireland, France, the United States and Mexico. CANTORAL has also produced two ‘daughter’ ensembles, which feature the same singers, but specialise in distinctive repertoire. These are directed by Sydney Freedman and Olivia Cantoral, two students on the Arts practice PhD programme. These ensembles form an integral part of their doctoral work.

Lucernarium Lucernarium is the dedicated ensemble of the MA programme in Chant and Ritual Song, and is dedicated to exploring the vocal music repertoires of Western

Hibernia

ACADEMOS

chant, medieval monophonic and polyphonic song, and choral song traditions from around the globe. Lucernarium also performs music of the Renaissance as well as contemporary choral music whose aesthetic is oriented towards the early- and world-song sound worlds. Lucernarium performs several times a year during the regular term and rehearses twice a week. A required ensemble for students in the MA Ritual Chant and Song programme, Lucernarium is also open by audition to other students at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the University of Limerick, as well as to interested members of the community. For more information, or to arrange an audition, please contact Course Director Wolodymyr Smishkewych at vlad@ul.ie.

Hibernia Vocal Ensemble HIBERNIA is a cross-disciplinary ensemble directed by Óscar Mascareñas that focuses on the performance of early music repertoires within the realm of contemporary practice. It is currently formed by students of the BA Voice and Dance (BAVAD) and former MA Ritual Chant and Song students, some of which are undertaking doctoral research at the Academy. The ensemble has recently begun to work in close collaboration with a dancer to develop new choreosonographies, that is, pieces that use movement and sound to investigate the multiple possibilities of expression that dwell within the human body. HIBERNIA's premiere took place at the Galway Early Music Festival in May 2010. More recently, it presented the results of a three-month research project at a performance in Glenstal Abbey. The ensemble is currently working on the recording of the programme 'Songs for An Age of Sorrow', which includes Gregorian chant and other medieval repertoires. Some preview tracks can be downloaded from www.oscaromg.com/hibernia.

ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings is the graduate string orchestra of the MA Classical String Performance Programme at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, in association with the Irish Chamber Orchestra. Established in 2008, ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings has toured internationally each year as an integral part of its educational programme. Each orchestra member is a fulltime registered postgraduate student on the two-year MA Classical String programme at the Irish World Academy, University of Limerick and is tutored by internationally acclaimed Visiting Professors Dr Bruno Giuranna (Viola), Mariana Sirbu (Violin), Michael Wolf (Double Bass), with Cello tuition from Course Director, Ferenc Szücs. ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings operates in full association with the Irish Chamber Orchestra, Ireland’s leading international orchestra, which has been resident at the Irish World Academy since its inception in 1994. Academos is directed by Katherine Hunka, with line leaders from the Irish Chamber Orchestra, providing a unique opportunity for the graduate performers to further their professional experience through this contact with players from the ICO. ACADEMOS Irish World Academy Strings was formally launched at its inaugural concert in Dublin in March 2008, made its European debut at the Centre Culturel Irlandais Paris in March 2009 and in February 2010 made its US debut at the Concert Hall of the Society for Ethical Culture New York, hosted by the Irish Arts Centre, with funding from Culture Ireland. An Irish tour took place in March 2011 and included venues in Limerick, Kildare, Kilkenny and Galway.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Irish World Academy

Scholarship And Award Recipients 2011/2012

Contemporary Dance student Mihaela Griveva performs ‘Absence and Loss’ choreographed by Nigel Rolfe, in association with the UL Arts Office, Spring 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Fulbright Scholarship Recipients: Dominique Dodge

Academy Scholarship And Award Recipients 2011/2012

Harper and singer Dominique Dodge grew up in northern NH and holds a BA Honours in Scottish Music from the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. Her love of traditional music has been shaped by her time in Scotland and Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia where she teaches harp for the Gaelic College summer school. Her 2006 solo album is comprised of rhythmic, artfully arranged dance tunes and songs in Gaelic and Scots. She has 10 years of teaching, performing and recording experience in Europe and North America. Dominique is delighted to have been awarded a Fulbright Scholarship to attend the University of Limerick’s Masters in Irish Traditional Music Performance in 2011/2012.

