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FEB. 2018

The 2018 Meetings & Conventions Guide

Selling

You

Branding in the Age of Technology Avoid Costly Mistakes in Organizational Change Misjudging Risk vs. Reward in Business Prepare for Sexual Harassment Claims $4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

THIS ISSUE Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association


Carlos A. Sugich Congratulations to Carlos Sugich for being named by the Thunderbirds, hosts of the Waste Management Phoenix Open presented by the Ak-Chin Indian Community, as the Tournament Chairman for the 2018 edition of “The People’s Open.”

Daniel McEvers Mahoney We also recognize Dan Mahoney who served as Tournament Chairman in 2016 and Big Chief in 2017.

Understanding what makes you unique.® www.swlaw.com ONE ARIZONA CENTER | 400 EAST VAN BUREN STREET | SUITE 1900 | PHOENIX, AZ 85004 DENVER | LAS VEGAS | LOS ANGELES | LOS CABOS | ORANGE COUNTY | PHOENIX | RENO | SALT LAKE CITY | TUCSON


FEBRUARY 2018

COVER STORY

22

& Conventions

MAGAZINE

Guide

Selling Yo

BRANDING

u

Branding in the Age of Techno logy

FEBRUARY 2018 •

Business

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

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$4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

Get a year of In Business Magazine Subscribe now at inbusinessphx.com

PARTNER SECTIONS TEMPE CHAMBER

ADVANTAGE Winter 2O18 • tempechamber.org

State Sen. Bowie Visits Tempe Chamber Businesses

“Seeing how great they are doing, how their employees are doing, I just really enjoy having the opportunity to meet with them and find out how I can be helpful at the Capitol,” the senator said. “I think it’s really important for business owners and people in the business community to

Tempe Chamber Outlines 2018 Legislative Agenda The Tempe Chamber of Commerce has released its policy agendas detailing the legislative priorities of the business community for 2018. The Chamber’s local, state and federal agendas are developed by its Government Relations & Transportation Committee comprised of chamber members with final approval given by the board of directors.

Areas of focus in the 2018 policy agendas include lowering the cost of doing business, increasing private-sector jobs, building a trained workforce and efficient and effective government. The full list of legislative priorities can be found by going to tempechamber. org and selecting Policy Agendas and Political News under the Advocacy tab.

T E M P E C H A M B E R A D VA N TA G E

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

37

About Us

7

How ASBA Has Mastered the Art of Alliances to Help Small Businesses Win Benefits of ASBA Relationship Development for Supply Chain

4600 E. Washington St., Suite 340 Phoenix, AZ 85034 p. 602.306.4000

Southern Arizona 3444 N. Country Club Rd. Suite 118 Tucson, AZ 85716 p. 520.327.0222 © 2018 ASBA. A publication of the Arizona Small Business Association. For more information or to join ASBA, please contact us at www.asba.com. Section designed by the Arizona Small Business Association.

Glenn H. Varney, Ph.D., and James M. McFillen address issues companies need to face when attempting to implement organizational change — where mistakes can be costly.

30

Addressing the Absence of Community in Personal Finance

In this second installment of his three-part series on Finance and Workforce, George Grombacher discusses the benefit to businesses of fostering a community to help their employees change their money habits. DEPARTMENTS

9 10

Join ASBA. Be amAZed®

6

Getting It Right the First Time

Guest Editor

Scott Harkey, president of OH Partners, introduces the “Branding” issue.

The Mission of the Arizona Small Business Association is to foster and empower a thriving Arizona small business community by offering relevant, dynamic, and innovative resources and the highest level of advocacy as THE VOICE of small business in Arizona. ASBA fosters and empowers a thriving small business community by: • bringing relevant and dynamic education and mentoring opportunities • providing innovative and relevant tools business owners can utilize to grow and sustain their business • creating a variety of relevant and dynamic opportunities for members to meet potential clients • working diligently to advocate for legislation and regulation supporting a pro-business environment.

In This Issue

28

1

Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Central Arizona

FEATURES

Avoid Costly Mistakes

Organization in al Change Misjudging

Reward inRisk vs. for Sexual Harassment Claims

THIS ISSUE

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association

DON’T MISS OUT!

In an afternoon tour of Tempe Chamber of Commerce businesses last week, state Sen. Sean Bowie (D-18) pledged support for businesses in his district and proposed new legislation that could create a larger pipeline of skilled workers. The senator stopped by four south Tempe businesses, with employee numbers ranging from 14 to 6,400. The businesses were Insight, a technology services corporation; C2 Tactical, a full-service gun store and firing range; Caliente Construction, a building and construction company; and Special Moments Catering, which runs a successful catering and boxed-lunch business. The senator made stops at Tempe Chamber businesses to meet with business leaders and encourage participation in the upcoming legislative session, which will begin Monday, January 8. Bowie remarked at the rapid growth of economic development and expansion in Tempe.

How is branding evolving with today’s technological advances and innovation? Leading practitioners in our community of the art and craft of public relations share insights into what makes branding work and how technology can provide tools in that effort.

FEB. 2018

IN BUSINESS

The 2018 Meetings

Selling You: Branding in the Age of Technology

The Power of Successful Business Collaboration by Angelia Hill, Vice President Marketing & Business Solutions, Arizona Small Business Association

Collaboration and working in partnership with other businesses can be one way to help your business grow. Communication and knowledge transfer represent the power behind today’s small and midsize businesses (SMBs). Whether it’s responding to customer inquiries or planning the next big product, small businesses can transform beyond corporate borders and capture immediate value with a strong partnership. Just about every aspect of a business is in some way dependent on a strategic partnership. Long before selling products and services, we engage with a range of partners, including manufacturers, suppliers, payroll companies, builders, technology companies, lenders and investors. The value of these relationships is well understood by executives. The groundbreaking Grow From the Right Intro study by the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council reveals that 85 percent of companies view finding strategic partners as essential or important to their business and around 60 percent are focused on developing a strategy for finding strategic partners. Some companies have tried collaboration with only limited success. If most companies start again and rethink the nature of their strategic relationships,

Feedback

14

Startups

“Startups Are Thriving in Phoenix”

16

CRE

“Tempe Is Hot Property for Office Submarket,” “Garden Condos in Biltmore,” “Deer Valley Industrial Spec” and “West Side Luxury Home Development”

18

Healthcare

“Transforming Healthcare through a Collaborative ValueBased Care Model,” “PCCN and UHC Launch Team Approach” and “GlobalMed OK’d for DoD Networks”

20

Legal

Local attorneys discuss what employers can do now to prepare for an expected increase in sexual harassment claims.

29

Books

New releases give fresh insights on business thinking.

34

Assets

Elie Goodman, Chad Barnett and Charles Touché respond to In Business Magazine’s burning business question of the month.

2018 Bentley Continental Range Plus: Sealed in Ink

11

36

they can get more from their collaborations. This article discusses, the importance of these agreements.

1

45

Arizona Small Business Association

SPECIAL SECTION Valley

Presents

A Guide to Your Next Great Event

FEATURING Children’s Museum of Phoenix Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau K1 Speed Merestone Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse Thunderbird Executive Inn

53

Briefs

Power Lunch

“Millennial Employees and Their Digital Demands,” “2018 Prediction: A Rush of Real Estate Agents,” “Multilingual Staffing Chatbot,” “Act!Now for SMBs” and “Revolutionary Real Estate Marketplace”

Southern Rail: Creative Comfort Plus: Tastes of Fame

12

Discussing the issue of risk vs. reward, Darren T. Case and Michael Marsh suggest that successful entrepreneurs may be their own worst enemy

By the Numbers

Sales team travel and entertainment (T&E) is a major expense. So how can a company’s expense spend help its team with sales budget planning?

13

From the Top

Disruption was the aim from the get-go for Tuft & Needle cofounder Daehee Park.

66

Roundtable

ON THE AGENDA

31

Spotlight

Council Connect — Arizona Technology Council Speaker Series — Economic Club of Phoenix

2018 Meetings & Conventions Guide

FEB. 2018

4

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

An increasing number of countries are introducing strict regulations on the marketing and advertising of food and drink products in an attempt to prevent obesity and lifestyle diseases. The Coca-Cola Company and PepsiCo are among eight major brandowning companies predicted to lose value should plain packaging be mandated - approximately 24 and 27 percent, respectively, of their total enterprise values. brandfinance.com/knowledge-centre/reports/brand-finance-plain-packaging-2017


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more rewarding

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Ask your teller about more rewarding options. *Credit cards are subject to credit approval. Certain terms, conditions and restrictions apply. See your Business Credit Card Application and Agreement and Disclosures for more details. All offers are for new business card accounts, may not be available with all card types and subject to change at any time. The APRs mentioned are accurate as of 6/15/17 and actual APR may vary with the market based on the Prime Rate as published in the Wall Street Journal. 1) AmaZing Cash® Back and AmaZing Rewards® Points for Business: Cardholder will earn cash back or rewards points on all net purchases. 3% cash back or 3x rewards points is earned on office supplies, wireless telephone services, computer network services and telecommunications services and equipment. 2% cash back or 2x rewards points is earned on airlines and car rentals when the purchase is made directly with the airline or car rental company. 1% cash back or 1x rewards points is earned on all other. 3%/3x and 2%/2x apply to the first $150,000 in combined purchases per calendar year, then 1%/1x applies thereafter. Rewards are not earned on transactional items such as cash advances, balance transfers, returned merchandise, etc. Must have at least $25 earned cash back or 2,500 points in order to redeem. For AmaZing Rewards Points, Purchases must be redeemed within 90 days of purchase date. Account must be in good standing. See the AmaZing Cash Back for Business or AmaZing Rewards for Business Program Terms and Conditions for full details. 2) Welcome Bonus Cash: Bonus offer applies to new AmaZing Cash for Business and AmaZing Rate for Business Credit Cards. Bonus not available to clients with previous or existing National Bank of Arizona credit card account. One bonus payment is allowed per business, not per account or per card. Transactional items such as cash advances, balance transfers, returned merchandise, etc. do not qualify toward $7,500 spend amount. AmaZing Cash for Business bonus cash will be added to your cash back balance and AmaZing Rate for Business bonus cash will be applied as a statement credit within 4 to 6 weeks from the end of the 90-day promotion. Certain terms, conditions and restrictions apply. 3) Welcome Bonus Reward Points: Bonus offer applies to new AmaZing Rewards for Business Credit Cards. Bonus not available to clients with previous or existing National Bank of Arizona credit card account. One bonus payment is allowed per business, not per account or per card. Transactional items such as cash advances, balance transfers, returned merchandise, etc. do not qualify toward $7,500 spend amount. Bonus points will be added to your rewards points balance within 4 to 6 weeks from the end of the 90-day promotion. Certain terms, conditions and restrictions apply.

NBAZ.COM | A division of ZB, N.A. Member FDIC © 2017 ZB, N.A.


I would definitely refer other business owners to Stearns Bank. It’s a perfect fit for those who want to have a close relationship with their bank.

Feb. 2018 In Business Magazine is a collaboration of many business organizations and entities throughout the metropolitan Phoenix area and Arizona. Our mission is to inform and energize business in this community by communicating content that will build business and enrich the economic picture for all of us vested in commerce.

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS Kristen Merrifield, CEO Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits (602) 279-2966 www.arizonanonprofits.org Jack Lunsford, President & CEO Arizona Small Business Association Central Office (602) 306-4000 Southern Arizona (520) 327-0222 www.asba.com

STEARNS BANK CUSTOMER

Lorraine Glaeser

Steven G. Zylstra, President & CEO Arizona Technology Council One Renaissance Square (602) 343-8324 www.aztechcouncil.org

President and CEO, Streets of New York

Doug Bruhnke, Founder & President Global Chamber® (480) 595-5000 www.globalchamber.org

Find out how we can help your business. Visit StearnsBank.com today! Member FDIC

Julie S. Cook, President NAWBO Phoenix Metro Chapter (480) 289-5768 www.nawbophx.org

follow us

Anne Gill, President & CEO Tempe Chamber of Commerce (480) 967-7891 www.tempechamber.org Our Partner Organizations are vested business organizations focused on building and improving business in the Valley or throughout Arizona. As Partners, each will receive three insert publications each year to showcase all that they are doing for business and businesspeople within our community. We encourage you to join these and other organizations to better your business opportunities. The members of these and other Associate Partner Organizations receive a subscription to In Business Magazine each month. For more information on becoming an Associate Partner, please contact our publisher at info@inbusinessmag.com.

ASSOCIATE PARTNERS Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce ahwatukeechamber.com Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry azchamber.com Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce azhcc.com The Black Chamber of Arizona phoenixblackchamber.com Chandler Chamber of Commerce chandlerchamber.com Economic Club of Phoenix econclubphx.org Glendale Chamber of Commerce glendaleazchamber.org Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Greater Phoenix Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce gpglcc.org Mesa Chamber of Commerce mesachamber.org North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce northphoenixchamber.com Peoria Chamber of Commerce peoriachamber.com Phoenix Metro Chamber of Commerce phoenixmetrochamber.com Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce scottsdalechamber.com Surprise Regional Chamber of Commerce surpriseregionalchamber.com WESTMARC westmarc.org

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Thanks, boss.

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01

WHEN BUSINESS BOOMS, BOOM BACK.

Feb. 2018

VOL. 9, NO. 2

Publisher Rick McCartney

Editor RaeAnne Marsh

Art Director Benjamin Little

Contributing Writers

Darren Case Wendy Forsythe George Grombacher Andrea Kalmanovitz Michael Marsh Scott McFarland James M. McFillen Jessica Post Dena Sanders Dr. Glenn Varney Stephen Viramontes Tim Wheatcroft Scott Willis

ADVERTISING

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President & CEO Rick McCartney

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Contact a business banker today:

Senior Art Director Benjamin Little

Chris Crafton 623-334-7186

Financial Manager Tom Beyer

Paul Menchaca 480-372-1628

1. Offers valid for applications received and completed between May 20, 2017 through July 7, 2017. Loans and lines are subject to credit approval and for business purposes only. Conditions, fees and restrictions may apply. Offers available for new Bank of the West loans and lines of credit. Offers require automatic payments from a Bank of the West Business Checking account. Rates and terms are subject to change at any time without prior notice. 2. The closing cost credit will be applied on the settlement statement as credit towards third-party fees such as appraisal, title policy and environmental fees incurred during the loan process. If the actual third party costs incurred are less than the advertised credit amount, no additional credit will be given. The fee credit cannot be combined with other loan offers. A credit up to $1,000 will be applied for loans between $150,000 and $500,000. A credit up to $2,000 will be applied for loans between $500,001 and $1,000,000. A credit up to $3,000 will be applied for loans between $1,000,001 and $2,500,000. 3. SBA loans from Bank of the West are in participation with the US Small Business Administration. Loans are subject to approval in accordance with both Bank of the West and SBA eligibility and lending guidelines. Certain fees, conditions and additional restrictions may apply. 4. A good faith deposit will be required upon accepting Bank of the West approval. If applicant withdraws the loan request after issuance and acceptance of Bank of the West’s Commitment Letter, all third-party costs incurred must be paid by the borrower. A credit up to $3,000 will be applied for SBA loans between $150,001 and $1,000,000. A credit up to $5,000 will be applied for SBA loans between $1,000,001 and $5,000,000. A credit up to $10,000 will be applied for SBA loans between $5,000,001 and $15,000,000. Credit cannot be applied toward SBA packaging or participation fee. 5. Bank of the West Prime + 0.5% rate is for new or existing Bank of the West customers who have or open a new Choice or Analyzed business checking account with Bank of the West. Available for Business Lines of Credit up to $750,000. After 12 months, a minimum rate of 4% applies. Bank of the West Prime is 4.00% as of March 22, 2017, and subject to change. 6. For new accounts, minimum opening deposit of $100 required; the monthly service charge of $20 on Choice Business Checking will be rebated for the first two statement cycles. Ask a banker about ways to waive the monthly service charge thereafter. Additional terms and conditions and fees apply. 7. Account charges based on service usage less earnings credits, based on balances, and may offset fees. See current Analyzed Business Checking Schedule of Fees for details. Minimum opening deposit of $100.

FEB. 2018 DATES

BLEED 4.875” w x 9.875” h TRIM 4.875” w x 9.875” h

MECH DATE

03-27-17

CLOSE DATE None

Events Amy Corben

Inform Us: Send press releases and your editorial ideas to editor@inbusinessmag.com.

2

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8

Louise Ferrari Camron McCartney Kelly Richards Parker Shipe Cami Shore

More: Visit your one-stop resource for everything business at www.inbusinessphx.com. For a full monthly calendar of business-related events, please visit our website.

And for a limited time we are also offering:

SPECS

Operations Louise Ferrari Business Development

Office Manager Allie Schimmel

Accounting Manager Todd Juhl Corporate Office InMedia Company at Galvanize Phoenix Campus 515 E. Grant St., Suite 150 Phoenix, AZ 85004 T: (480) 588-9505 info@inmediacompany.com www.inmediacompany.com Vol. 9, No. 2. In Business Magazine is published 12 times per year by InMedia Company. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to InMedia Company, 515 E. Grant Road, Suite 150, Phoenix, AZ 85004. To subscribe to In Business Magazine, please send check or money order for one-year subscription of $24.95 to InMedia Company, 515 E. Grant Road, Suite 150, Phoenix, AZ 85004 or visit inbusinessphx.com. We appreciate your editorial submissions, news and photos for review by our editorial staff. You July send to editor@inbusinessmag.com or mail to the address above. All letters sent to In Business Magazine will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication, copyright purposes and use in any publication, website or brochure. InMedia accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or other artwork. Submissions will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. InMedia Company, LLC reserves the right to refuse certain advertising and is not liable for advertisers’ claims and/or errors. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of InMedia. InMedia Company considers its sources reliable and verifies as much data as possible, although reporting inaccuracies can occur; consequently, readers using this information do so at their own risk. Each business opportunity and/or investment inherently contains certain risks, and it is suggested that the prospective investors consult their attorney and/ or financial professional. © 2018 InMedia Company, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine July be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission by the publisher.

NOTES

LINKS

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40562_BOW_WAREHOUSE.TIF (CMYK; 884 PPI, 881 PPI; 33.93%, 34.03%), BOW_BNPP_P. EPS (56.36%)

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SCOTT HARKEY, OH PARTNERS

Branding or Technology?