Dominique Dodge

Ciara Glasheen Ciara Glasheen is an Irish World Academy graduate. She was selected for a Fulbright Award 2011-2012 and invited to continue her study through a Master of Music degree, specialising in oboe performance and pedagogy at the University of Colorado in Boulder. The presentation was made yesterday at the US Embassy in Ireland by John Hennessy-Niland, Deputy Chief of Mission. Ciara recently completed a Graduate Diploma in Education (Music) at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, UL and is an accomplished oboist.

Ciara Glasheen

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Irish Research Council for the Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship 2011 – 2012 Recipient: Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell has been awarded an IRCHSS Government of Ireland Postdoctoral Fellowship (2011-12) to prepare her doctoral dissertation for publication. She completed her doctoral thesis on the history of the Irish harp and its patronage from 1790-1845 at the University of Limerick in 2009 and her current research project, entitled Custodians of Culture: Essays on the Social, Political, Musicological and Cultural History of the Irish Harp from 1790 to 1900, will be completed at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance under the mentorship of Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin. Assessed by an expert International peer review panel (from outside the Irish academic community), this fellowship is valued at €31,745 per annum and is aimed at candidates who have completed their PhD not more than five years previously.

Dr. Mary Louise O'Donnell

Jack Kent Cooke Graduate Arts Award Recipient: Joanna Hyde A native of Colorado, USA, Joanna Hyde received the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s 2011 Graduate Arts Award to pursue graduate studies in music. She was selected as one of 10 scholars from across the country by a panel of distinguished arts professors and professionals based on criteria including artistic and/or creative merit, academic achievement, and a breadth of interests and activities. Joanna began studying classical violin at the age of six, and shortly thereafter expanded her musical endeavours to American fiddling styles such as old time, Texas swing, and bluegrass. Studying and performing alongside her musician brothers as she grew up, Joanna spent several summers attending various folk music camps and conferences throughout the USA, during which she fell in love with Irish traditional music. She graduated with a BA in Music from Colorado College in 2009, receiving the Music Department awards for academic achievement as well as excellence in instrumental music. Joanna is thrilled to be a part of the MA in Irish Traditional Music Performance programme at the University of Limerick.

Ciara Glasheen

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FONCA (National Fund for the Arts, Mexico) Recipient: Olivia Cantoral

Academy Scholarship And Award Recipients 2011/2012

Olivia Cantoral is currently undertaking the PhD Arts Practice at the Irish World Academy. Her research interrogates her own musical practice as well as early music performance, taking the 14th century Spanish musical manuscript Codex Las Huelgas as her subject matter. The work she conducts marries musicology with performance practice, building a bridge between the performing of the repertory in Codex Las Huelgas by skola ix – the Irish World Academy-based female vocal ensemble- and her confidence for a creative historical musicology.

Olivia Cantoral

Roche Continents – Youth, Arts, Science Scholarship Recipient: Niamh Phelan Niamh Phelan is a Community Music MA student with a formal background in mathematics and music education. She was recently awarded the Roche Continents Scholarship 2011 and jetted off to Salzburg, Austria to reap the rewards. Niamh is a professional violin teacher and enjoys performing an extensive range of genres. In September 2010, Niamh was appointed as a scholar for the Sing out with Strings 2010/11 outreach programme in conjunction with the Irish Chamber Orchestra and the IWAMD. Niamh also had the opportunity to attend Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance with the help of the Paul Brady Blas Bursary

Niamh Phelan

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The FONCA (National Fund for the Arts, Mexico) is an institution created in 1989 as required by the Mexican government whose aims are to provide a financial structure that may support the artistic production, to strengthen and promote culture, and to preserve the cultural heritage of the country. Accordingly, it runs different programs destined to fulfil such objectives, such as the ‘Scholarships to Study Abroad’ which allow Mexican artists and researchers to develop their personal practice thus fostering cultural diversity and excellence in professional artistic performance. On the other hand, the government of Ireland through the Mexican Office for International Affairs offers two scholarships every year to Mexican students who wish to carry out postgraduate studies in Ireland. The grants cover all the areas of knowledge.

Roche Continents – Youth! Arts! Science!” is a project grown from a partnership between Roche and the Salzburg Festival. 100 students from across Europe are selected to participate in this exceptional challenge. To be eligible to apply, one has to be a student (undergraduate, doctoral candidate or post-doc) aged 20 to 29 from the life sciences, chemistry, the fine arts or music. Roche is well known for promoting culture in novel settings, and Roche Continents is an example of this commitment. Participants attend concerts and talks by guest speakers, and are given the opportunity to join discussions with artists as well as take part in group workshops, exploring the common ground of innovation and creativity in the arts and science.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Scholarships at the Irish World Academy

Choreographer Luke Murphy (centre) conducting a workshop during the Academy’s ‘Step Up: Dance Project’ July 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Stepping Stones Scholarship A new scholarship fund has been made available for post-graduate study at the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick. The Stepping Stones Scholarships target international post-graduate students with a demonstrable record in a performance and/or academic specialisation relevant to a programme of study at the Academy. Priority will be given to:

o o o o

applicants experiencing demonstrable financial challenge applicants from parts of the world underrepresented at the Academy applicants with projects that resonate with the spirit of the Stepping Stones initiative: equality of arts practices, an interdisciplinary vision, and desire to build bridges between arts practices applicants for programmes with a higher number of available places

The first cohort of Stepping Stones scholars come from five different countries and will participate in seven different programmes. These include:

Scholarships

Ron Mc Daniel Catherine John Sabrina Ng Rui Ting Elizabeth Painter Colin Botts Daniel Howe Lisa Vogel Masumi Seki Amelia Thornton Aramhv Vazquez Jaimee Jensen Carolyn Dike

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USA USA Singapore USA USA Canada USA Japan USA Mexico USA USA

The Marie Duffy Foundation Award for excellence in Dance Performance at the University of Limerick. The Marie Duffy Foundation in association with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance at the University of Limerick is pleased to announce the establishment of the Marie Duffy Excellence Award in Dance Performance. This bursary, which has been introduced for the first time this year, is valued at one thousand (1000) euro and will acknowledge excellence in Irish dance performance by final year undergraduate students of the BA Irish music and Dance. The recipient of the new Irish Dance bursary will be selected by the course board in consultation with the external examiner. Students will apply for consideration for the award and illustrate how the award will be used to develop their artistic practice. This will be a factor in the recommendation of the award. The principal criteria for assessing the award will be the creative output of the student.

MA in Community Music MA in Community Music MA in Community Music MA in Ethnochoreology MA Irish Traditional Music Performance MA Contemporary Dance Performance MA Contemporary Dance Performance MA Classical Strings MA Classical Strings MA Classical Strings MA Ritual Chant & Song MA Ethnomusicology

Further information and application queries should be directed to : Dr Helen Phelan, Associate Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Phone: + 353 61 202590 Email: helen.phelan@ul.ie

www.irishworldacademy.ie

The Irish World Academy continues to have a strong international student profile and currently has students on both its undergraduate and postgraduate programmes from Singapore, the USA, Canada, Japan, Finland, Italy, France, the UK, Poland, Hungary, the Netherlands, Spain and Mexico.

Marie Duffy with the Academy’s director Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin and dance lecturer Orfhlaith Ní Bhriain at the announcement of the Marie Duffy Foundation Award, June 2011


The Marie Duffy Foundation Award for excellence in Irish Dance Music Composition. The Marie Duffy Foundation is pleased to announce the Marie Duffy Excellence Award for Irish Dance Music Composition. This award is valued at one thousand and five hundred (1500) euro and will acknowledge excellence in Irish Dance Music Composition. Applications are invited from musicians world wide. Further details are available from the Marie Duffy Foundation website. A Gala evening will be held at the Irish World Academy on November 23rd.

Paul Brady Blas Summer School Scholarship The Paul Brady Blas Scholarship provides €20,000 in funds over three years, providing 25 places for deserving musicians on the Blas Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, which takes place annually in June. The Paul Brady Blas Summer School scholarship recipients will benefit from master classes and tuition from some of Ireland's most respected traditional musicians and dancers. The first Paul Brady Blas Scholarships were awarded in June 2010 where recipients spent two weeks at the Academy, receiving tuition from tutors including Dónal Lunny, Martin Hayes, John Carty, Derek Hickey, Colin Dunne, Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, Siobhán Peoples, Ernestine Healy, Niall Keegan, Muireann Nic Amhlaoibh and many more. Applications are invited in writing for Blas 2011 and should be made to: Ernestine Healy, Director, Blas International Summer School of Irish Traditional Music and Dance, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick or email ernestine.healy@ul.ie. Applicants should be over 17 and should include a sample recording of their music and/or dance. See www.blas.ie for further information.