There is no doubt that technology is impacting every aspect of the way we live our lives. It not only affects our personal lives, but extends to the way businesses operate and how they connect with their target audience — most fundamentally in how they brand themselves. It’s nearly impossible to suggest that a business in this day and age can successfully develop, maintain and expand its brand without utilizing technology. However, it is crucial to fully understand who your business is at its core to ensure you will win the hearts and minds of consumers before introducing the latest technology innovations. It’s about reverting back to the basics and the power of discussion by offering two-way communication to your consumers. I take a deeper look at this approach in my article [cover story “Selling You: Branding in the Age of Technology” starts on page 22] by drawing a parallel between a company’s emotional connection to its consumers and its use of technology. While technology continues to evolve new mechanisms for reaching and connecting with an audience, the core elements of a business’s message remain tethered to basic human nature. For the cover story this month, several of my colleagues in the local public relations arena join me in discussing this and the way it plays out for businesses. How important is technology in the workplace environment? To the millennial generation, it can be a deciding factor in where they choose to work. The Briefs article “Millennial Employees and Their Digital Demands” may be a wake-up call to employers. Having the ability to evolve with trends and innovations is essential for business survival. In his feature Leadership article, Dr. Glenn Varney discusses how businesses can properly and fully diagnosis organizational issues, helping them avoid the hastily and often poorly executed change made without properly assessing their situation that results in failure nearly 70 percent of the time. The Legal feature examines the headline topic of sexual harassment. Local Fennemore Craig attorneys Jessica Post and Dena Sanders discuss the likelihood of an increase in sexual harassment claims, and how employers can prepare to deal with them. From startups to commercial real estate to where to take that power-lunch meeting, each issue of In Business Magazine covers the relevant topics that help our business community grow. Also in this issue is the annual Meetings & Conventions Guide, the Valley’s most comprehensive guide to event venues. I’m pleased to help bring you this February issue, and hope you enjoy the read.

As president of OH Partners, Scott Harkey leads marketing and strategy efforts for the agency’s robust account roster. His extensive experience in media as well as traditional and digital marketing uniquely qualify him to spearhead integration initiatives for brands on a national level. Harkey has guided the agency onto Inc. 500’s list for Fastest Growing Private Companies the last three years and secured the agency as one of the Top 100 Fastest Growing Adverting Agencies in the country.

Sincerely,

Scott Harkey President OH Partners

CONNECT WITH US:

Who You Are Branding is the buzz word for a company to identify to a large

We want to thank Scott Harkey for

audience just who they are. It goes beyond a simple logo and is

leading this issue. OH Partners has quickly

now meant to include forms of communicating with that audience.

become a top agency that is mastering

Technology is quickly becoming a great way to develop and enhance

new technologies in branding and relating

one’s brand — but not withstanding the more traditional methods

them to traditional “basics” to better serve

to determine that brand and its effect. In this issue, we look at what

clients and to analyze the effectiveness of

some of the top players are advising their clients to do and learn

campaigns using technologies. It is leading the pack these days in

about some of the most effective uses of that advice. Also see our

a field that is ever-changing. His expertise and willingness to share

“Feedback” page in this issue for more on specific ways companies

his insights is a great asset to our readers. I hope you will enjoy this

are using technology to market their company.

month’s cover story.

& Conventions

MAGAZINE

Guide

FEB. 2018

IN BUSINESS

The 2018 Meetings

Selling Yo

BRANDING

u

Branding in the Age of Techno logy

Avoid Costly Mistakes

FEBRUARY

Organization in al Change Misjudging

2018

Reward inRisk vs.

Business

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

THIS ISSUE

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association

Prepare

for Sexual Harassment Claims $4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

DON’T MISS OUT!

Get a year of In Business Magazine Subscribe now at inbusinessphx.com

—Rick McCartney, Publisher

Let us know what you think of this issue of In Business Magazine. Email our publisher at feedback@inbusinessmag.com.

Story Ideas/PR: editor@ inbusinessphx.com Business Events/ Connections: businessevents@ inbusinessphx.com Marketing/Exposure: advertise@ inbusinessphx.com Visit us online at www.inbusinessphx.com

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VALLEY LEADERS SOUND OFF

What is a new use you’ve made of technology over this past year for a marketing campaign?

FEEDBACK QUESTION: Let us know what you want to know from the Valley’s top business leaders. editor@inbusinessphx.com

For all past Feedbacks go online to inbusinessphx.com and see what Valley executives think on various business topics.

CHAD BARNETT

ELIE GOODMAN

CHARLES TOUCHÉ

Chair, Subway Franchisee Advertising Fund Trust President, Foods 2000, Inc. Sector: Restaurant

Vice President of Marketing MeMD Sector: Healthcare

CEO Lovitt & Touché Sector: Insurance

At MeMD, we take a strategic and data-centric approach to marketing that not only benefits business development efforts, but allows us to better serve employers and consumers with our telehealth solutions. This past year, we utilized free flu maps generated by Google and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to geo-target parts of the country hit hardest by the flu via Facebook advertising. Our previous customer research showed that convenience is the top reason people choose MeMD over other healthcare options for common injuries and illnesses, such as the flu. With this knowledge, we ran ads making it easy and convenient for flu fighters to speak with a provider quickly over the phone or their computer. We drilled into our target audience further, segmenting according to the psychographics and demographics of typical users, based on our internal data. This approach was not only effective at driving new business affordably, but we were able to better serve consumers and educate the public about the advantages of telehealth in the regions where our service was needed most.

For more than 100 years, we have primarily taken a relationship-based approach to marketing and business development. This has proved to be very successful, and has helped deepen our roots within the Valley and Tucson communities. In recent years, though, we have started to expand our tactics and use more technology to support our relationship-based approach. As an example, we offer insurance and risk management solutions specifically for businesses in the life sciences industry, as well as schools and educational institutions. To reach the right decision makers in these sectors, we have started developing custom website landing pages and educational content specific to their needs. We are then driving traffic to these landing pages via targeted email campaigns, and we plan to delve into digital remarketing in the near future. We will always be committed to long-term, sincere relationship-building — as it’s engrained in our culture — but we are now exploring more digital opportunities to initiate those relationships.

For us, one of the best uses of marketing technology has been through partnership with Mobivity, headquartered here in Arizona. Mobivity’s SmartReceipt® connects what people buy with why they buy, to drive actions that grow our business. SmartReceipt collects our pointof-sale (POS) data, stores it in the cloud, analyzes it, and provides transaction insights that help us understand the results of our campaigns and inform our strategic business decisions. SmartReceipt measures what drives customer behavior, and provides visibility that helps us focus budgets on programs that are proven to increase sales, transactions and customer frequency. SmartReceipt is also a communications tool that targets customers based on their real-time purchases, creating individualized marketing messages directly driven from a specific transaction.  We also use SmartReceipt to activate local partnerships, reinforcing community ties and creating emotional connections with our customers. From contests and bounce-backs to charities and sports teams, SmartReceipt communications are relevant, timely and effective for local customers. SmartReceipt provides a competitive edge in the very crowded QSR space. Understanding customer behavior is key to creating loyal customers. Subway subway.com Chad Barnett is chair of the local Subway Franchisee Advertising Fund Trust and president of Foods 2000, Inc., which owns and operates more than 40 Subway locations in Arizona. 

FEB. 2018

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MeMD memd.me Elie Goodman serves as vice president of marketing for MeMD, a Scottsdale-based telehealth solution for businesses and consumers nationwide that provides online care for common illnesses, injuries and behavioral health issues. He oversees all marketing strategy and execution, including branding, digital marketing, advertising, promotions, team building, resource alignment, print and Web design, and engagement efforts.

Sign up for the monthly In Business Magazine eNewsletter at www.inbusinessphx.com. Look for survey questions and other research on our business community.

Lovitt & Touché lovitt-touche.com Charles Touché is CEO of Lovitt & Touché, one of the nation’s largest independent insurance brokerages, with nearly 200 employees in Tempe and Tucson and more than $400 in total annual premium. Touché has served as CEO since 1998, and he drove the effort to expand operations to the Valley in 1995. Lovitt & Touché has served Arizonans for more than 100 years.


QUICK AND TO THE POINT

Millennial Employees and Their Digital Demands Here’s an unsettling tidbit for employers: Forty-two percent of millennials say they would quit their job if their employer uses subpar technology, according to a report (bit.ly/mill-stats-marketers) from marketing website DMR, formerly Digital Marketing Ramblings. Millennials — those workers born between 1982 and 2000 — became the largest generation in the U.S. workforce in 2015. Studies show that the group will make up more than a third of the global workforce by 2020 and as much as 75 percent of America’s workforce by 2025. Growing up in the world of mobility, these digital-native employees view their smartphone as much more than a tool; rather, these devices dismantle the barriers between their professional and private lives. A recent Zinwave survey found that cell phones are second only to email as the most popular business communication tool. Zinwave also found that millennials use their cell phones at work more than any other generation of employees. Additionally, in a

prior survey, Zinwave identified millennials as the group most likely to complain about frequent problems with cellular coverage and the irritation and productivity losses it causes. Millennials demand reliable and strong indoor signals, and they’re increasingly blaming their companies or building owners for unreliability. Companies, therefore, must invest in reliable, flexible and future-proof cellular connectivity solutions. The solution must be vendor-agnostic, since it must support different brands of devices, cellular carriers and wireless spectrum frequencies. And it must offer a low total cost of ownership (TCO) while being capable of adding more carriers and frequencies without requiring more hardware. These mobile-first employees demand that their workplace support their mobile lifestyle. It’s essential that businesses understand that — or risk losing a talented workforce. —Scott Willis, president and CEO of Zinwave (www.zinwave.com), which offers in-building wireless products and service through its patented distributed antenna system.

2018 Prediction: A Rush of Real Estate Agents The number of individuals who will earn their real estate license and start a career in real estate is expected to rise to the highest level seen in recent years. In Phoenix, there was a 4.7-percent increase in agent count from November 2016 to November 2017. It’s predicted the market could see an increase of another 5 to 6 percent in 2018. That growth could result in Arizona reaching the 80,000 mark for the number of licensed agents and brokers by the end of the year. Two converging factors contribute to this: Real estate is an industry ideal for secondcareer professionals (only 4 percent of licensed agents reported real estate as a first career, according to the National Association of Realtors®), and Arizona is a popular destination for people looking for a change in lifestyle. These people often have had successful careers in other fields and their skills translate well to

the real estate profession. Self-motivation, strong social skills and good negotiation skills do very well in the industry. These are likely some of the reasons that a licensed Realtor® was listed in a LinkedIn study as one of the top20 emerging jobs. Choosing the right real estate broker is a critical choice for new licensees. A company needs to have the right systems and processes in place to successfully onboard new agents — particularly in a growing market where several new agents are likely to be joining a company each month. New agents require training, support, technology and marketing plans to get them up and running and servicing buyers and sellers. —Wendy Forsythe, COO at HomeSmart International (homesmart.com) and recognized in 2017 as one of the Swanepoel Power 200 and a 2017 Inman Real Estate Influencer

BYTES

by Mike Hunter

Multilingual Staffing Chatbot RoboRecruiter’s bot Robo is newly multilingual — able to support five languages across all its products (Dutch, English, Estonian, French and German). As internationalization develops, the list will continue to grow. Creator of the successful digital platform Elance, Beerud Sheth brought to his new endeavor, RoboRecruiter, an extreme amount of experience in the staffing industry. He saw chatbots that can hire human talent as “the next big thing,” believing that, with more and more people working (and hiring) remotely, it is critical that chatbots be able to communicate with potential candidates in their mother tongue. roborecruiter.ai

Act!Now for SMBs Swiftpage, the provider of Act! CRM software, a leading cloud enabled platform aimed at helping small and mid-sized businesses grow, has launched an all-new and completely free resource center: Act!Now. To kick start 2018, Act!Now targets the three pillars of SMB growth: identify, plan and measure. Act!Now will provide a wealth of free resources and exclusive content aimed at helping businesses identify opportunities, develop plans to drive business goals and incorporate systems to measure results. Content will include featured articles, testimonials, downloadable resources, infographics and more, all including tips and strategies for achieving meaningful business growth. act.com/act-now

Revolutionary Real Estate Marketplace SetSchedule® is a “first of its kind” technologybased real estate exchange marketplace that connects Realtors® with homeowners, buyers and investors. It focuses on placing top tier agents with verified appointments directly in front of vetted homeowners and investors actively looking to buy and sell. The company’s patented technology allows real estate professionals to access qualified leads on demand, helping match professionals to people looking to sell or buy properties. As members continue to use the system, data is stored related to the agent’s budget, location, experience and more to ensure that each agent gets the best fit for referrals. setschedule.com

Bryant Commercial Real Estate’s Vinny Summo negotiated a 25-month lease to bring Veggie Rebellion to a 1,400-square-foot storefront in Glendale. “This is the beginning of a changing retail landscape,” Summo says. “The vegan food industry grew by $3.1 billion in one year.” bcreaz.com

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METRICS & MEASUREMENTS

ROI on Expense Spend

How can a company’s expense spend help its team with sales budget planning? by Tim Wheatcroft

Chrome River Technologies developed PROSPER to address the disconnect between data on T&E expenses and data on new revenue that spend generates. It combines data from the CRM and expense solutions, allowing sales team members to allocate all T&E spend to specific prospects or clients. This, in turn, enables sales and finance leaders to easily visualize the revenue generation outcomes of each type of activity and spend. As a result of this insight, managers can make smarter analysis of both where to increase spend and where to reduce spend on activities that don’t deliver an adequate return on investment. Tim Wheatcroft is the head of communications at Chrome River Technologies. chromeriver.com

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Sales team travel and entertainment (T&E) is a major expense. But do companies know how this spend actually contributes to revenues, and which expenses don’t? While sales teams generate huge amounts of data based on their activities, and wins and losses are highlighted in their respective CRM systems, finance teams can often only view granular spend details in their expense management system. Without the ability to tie specific activities and spend back to sales results, it’s impossible to deliver any meaningful analysis. The big challenge behind this is that sales data and travel and expense data are held in two silos, which can’t communicate. Therefore, the volumes of data they contain have no context and are, in this case, meaningless. Given that just 11 percent of sales professionals say the cost of T&E expenses is tracked and compared to new revenue they generate, this means that billions of dollars in travel spend is made “blind,” leading to huge cost inefficiencies in sales organizations. This key challenge faced by many corporate sales and finance leaders — actually knowing precisely which T&E spend has the biggest impact on driving new revenue and which expenses do not positively impact financial results — often results in companies being unable to make informed budget choices and, therefore, initiating cost cuts across all areas of the organization. Most people in the corporate finance and sales world are quite familiar with the statistic that 80 percent of a company’s sales are derived from 20 percent of a given organization’s

sales people. When budgets are tight and companies cut spending, they frequently hurt themselves by reducing the T&E budgets of their best sales people. This one-size-fits-all approach can backfire and negatively impact sales, because the result is that companies tend to restrict the spend of their most productive employees. To solve this challenge, companies need keener insight into their T&E spend, by employee and by customer. Directly connecting T&E spend data with sales data along with gaining actionable insight into how those expenses translate into revenue will help companies directly access and address the ROI of their T&E spend.

Siloed T&E Spending Where does travel and entertainment fit into your controllable expenses? Where it is allocated

Does your employer track the return on investment for business travel spend?

Percentage of companies

It’s a top controllable expense

Response

35%

No, we don’t measure return on investment for

It’s in the top 3

47%

business travel spend.

It’s in the top 5

16%

I don’t know if we measure return on investment for

It’s not in the top 5

2%

We do measure return on investment but not for my

19% 11%

and compared to new revenue I generate. 9%

From 21 to 40 percent of companies

19%

From 41 to 60 percent of companies

43%

From 61 to 80 percent of companies

23%

More than 80 percent of companies

7%

Source (top and bottom chart): 100 senior finance executives at large/mid-sized U.S. companies surveyed by YouGov/Chrome River

According to survey data, just 11 percent of sales professionals say the cost of T&E expenses is tracked and compared to new revenue they generate,

35%

business travel spend.

Yes, the cost of my travel and expenses is tracked

Their expense spend

From 1 to 20 percent of companies

35%

role.

How much expense spend is for sales activities? Number of companies

Percent

Yes, the cost of my travel and expense is tracked and compared against other metrics. Source: 1,450 frequent business travelers across U.S./Canada/UK/Australia surveyed by SurveyMonkey/Chrome River

1%


MINDING THEIR BUSINESS

Daehee Park, Waking Up the Sleep Industry

Disruption was the aim from the get-go for Tuft & Needle co-founder by Andrea Kalmanovitz

Just seven short years ago, Daehee Park met JT Marino through a mutual professor at Penn State. Both had big dreams and aspirations that aligned and, today, those dreams have manifested into a $170-million national company headquartered right in the heart of Downtown Phoenix. As a Silicon Valley entrepreneur at the time, Park was a software engineer working on the “next big thing,” which consisted of a bunch of apps that he says served no purpose. He absolutely hated it. He wanted to work on something that mattered. So, the pair got together in Marino’s apartment one Saturday afternoon and put their heads together on what to do next. The duo decided to build a business that had three main cornerstones: 1) They wanted to build a concept that would solve a real problem, 2) they wanted to create a unique work culture that people actually wanted to work at, and 3) they wanted to see the business through a non-traditional lens and use their combined experience to disrupt an industry. “At the time, we were surrounded by so many people who had ‘big ideas’ but weren’t ready to take any action to make them happen,” Park says. “JT and I were both ready to build a grassroots business model that would actually help people and flip an entire industry on its head.” The first step was identifying what problem they wanted to fix. They didn’t even have to sleep on it. Marino had recently gone through a horrible experience buying a new mattress. The salesman was pushy, ill-informed and talked him into buying a $3,500 mattress, as Marino was led to believe that the more expensive it was, the more comfortably he’d sleep. As Park and Marino commiserated on the topic, they realized the mattress industry was broken, and if they could fix even one or two of the common pain points as a customer, they could be onto something. “It was extremely apparent that there was something wrong with the way that mattress retailers were running the Industry,” Park relates. “With crazy

markups, sales gimmicks, employee commissions and the like, it was near impossible for a customer to have a good experience buying a mattress.” To test the waters on their concept, they immediately launched a concept website for a direct-to-consumer mattress retailer. They made their first sale within 15 minutes. They refunded the customer and, soon after, Tuft & Needle was born. To keep the business fresh, Park and Marino place a high importance on ensuring Tuft & Needle continually takes innovative measures to shake up their business model and stay at the forefront of the industry. Since its inception and first universally comfortable mattress on the market, the company has developed a full product suite inclusive of &Sheets, &Pillow, &Pouch and &Frame — with more on the horizon. “From the onset of the company, we believe in efficiency without cutting corners. When it comes to pricing, this means creating the best product with the highest quality materials and charging what we need, not what we can,” Park says. Tuft & Needle has been helping people wake up better ever since and has grown to become a $170-plus-million business in yearly revenue with more than 140 employees. As a testament to his achievements at a young age, Park was just named on the 2018 edition of Forbes 30 Under 30 list. “It is such an honor to be listed next to so many inspiring men and women,” Park says. “It is very humbling to see the awesome concepts that have come to life based on true grit and hard work.” Tuft & Needle’s retail growth is focused on customer experience and providing a stark contrast to the status quo in the standard retail experience. The company provides sameday to-your-door shipping and, in addition to its expansive brick and mortar retail footprint, Tuft & Needle enhances the customer experience by enabling online purchasing capabilities through its website and Amazon. Tuft & Needle tuftandneedle.com

Humans spend one-third of their life sleeping, and 91 percent of Americans agree that a good mattress is essential to health and well-being. bit.ly/sleep-to-mattress

A SOUND SLEEP BUSINESS MODEL • Daehee Park cofounded Phoenix-based Tuft & Needle at the age of 24 with partner JT Marino. • Founded in 2012, Tuft & Needle pioneered the disruption of the mattress industry. Its business model is built on leading a revolution against unfair mattress markups, commission-based sales models and information asymmetry by creating an exceptional, honestly priced product. • Park was honored with the 2018 Forbes 30 Under 30 award.