Paul Brady with recipients of the Paul Brady Blas Summer School Scholarships, June 2011

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The Trustees of Muckross House Scholarship for the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programme Through Dr Catherine Foley’s connection with Muckross House since 1979 as a collector of Irish traditional music, song and dance, the Trustees of Muckross House have awarded for a number of years a scholarship to the MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance programme. The 2011/12 recipients are Margaret McCarthy and Tereza Bernardova. For further information, contact Dr Catherine Foley, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick, Limerick, Ireland. Phone: + 353 61 202922, Email:Catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

The RTÉ lyric fm Scholarship for Classical String Performance RTÉ lyric fm has been a strong supporter of the Irish World Academy since RTE launched its classical music station in 1999. The RTE lyric fm Scholarship is available to students wishing to study on the MA in Classical String Performance. Applications to Ferenc Szucs, Director, MA Classical String Performance, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance,, University of Limerick. Phone: + 353 61 202918/Email: ferenc.szucs@ul.ie

Irish World Academy Research Fee Waivers A limited number of full or partial fee waivers are available for PhD research students at the Irish World Academy. There is no application deadline for these fee waivers, which will be discussed as part of the consultative process in assessing any research application. Enquiries for doctoral research should be addressed in the first instance to the appropriate course director specialist or to Professor Mícheál Ó Súilleabháin, Director, Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick.

Scholarships

Phone: + 353 61 202590, Email: Melissa.carty@ul.ie All applications in the first instance should be sent to the course director of the appropriate MA programme. Late applications may be accepted.

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Research at the Irish World Academy

Sean-n贸s singer R贸is铆n Elsafty workshop at the Blas Summer School, June 2011 Photograph 漏 Maurice Gunning

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Research at the Irish World Academy The Irish World Academy has offered a PhD programme since its inception in 1994. Its initial specialisation in Irish music and dance studies has expanded to reflect the growing research specialisations at the Academy including chant scholarship, classical string performance, community music, contemporary dance, ethnochoreology, ethnomusicology, music education, music therapy and ritual studies.

PhD Graduates in 2011 include:

Mel Mercier Title: Supervisor:

Mescher Bones Tradition: Syncopations on the American Landscape Professor Mícheal Ó Súilleabháin (Chair of Music, Director, Irish World Academy, University of Limerick)

Mel Mercier

Andrea Intween Title: Supervisor:

Exploring Anthroposophical Music Therapy Professor Jane Edwards (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick)

Andrea Intween

Óscar Octavio Mascareñas Garza Title: Supervisor:

Exposing the Play in Gregorian Chat: The Manuscript as an Opening of Re Presentation Dr. Helen Phelan (Irish World Academy, University of Limerick) and Dr. Emma Hornby (University of Bristol)

Research

Óscar Octavio Mascareñas Garza

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Phd Arts Practice Programme Since 2009, the Academy also offers a second PhD track in Arts Practice research. This is a four- year, structured PhD programme which allows performers to reflect on their professional practice through a combination of performance and academic reflection. To date, the programme has attracted students from a wide variety of performance backgrounds including Irish dance, Irish song, Irish harp, contemporary dance, early music, orthodox chant, ritual song, theatre and community-based performance.


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Clár Programmes at the Irish World Academy

Siobhán Peoples and Dermot Sheedy, lunchtime concert Spring 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

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Clár Programmes at the Irish World Academy BA Irish Music and Dance Niall Keegan, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202465 Email: niall.keegan@ul.ie

BA Voice and Dance

MA Community Music

MA Music Therapy

MA Contemporary Dance Performance

MA Irish Traditional Dance Performance Dr Catherine Foley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202922 Email:catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

MA Irish Traditional Music Performance Sandra Joyce, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie

MA Ritual Chant and Song

Clár

Ferenc Szucs, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202918, Email: ferenc.szucs@ul.ie

Dr Óscar Mascareñas Garza, Course Director Phone: +353 61 233762 Email: oscar.mascarenas@ul.ie Professor Jane Edwards, Course Director. Phone: + 353 61 213122 Email: jane.edwards@ul.ie

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MA Classical String Performance

Wolodymyr Smishkewych, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 234743 Email: Wolodymyr.smishkewych@ul.ie

Jean Downey Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213160 Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Mary Nunan, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213464, Email: mary.nunan@ul.ie

MA Ethnochoreology Dr Catherine Foley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202922, Email:catherine.e.foley@ul.ie

MA Ethnomusicology Dr Colin Quigley, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202966, Email: colin.quigley@ul.ie

M. Ed (Music) Grad. Dip Education (Music) Jean Downey, Course Director Phone: + 353 61 213160, Email: jean.downey@ul.ie

Phd Arts Practice Dr Helen Phelan, Course Director Associate Director, Irish World Academy Phone: + 353 61 202575 Email: Helen.phelan@ul.ie

Certificate In Music and Dance Sandra Joyce, Acting Course Director Phone: + 353 61 202565 Email: Sandra.joyce@ul.ie


Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

Other Programmes and Arts Offices at the University of Limerick

Faculty of Education and Health Sciences: Graduate Diploma/Master of Arts in Dance (Part Time) The Graduate Diploma in Dance is a one-year, part time programme of study. The Graduate Diploma in Dance enables participants to acquire the necessary skills to teach at Leaving Certificate Physical Education level by focusing on the aesthetic/artistic/dance components of such a certificate. The emphasis is on participants’ own professional development. Students who satisfy the University’s entrance requirements for transfer to a master’s degree may be considered for admission to the master’s programme. The object of the programme is t o interested teachers with a unique opportunity to develop appropriate dance education skills, the course aims to promote dance culture and develop greater participation in the art of dance in Ireland. Course director: Brigitte Moody, Department: Physical Education and Sport Sciences. Phone: + 353-61-202807, Email: Brigitte.moody@ul.ie

Faculty of Science and Engineering: The Centre for Computational Musicology & Computer Music Ma/Msc in Music Technology The Master's Degree in Music Technology is a 12-month intensive course that is designed specifically for musicians from all disciplines. The course is aimed at graduates who are interested in combining technological competence with artistic endeavour. Director: Nicholas Ward, nicholas.ward@ul.ie Phone: 061 234246 www.csis.ul.ie

Faculty of Science and Engineering: The Interaction Design Centre (IDC) MA in Interactive Multimedia The MA in Interactive Multimedia is a 12-month intensive course that is designed specifically for art and design graduates who are interested in pursuing studies, which combine technological competence with design/artistic endeavour. The convergence of computer and media technologies offers unique opportunities for design/artists to exploit their potential in new areas, across a wide range of activities, such as recording, multimedia, software, broadcasting and education. Director: Mikael Fernström, Phone: + 353 61 202606, Email: mikael.fernstrom@ul.ie www.csis.ul.ie

John Spillane lunchtime concert, March 2011 Photograph © Maurice Gunning

Arts Offices At The University Of Limerick The Association of Irish Choirs Founded in 1980, The Association of Irish Choirs (formerly Cumann Náisiúnta na gCór) is a national resource organisation, funded by The Arts Council, to support and promote excellence in choral music throughout Ireland. The Association fulfils its function as a national resource organisation by providing information and advice to choirs and conductors and by presenting a range of programmes and activities designed to respond to the needs of Association members, the wider choral community and the public. The Association of Irish Choirs moved its administrative offices from Cork City to the University of Limerick in February 2010. University of Limerick is home to a number of arts organisations with which the Association hopes and intends to collaborate including the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, the Irish Chamber Orchestra and the University Concert Hall. The Association intends to play its part in student life while also contributing to the artistic life of the city and its surrounds. In addition to providing for the needs of the choral sector, AOIC is also the producing and parent organisation of the Irish Youth Choir. In June 2010, following nationwide auditions, 98 young singers and 50 instrumentalists between the ages of 18 and 28 benefited from the IYC and NYOI summer residential programme of training, rehearsals and concerts here at University of Limerick. The Irish Youth Choir also offers