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ENTREPRENEURS & INNOVATORS

STARTUP WEEK PHOENIX Back in 2015, before the startup community became what it is today, Startup Week Phoenix started as a free, weeklong conference put on by entrepreneurs for other entrepreneurs. For the first several years, it was largely tech-focused and encouraged participants to foster good ideas, get those ideas to market, create a proof of concept and, ultimately, sell the idea. With more than 10,000 planned participants and a growing list of local experts and success stories leading the conversation, Techstars Startup Week PHX 2018 (Feb. 19–23) is all about entrepreneurs. This year, entrepreneurs will experience a five-day immersive program, learning everything from the nitty gritty details of starting a business to seeing it through to success. Hear from some of the most diverse, successful voices in the Phoenix startup community, meet friends and colleagues at various points in the startup process and find people to connect with. —Stephen Viramontes PHXStartupWeek.com

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Startups Are Thriving in Phoenix If a startup is looking for a place to dig in its roots and flourish, that place is Greater Phoenix. There’s no other city in the nation full of more promise and potential of fostering a growing startup than the Valley of the Sun. And I saw it all begin in 2015 with the birth of what is now Techstars Startup Week PHX powered by Chase for Business. At the time I was local, and in the middle of transitioning to the fast-paced startup community in Boston. But I heard about the startup community developing back home, and I was drawn to Phoenix by the appeal of a small grassroots movement of entrepreneurs and the desire to pursue my ideas and goals my way. What I found here was compelling, unexpected and entirely unique to Phoenix. While other cities are startup hubs for a set of similar reasons to each other, there are three aspects of Phoenix that completely set it apart from the rest and make it the best place for startups to be right now. Cowboy Up: Phoenix has the rough and rugged reputation it does for a reason. This city is full of scrappy individualists, who are eager to get their hands dirty and honor the Old West mentality of Arizona. If they don’t know how do something (e.g., securing capital, getting paid customers, or anything else that goes along with founding a startup), they have the ingenuity and grit to figure it out. But they also have a community of local experts who are responsive and willing to impart wisdom through mentorship and more. Where other cities’ startup cultures can be lonely, Phoenix’s is overflowing with collaboration.

FEB

19

Techstars Startup Week PHX will be held February 19–23 at the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center in Downtown Phoenix. PHXStartupWeek.com

In Arizona We Trust: The thing I was most surprised about when I dove head first into Phoenix’s startup world was the unwavering commitment to Arizona. As a transplant myself, I chose Phoenix because I did believe in it. And I am not alone. Startups in Phoenix want to see the community and the city itself grow. It’s obvious to see that each individual and business here understands and is willing to fight for the common goal of bettering Phoenix. If this city succeeds, so do we. Embrace South of the Border: More and more, if a startup is going to find success, it has to be willing to jump into the global marketplace, and Phoenix is at the front line. Literally. Having gone down to Mexico, and participated in Startup Weeks there, I know the proximity Phoenix has with our neighbors to the south and how that is an invaluable advantage. Being a gateway for Central and South American businesses to enter the U.S. market is rapidly positioning Phoenix at the forefront of the global market. The most successful startups will be those that partner with businesses in Mexico and Latin America. With such a fresh approach, provocative perspectives and talent, Phoenix is unsurprisingly at the top of experts’ lists when they consider emerging startup hotspots. And this is in no small part due to Startup Week Phoenix. —Stephen Viramontes, volunteer chief organizer of Startup Week PHX and CEO of Assure Vote, a local GovTech software-as-a-service company.


PROPERTY, GROWTH AND LOCATION

BY MIKE HUNTER

Tempe Is Hot Property for Office Submarket

Colliers International anticipates a strong completion of 2017 for the multifamily market and forecasts a favorable 2018. Development of apartments has been occurring at record levels for the past several years. Fortunately, the pace of net absorption has closely tracked the rate of construction. Strong demand continues to spur new development. Currently, more than 12,000 units are under construction, up nearly 60 percent compared to a year ago. An additional 16,000 units are planned in Greater Phoenix. Construction in the past few years has been focused in just a few key areas. Vacancy tightening and rent escalations have now reached a level to justify development in a large collection of submarkets throughout the Valley. colliers.com

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In a Phoenix office market already experiencing its fourth consecutive year of annual absorption gains, landmark deals such as this are expected to have an additional top-down impact. “The State Farm campus and downtown Tempe area are a nice welcome to Phoenix as you fly into Sky Harbor International Airport,” says JLL Senior Managing Director Dennis Desmond. “The fact that State Farm chose to build this campus off Tempe Town Lake solidifies the area as a central business district of Tempe and further solidifies that market as an economic force in Metro Phoenix.” “The sale is an equally strong testament to the robust investment interest that Metro Phoenix is seeing from institutional buyers,” adds JLL Senior Vice President Tivon Moffitt. “We expect this sale will spur even more interest from institutional buyers, which will create more opportunities for Arizona-based capital firms to invest in significant trophy assets valley-wide, as was the case with State Farm.” JLL jll.com/phoenix

GET REAL

Garden Condos in Biltmore

Deer Valley Industrial Spec

West Side Luxury Home Development

CONTOUR on Campbell is a new

Dallas-based Jackson-Shaw and Las

Maracay Homes closed on 94 premium

condominium project in the heart of The

Vegas-based LaPour Partners Inc. have

homesites in Peoria for a total purchase

Biltmore. Its first-floor Garden Collection

completed construction of Parc Pinnacle,

price of $7.56 million. The 80-acre land

homes feature an expansive private patio

an A-1-zoned, 311,840-square-foot, three-

parcel, located at 77th Avenue and

of approximately 600 square feet — a

building speculative industrial development

Pinnacle Peak Road, will be developed into

very unique feature for new-build condos

in Deer Valley. Each building features

a new, single-family-home neighborhood

in Phoenix — that can be designed as an

modern, flexible industrial space designed

featuring all single-story homes, ranging

urban garden, an outdoor kitchen and

for manufacturing, distribution, assembly

from approximately 2,990 to 4,389 square

dining area and/or to offer plenty of seating

and related industrial uses. Situated on 20

feet. Homes are planned to be built on

around a fire pit or water feature. The

acres at the northwest corner of Pinnacle

oversized homesites — many of which back

developer, LivURBN, is also introducing

Peak Road and Central Avenue — in the

to open space — ranging from more than a

20 homes that include a bonus den that

heart of the Deer Valley submarket, close

quarter-acre to nearly full-acre lots, some

is suitable for a home theatre, an office,

to Loop 101, Interstate 17 and State Route

with options for detached or attached RV

a formal dining room or art studio, and

51 — the development is also one mile from

and accessory garages to accommodate

can be upgraded to include sliding doors.

Phoenix Deer Valley Airport, 20 minutes

boat or RV storage. The gated community

Newly opened is a stylish model home fully

of Sky Harbor International Airport, and

is scheduled to begin development in early

furnished and dressed by award-winning

surrounded by more than 1.7 million square

2018 with an anticipated open-for-sales

interior design company Est Est.

feet of retail and restaurant amenities.

date in early 2019.

contourcondos.com

jacksonshaw.com/projects/detail/parc-pinnacle

maracayhomes.com

The recent sale of the Marina Heights–State Farm campus in Downtown Tempe — at $928 million — is the largest office sale in Arizona history.

Photos courtesy of Contour, Jackson-Shaw, Maracay Homes (bottom, l to r)

STRONG MULTIFAMILY MARKET

According to the Q4 2017 Phoenix Office Market report from JLL, a leading professional services firm that specializes in real estate and investment management, Tempe has enjoyed more than 27 percent of all office absorption since the start of Phoenix’s four-year positive absorption streak, in which the Valley has recorded annual absorption gains totaling 2.0 million square feet or more. This is the longest streak of its kind in the Phoenix office market, and, although the pace of growth is slowing, JLL data indicates that the Valley has not yet peaked. The volume of tenants still in the market — currently encompassing 62 active requirements representing 3.5 million square feet of space — suggest there is still room to grow, even if users must get creative with the options currently available. The recent Marina Heights sale is expected to further boost investor interest in Class A trophy assets. The five-building, 2.0-million-square-foot Marina Heights project, which serves as a regional hub for State Farm, was sold in December 2017 for $928 million, making it the largest office sale in Arizona history and positioning Tempe as the most in-demand office submarket this cycle.


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YOUR BENEFIT IN BUSINESS

WELL WELL WELL

by Mike Hunter

PCCN and UHC Launch Team Approach Phoenix Children’s Care Network and UnitedHealthcare have launched an accountable care program that promotes a team approach to healthcare and improves quality, lowers costs and enhances the coordination of people’s care. This new accountable care relationship enables PCCN to treat patients using an innovative valuebased model focused on keeping people healthy. UnitedHealthcare shares data with PCCN to inform doctors of patients’ underlying medical conditions, past treatments, gaps in care, medications prescribed and future care needs. This takes the burden off the child’s family from having to connect information from each of their doctor’s visits themselves, and reduces duplicative tests and improves care coordination across specialties and care settings. Through this initiative, PCCN and UnitedHealthcare are able to identify clear, actionable information specific to individual patients’ health needs. pccn.org • uhc.com

GlobalMed OK’d for DoD Networks Scottsdale-based GlobalMed, an international provider of telehealth solutions, has earned the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) Authority to Operate (ATO) on DoD networks for its industry leading virtual health platform. GlobalMed is the first provider of HIPAA-compliant clinical video collaboration to obtain an ATO. This much-coveted certification enables GlobalMed to put its virtual health applications, hardware and software directly on the DoD network, making its solutions available to the DOD’s integrated healthcare system known as the Military Health System. In addition to providing medical care in combat situations and at bases overseas (as well as on ships), the system has 57 hospitals and 400 clinics. Like the VA, the military’s health facilities cannot accommodate the demand for care by all activeduty service people, their dependents, and retirees (many of whom are not eligible for VA services). Telehealth is proving to be a cost-effective solution. globalmed.com

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Transforming Healthcare through a Collaborative Value-Based Care Model The U.S. healthcare system is immersed in the most significant payment reform changes in decades. This transition from rewarding the volume of care to the value of care — measured by patient outcomes — brings substantial challenges and opportunities to all stakeholders in the industry. And it holds even more importance for an emerging healthcare hub such as Arizona, a state in which healthcare job growth and overall job growth has outpaced the national average. Before we understand where healthcare reimbursement is going, we need a quick assessment of where it is: the long-established fee-for-service model. Under this model, healthcare providers are compensated for each service they deliver, like office visits or tests. There is no financial reward for improving overall health outcomes or practicing cost-effective, quality care. The transition to rewarding value instead of volume will place a high priority on keeping patients healthy and away from high-cost centers of care. Whatever the financial arrangements and whether they’re called “value-based,” “riskbased” or “outcomes-based,” these payment models hold one key common attribute: They shift risk from payers to healthcare providers. This understandably makes doctors nervous. However, by aligning their medical practices with the following four core principles of value-based care, and striving for collaboration among healthcare stakeholders throughout the care continuum, healthcare providers can set themselves on the course toward cost-reduction and improved patient outcomes. Community care coordination: Optimizing value-based care outcomes depends on making real progress in the way doctors and health plans manage the most complex, sick and socially vulnerable populations. The right technology and care programs integrate and efficiently collaborate on care plans for physical, behavioral and social aspects of patient health and leverage clinically integrated processes across communities of care. Interoperability and data liquidity: There is an unprecedented amount of data flying around the healthcare system today, a situation that presents an opportunity to provide better

care than ever before. However, it also places a huge burden on physicians to integrate efficient workflows between myriad software systems. To succeed, physician practices must rely on technology that simplifies data disparity in complex healthcare environments and provides access to current, accurate and comprehensive data for care management and analysis. Payer-provider collaboration: After years of sometimes contentious relationships, payers and providers are realizing that, under valuebased care models, they need each other’s data and cooperation to work together toward the shared goal of better patient care and lower costs. Today, practice support resources and provider support centers have to be a part of value based care model — a vital ingredient for the last mile of care delivery. Performance tracking and trending: Physicians need more than just reporting tools and outdated portal information. Rather, they need updated, trustworthy insights for patient events, and performance goals complemented with quality metrics updates, current information on open care items and real-time patient event notification. While it’s still in the early days in the shift to value over volume, and it’s difficult to say exactly what form value-based care models will eventually take, it’s certain that coordination and collaboration are key to making that unavoidable transition a successful one. —Scott McFarland, president of HealthBI (www.healthbi.com), where he leads the organization’s health information technology platforms and contact center solutions for providers, payviders and payers

United Health Foundation’s recently released America’s Health Rankings® Annual Report ranks Arizona at 31 overall, which is down two spots from 2016. Among the state’s successes, however, preventable hospitalizations decreased 32 percent in the past five years, from 52.9 to 36.1 discharges per 1,000 Medicare enrollees. americashealthrankings.org/learn/reports/2017-annual-report


LAW MATTERS TO BUSINESS

Sexual Harassment Claims Rising? How can employers prepare for an expected increase in sexual harassment claims? by Jessica Post and Dena Sanders

MAGAZINE

Guide

FEB. 2018

IN BUSINESS

The 2018 Meetings & Conventions

Selling Yo

BRANDING

u

Branding in the Age of Techno logy

Avoid Costly Mistakes

FEBRUARY

Organization in al Change Misjudging

2018

Reward inRisk vs.

Business

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

THIS ISSUE

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association

Prepare

for Sexual Harassment Claims $4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

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Jessica Post is a director in the Phoenix office of Fennemore Craig. Post practices in the areas of labor and employment, and complex business litigation. She assists companies in employment discrimination, wage and hour, restrictive covenant and trade theft matters. fclaw.com

Dena Sanders is an attorney in the Phoenix office of Fennemore Craig. She focuses her practice in labor and employment, business litigation and natural resources law. fclaw.com

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In recent months, sexual harassment in the workplace has become a focal issue, with new headlines popping up seemingly every day regarding a Hollywood mogul or elected official being accused of sexual harassment. Although sexual harassment has always been an important issue in the workplace, the recent heightened publicity has caused employers to stop and rethink their policies on the subject. Employers also should expect a rise in claims of sexual harassment as employees feel more comfortable reporting inappropriate conduct. What is sexual harassment and how can an employer recognize it? Workplace sexual harassment generally falls within one of two categories: quid pro quo harassment and hostile work environment harassment. Quid pro quo (“this for that”) harassment is relatively easy to identify, as it occurs when an employment decision or treatment of an employee is based on the employee’s submission or rejection of unwelcome sexual advances or requests for sexual favors. For example, an employer who fires an employee for refusing to go on a date with him has engaged in quid pro quo harassment. Hostile work environment harassment, on the other hand, can be more difficult to recognize. Employers and employees alike often find it difficult to know when conduct has crossed the line between commonplace workplace behavior and unlawful sexual harassment. Sexual harassment can include any kind of unwelcome sexual conduct, including unwelcome sexual advances; requests for sexual favors; or other verbal, physical or visual conduct of a sexual nature. Examples of behavior that can constitute sexual harassment include discussing sexual activities, using demeaning terms, displaying sexually suggestive material, making sexually offensive jokes and commenting on physical attributes. In order to constitute unlawful harassment, the unwelcome conduct must be both subjectively and objectively offensive. Subjectively offensive means the person affected by the harassment must personally find the conduct abusive and unwelcome. To be objectively offensive, the conduct must be “severe” or “pervasive” such that a reasonable person would find it hostile or abusive. Whether conduct is “severe” or “pervasive” is determined on a case-by-case basis but, generally, a sliding scale approach is taken. For example, conduct that is severe (such as a sexual assault) would constitute sexual harassment, but conduct that is less severe (telling inappropriate jokes to a co-worker) would have to be more pervasive in order to constitute unlawful harassment. One question that frequently comes up is whether inappropriate conduct that occurs outside the workplace can be sexual harassment. The answer is yes. An incident that occurs at a bar or restaurant after work, such as one employee trying to kiss a co-worker, does not stay out of the workplace. The marketing phrase from a few years ago — “What

happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas” — does not apply to sexual harassment claims. It is not a defense for an employer to state that the improper conduct occurred outside of the workplace and therefore does not constitute sexual harassment. Once an employer is able to recognize sexual harassment, what can the employer do to prevent it from occurring? The most important step an employer can take is to have a sexual harassment policy in place that makes the employer’s expectations clear to everyone in the workplace. Employers should also conduct in-person sexual harassment training seminars to ensure their employees understand what is and isn’t sexual harassment, are aware of the employer’s expectations, and understand the negative consequences associated with engaging in harassing behavior. A well-written sexual harassment policy will have clear reporting and investigative procedures in place to ensure employees report instances of sexual harassment and employers properly investigate them. A policy also should identify at least two different reporting avenues so an employee may choose the option that makes the employee feel most comfortable. This avoids a situation in which the company representative who is supposed to receive the report of sexual harassment may also be considered or named as the alleged harasser, which compromises the effectiveness of the policy. Employers also should make sure that any sexual harassment policy is consistently enforced. When a sexual harassment complaint is made, the employer should take prompt action to conduct an impartial investigation to make sure the harassment conduct no longer continues. If employers take these steps — draft a good policy, which they enforce, and train employees on the policy — employers may have a defense to a claim of sexual harassment they would not otherwise have. These steps also will reduce the incidences of workplace sexual harassment because employees better understand what is sexual harassment and the negative work consequences that will result from engaging in harassing behavior.

In 2011, a St. Louis employee was awarded $15 million in compensatory damages and $80 million in punitive damages against her employer and the harasser when she prevailed in her sexual harassment lawsuit [Alford v. Aaron’s Rents, Inc., Case No. 08-cv-0683MJR (S.D. Ill. May 3, 2011)], although the court subsequently reduced the award to $40 million to comply with punitive damage caps.


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Selling You: Branding in the Age of Technology How is branding evolving with today’s technological advances and innovation? by RaeAnne Marsh


The more things change, the more they stay the same. That old truism is never more on-the-money than in reference to technology and branding. Leading practitioners in our community of the art and craft of public relations share insights into what makes branding work and how technology can provide tools in that effort. While they discuss opportunities that have opened up thanks to state-of-the-art

technology, a recurrent theme goes to the heart of branding as a power that transcends today’s advances. There is powerful information for businesses in their response to our question: As branding evolves with technological advances and innovation, what are some new and effective ways companies are — or should be — branding themselves now?

Catherine Alonzo Chief Executive Officer Javelina javelina.co Knowing the “why” was the key to the election of our current President, as well as the success of companies like Cards Against Humanity and Lyft, which say to their customer, “We are who we are, and this is what we believe in.”

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The irony of branding today is that as complex technologies and tools are as widespread and available as ever before, audiences are the most responsive to authentic, raw, stripped-back stories. Perhaps this is because of the advent of technology. In an age when technological bells and whistles abound, consumers are craving what is real. Companies like Google and Apple have not succeeded because of their technological prowess, but in spite of it. Their success lies, instead, with their brands being a reflection of who they truly are as people and as companies — as well as what they care about. In other words, they deeply understand and powerfully communicate their “why.” Knowing the “why” was the key to the election of our current President, as well as the success of companies like Cards Against Humanity and Lyft, which say to their customer, “We are who we are, and this is what we believe in.” Against that backdrop, companies should take this four-step approach to branding today: Understand your “why.” Why is it that you do what you do? What is the change you want to see in the world and why does it matter? Figuring this out is no easy thing to do. It takes time, reflection and collaboration. But you’ll know when you’ve found the true answer — it feels like ice cream to a sensitive tooth. Find the right words to explain your “why.” Start telling other people about your Why and see what they respond to,

what feels good to you, and what is easy to say. By practicing and workshopping like this, you’ll figure out how to put your Why into words that others can understand. Incorporate your “why” into your brand position and marketing statement. The way you talk about your company should start with the “why,” but it has to include the “how” and the “what,” too. Write a descriptive message of your company that incorporates all three, and then update all your materials (website, social media, printed collateral, etc.) to reflect your new Why-driven message. Test it out. Use the wide range of modern technologies available today to track, measure, tweak and test how audiences respond to and engage with your message and brand. Technology is no replacement for an authentic brand, but it is a remarkable driver of one. Examples include social media platforms like Instagram and LinkedIn, content creation tools like Canva and Grammarly, project management assisters like Asana and Workflowy, and tools for coordination and tracking like Google Analytics and Sprout Social. There are countless more tools out there that can help take your brand to the next level. But it starts with the “why.” Until you have that thoughtfully woven through your brand and marketing materials, technology is a mere distraction.

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Scott Harkey President OH Partners  ohpartners.com The art and science behind successfully branding any company is to win the hearts and minds of consumers, yet with the constant technological innovation in recent years this approach seems to have taken a diminished role.

Progressing alongside technology is crucial for any brand to be successful, but that’s not the only method to be effective. By utilizing the endless technology advancements over the past 10 years, brands have been fixated on measuring online conversions, tracking direct sales and more. Although these are significant statistics to measure, they shouldn’t be the main focus for a company’s brand. It’s about reverting to the basics. The art and science behind successfully branding any company is to win the hearts and minds of consumers, yet with the constant technological innovation in recent years this approach seems to have taken a diminished role. I am excited because, over the last year, our clients and partners have focused their attention on meaningful branding rather than conversion rates and sales tracking, which has proven to be incredibly successful. It all starts with the basics and truly understanding your brand. I suggest completing an exercise to deeply evaluate your current brand and answer these two questions: How do your consumers currently view your brand? What do you aspire to accomplish as a brand? Once you fully understand this internally, you will be able to successfully and authentically communicate to your audience who you really are, not who you are trying to be. A majority of companies fall flat by sharing messages that don’t genuinely represent their brand. Even though there is an abundance of technology at your disposal, if you aren’t looking inside your brand first, you are going to fail in the execution.

Although this tactic could potentially take longer to see results, it will help companies acquire more brand advocates and create larger returns. Brands will see their ROI go up, resulting in a bigger impact over a longer period of time. With the growth of social media and influencer marketing, branding and marketing isn’t a one-way megaphone. It is a two-way conversation. Through effective branding, companies can leverage the power of discussion. Consumers who enjoy a brand generally suggest the product to friends, family, co-workers and more. The best advertising has always been and will always be word-of-mouth advertising, so successful branding is exponentially important in today’s connected world. An average American consumer is exposed to about 5,000 promotional advertisements a day, so it is crucial to stand out in the digital clutter. Companies need to create a brand that really stands for something and connects emotionally with its consumers. It’s important for consumers to have a voice and let them know they’ve been heard. If your company isn’t passionate about something other than money, it likely won’t be successful. Brands will constantly have access to the latest in technology innovation, but if they don’t truly and deeply understand themselves, it won’t make a difference. Be true to your brand, create a positive network of brand advocates, cultivate an emotional connection and let technology be a supplemental resource.

Park Howell

Founder Business of Story businessofstory.com What brands forget in their universal fight to be heard is what makes them tick in the first place: people. INBUSINESSPHX.COM

As a kid, I loved the Flintstones and the Jetsons. Two great families with outstanding brands. The Flintstones are the (sing it with me) “modern stone-age family.” The Jetsons, on the other hand, are the space-age family unit illustrated by George jettisoning “his boy Elroy, daughter Judy, and Jane, his wife,” from his Prius-like spaceship down to their respective destinations. The Internet has brought us Jetson-like communications advancement. But don’t get all starry-eyed over technology. Your brand story starts and ends with the primal foundations

found in Fred and Wilma. Story, after all, is what has evolved us from cavemen to consumers. It’s what makes us human. Today’s technology is simply the transmitter of those stories. For example, outdoor equipment retailer REI’s brand ethos — it’s primal story — to get people outdoors has around for decades before it started a movement with its #OptOutside campaign. REI simply used technology to encourage people to not shop on Black Friday and, instead, spend that day outdoors with family and friends.

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Park Howell

You can hear the creator of REI’s #OptOutside campaign, Lee Einhorn, describe how they developed the story first and then created a powerful brand movement by connecting through technology, on the Business of Story podcast at businessofstory.com. AirBnB’s brand story is about helping people “Belong Anywhere.” It uses tech to connect travelers with homeowners to make that happen. Charles Schwab exists to help people achieve better financial outcomes for themselves and their families. The company uses its mobile app and online trading as an expression of its brand story of making it easier to manage your wealth. But like George’s spaceship, technology is shiny. That’s why brands are quick to jump on the latest communication trends. In their haste, they often lose their humanity in the virtual world. They bombard you with fleeting infographics. Listicles. Micro documentaries. Pins. Polls. Quizzes. Surveys. Memes. Gifs. Tweets. Snapchats. Instagrams. These brand blips whiz over long-form blogs, vlogs, videos, podcasts, eNewsletters, eBooks and emails in a meteor shower of competing messages. Facebook, for instance, had an original mission “to give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.” But it’s become what many consider an overreaching advertising platform that invades your privacy. Users are turning away in droves for more authentic platforms like Instagram and SnapChat. What brands forget in their universal fight to be heard is what makes them tick in the first place: people. We strive to connect and grow our communities online, but we miss actual human interaction. Without it, our brand essence skips off the atmosphere and into deep, dark space.

What brings us home are true stories well told about the actual human impact your brand makes on this planet. Consider purpose-driven brands like CharityWater.org, Tesla’s launch of its more affordable Model 3 vehicle and Heineken’s #OpenYourWorld campaign. These are core brand stories shared through technology, not created by it. “Marketing is about values,” said Apple founder Steve Jobs. “It’s a complicated and noisy world, and we’re not going to get a chance to get people to remember much about us. So, we have to be really clear about what we want them to know about us.” How will Apple’s own technological missteps — including admitting to throttling back the performance of older iPhones to spur users to purchase its latest model, and the “dongleocalypse” it created by releasing its new Macbook Pro with all new connection terminals that make it difficult to connect — impact its brand credibility? So, while your technology and communications channel options rocket ahead at an attention-numbing pace, stop and ask yourself: What does my brand stand for? Why do we exist? How do we actually help people accomplish something? Capture those narratives to clarify your brand position, define your promise and declare your purpose. Craft them into meaningful stories that resonate with your people, your customers and your stakeholders. Then deploy the wizardry of the Web, with care, to share your brand stories with the world. You see, the most innovative and effective way to brand yourself is not found in our latest technology. The branding advantage you want to take advantage of has been native to the human condition since the beginning of mankind: Just tell a better story. Yabadabadoo!

Alexis Krisay

Partner and President of Marketing Serendipit Consulting serendipitconsulting.com Brands that engage with customers and show how they care and understand the customer’s needs will, ultimately, rise to the top above competitors.

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As technology advances, digital and assistive technology are changing the way consumers behave. Brands must become more integrated into consumers lives by putting them at the core of everything. Therefore, marketers have their work cut out for themselves, yet they also have a huge amount of opportunity. Consumers today are more connected, informed and empowered than ever. Their behaviors are reshaping the paths to purchase every day. They are demanding, impatient and expect brands to deliver content, solutions and opportunities to them in an instant. Ultimately, there is an app for just about everything, making consumers connected to an on-demand economy that delivers services, experiences and validation in the moment. Brands must know their customers inside and out, and focus their marketing by putting the customers at the center

of everything. Consumers today have high expectations and tend to gravitate toward brands that deliver utility and value to them. Brands must now refrain from shouting their message from the rooftops and, instead, be a bit more introspective and think about what their users are saying and how they can best approach them with a personalized message. Brands that engage with customers and show how they care and understand the customer’s needs will, ultimately, rise to the top above competitors. In 2018, brands will need to be aware of how augmented reality, assistive technology and location-based marketing play into their overall strategy. This on-demand culture now expects brands to be thinking about the latest in all these areas.

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Alexis Krisay

AUGMENTED REALITY

Consumers enjoy altering their persona and environment and seeing it come to life. Brands that can incorporate AR into their consumer interactions will be extremely successful. AR cameras have allowed users to alter their image and share socially; if brands can incorporate AR tools for consumers to try or preview products or services, the viability of these opportunities is huge.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Siri, Alexa and Google Echo are changing the ways people search, demand and purchase. Consumers today rely on these micro recommendations to make purchases. They don’t want to spend hours researching; they want to ask a question, obtain quick information and make the purchase guided by these technology assistants. Brands that optimize their content for quick searches and utility-based content will catapult to the top.

LOCATION-BASED MARKETING

Geolocation is the next buzzword in marketing. Brands now have the opportunity to target consumers via GPS technology in their environment. Predictive analytics algorithms currently can be used to forecast a user’s location, sending an offer before a user leaves the house, or during the week based on their routine. However, brands must be hyper-targeted with their content to consumers via location-based marketing. Consumers expect customized offers and information, and will reject brands if they sense mass marketing. Brands also can leverage influencers through location-based marketing. With the ability to identify local influencers via social media and other location platforms, brands can empower authentic messaging and reap the word-of-mouth benefit of influencers.

Ryan Town

Managing Director Pyxl pyxl.com When it comes to building a brand, technology serves as a tool for agencies and in-house teams to build a strong foundation to base their assumptions on.

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Today, it is cheaper and faster than ever to connect with customers and track engagements. A marketer can stalk research consumer browsing and buying habits across a multitude of devices, and implement platforms to capture specific metrics on how people are engaging with their brand online. However, it’s easy to get overloaded with all this data without the right technology. Data by itself can be dangerous, which is why we have seen a major shift toward platforms that use this data to produce meaningful and actionable insights. These calculations are invaluable to the branding process because they indicate what messaging and content a customer will or will not engage with. When it comes to building a brand, technology serves as a tool for agencies and in-house teams to build a strong foundation to base their assumptions on. Brands have to ask the right questions to get to the root of solving their customers’ problems. Surveys, interviews, content, and competitive audits and site analytics analyses are all techbased research media that identify where problems lie and, ultimately, what your customers want from your brand. Through these efforts, successful modern brands emerge that are grounded in facts. Another way recent technology has changed the game for brands is empowering them to customize content on-the-fly

for their customers and have conversations with them oneto-one. By having the ability to segment their audience — in real time — and serve personalized content, brands today are able to be multifaceted and create a deeper connection with a variety of customers. Building a brand is only the start; technology is also critical when it comes to maintaining that brand. Unfortunately, the Internet has loosened the grip brands have on consistency and reputation. Anyone with a little tech savviness can do a Google image search for your logo (and add their own creative spin!), or start a negative conversation about your brand online. These are challenges clients frequently mention. We’ve been able to help those clients give technology a dose of its own medicine with solutions like online social monitoring and digital brand warehouses, where employees, vendors and even the media can access approved logos, images and taglines. These tools help brands establish and maintain consistency across all marketing channels, so their customers have a seamless and connected experience. While technology can create some hassle when it comes to maintaining a brand and controlling that brand’s message online, it has, overall, included some major innovations that improve the way we connect and communicate with consumers around the world.

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DECISIONS THAT MATTER

Getting It Right the First Time James M. McFillen has more than 35 years of experience as a scholar, teacher and consultant in the fields of leadership, motivation, human behavior and the application of the scientific process to organizational change. Glenn H. Varney, Ph.D., has spent more than 20 years in human resources and 25 years in academia. He is a recognized teacher, practitioner and consultant and has written extensively about leadership and organizational change. Varney, McFillen and human resource expert Scott Janoch share their collective experience in Grasp the Situation: Lessons Learned in Change Leadership, showcasing how to avoid failures and missteps in organizations and on a personal level when attempting to implement any form of change. graspthesituation.org

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When attempting to implement organizational change, mistakes are costly by Glenn H. Varney, Ph.D., and James M. McFillen

Leaders and managers of an organization often face the challenge of change. Unfortunately, managers often make costly mistakes when they start making changes in their organizations. In fact, the record shows that 70 percent of change projects in organizations fail. We’ll look at one such failure as an instructive example to discuss why the attempted organizational change failed and how the organization could have gotten it right in the first place — because getting it right the first time is possible. The manager of an assembly plant, William, and the human resource manager, Robert, visited a Japanese assembly plant and observed the value of teamwork in building cars. When they returned home, they made the decision to implement a team process to improve quality throughout their plant. They started by pulling their supervisors off the line and putting them through four days of “Managing by Teams” training. The plan was to convert their “line” approach to a “team-based” approach. Halfway through the training of about 100 supervisors, the union president showed up in Robert’s office to announce that “the union membership would not be involved in any team nonsense.” The project was dead on the spot. This mistake cost the company almost $1 million. The plant's upper management got wind of what William and Robert had done and started asking questions about how they had gotten “cross-wise” with the union. Justification for the supervisory training, in their words, was to “introduce and inform our line supervisors about methods used by our competition. It was mostly for their information — we had no

Change is considered necessary for growth. Yet, nearly 70 percent of the time, major organizational alterations or adjustments fail.

intent of copying their methods.” Their explanation was not well received by William’s boss, the vice president of operations. Where both William and Robert went wrong was in failing to recognize how the union leadership would react to any kind of change that affected the union contract. The general rule when change is even remotely being considered is to always engage with those who will be affected the most. William and Robert’s intentions were worthy, as they were focused on improving quality and reducing costs. However, not getting change right the first time means they will probably not get a second chance. William and Robert made the costly mistake of not fully grasping the situation before deciding to make such a fundamental change in the organization’s assembly process. These two managers should have found the time to engage in effective diagnosis and fully understand the impact this change would have on the organization. When contemplating change, managers must avoid the trap of not fully understanding the current state of the organization and the factors that underlie it. The organization exists in its current form for a reason. In addition to understanding the current situation, getting it right the first time involves clearly defining the gap between the current situation and the desired state of the organization. The Irish have a saying, “If you don’t know where you are going, any road will get you there.” Diagnosis establishes the direction for intervening in the organization and identifies potential roadblocks and pathways


BETTERING YOUR BUSINESS for change. Diagnosis involves going slowly at first in order to go faster later by designing an intervention that will get it right the first time. Change can be strategic or problem-based. Strategic change is proactive and involves defining a change in the future direction of the organization. Such a change might arise because of possible new market opportunities or anticipated competitive challenges. William and Robert were engaged in strategic change. They were trying to move their organization in a new direction to counter competition in their industry. Problem-oriented change is reactive and occurs when something goes wrong in achieving the current direction of the organization, such as problems in the existing production process or excessive employee absenteeism. In both types of change, leaders and managers all too frequently leap into action without fully grasping the situation at hand. To get it right the first time, managers should follow some basic diagnostic steps. They are, essentially, the same steps a physician uses to diagnose an illness before prescribing a treatment: • Study the current conditions (i.e., the symptoms), and collect information to thoroughly understand the situation. • Identify the factors that support the current conditions. Those factors are both causes of the current situation and potential roadblocks to any change. A successful intervention must address the relevant factors in order to effect change. • Compose a list of potential actions and carefully consider whether and how each action would affect the relevant underlying factors to change the situation and aid the transition. • Select or design an intervention that incorporates the relevant actions and conduct a test of the intervention to determine whether it delivers the intended results. If not successful, repeat the diagnostic process. If successful, develop a plan for rolling out the intervention in the organization. • Implement the intervention and continue to study its effectiveness in achieving the desired change. If William and Robert had followed the diagnostic steps, they would have done their homework on what the Japanese company was doing — before visiting the plant. Also, they should have completed a “fit analysis” to see if any of the Japanese ideas would work in their operation. Furthermore it would have been wise to discuss what they were thinking about with the union leadership and invite them to participate in the process. Assuming they came back with some good ideas, they could then have formed a joint task force to study the ideas further in order to see what might work in their plant. This process would have generated a more positive feeling with the union and their members, resulting in a joint cooperative effort to improve the plant operation. The following are guidelines to help in making organizational change in a way that will help avoid the 70-percent failure rate: • Remember to always think ahead before taking action. • Analyze and plan in order to determine the impact change will have on the organization. A negative impact might mean a “no go.” • Slow down and fully grasp the situation before moving ahead. Stay alert to impending shifts in the organization to avoid mistakes. • Anticipate and avoid potential problems in the path to change. • Lastly, and probably most importantly, always engage all people who will be affected by the change. Learning how to conduct a thorough diagnosis in order to fully grasp the situation will pay off not only at work, but also in life.

The general rule when change is even remotely being considered is to always engage with those who will be affected the most.