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Irish World Academy Of Music And Dance

opportunities for young conductors to develop their skills through the Conductor in Training initiative, run in conjunction with the National Chamber Choir, and by offering masterclass opportunities during the IYC week. Founded in 1982, IYC members have gone on to form the backbone of musical life in this country and beyond as conductors, choir founders, singers, teachers and musicians. They include singer Julie Feeney, soloists Mairéad Buicke and Bridget Knowles, conductors Bernie Sherlock and Niall Crowley, to name but a few. In August 2010, The Association of Irish Choirs presented its 30th Annual Choral Conducting Summer School, attended by 60 conductors, teachers, students, choral enthusiasts and musicians at the newly opened Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. The course was delivered on 5 levels; beginner to advanced designed to address the needs of conductors of all levels. AOIC also presented a number of workshops and masterclasses as part of the Annual Choral Conducting Summer School. For further information, contact AOIC aoic@ul.ie or Liz Powell, CEO at 061 234823 or Liz Kelly, General Manager on 061 202715 for further information.

Other Programmes and Arts Offices

University of Limerick Arts Officer:

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Patricia Moriarty Phone + 353 61 20 2130 patricia.moriarty@ul.ie

University of Limerick Visual Arts Officer: Yvonne Davis Phone + 353 61 21 3052 Yvonne.davis@ul.ie

Irish Language Office/Aonad na Gaeilge Deirdre Ni Loinsigh, Stiúrthóir na Gaeilge Phone: 061 213 463 Deirdre.niloingsigh@ul.ie Ciara Considine, Marketing/Admin Phone: 061 234 754 ciara.considine@ul.ie

Department of Music, Mary Immaculate College Mary Immaculate College, Limerick was founded in 1898 and became a recognised college of the National University of Ireland in 1974 before being academically integrated with the University of Limerick in 1991. The College occupies a mature campus on the South Circular Road in the suburbs of Limerick City and student enrolment currently stands at 3,000. The Department of Music offers music for the B.Ed and BA (Liberal Arts) programmes as well as a taught MA in Music Education and other postgraduate degrees to doctoral level by research (Graduate Assistantships @ €7,000 p.a. plus fee waiver available). Regular choral and chamber concerts (see website) are a vital part of the life of the Department. There are close ties and many cross-campus ventures with the Irish World Academy of Music and Dance. MIC has now opened its new 500-seater performing arts venue, the Lime Tree Theatre. Faculty Dr. Gareth Cox (Head of Department) Dr. Paul Collins Dr. Michael Murphy Gwen Moore Ailbhe Kenny Dr Karen Power (Music Technician) Colette Davis (Staff Accompanist) Departmental Enquiries: Secretary: +353 61 204507 e-mail: musicinfo@mic.ul.ie Website: www.mic.ul.ie

Further information on the Irish World Academy’s courses, concerts, seminars and special events: Phone: + 353 61 202917/ Fax: + 353 61 202589 Email: ellen.byrne@ul.ie www.irishworldacademy.ie

Maurice Gunning Maurice Gunning has been working as Photographer-inResidence with the Irish World Academy since 2004. Concentrating on fine art documentary photography as well as specialising in dance, music and theatre photography, Maurice has worked with many of the leading traditional & classical musicians and contemporary dancers. He received his MFA from the University of Wales in 2009 after a period of time spent documenting the Argentine Irish community of Buenos Aires. This work has been exhibited in the UK and in Buenos Aires in 2010 with support from Culture Ireland. Working with funding from the Irish Heritage Council over the past three years on a project dealing with Ireland’s Traditional Boating Heritage has culminated in the first showing of this work in the Cultural Centre, Athens and the Hunt Museum Limerick. A new collection of work will open in Dance House, Dublin in 2011. A new direction into cinematography sees Maurice’s first documentary on the Chilean Miners being broadcast on RTE in 2011. Commissions for CD artwork and design are also incorporated into his commissioned work. The photographs throughout this book are examples of his work documenting events at the Irish World Academy. For further information see:

www.mauricegunning.com info@mauricegunning.com

Front Cover photograph: Nepalese Shaman Yarjung Krumchai Tamu performing a foundation ritual at the House of Light event, Irish World Academy, February 2011. Back Cover photograph: Students of the Academy’s BA Voice and Dance, Performance April 2011


The Sionna Mosaic by Desmond Kinney at the Irish World Academy building. Photograph Š Maurice Gunning



Comhaimseartha Autumn Winter 2011-12