CLICKSAND CLICKSAND exposes how the online marketing industry is destroying millions of businesses in a greedy money grab. From the largest companies such as Google, Facebook and HubSpot to small agencies and consultants in every city and town, online marketers are convincing unsuspecting business owners that online marketing is a panacea that will solve all their sales and marketing challenges. In reality, the businesses that fall for the “pitch” of online marketers are being lured onto the rocks of destruction by following a siren song of pitchmen who are more interested in making money than helping their clients. This book challenges the conventional “group think” mentality prevalent in business these days. CLICKSAND: How Online Marketing Will Destroy Your Business (And the Unlikely Secret to Saving It) Bill Troy

250 pages

Publisher: Ideapress Publishing

On shelves: 2/20/2018

$24.95

Selling to the C-Suite, Second Edition How do the best salespeople become trusted advisors to top executives? How do they prepare the right message and get in front of the right influencers and decision-makers? How do they close major sales and establish loyalty for the longterm? The authors of this groundbreaking book took a novel approach to answer these questions by asking more than 500 senior decision-makers what they look for when salespeople call. What these top executives reveal will change the way you sell. This second edition has been updated with new insights on how to stand out and succeed in a market where executives are using social media and other technologies as a key part of their buying process. Selling to the C-Suite, Second Edition: What Every Executive Wants You to Know About Successfully Selling to the Top Nicholas A.C. Read and Stephen J. Bistritz, ED.D

288 pages

Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education; 2nd edition

$32

On shelves: 2/23/2018

Cracking the Code of Service Mark Colgate, drawing from more than 20 years of experience teaching customer service courses, enlightens us that the age-old adage, “customer is king,” is actually incorrect. Colgate stresses that, instead, companies should pursue consistency to deliver the best service experience — for both customers and employees. Cracking the Code of Service is a book about the science, the systems and the discipline of great customer service. Businesses can differentiate themselves and their organization by implementing the scientifically driven F.A.M.E. model (Framework, Accountability, Moments and Endurance) to create their unique approach and communicate their service brand to their customers in a compelling, clear and memorable way. Cracking the Code of Service: How to Elevate Your Employees and Customers Through World Class Service Mark Colgate Publisher: Elevate

256 pages On shelves: 2/27/2018

$23.99

FEB. 29 2018 INBUSINESSPHX.COM


OUR SUBJECT IN-DEPTH

Addressing the Absence of Community in Personal Finance Businesses can benefit by fostering a community to help their employees change their money habits by George Grombacher

If an organization could help its employees more fully realize the impact they have through their work, it could help the organization more fully align while, at the same time, helping the employee achieve personal alignment — leading to greater fulfillment and contentment in their lives. It would have a dramatic and positive impact on their financial situation because a fulfilled and contented person is less likely to over-consume material things.

George Grombacher is a consultant, podcaster, writer and speaker. He’s a co-founder of the “Figure it Out podcast” and host of the “Money Savage” podcast. His first book, The Farmer’s Rules for Your Financial Harvest, will be released in early 2018. He helps companies design educational strategies for increasing employee participation in retirement plans. GeorgeGrombacher.com

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“We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” —Aristotle According to Charles Duhigg in his book The Power of Habit, a habit consists of three elements: a cue, a routine and a reward. The cue triggers our brains to determine which routine, or habit, to use, and the reward helps us decide if it’s worth remembering. If the reward is strong enough, a craving will emerge. It is this craving that motivates us to pursue a new habit and replace an old one. Is it the responsibility of an organization to help its employees change their money habits? Maybe, maybe not. But if an organization is in position to do so, why not? We are in a time when many companies are focused on employee wellness, which means the organization is working to create positive behaviors and results for its employees. What’s at stake? More of the same behaviors. According to a Harris Poll, 82 percent of employees working full time have financial stress, 34 percent have trouble meeting monthly expenses, and 37 percent spend two to three hours per week at work thinking about or dealing with their finances. The actual costs to an organization should be evaluated within every company. OK, how do we do it? How best to enact change? An organization that recognizes the value of community in bringing about positive and lasting change is one that will help its employees become more financially successful. Changing habits starts with addressing these three questions: • Do you want to do this? • Do you know how to do it? • Do you have the support you need to do it? To move forward, we need to agree on the assumption that everyone wants to be successful with money, and answer “yes” to the first question. The second is a broad question, and it’s important to be specific on what money skill we’re talking about. With less than a third of Americans keeping a budget,

according to Gallup, let’s start there and offer training on putting together a personal budget. The last question is the most important one. Does the person have a positive community supporting the new habit? Community becomes the “reward” element of the habit loop; remember, if the reward is strong enough, a craving will emerge motivating us to pursue the new habit. What makes AA (Alcoholics Anonymous) so effective is the power of its positive community in teaching people that change is possible and attainable. Change is easier when it occurs within a community and can happen whenever people come together to help one another. Many Americans struggle with money and many of those struggles are caused by poor habits. Poor habits need to be replaced with good habits and reinforced through a supportive community. Every organization has the opportunity to foster such a community.

A Financial Wellness Program A business can enable successful financial habits among its employees by implementing the following steps: • Deciding on a budgeting tool or resource. I recommend the organization teach its employees some variation of the 50/20/30 budget. • Identifying champions within the organization to lead this initiative. I recommend 5 percent of the organization, so if there are 100 people, there would be 5 champions. Each champion, after completing the program and gaining mastery of it, then heads up teams of 20 employees. Within each team, every employee is partnered with another employee. • Rolling out the initiative to the employees as a part of the organization’s overall wellness program.

 Finance and Workforce: A Three-Part Series

Putting the 'Why' in Personal Finance (January 2018) A  ddressing the Absence of Community in Personal Finance (February 2018) Money, the Final ‘Off Limits’ Topic (March 2018) To reference published segments, please access the archived

• Incentivizing completion of the program through companywide recognition as well as rewards such as gift cards to a local coffee shop or movie tickets. • Celebrating stories of success by asking for feedback from employees and champions. Odds are, an organization is already in the habit of celebrating accomplishments or birthdays; the communication of financial successes should be included in those communications. • Adding this program to the organization’s new employee

“Features” articles on the In Business Magazine website,

onboarding, immediately pairing the employee with a

www.inbusinessPHX.com.

graduate from the program and announcing their enrollment.

“Community” is a necessary tool in individuals’ efforts to replace their current money habits with new ones.


BY MIKE HUNTER

FEBRUARY 2018

Arizona Technology Council

Economic Club of Phoenix

Wed., Feb. 21 | 11:30a – 1:30p

Thurs., Feb. 22 | 11:30a – 1:30p

Employee engagement is a factor in business that hits companies right on their bottom line. Disengaged employees are less productive — or they may not stay at all. In fact, about 25 percent of the workforce turns over every year, which results in a huge financial cost to employers. Presented by the Arizona Technology Council, UBS Financial, and Hire Capacity, this Council Connect Luncheon focuses on employee engagement that will translate into better talent retention and attraction. Hire Capacity and its founder, Harry Lakin, offer an engaging and unique platform that helps bridge communication gaps and fosters deeper, more meaningful employee engagement. His lunch-and-learn Interaction Styles session offers quick and real-world suggestions for managers to learn meaningful strategies to improve communication immediately. The single best way for employers to bring aboard and then retain top talent is with a comprehensive employee engagement strategy. This does not mean setting up beer kegs, bringing in pool tables and providing free massages; the single biggest factor to successful employee engagement is managers who are able to coach and chat with their direct reports in the way those direct reports need to hear it. Using Hire Capacity’s proprietary OMS Assessment, Lakin helps attendees understand their own personal communication style and then how to be versatile when engaging with others — allowing for more meaningful and less disruptive communication outcomes. Additionally, this presentation qualifies for and will provide one hour of Arizona CPE credits for accounting professionals and one hour of Arizona CLE credits for legal professionals. Attendees interested in earning these credits must contact Laruen Witte at the Arizona Technology Council in advance. —Mike Hunter

Long recognized as the place to meet national and international leaders in business, the Economic Club of Phoenix’s monthly luncheons have included CEOs from Southwest Airlines to the Ford Motor Company who have taken the stage to share with local executives their wealth of experience. This month’s speaker is Chester (Chet) Cadieux III, a native of Tulsa, Oklahoma, who is chairman, president and CEO of QuikTrip Corporation, a regional gasoline/convenience store operation based in Tulsa. QuikTrip was founded in 1958 by Chet’s father, Chester Cadieux II, and is now the 33rd-largest privately held company in the United States. QuikTrip has been included on Fortune’s list of “100 Best Companies to Work for in America” for 15 consecutive years. The Economic Club of Phoenix continues to drive the collective power of Arizona business. Through local networking, exposure to national and international industry icons, and access to the leadership and knowledge of Arizona State University’s W. P. Carey School of Business, this pre-eminent forum was created to foster discussion of economic issues amongst academic, business, labor and public sectors in the Phoenix area and is an essential resource for every Valley business leader. —RaeAnne Marsh

Council Connect: Attracting + Retaining Top Talent with Employee Engagement

Members: $35; non-members: $50

Speaker Series: Chester (Chet) Cadieux III

The Gladly

$85

2201 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix

Camelback Golf Club

aztechcouncil.org

7847 N. Mockingbird Ln., Scottsdale

SAVE THE DATE

Upcoming and notable ‘3 Keys to Catapult Your Business and Life Success’ Mar.

Tues., March 13

13

At this eWomenNetwork event, Felicia Searcy will help attendees break out of the cycle of “almost there” regarding success in their business and their life. ewomennetwork.com

wpcarey.asu.edu/economic-club

FEBRUARY 2018 S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 FEBRUARY 2018 NOTABLE DATES 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Fri., Feb. 2 — Groundhog Day 25 26 27 28

Wed., Feb. 14 — Valentine's Day

Mon., Feb. 19 — Presidents Day

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FEBRUARY 2018 Fri., Feb. 2

Mon., Feb. 13

Noon – 2:00p

7:00a – 9:00a

Ask an Expert: Marketing

Monthly Breakfast: Lauren Bailey

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Association for Corporate Growth – Arizona

Melissa Forziat, a small-business marketing coach and event manager with international experience in event and brand management, will speak on marketing.

The speaker will be Lauren Bailey, CEO and co-founder of Phoenix-based hospitality group Upward Projects — the company behind Postino WineCafé (“Postino”), Joyride Taco House, Windsor, Churn and Federal Pizza — who will dive into the ins and outs of growing one of the most successful restaurant groups in the Valley and talk about the significant partnership with Brentwood Associates, a leading growth-based private equity firm, to expand the Postino concept nationwide.

Members: free; non-members: $10 Chandler Chamber of Commerce

$89

25 S. Arizona Pl., Chandler

The Arizona Biltmore

chandlerchamber.com Tues., Feb. 6

7:30a – 9:00a

Fri., Feb. 9

2400 E. Missouri Ave., Phoenix

acg.org/arizona Tues., Feb. 14

8:00 – 9:30a

11:00a – 1:00p

Monthly Breakfast

‘Together We Give: Cause Marketing and Your Business’

Monthly Signature Education Luncheon: Sean O’Neil

North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce

Tempe Chamber of Commerce

North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Featured guest speaker is Sean O’Neil, president of Remember Media, LLC and founder and CEO of speaking and training company Memory Dynamics, Inc.

Holiday Inn North

This third session of the Leadership Speaker Series is presented by Mindy Weinstein, founder and president of Market MindShift, as well as a digital marketing strategist, national speaker, trainer and published author. Weinstein is also an adjunct marketing professor at Grand Canyon University and University of Denver.

12027 N. 28th Dr., Phoenix

Members: $25; non-members: $35

Tommy Bahama

northphoenixchamber.com

MarinaLink by State Farm

15205 N. Kierland Blvd., Scottsdale

Networking event for business owners, professionals and entrepreneurs. Free

Members: $20; non-members: $25; at the door: $30 cash

400 E. Rio Salado Pkwy., Tempe

tempechamber.org

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6

8

northphoenixchamber.com

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Tues., Feb. 13

Tues., Feb. 6

11:30a – 1:15p

‘Bring a Gentleman to Lunch’ Luncheon West Valley Women West Valley Women’s annual “Bring a Gentleman to Lunch” luncheon. Members: $30; non-members: $35 Arizona Broadway Theatre

7701 W. Paradise Ln., Peoria

15 Wed., Feb. 15

11:30a – 1:00p

Arizona Technology Council

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Organizational characteristics and project management principles that contribute to delivering successful IT projects, presented by The PMO Squad’s founder and CEO Joe Pusz. Known as PMO JOE, he leverages his time leading corporate PMOs to provide services that satisfy realworld needs, and has led project management functions in industries that include aerospace & defense, aviation, finance, healthcare and technology for organizations with budgets up to $600 million.

Monthly evening mixer sponsored by Bell Mortgage includes a chance to win the “Chamber Cash Pot” sponsored by Earnhardt Ford.

Members: free; non-members: $15

1900 N. Arizona Ave., Chandler

Galvanize

515 E. Grant St., Phoenix Fri., Feb. 16

aztechcouncil.org

Members: $5; non-members: $15 AMF Chandler chandlerchamber.com

8:00 – 9:30a

‘Together We Inspire: Synergistic Leadership’

4:00p – 5:30p

Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Small Business Council

Deborah Dubree’s ‘No BS’ speaking, coaching and training methods have attracted high-performing business executives, business owners, attorneys, financial advisors, sales directors, entrepreneurs and professional athletes from around the world.

Featured speaker: Kimber Lanning, founder and executive director of Local First Arizona, a statewide organization implementing innovative strategies for new models of economic development that create vibrant local economies. Lanning is an entrepreneur, business leader and community development specialist who works to cultivate strong self-reliant communities and inspire a higher quality of life for people across Arizona. “GEM Talks” (Gilbert, Entrepreneurial, Motivational) are patterned after “TED Talks.”

Members: $25; non-members: $35 MarinaLink by State Farm tempechamber.org

$15; at the door: $20

FEB. 2018

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INBUSINESSPHX.COM

1689 S. SanTan Village Pkwy., Gilbert

For more events, visit “Business Events” at www.inbusinessphx.com

5:00p – 7:00p

Business After Business

A GEM Talk: Kimber Lanning

Topgolf Gilbert

16

Lunch & Learn: Project Management Fundamentals

westvalleywomen.org Thurs., Feb. 8

14

gilbertaz.com

Please confirm, as dates and times are subject to change.

400 E. Rio Salado Pkwy., Tempe


Tues., Feb. 27

11:00a – 1:00p

Business Resource & Networking Luncheon North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce Each person is allowed generous time to introduce himself/ herself and present information pertinent to his or her business. Attendees are welcome to bring/donate an item for the door prize drawing. Members: $20; non-members: $25; at the door: $30 cash Deer Valley Airport Restaurant 702 W. Deer Valley Rd., Phoenix northphoenixchamber.com Tues., Feb. 20

7:30a – 8:30a

Tues., Feb. 27

Business Before Hours

Women’s Business Connection: Angela Snyder

Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Mesa Chamber of Commerce

This networking mixer provides an informal atmosphere for businesspeople to meet and network with fellow members of the business community.

Guest speaker is Angela Snyder, who has more than 25 years of expertise in tax preparation, IRS audits, accounting, systemizing processes and business coaching. She is a federally licensed, IRS Enrolled Agent and maintains a former Federal Top Secret Security clearance.

Members: free; non-members: $10

Members: $15; non-members: $25

Infusion Coffee & Tea

Red Lobster

1300 E. 8th St., Tempe

1403 S. Alma School Rd., Mesa

tempechamber.org

mesachamber.org

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21

Follow a step-by-step process with the In Business Brand®

11:30a – 1:00p

1. TARGETED PRINT

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27 Wed., Feb. 28

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2. ONLINE & DIGITAL

5:30p – 7:30p

Business After Hours Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Chamber Chat – After Hours

Members of the business community come together to enjoy a night of food, drinks, conversation and network development during this casual mixer.

Gilbert Chamber of Commerce

Members: free; non-members: $10

A networking mixer at one of the newer Gilbert Restaurants.

Best Western Plus Tempe

$10

5300 S. Priest Dr., Tempe

Wed., Feb. 21

4:00p – 6:00p

Whiskey Row Gilbert

323 N. Gilbert Rd., Gilbert

3. SOCIAL MEDIA & EMAIL

tempechamber.org

gilbertaz.com Thurs., Feb. 22

9:00a – 11:30a

‘Raising Capital – Funding Basics and Lender Insights’ Maricopa SBDC This program is intended for small businesses owners who are currently seeking funds to grow their existing business. A panel of West Valley lenders will provide insight and information related to the types of business they service, loans offered, and suggestions for how to prepare for a meeting with a lender. The program is part of the partnership with the City of Peoria and the Maricopa SBDC. This program is in response to the Peoria Business Needs Survey and will discuss the specific needs of Peoria-based businesses. Free Huntington University – Peoria Campus

8385 W. Mariners Way, Peoria

maricopa-sbdc.com

If your event is directed to helping build business in Metro Phoenix, please send us information to include it in the In Business Magazine events calendar. Full calendar online. events@inbusinessmag.com

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4. POWERFUL EVENTS

Want to meet for lunch? We will bring lunch to you to talk about what the In Business Brand® can do for you. Learn more at marketing.inbusinessphx.com


WE VALUE WHAT WE OWN

2018 Bentley Continental Range MAGAZINE

Guide

FEB. 2018

IN BUSINESS

The 2018 Meetings & Conventions

Selling Yo

BRANDING

u

Branding in the Age of Techno logy

Avoid Costly Mistakes

FEBRUARY

Organization in al Change Misjudging

2018

Reward inRisk vs.

Business

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

THIS ISSUE

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association

Prepare

for Sexual Harassment Claims $4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

DON’T MISS OUT!

Get a year of In Business Magazine Subscribe now at inbusinessphx.com

2018 BENTLEY CONTINENTAL RANGE MSRP: $236,100 City: 20 mpg Hwy: 12 mpg

This exquisite vehicle from Bentley is simply the envy of all who wish to travel in style with the wind blowing through their hair. Its 6.0-litre, W12 twin-turbo engine includes a variable displacement system that combines low emissions with incredible output, which results in 582 horsepower. For a full-sized vehicle with so much to offer in space and comfort, that is, simply, fast. With satin-chrome dials and curved dash, the sweeping design throughout the interior of the Continental is like a glamourous Parisian night club. Inspired by the form of the Bentley wings, the lines throughout combines the classic Bentley design of a bygone era with the contemporary technologies and conveniences of tomorrow. The coachbuilders of Mulliner, who have been working on Bentleys since 1924, now are working to individualize each vehicle to the owners needs with options that include quilted leather seats, knurled sports gear lever and drilled alloy sports foot pedals and more — making for a personalized interior that will only add to the luxuries of this masterpiece. The cooling system and front seat ventilation system is designed to keep the summer days with the top down as cool as possible. There is a seat massage system as well, meant to provide great comfort and lumbar support with ten massage cells designed to keep the driver alert and awake for those long drives.

The eight-inch touch screen in the center console provides easy access to navigation maps, trip data, comfort controls and entertainment system at all times. A 30-gigabyte hard drive provides quick access to mapping data and the option of landscape imagery, alongside live traffic data and online access for point-of-interest searches. An optional Wi-Fi hotspot supports the use of digital devices such as tablets, smartphones and laptops. All it requires for operation is a SIM card; this can be the card normally used in one’s phone or a separate card supplied by one’s mobile network. Bentley bentleymotors.com

Trans: 8-speed automatic 0-60 mph: 4.4 sec

Sealed in Ink In an age when electronic devices do it all, the flourish of a strong signature to finalize a transaction makes the occasion momentous.

Cartier Roadster Rollerball

Montblanc Meisterstück Classique Rollerball

Omas Pierre Jouet Anniversary

From pens of black composite with palladium-finished details up to

With the barrel made of black

handcrafted into a work of art

full palladium finish, this Cartier

precious resin and an inlay of the

themselves, Omas fountain pens

pen will stop any negotiation

Montblanc emblem, this classic

express elegance and poise

and get straight to signing the

will seal the deal. $465–$815.

and elevate the simple act of

deal. $485–$930.

montblanc.com

writing. This Pierre Jouet

cartier.com

Precious metals, gems and enamels

Anniversary is one of Omas’ limited editions. €19,672.13 omas.com

FEB. 2018

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INBUSINESSPHX.COM

Exclusive Design: In Bentley’s Mulliner workshop, drivers’ dreams become reality through the customized services in design and comfort. Since 1924, Milliner Coachbuilders has galvanized the automotive world’s most dedicated craftspeople, supported by the vast styling and engineering experience of Bentley, to make personalizing each vehicle a reality.

Photos courtesy ofBentley (top), Cartier, Montblanc, Omas (bottom, l to r)

These writing instruments take it up another notch.


SAME FIRM, NEW NAME. THE FRUTKIN LAW FIRM IS NOW RADIX LAW.

The word Radix in Latin means “root”: the root of a tree, the root of knowledge, or the root of a number. Our new name reflects our values. We are a business law firm that knows the law, helps our clients pursue opportunities and deal with challenges, and we are rooted right here in Arizona.

15205 N. Kierland Blvd., Suite 200 Scottsdale, AZ 85254 Phone: (602) 606-9300 radixlaw.com

KFNX Exclusively Features Laura Ingraham and Michael Savage Ranked Top Ten Shows in the Country

THE LAURA INGRAHAM SHOW

THE SAVAGE NATION WITH MICHAEL SAVAGE

To advertise, host a show, or for more information: Call (602) 277-1100 or visit our website: www.1100kfnx.com


MEALS THAT MATTER

Southern Rail: Creative Comfort

McClendon Farms heirloom carrots, mushrooms and fresh pea tendrils $15

ORIGINAL MUFFALETTA BURGER Cured meats, provolone cheese, tomato and olive salad with Creole aioli on a sesame brioche bun $14

made pickles to cornmeal-crusted fried green tomatoes and pimento cheese. (The fried green tomatoes are a good choice on their own, and can be ordered as an appetizer.) The fried chicken is available only on the dinner menu, but lunch offers chicken and biscuit dumplings, a hearty stew of pulled chicken with McClendon Farms heirloom carrots, mushrooms and fresh pea tendrils. Something different in the burger family is Southern Rail’s Muffaletta Burger. Piled high in a sesame brioche bun are cured meats, provolone cheese and tomato slices smothered under olive salad and Creole aioli. Dessert temptations range from brioche bread pudding with bourbon sauce to the much lighter beignets, served under sifted mounds of powdered sugar. A knowledgeable wait staff is helpful with questions about the dishes as well as the beverage list that includes local wines and craft beers. —RaeAnne Marsh Southern Rail 300 W. Camelback Road, Phoenix (602) 200-0085 • southernrailaz.com

Tastes of Fame The Food Network’s Guy Fieri likes our Valley of the Sun. Nearly 30 of our restaurants have his signature on the premises. He’s been bringing “Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives” here for 10 years; here are three of his more recent stops.

Bootleggers Modern American Smokehouse

Republica Empanada

The long menu here is long on BBQ and

mid-century architecture in a row of

smoked — including the vegetable sides.

brick storefronts. While there is more

From appetizers to desserts, with creative

to the menu than empanadas, it is

tacos along with sandwiches, it’s comfort

overwhelmingly empanadas — for lunch

food in a comfortable setting.

and dessert - representing myriad tastes

7217 E. 1st St., Scottsdale

and of South America.

(480) 404-9984

204 E. 1st Ave., Mesa

bootleggerssmokehouse.com

(480) 969-1343

La Santisima Gourmet Taco Shop

This is a standout for more than its

The restaurant’s name promises tacos, and the menu doesn’t disappoint, but there’s even more variety and creativity among the handmade corn quesadillas. No Tex-Mex; flavors here draw from the distinctive regions of Mexico. 1919 N. 16th St., Phoenix (602) 254-6330 5932 W. Glendale Ave., Glendale

republicaempanada.com

& Conventions

Guide

FEB. 2018

The 2018 Meetings

Selling Yo

u

BRANDING

Branding in the Age of Techno logy

Avoid Costly Mistakes

Organization in al Change Misjudging

FEBRUARY

Reward inRisk vs.

2018

Business

• INBUSINESSPHX.COM

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

Guy Fieri has put his “Triple D” brand on 28 restaurants in the Greater Phoenix area, and only three in the rest of Arizona.

MAGAZINE

36

IN BUSINESS

FEB. 2018

(623) 939-3292 • lasantisimagourmet.com

THIS ISSUE

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Arizona Small Business Association

Prepare

for Sexual Harassment Claims $4.95 INBUSINESSPHX.COM

DON’T MISS OUT!

Get a year of In Business Magazine Subscribe now at inbusinessphx.com

Photos courtesy of Southern Rail (top and far left), La Santisima Gourmet Taco Shop (bottom)

CHICKEN & “BISCUIT DUMPLINGS”

A friendly neighborhood destination resurrected just a few years ago from Phoenix landmark Beef Eaters as part of Phoenix’s revitalization project, The Newton shopping center is anchored by Southern Rail. “Friendly,” in fact, suffuses the restaurant, helping give the wide-open dining room a cozy atmosphere. Décor combines industrial concrete floors with the warmth of wood, from the finished rustic ceiling to the seating options below it. The preponderance of hard surfaces may raise the sound level to lively buzz, but the generous space around the tables provides a setting conducive to productive business conversation. Two patio scenes complement the dining room, wrapping as an “L” around two sides. One side, dominated by a fireplace, spills out from the indoor/outdoor bar; the other faces the Light Rail that gives context to the restaurant’s name. The other part of the name references the menu: Although these creations of noted local chef Justin Beckett draw from other familiar classics, the dishes are influenced by Southern cooking traditions. It’s hard to get more Southern than the New Orleans staple, the po’boy. Southern Rail fills its French bread rolls with choices that range from shaved pork loin, ham and house-


TEMPE CHAMBER

ADVANTAGE Winter 2O18 • tempechamber.org

State Sen. Bowie Visits Tempe Chamber Businesses In an afternoon tour of Tempe Chamber of Commerce businesses last week, state Sen. Sean Bowie (D-18) pledged support for businesses in his district and proposed new legislation that could create a larger pipeline of skilled workers. The senator stopped by four south Tempe businesses, with employee numbers ranging from 14 to 6,400. The businesses were Insight, a technology services corporation; C2 Tactical, a full-service gun store and firing range; Caliente Construction, a building and construction company; and Special Moments Catering, which runs a successful catering and boxed-lunch business. The senator made stops at Tempe Chamber businesses to meet with business leaders and encourage participation in the upcoming legislative session, which will begin Monday, January 8. Bowie remarked at the rapid growth of economic development and expansion in Tempe.

“Seeing how great they are doing, how their employees are doing, I just really enjoy having the opportunity to meet with them and find out how I can be helpful at the Capitol,” the senator said. “I think it’s really important for business owners and people in the business community to

Tempe Chamber Outlines 2018 Legislative Agenda The Tempe Chamber of Commerce has released its policy agendas detailing the legislative priorities of the business community for 2018. The Chamber’s local, state and federal agendas are developed by its Government Relations & Transportation Committee comprised of chamber members with final approval given by the board of directors.

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

Areas of focus in the 2018 policy agendas include lowering the cost of doing business, increasing private-sector jobs, building a trained workforce and efficient and effective government. The full list of legislative priorities can be found by going to tempechamber. org and selecting Policy Agendas and Political News under the Advocacy tab.

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know their legislators. Having us come to visit their offices is great and it gives us a chance to know them, but really, we want to be helpful to our constituents and to the businesses in our communities.” The businesses presented a variety of legislative issues to Bowie in advance of the spring session. Among the issues discussed was the legislature’s intent to work on a tax treatment of goods and services, upon which Sen. Bowie is a member of an ad-hoc committee designed to study the current law and adapt it for current and future technology needs. Other points of emphasis were education funding, personal gun safety, the transaction privilege tax for prime contractors and the minimum wage and paid sick time law enacted by the passing of Proposition 206 in the 2016 election. While on the tour, Bowie shared a proposed bill that looks to provide further education for tradecraft. The yet-to-be-named bill proposes a scholarship fund to award students who study career and technical education (CTE) in community colleges across the state. CTE programs,

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according to the state’s department of education, are occupational programs that specifically work toward a professional degree, such as tradecraft, engineering, healthcare or service specialties. Funding for the proposed bill would require $10 million in business contributions, according to Bowie. If that funding is achieved, the remaining $5 million will come from the state budget. The scholarships will be available for low- and medium-income families, and will cover two years of education for in-state students at a public community college in a CTE program. “I think [the bill] could have a huge impact,” the senator said. “I think having more young people choosing these professions and careers, going into those fields is going to have a big impact on a lot of businesses here in Tempe in the construction industry [and in] a lot of the trades. I think it could have an impact if we can get it through the legislature.” Sen. Bowie stated the bill has bipartisan support and is hopeful it could become law during the upcoming session.


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Tempe Chamber Military Affairs Committee Gives Annual Donation to Toys for Tots As part of their holiday luncheon, the Tempe Chamber of Commerce’s Military Affairs Committee gave a large donation of toys and cash to the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys for Tots program. The committee has partnered with the foundation for several years’ running. As in previous years, the Tempe South Rotary Club partnered with the Military Affairs Committee and provided a substantial portion of the toys donated. The committee’s past president, Cliff Jones, is a retired Marine Corps member and is appreciative of the opportunity he has to work alongside current Marines. “It’s a natural fit for the committee to support a charitable program with the Marines,” Jones said. “For me, it’s a miniature opportunity to support the Corps in their endeavors.” Accepting the donations on behalf of the foundation were Master Sgt. Daniel Hernandez and Gunnery Sgt. Trung Tran. Master Sgt. Hernandez thanked the Military Affairs Committee and spoke about the growth of the Toys for Tots program. “We love it,” Hernandez said. “We love to add to the amount that we already have. Every year, [Toys for Tots] continues to grow bigger and

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stronger and with more people getting involved with it. We have just about every Marine Corps Reserve Unit in the U.S. involved and a part of this program.” The Toys for Tots program was founded in 1947 by Maj. Bill Hendricks, and collected more than $280 million in donations, according to the foundation’s 2016 annual report. Anyone is eligible to benefit from the program, not just Marine Corps families.


New Face at Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Karen Meyer Hired as Tempe Chamber Business Development Director The Tempe Chamber of Commerce has hired Karen Meyer, a Tempe native and former business owner, to serve as the Business Development Director. Meyer will lead the Chamber’s effort to recruit new businesses into the organization and enhance our ability to serve the Tempe business community. A major focus area of Meyer’s will be to ensure that Chamber membership packages are relevant, unique and valuable to members. “We are fortunate to welcome Karen to our team,” said Anne Gill, Tempe Chamber president and CEO. “She has a great deal of experience working with membership

organizations to successfully grow their membership and will be a valuable asset as we continue to expand our programs and services.” Meyer spent the last nine years with Troon Golf where she most recently she held the role of Director of Membership Development for Firerock Country Club. Meyer has been involved in chambers of commerce as a business owner, an ambassador and as a board member. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from Arizona State University, is a fourth generation Arizonan and longtime resident of Tempe.

Ken Blanchard College of Business | College of Education | College of Nursing | College of Arts & Sciences | College of Fine Arts & Production

Campus • Evening • Online

A R I Z O N A’ S P R I VAT E U N I V E R S I T Y S I N C E 1 9 4 9 Get started today! 855.287.0174 | www.gcu.edu/inbusiness Grand Canyon University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. (800-621-7440; http://www.ncahlc.org/ ).

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

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Chamber Honors Servicemembers at Goldwater Air Base The Tempe Chamber of Commerce and its Military Affairs Committee honored an officer and an enlisted Guardsman in the 161st Air Refueling Wing during a ceremony at Goldwater Air National Guard Base in Phoenix Wednesday, Oct. 11. Referred to as the Plough/Truman Award, the award was established to honor Maj. Truman Young, a pilot, and Tech. Sgt. Donald Plough, a boom operator, two of four airmen who were killed when their KC-135 refueling aircraft was hit in a mid-air collision and crashed on March 13, 1982. Lt. Col. Dean C. Owen, an Arizona native and commander of the 197th Air Refueling Squadron, was awarded the Maj. Truman Young Award. Lt. Col. Owen has been in the Air National Guard for over 26 years. In his acceptance speech, he noted the dichotomy between the bravado associated with military pilots and his day job — a rancher — and the humility that he shows in his duties. “I’m humbled to receive it, Lt. Col. Owen said of receiving the award. “I’m humbled that people think of me that way. The core values of the air

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force — integrity first, service before self and excellence in all we do — I try to live my life that way.” The Tech. Sgt. Donald Plough Award was given to Staff Sgt. Gregory A. Laffrey. Staff Sgt. Laffrey is a nine-year veteran of the active duty Air Force and joined the Air National Guard in 2016 as a client systems technician for the base. While on active duty, he was a mental health technician. Staff Sgt. Laffrey noted his experience with other civilian-military affairs groups as he accepted the award. “I’m thankful; I wasn’t expecting it,” he said. “In a previous life, I was with a military affairs committee as a past assignment, so I know what that relationship is and how important that is. It’s nice to have them involved with the award.” The Tempe Chamber’s Military Affairs Committee holds numerous luncheons and awards with military installations across the Phoenix area. They recognize service members at each installation that are nominated by commanding officers and community groups.


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Board of Directors Chairman of the Board: Dawn Hocking Chair-Elect: Jenna Rowell

Tempe Chamber Staff Anne Gill, President / CEO anne@tempechamber.org Chris Samuels, Communications Director chris@tempechamber.org Karen Meyer, Business Development Director karen@tempechamber.org Sukki Jahnke, Media & Program Development Director sukki@tempechamber.org Mark Tarabori, Membership Relations Specialist marktarabori@tempechamber.org Julie Flanigan, Director of Finance julieflanagan@tempechamber.org

Treasurer: Bill Goodman Vice-Chairs: Peter Adams, Jennifer Ochoa Immediate Past Chair: Brian Wood Directors: Chad Akin, David Bonkowski, Tracy Bullock, Jihan Cottrell, Lynda Santoro, Manny Tarango, Brad Taylor, Marshall Hunt, Tina Lee Ex-Officios: Paul Mittman, Suzanne Durkin-Bighorn, Andrew Ching, Robert Cox, Joe Hughes, Stephanie Nowack Committee Chairs: Gwen Gustafson, Ted Greene, Glen Hayward, Shana Ellis, Ed Logan, Margo Brown Tempe Chamber of Commerce 1232 E. Broadway Rd., #211 Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 967-7891 • www.tempechamber.org

Natalie Cole, Membership Coordinator nataliecole@tempechamber.org

connecting

REAL people with

www.readbetterbebetter.org facebook.com / readbetterbebetter

REAL

careers

twitter.com / readbetteraz

via

HIRING

companies

@readbetteraz

and

QUALITY

resources

For more information about the program, or to find out how you can help, please contact Sophie Etchart, Founder & CEO of Read Better Be Better at sophiee@readbetterbebetter.org or (623) 229-7880.

8

T E M P E C H A M B E R A D V A N TA G E

CareerConnectors.org 480.442.5806

CareerConnectors is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organization


About Us

The Mission of the Arizona Small Business Association is to foster and empower a thriving Arizona small business community by offering relevant, dynamic, and innovative resources and the highest level of advocacy as THE VOICE of small business in Arizona. ASBA fosters and empowers a thriving small business community by: • bringing relevant and dynamic education and mentoring opportunities • providing innovative and relevant tools business owners can utilize to grow and sustain their business • creating a variety of relevant and dynamic opportunities for members to meet potential clients • working diligently to advocate for legislation and regulation supporting a pro-business environment. Join ASBA. Be amAZed®

In This Issue

6

7

How ASBA Has Mastered the Art of Alliances to Help Small Businesses Win Benefits of ASBA Relationship Development for Supply Chain

The Power of Successful Business Collaboration by Angelia Hill, Vice President Marketing & Business Solutions, Arizona Small Business Association

Collaboration and working in partnership with other businesses can be one way to help your

Central Arizona

business grow. Communication and knowledge transfer represent the power behind today’s

4600 E. Washington St., Suite 340 Phoenix, AZ 85034 p. 602.306.4000

small and midsize businesses (SMBs). Whether it’s responding to customer inquiries or

Southern Arizona 3444 N. Country Club Rd. Suite 118 Tucson, AZ 85716 p. 520.327.0222 © 2018 ASBA. A publication of the Arizona Small Business Association. For more information or to join ASBA, please contact us at www.asba.com. Section designed by the Arizona Small Business Association.

planning the next big product, small businesses can transform beyond corporate borders and capture immediate value with a strong partnership. Just about every aspect of a business is in some way dependent on a strategic partnership. Long before selling products and services, we engage with a range of partners, including manufacturers, suppliers, payroll companies, builders, technology companies, lenders and investors. The value of these relationships is well understood by executives. The groundbreaking Grow From the Right Intro study by the Chief Marketing Officer (CMO) Council reveals that 85 percent of companies view finding strategic partners as essential or important to their business and around 60 percent are focused on developing a strategy for finding strategic partners. Some companies have tried collaboration with only limited success. If most companies start again and rethink the nature of their strategic relationships, they can get more from their collaborations. This article discusses, the importance of these agreements.

1


Key Factors to Develop Profitable Business Collaboration Develop a high ‘trust quotient’: the foundation of effective collaboration. The importance of trust between strategic partners is acknowledged at several points. With trust in the relationship, decisions or actions can be executed quickly, and that usually means less time and expense. Higher trust equates to less blame when things go wrong — which, in turn, can promote more innovation and creativity. Where there is low trust,

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

things tend to slow down as decisions and outputs pass through processes of supervision or checking, which, in turn, impacts efficiency and increases costs — often with little or no value added. Low trust inhibits the sharing of information, ideas and lessons learned.

Mike Leeds | Chair Pro Sales Coaching, LLC

Jason Trujillo | Past Chair Woodbury Financial

“Alliances are often said to be like marriages. The partners have to understand each other’s expectations, be sensitive to each other’s changes of mood and not be too surprised if their partnership ends in divorce.” —The Economist Companies that integrate deeply with suppliers grow faster and outperform their

Andrew Westle | Vice-Chair

David Bones | Treasurer The Kenrich Group Phoenix

Jennie King | Secretary Salt River Project

Lisa Hunt AETNA

Daniel Schenk Clark Hill PLC

Otto Shill Jennings, Strouss & Salmon PLC

peers. Most companies align their suppliers, products or service lines and start with the input of relevant functional leaders internally, such as manufacturing, R&D, engineering and product line leadership. Ultimately, supplier collaboration teams should work on large

Kerry Stratford The Caliber Group

projects for the maximum impact and decide which specific value-sharing mechanisms to invest. Before embarking on a new program, it is important to know if all partners have the internal capabilities and strategy alignment to make the external collaboration a success.

Janice Washington Arizona Small Business Development Center Network

Functional leadership must consider the skills required and assess if a solid foundation exists, and what the availability is of internal knowledge, supply-chain management and product development. The search and connect process should be prioritized based on factors benefiting both large and small businesses, and support cross-functional leadership. Companies connecting with only those best placed to deliver a real business outcome can turn a process that often takes many months with no guarantee of success into one that can take just a matter of weeks and ensures only compatible firms connect. In the formative phase, clearly outlined goals of the program as well as roles, responsibilities and identifying the type of collaboration to meet specific business imperatives require varying degrees of expertise. The leadership team should determine the type of collaboration program that will best deliver real-world value. .

2

Valerie Wynia Arizona Public Service


Types of Supply Chain Integrations for Successful Collaboration Programs Reduce Cost Collaboration — This program focuses on reducing costs for both partners. Vendors are treated as partners rather than cost centers, strengthening the development of a longterm trusting relationship. The right approach has to take into account the current business funding structure, the line of sight on efficiency and the prevalence of initiatives. Cost efficiency, cost reduction and spend analytics continue to be among the top business priorities in supply chain management (SCM) and procurement. According to Deloitte’s 2016 Global Chief Procurement Officer (CPO) Study, 74 percent of CPOs are citing cost reduction as a strong business priority for the upcoming 12 months. An example of cost reducing collaborating is small companies that cannot order through multiple units forming purchase consortiums with other firms in their industry. In 2008, a group of four banks controlled the ATM market in one U.S. market. To counterbalance the group’s power, four suppliers created a purchasing consortium for ATM parts and maintenance, ultimately cutting their costs by 25 percent. Value-Based Collaboration — “Collaboration” is defined as “people working together on nonroutine cognitive work.” The concept of value collaboration doesn’t point in one direction to advance your business goals. Consider a wide range of interlocking issues. The project’s sponsors must demonstrate that it creates value. As planners follow the core steps, they should continually revisit their solution factors to check whether the project remains oriented toward the company’s business use cases.

Identifying Correct Key Values Can Help Strike the Right Balance on Several Issues The following are examples of aspects that should be considered: • Does the leadership of both companies view the support of collaboration as a strategic or tactical effort? • How does the organization support collaboration activities? • Will the organization primarily react to demands from the business side, or will it proactively offer solutions to challenges that business units face? • Is the organization providing users with a rich set of collaborative functions? • The organization must take stock of its biases to be sure they align with value.

Technology and Innovation Collaboration — Widespread Internet connectivity is making it easier than ever for people to work together no matter where they are in the world. With social networking, voice mail, blogs, Twitter, Wikis, voice-over-IP, teleconference, videoconferencing, instant messaging, chat forums, mobile and computing, never have we had so many ways to collaborate. The demand for freedom of access to rich media websites (like YouTube), has never been greater. Here are a few themes you should consider for 2018 technology collaboration best practices: 1. Learn from the consumer virtual world. Researchers at UC Irvine, with a $3 million National Science Foundation grant, plan to study how online virtual multiplayer games, such as World of Warcraft, can help organizations collaborate and compete more effectively. A proprietary Twitter knockoff, and Cisco’s collaboration software, called Quad, integrates WebEx monitors task accountability productivity across teams. When you are ready to partner with another company, technology allows teams to be more efficient by streamlining workflows.

3


2. Don’t assume that high-performance collaboration will happen just because you have the technology tools. Collaboration must fit with the culture of an organization. Collaboration platforms aren’t just for those ubertechy, ever-mobile, digital-loving millennials. Collaboration tech brings generations of workers together on common ground, giving them the tools they need to thrive together and elevate a business. 3. Keep it real. Large corporate partnerships offer a lot of advantages for young technology companies. Most small tech businesses wish to develop long-term corporate relationships, but only half of them are successful.

Why So Many Tech Relationships Fail The downside of technology-based collaboration is its intangibility. It’s hard to visualize remote colleagues or a set of abstract tasks and deadlines. Many leading collaboration tools (Trello, Slack) can make collaborators even more “real” to one another by tracking and connecting them virtually. • The small business fails to adequately prepare to understand its true proof of concept and value proposition. • There is misaligned timing and no clear decision making. • There is no high-dollar funding for the small business that cannot maintain inventory or demands from the larger partner. • There is lack of buy-in from employees on both sides. The large company is not totally off the hook. Deep tech integrations with young companies require decisions early in the relationship on the fit and structure of the collaboration. Bigger companies must share past experiences and, often, their complexity with small-business leaders to avoid potential pitfalls.

Master Your Social Position!

Social Media that gets noticed, backed by the credibility of In Business Magazine… Marketing Automation | Social Media | Digital Products www.inbusinessmag.com 480.588.9505

4


Finding Strategic Partnerships For some partnerships when there is value for large companies to partner with small business, companies strategically partner with smaller players to bolster their position in the marketplace. This is fueled by changing consumer needs, the rapid rise of competitors, and the unrelenting acceleration of technological shifts that requires a new model for large companies. A case in point: Imagine you’re Marriott. Of course, when people go online to book a hotel, you naturally want them to book with you directly. But you’ll miss out on a lot of room sales opportunities and increased exposure unless you partner with online travel agencies like Expedia and Orbitz. Both companies started small and grew into large businesses through partnering. Start with a very tight vertical and then grow larger. Start making a list of potential partners that can deliver the hottest new leads of companies with complementary products and services. Create a mutually beneficial relationship. A deal where a startup makes millions might be amazing for the startup and completely irrelevant for the multi-million-dollar conglomerate. The company asking for the integration can often run away with all the value, leaving the partner with nothing. If you are a small tech business and you were able to convince PayPal to add a little check box on their website of your new discount shopping app, you would have hundreds of thousands of clients, but what would be in it for them? However, if you are a small business in the travel industry, you may be able to convince an airline to endorse you on their website or in their in-flight magazine. Even better, you could get them to add a little check box next to your ticket purchase button. In this instance, the airline also benefits because they are potentially providing a helpful service to their customers. Striking a deal with a large corporation should not just represent more revenue. It also has the potential to enhance the defensibility of the small business for a competitive advantage. If the small partner becomes the preferred and/or exclusive provider, it locks out a lot of other, similar, businesses. Eventually, it might even be able to start charging more for its services because it has the channel locked up. That’s how you build equity value. The relationship between large companies, small business suppliers and vendors can be transformative, with free, open communication and a constant exchange of ideas, technology and preconditions. In addition, leadership of large companies must have mechanisms in place for communication, transparency, evaluation and systems for sharing new ideas and growth. This is the foundation of a win-win, highly effective collaboration and partnership. The best result and competitive advantage for all players. The Arizona Small Business Association has a proven track record in developing and improving collaborative business relationships. Visit online for details: www.asba.com

5


How ASBA Has Mastered the Art of Alliances to Help Small Businesses Win Small businesses are increasingly realizing

accountant may create a reciprocal offer

work together to produce a discounted

the benefits of working together.

for the Web developer’s customers. Both

package for soon-to-be-married couples.

businesses benefit by reaching a new

They have an opportunity to win more

in a number of ways: by combining and

audience, and their customers benefit

business, and the customer benefits from

leveraging expertise, by tapping into an

from a special offer.

a coordinated package of services at a

Collaboration can help businesses grow

extended contact base and, in some cases, by sharing resources. The key to all collaborations aims to support the success of all parties involved. • A lighting shop may connect with an

develop a range of products and services together, and so improve the overall value to the customer. • Non-competing small businesses partner

electrician to run a joint advertising

to share costs for activities such as trade

campaign, and share customers,

shows and exhibitions, advertising and

resources and know-how.

other marketing activity, to bring costs

• A Web developer may connect with an accountant and create a special offer for the accountant’s customers. In turn, the

6

• A large corporation and a small business

down and attract a larger audience. • A wedding photographer and florist have a similar customer base and may

good price. Initially, it’s a good idea to start with a project that doesn’t require too much commitment from either party. For example, you can offer one of your partner’s products to your customers — low risk but with the potential of positive results. This gives you the chance to get to know each other, understand how your businesses could work together and see how the relationship can develop.


Benefits of ASBA Relationship Development for Supply Chain Market expansion: The ability to expand business to new verticals,

• Product creation: Access to association partners for opportunity

Mexico, etc. is a huge asset. Many times, these opportunities have not

to co-brand/co-create products. Multiple companies to help drive

been readily available to small companies.

innovation in a faster timeframe with better results.

• Information sharing and collaboration: Access to thought

• Networking: Expansion of the business social network to include

leadership of the association members (big and small) for information

highly intelligent, knowledgeable, motivated people who understand

exchange, learning, best practices and opportunity brainstorming.

the exchange of support and are willing to offer theirs.

• Decision makers: Access to decision makers at large companies; the opportunity to have an ally within these large companies,

The Arizona Small Business Association (ASBA), in strategic

including the founding corporation.

partnership with the preeminent thought leaders and entrepreneurs in

• New distribution: Access to showcase and distribution points

the state, can assist you with collaboration relationship development.

offered by the group.

We are the leading SMB association in Arizona leveraging the

• Marketing: Connection to a larger name-brand organization means

brain trust within our membership base and beyond; ASBA adds

you gain from their existing branding.

immeasurable value to the businesses we represent. We provide

• Free research; R&D share: Research conducted by smaller

members opportunities for networking and professional development

companies from within the association as well as many of the

along with access to tools and resources, while working to elevate and

larger sponsor companies. Large companies can see cutting-edge

promote the discipline of partnership management.

technologies that are just starting to come to light.

Success Team program for large and/or small business alliances is

• Exposure to new companies: Access to clients, partners and

managed by Robin Duncan, senior director of membership.

other member companies and gaining new market knowledge.

www.asba.com

DONATE. VOLUNTEER. CHANGE A LIFE. HELP A CHILD BUILD CONFIDENCE & REALIZE THEIR POTENTIAL

BBBSAZ.ORG (602) 264-9254

7


BIG THANK YOU! 2017 was a phenomenal year for ASBA members and sponsors! Thank you for your continued support! Let’s Make 2018 Powerful!

ASBA STAFF LIST & TITLES Jess Roman Interim Chief Executive Officer Debbie Hann, Chief Operating Officer Angelia Hill VP, Marketing & Business Solutions Robin Duncan Sr. Director, Business Development Ryan Reyes Director, Strategic Partnerships & Initiatives Jeanne Quinn Lowing Business Relationship Manager Ashley Vizzerra Member Services Manager Genesis Garcia Administrative & Design Coordinator

ASBA LOCATIONS: Central Arizona Office 4600 E. Washington Street, Suite 340 Phoenix, AZ 85034 p. 602.306.4000

Southern Arizona Office 3444 N. Country Club Rd. Suite 118 Tucson, AZ 85716 p. 520.327.0222

8


Valley

Presents

A Guide to Your Next Great Event

FEATURING Children’s Museum of Phoenix Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau K1 Speed Merestone Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse Thunderbird Executive Inn


For an extraordinary meeting, start with an amazing place. Glendale and the West Valley have plenty of unique spaces for groups of 7 to 70,000. Our year-round golf, world-class entertainment, pro sports and endless outdoor recreation raise excitement to a whole new level. And best of all, we’re just minutes from Sky Harbor International Airport in one of the nation’s top travel destinations. Ready for a meeting that’s hard to top? Contact the Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau today.

GLENDALE , AZ CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU Showcasing the West Valley

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Bring your next corporate event West! Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse in Chandler — in close proximity to Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe and Mesa — is the perfect place to host a private event.

Groups of 10 to 10,000 Distinct private venues available

Provide a True Western Flare to any event… Frontier Hall is the East Valley’s Largest Event Venue. • 45,000 sq. ft. of continuous indoor space • Adjacent to the 50,000-sq.-ft. Sonoran Lawn • Full-service facility with Catering & Event Planning

Contact the sales department: info@rawhide.com or (480) 502-5600

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Events Market The Valley’s varied venue

Markets are improving and meeting planners are seeing the Valley as a viable option for events. Hotels continue to show strong demand, and this is the first level of how to take the temperature of the industry. Business is booking at a short-term pace, but venues are getting a lot of calls now checking spring and summer. And locals regularly look at the summer as an opportunity to take advantage of meeting in their own backyard in a beautiful resort, and take advantage of value. Throughout the Greater Phoenix cities as well as growing opportunities of the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community along Scottsdale’s eastern border, the market is firing on all cylinders, with optimism showing as properties are renovating and refurbishing — and building new. As Super Bowl has shown us multiple times, these major events give areas like downtown Phoenix tremendous positive exposure as a place to hold a convention. Phoenix successfully hosted a Super Bowl when downtown Phoenix could easily have been characterized a construction zone; now, with projects like the light rail, CityScape, the Sheraton, Westin and Palomar hotels all completed, the city is even better positioned to fulfill the needs of event planners. Plus, there is a revitalization of formerly rundown neighborhoods to unique destinations, such as the booming arts —RaeAnne Marsh district of Roosevelt Row.

About Our Guide We hope you will enjoy this comprehensive compilation of the Valley’s top sites for business events, conventions and meetings. Our Valley is home to some of the best properties, with state-of-the-art technology and facilities to ensure the success of your next great event. In Business Magazine has compiled this guide so companies can compare amenities and make choices for their local events. This guide will be online at www.inbusinessphx.com for a full year.

Planning Tips to Avoid Common Meeting Mistakes With the large array of details it takes to plan and execute

Provide a map of all meeting areas. Larger

on a successful conference, convention or trade show; small

conventions create unneeded anxiety for those who are

details that make a large impact often slip through the

unfamiliar with the area or layout of the location. Ensuring

cracks. The following are tips to avoid common mistakes of a

that each attendee is provided a map of the meeting rooms

business conference.

before the convention is ideal in pacifying frustrations and

Book soundproof conference rooms. One of the largest complaints at business meetings is frequent

getting the attendees where they need to go. Provide healthy snack options at break times.

interruptions. It’s often difficult to control outside

Eating healthy is an easy way to make sure all the

noise, but many cities across the U.S. have invested in

conference attendees are at their peak performance at the

soundproofing options that eliminate the pandemonium of

sometimes (unnecessily) long meetings and presentations.

the outside world.

Recent studies have shown that eating healthy can increase

Monitor meeting room temperatures. There is nothing worse than being stuck in a freezing cold, or

an individual’s productivity and focus. It’s a good idea, then, for the organizer to tailor a snack selection to be

burning hot, room when not being dressed properly for it.

inclusive of those who may crave some healthy options.

Research shows that the optimal work environment for

—Michael Lentin, owner and CEO of CitiQuiet, market

people is 72–77 degrees Fahrenheit. Within this range,

leader in soundproof windows

attendees will not only be comfortable but be able to work as optimally as possible.

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

CitiQuiet citiquiet.com

FEB. 2018

55


Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

100,000+

14,000

Tempe

n/a

n/a

67,000

5,600

Mesa

n/a

n/a

49,000

5,000

Camby Hotel 2401 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 468-0700 thecamby.com

Phoenix

6

1200

20,000

277

Chandler Southgate Hotel 7475 W. Chandler Blvd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (480) 961-4444 chandlersouthgatehotel.com

Chandler

5

1,800

6,800

159

Courtyard Scottsdale Old Town 3 3311 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 429-7785 marriott.com

Scottsdale

4

1,360

2,200

180

Crowne Plaza Hotel Phoenix – Airport 4300 E. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 273-7778 ichotelsgroup.com

Phoenix

8

5,376

9,300

290

DoubleTree by Hilton Phoenix 2100 S. Priest Dr. Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 967-1441 doubletree3.hilton.com

Tempe

12

7,493

30,000

270

Scottsdale

21

11,200

25,000

312

Venue

# of Meeting Rooms

n/a

City

n/a

# of Sleeping Rooms

Total Meeting Space

Largest Room

# of Meeting Rooms

City

Venue

Scottsdale

Conference Centers

Convention & Visitors Bureaus (con’t)

Black Canyon Conference Center 9440 N. 25th Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85021 (602) 944-0569 blackcanyonconferencecenter.com

Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau 4343 N. Scottsdale Rd., Suite 70 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 421-1004 scottsdalecvb.com

Desert Willow Conference Center 4340 E. Cotton Center Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 431-0001 desertwillowconferencecenter.com Poco Diablo Resort & Conference Center 1752 Arizona 179 Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-7333 pocodiablo.com Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center 15249 N. 59th Ave. Glendale, AZ 85306 (602) 978-7987 thunderbirdexecutiveinn.com

Phoenix

Phoenix

Sedona

21

11

10

5,169

5,435

3,300

51,000

40,000

8,500

n/a

n/a

137

Mesa Convention Center 263 N. Center St. Mesa, AZ 85201 (480) 644-2178 mesaconventioncenter.com Phoenix Convention Center 100 N. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 262-6225 phoenixconventioncenter.com

Glendale

24

3,450

40,000+

134

Glendale

2

12,788

40,000

n/a

Mesa

15

19,000

40,000

n/a

Phoenix

90

46,000

160,000

n/a

Convention & Visitors Bureaus Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau 5800 W. Glenn Dr. Glendale, AZ 85301 (623) 930-4500 visitglendale.com Greater Phoenix Convention & Visitors Bureau 125 N. 2nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 254-6500 visitphoenix.com

56

FEB. 2018

Visit Mesa 120 N. Center St. Mesa, AZ 85201 (480) 827-4700 visitmesa.com

Hotels

Convention Centers Glendale Civic Center 5750 W. Glenn Dr. Glendale, AZ 85301 (623) 930-4300 glendaleciviccenter.com

Tempe Tourism Office 222 S. Mill Avenue, Suite 120 Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 894-8158 tempetourism.com

Glendale

Phoenix

17

n/a

95,000

n/a

612,500

900,000

8,500

Embassy Suites by Hilton Scottsdale Resort 5001 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 949-1414 chaparralsuites.com

62,000

INBUSINESSPHX.COM


Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center | Glendale, Arizona

1 Global

Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center is a unique Arizona destination serving clients from around the world. Nestled on the historic campus of Thunderbird School of Global Management, the recently renovated Thunderbird Executive Inn will surprise and delight you with: 4134 upscale guest rooms 4More than 40,000 square feet of meeting space, including six state-of-the-art auditoriums and 24 breakout rooms 4Unique diversions such as the world famous Thunderbird Pub, located in an historic WWII military airfield control tower Whether you’re planning a conference, business meeting, training program, trade show or simply a vacation escape to sunny Arizona — our hotel and conference center is an exceptional choice.

www.thunderbirdexecutiveinn.com 1 Global Place, Glendale, AZ 85306 Inquiries: 602.978.7987 Email: hotelsales@thunderbird.edu


City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

50,000

527

Renaissance Phoenix Glendale Hotel & Spa 9495 W. Coyotes Blvd. Glendale, AZ 85305 (623) 937-3700 renaissanceglendale.com

Glendale

17

3,400

115,085

320

Scottsdale Marriott Suites Old Town 7325 E. 3rd Ave. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945-1550 marriott.com

Scottsdale

13

1,400

9,755

243

Sheraton Crescent Hotel 2620 W. Dunlap Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85021 (602) 943-8200 sheratoncrescent.com

Phoenix

18

8,064

40,000

342

Sheraton Phoenix Airport Hotel – Tempe 1600 S. 52nd St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 967-6600 sheratonphoenixairport.com

Tempe

9

3,450

9,181

209

Sheraton Grand Phoenix 340 N. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 262-2500 sheratonphoenixdowntown.com

Phoenix

20

27,170

112,00

1,000

Windemere Hotel & Conference Center 5750 E. Main St. Mesa, AZ 85205 (480) 985-3600 windemerehotelmesa.com

Mesa

12

3,600

8,500

114

Wyndham Garden Hotels Phoenix 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 (602) 604-4900 wyndham.com

Phoenix

4

5,000

5,000

160

Wyndham Garden Phoenix Midtown 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 (602) 604-4900 wyndham.com

Phoenix

4

5,000

5,000

160

Embassy Suites Phoenix Biltmore 2630 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-3992 embassysuites3.hilton.com Embassy Suites Phoenix – Tempe 4400 S. Rural Rd. Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 897-7444 embassysuites3.hilton.com Hilton Phoenix/Mesa 1011 W. Holmes Ave. Mesa, AZ 85210 (480) 833-5555 hilton.com Hotel Palomar Phoenix, A Kimpton Hotel 2 E. Jefferson St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-6633 hotelpalomar-phoenix.com Hotel San Carlos 202 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-4121 hotelsancarlos.com Hotel Valley Ho 6850 E. Main St. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 376-2600 hotelvalleyho.com Hyatt Regency Phoenix 122 N. 2nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 252-1234 phoenix.hyatt.com Phoenix Airport Marriott 1101 N. 44th St. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 273-7373 marriott.com

58

FEB. 2018

Phoenix

Phoenix

Tempe

Mesa

Phoenix

Phoenix

Scottsdale

Phoenix

Phoenix

10

8

10

17

10

2

11

32

15

3,500

3,696

4,000

5,600

3,159

702

4,000

12,000

750

13,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

25,000

10,000

1,200

13,000

45,000

24,716

250

242

232

224

260

242

128

191

693

Venue

20,000

5,400

# of Sleeping Rooms

20

13

Total Meeting Space

Phoenix

DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Phoenix 320 N. 44th St. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 225-0500 doubletreephoenix.com

Phoenix

Largest Room

Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel 100 N. 1st Street Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 333-0000 marriott.com

# of Meeting Rooms

Four Points by Sheraton 2532 W. Peoria Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85029 (602) 943-2341 ihg.com

City

Hotels (con’t)

Venue

Hotels (con’t)

347

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City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

35,920

210

Gainey Suites Hotel 7300 E. Gainey Suites Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480)367-4616 gaineysuiteshotel.com

Scottsdale

11

2,925

8,300

162

Grand Canyon

3

3,400

4,500

250

Harrah’s Ak-Chin 15406 N. Maricopa Rd. Maricopa, AZ 85139 (480) 802-5000 harrahsakchin.com

Maricopa

4

4,020

5,000

300

Hermosa Inn 5532 N. Palo Cristi Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (602) 955-8614 hermosainn.com

Scottsdale

4

1,989

2,326

34

Hilton Scottsdale Resort & Villas 6333 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 948-7750 hilton.com

Scottsdale

7

10,000

25,000

235

Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Gainey Ranch 7500 E. Doubletree Ranch Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480) 444-1234 scottsdale.hyatt.com

Scottsdale

32

14,280

70,000

493

JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa 5350 Marriott Dr. Phoenix, AZ 85054 (480) 293-5000 marriott.com

Phoenix

40

33,218

311,853

950

JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa 5402 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-1700 marriott.com

Scottsdale

20

19,968

91,119

453

Phoenix

3

1,200

2,164

328

Arizona Golf Resort & Conference Center 425 S. Power Rd. Mesa, AZ 85206 (480) 832-3202 arizonagolfresort.com Arizona Grand Resort & Spa 8000 Arizona Grand Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85044 (602) 438-9000 arizonagrandresort.com Carefree Resort & Conference Center 37220 N. Mule Train Rd. Carefree, AZ 85377 (480) 488-5300 carefree-resort.com CopperWynd Resort & Club 13225 N. Eagle Ridge Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85268 (480) 333-1900 copperwynd.com Crowne Plaza San Marcos Golf Resort 1 San Marcos Pl. Chandler, AZ 85225 (480) 812-0900 sanmarcosresort.com DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort by Hilton Hotel – Scottsdale 5401 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 947-5400 doubletree.hilton.com

Mesa

Phoenix

Carefree

Scottsdale

Chandler

Scottsdale

9

125

26

4

16

23

5,170

14,031

11,000

6,000

9,600

12,064

200,000

12,000

120,000+

60,000

8,000

35,000

40,000

740

186

744

224

32

249

378

Fairmont Scottsdale Princess 7575 E. Princess Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (480) 585-4848 fairmont.com

Scottsdale

49

23,000

<150,000

648

FireSky Resort & Spa 4925 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945-7666 fireskyresort.com

Scottsdale

13

6,800

14,000

240

60

FEB. 2018

Venue

5,940

24,576

# of Sleeping Rooms

8

76

Total Meeting Space

Scottsdale

Phoenix

Largest Room

Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North 10600 E. Crescent Moon Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85262 (480) 515-5700 fourseasons.com

# of Meeting Rooms

Arizona Biltmore, A Waldorf Astoria Resort 2400 E. Missouri Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-6600 arizonabiltmore.com

City

Resorts (con’t)

Venue

Resorts

Grand Canyon Squire Inn 74 Arizona 64 Grand Canyon Village, AZ 86023 (928) 638-2681 grandcanyonsquire.com

The Legacy Golf Resort 6808 S. 32nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85042 (602) 305-5500 shellhospitality.com

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City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

40,000

404

Scottsdale Resort & Conference Center 7700 E. McCormick Pkwy. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480) 991-9000 destinationhotels.com/scottsdaleresort

Scottsdale

50

10,000

50,000

326

Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort & Spa 5594 W. Wild Horse Pass Rd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (602) 225-0100 wildhorsepassresort.com

Chandler

30

17,376

180,000

500

Talking Stick Resort 9800 E. Indian Bend Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85256 (480) 850-7777 talkingstickresort.com

Scottsdale

22

25,000

113000

496

Tempe

20

9,384

30,000

303

W Scottsdale 7277 E. Camelback Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 970-2100 wscottsdalehotel.com

Scottsdale

8

3,500

14,000

230

We-Ko-Pa Resort & Conference Center 10438 N. Fort McDowell Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85264 (480) 789-5300 wekoparesort.com

Scottsdale

15

18,000

25,000

248

Westin Kierland Resort & Spa 6902 E. Greenway Pkwy. Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (480) 624-1000 kierlandresort.com

Scottsdale

41

25,000

200,000+

732

The Wigwam Resort & Golf Club 300 E. Wigwam Ln. Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 (623) 935-3811 wigwamarizona.com

Phoenix

25

10,800

100,000

331

Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (520)796-4923 wingilariver.com/wild-horse-pass

Chandler

10

8,000

12,000

242

Mountain Shadows 5445 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 624-5400 mountainshadows.com Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia 4949 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 627-3200 omnihotels.com Orange Tree Golf Resort 10601 N. 56th St. Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (480) 948-6100 shellhospitality.com The Phoenician 6000 E. Camelback Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 941-8200 thephoenician.com Phoenix Marriott Tempe at The Buttes 2000 W. Westcourt Way Tempe, AZ 85282 (602) 225-9000 marriott.com Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort 7677 N. 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 997-2626 squawpeakhilton.com Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort 11111 N. 7th St. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 866-7500 tapatiocliffshilton.com Sanctuary Camelback Mountain 5700 E. McDonald Dr. Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 (480)607-2350 sanctuaryoncamelback.com Scottsdale Marriott at McDowell Mountains 16770 N. Perimeter Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (480) 502-3836 marriott.com

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Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Tempe

Phoenix

Phoenix

Paradise Valley

Scottsdale

10

16

4

26

15

46

36

11

24

4,475

9,216

5,000

20,533

10,000

9,760

16,000

3,204

5,005

13,000+

12,835

27,000

10,000

160,000+

40,000

<48,000

65,000

8,000

14,527

125

n/a

293

160

643

354

563

584

105

266

Venue

10,080

2,365

# of Sleeping Rooms

21

6

Total Meeting Space

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Largest Room

Scottsdale Plaza Resort 7200 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-5000 scottsdaleplaza.com

# of Meeting Rooms

The McCormick Scottsdale 7401 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-5050 millenniumhotels.com

City

Resorts (conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t)

Venue

Resorts (conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t)

Tempe Mission Palms Hotel & Conference Center 60 E. 5th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 894-1400 missionpalms.com

FEB. 2018

61


# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms n/a

n/a

Comerica Theatre 400 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85003 (602) 379-2800 comericatheatre.com

Phoenix

5

40,000

80,000

n/a

n/a

The Croft Downtown – Phoenix 22 E. Buchman St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 462-970 thecroftdowntown.com

n/a

2

5,000

8,500

n/a

Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center 122 E. Culver St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 241-7870 azjhs.org

Phoenix

2

2,500

5,500

n/a

Desert Botanical Garden 1201 N. Galvin Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (480) 941-1225 dbg.org

Phoenix

5

4,200

5,000

n/a

Phoenix

Outdoor picnicstyle only

n/a

n/a

n/a

Scottsdale

14

3,364

13,000

54

GameWorks – Tempe 5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 491-7300 gameworks.com

Tempe

4

2,500

10,000

n/a

Heard Museum 2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 252-8840 heard.org

Phoenix

9

5,300

<20,000

n/a

Herberger Theater Center 222 E. Monroe St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 254-7399 herbergertheater.org

Phoenix

6

2,980

9,000

n/a

Arizona Center 400 E. Van Buren St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 271-4000 arizonacenter.com Arizona Science Center 600 E. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 716-2000 azscience.org Babylon Banquet Hall 8035 N. 43rd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85051 (619) 384-3545 babylonbanquethall.com Boojum Tree 16026 N. 36th St. Phoenix, AZ 85032 (602) 867-8975 boojumtree.com The Carnegie Center 1700 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85007 (602) 926-3604 azlibrary.gov Castles ‘n’ Coasters 9445 N. Metro Pkwy. E. Phoenix, AZ 85051 (602) 997-7575 castlesncoasters.com The Cedars Banquet Hall 1702 E. Northern Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 944-2566 cedarsbanquethall.com Chase Field 401 E. Jefferson St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (480) 339-5000 azchasefield.com

62

FEB. 2018

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Outside space only

9

1

2

2

2

1

21

n/a

n/a

10,000

10,000

1,800

3,935

3,600

39,600

45,000

n/a

10,000

10,000

3,000 (for nonprofits only)

5,000

3,600

100,000+

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Enchanted Island Amusement Park 1202 W. Encanto Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85007 (602) 254-1200 enchantedisland.com The Franciscan Renewal Center 5802 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-7460 thecasa.org

City

<14,000

Venue

5,000

15,700

# of Sleeping Rooms

3

2

15,000 (ice rink)

Total Meeting Space

Phoenix

Phoenix

Largest Room

n/a

Children’s Museum of Phoenix 215 N. 7th St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 253-0501 childrensmuseumofphoenix.org

# of Meeting Rooms

Az Ice Arcadia 3853 E. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85018 (602) 957-9966 arcadiaice.com

City

Special Event Venues (con’t)

Venue

Special Event Venues

INBUSINESSPHX.COM


# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms n/a

University of Arizona College of Medicine 550 E. Van Buren St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 827-2002 medicine.arizona.edu

Phoenix

3

4,600

6,400

n/a

Valley Youth Theatre 525 N. 1st St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-8188 vyt.com

Phoenix

1

2,500

2,500

n/a

n/a

Venue at the Grove 7010 S. 27th Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85041 (602) 456-0803 venueatthegrove.com

Phoenix

1

2,250

2,250

n/a

n/a

The Wrigley Mansion 2501 E. Telawa Trail Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-4079 wrigleymansionclub.com

Phoenix

13

1,075

3,000

n/a

Warehouse 215 @ Bentley Projects 215 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 340-9200 bentleygallery.com

Phoenix

1

22,000

22,000

n/a

MonOrchid 214 E. Roosevelt St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-0339 monorchid.com Musical Instrument Museum 4725 E. Mayo Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85050 (480) 478-6000 mim.org Nina Mason Pulliam Rio Salado Audubon Center 3131 S. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 468-6470 riosalado.audubon.org Penske Racing Museum 7125 E. Chauncey Ln. Phoenix, AZ 85054 (480) 538-4444 penskeracingmuseum.com

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

3

6

2

2

4,500

9,300

1,920

2,500

6,000

30,000

3,000

5,000

n/a

n/a

n/a

Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 257-1222 phxart.org

Phoenix

5

6,600

8,600

n/a

Phoenix Zoo 455 N. Galvin Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 286-3800 phoenixzoo.org

Phoenix

16

4,000

4,300

n/a

Rawhide 5700 W. North Loop Rd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (480) 502-5600 rawhide.com

Chandler

14

46,000

75,000+

n/a

Secret Garden 2501 E. Baseline Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85042 (602) 268-5522 secretgardenevents.com

Phoenix

4

2,500

3,000

n/a

Stand Up Live 50 W. Jefferson St., Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85003 (480) 719-6100 standuplive.com

Phoenix

2

6,500

9,000

n/a

INBUSINESSPHX.COM

City

n/a

1,500

Venue

n/a

1,000

# of Sleeping Rooms

3

2

Total Meeting Space

Phoenix

Phoenix

Largest Room

Turf Paradise 1501 W. Bell Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85023 (602) 942-1101 turfparadise.com

# of Meeting Rooms

K1 Speed 2425 S. 21st St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 275-5278 k1speed.com

City

Special Event Venues (con’t)

Venue

Special Event Venues (con’t)

FEB. 2018

63


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Alonzo, Catherine, 24

Harkey, Scott, 9, 25

McFarland, Scott, 18

Touché, Charles, 10

Barnett, Chad, 10

Hendricks, Bill, 40

McFillen, James M., 28

Town, Ryan, 27

Bistritz, Stephen J., 29

Hernandez, Daniel, Master Sgt., 40

Meyer, Karen, 41

Tran, Trung, Gunnery Sgt., 40

Bowie, Sean, Sen., 37

Hill, Angelia, 45

Moffitt, Tivon, 16

Troy, Bill, 29

Cadieux, Chester III, 31

Howell, Park, 24

Owen, Dean C., Lt., Col., 42

Varney, Glenn H., 28

Case, Darren T., 66

Jones, Cliff, 40

Park, Daehee, 13

Viramontes, Stephen, 14

Colgate, Mark, 29

Krisay, Alexis, 26

Plough, Donald, Tech. Sgt., 42

Wheatcroft, Tim, 12

Desmond, Dennis, 16

Laffrey, Gregory A., Staff Sgt., 42

Post, Jessica, 20

Willis, Scott, 11

Forsythe, Wendy, 11

Lakin, Harry, 31

Read, Nicholas A.C., 29

Young, Truman, Maj., 42

Goodman, Elie, 10

Lentin, Michael, 55

Sanders, Dena, 20

Grombacher, George, 30

Marsh, Michael, 66

Sheth, Beerud, 11

1100 KFNX, 35

Foods 2000, Inc., 10

OH Partners, 9, 25

Southern Rail, 36

Alliance Bank of Arizona, 2

Gilbert Chamber of Commerce, 33

Omas, 34

Stearns Bank, 6

APS, 17

Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau, 54

Phoenix Children’s Care Network, 18

Swiftpage, 11

Pyxl, 27

Tempe Chamber of Commerce, 32, 33, 37

Arizona Diamondbacks, 67 Arizona Small Business Association, 45

GlobalMed, 18

QuikTrip, 31 Radix Law, 35

Thunderbid Executive Inn & Conference Center, 57

Hire Capacity, 31

Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse, 54

Tiffany & Bosco, P.A., 66

Assure Vote, 14

HomeSmart International, 11

Read Better Be Better, 44

Bank of the West, 8

Jackson-Shaw, 16

Republica Empanada, 36

Bentley, 34

Javelina, 24

RoboRecruiter, 11

Big Brothers Big Sisters, 51

Jive, 6

Serendipit Consulting, 26

WasteManagement Phoenix Open, 3

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, 68

JLL, 16

SetSchedule, 11

Westin Kierland, The, 64

K1 Speed, 59

Small Business Council, 32

Zinwave, 11

La Santisima Gourmet Taco Shop, 36

Snell & Wilmer, 2

Arizona Technology Council, 31, 32 Association for Corporate Growth – Arizona, 32

BMO Harris Bank, 21 Bootleggers Modern American Smokehouse, 36

Grand Canyon University, 41 HealthBI, 18

Toys for Tots, 40 Tuft & Needle, 13 UnitedHealthcare, 18, 19

LaPour Partners, 16

Business of Story, 25

Lee & Associates, 66

Career Connectors, 44

LivURBN, 16

Cartier, 34

Lovitt & Touché, 10

Chandler Chamber of Commerce, 32

Maracay Homes, 16

Children's Museum of Phoenix, 57

Maricopa SBDC, 33

Chrome River Technologies, 12

Mayo Clinic, 15

CitiQuiet, 55

MeMD, 10

Colliers International, 16

Merestone, 59

Delta Dental, 7

Mesa Chamber of Commerce, 33

Economic Club of Phoenix, 31

Montblanc, 34

Est Est, 16

National Bank of Arizona, 5

Fennemore Craig, 20

North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, 32, 33

In each issue of In Business Magazine, we list both companies and indivuduals for quick reference. See the stories for links to more.

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A CANDID FORUM

BY

Successful Entrepreneurs May Be Their Own Worst Enemy Facing the issue of risk vs. reward by Darren T. Case and Michael Marsh

MAGAZINE

FEB. 2018

IN BUSINESS

The 2018 Meetings & Conventio ns Guide

Selling Y

BRANDING

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Branding Age of Techin the nology

Avoid Costly Mistak

FEBRUARY

Organizational es in Change Misjudging

2018

Reward inRisk vs. Business

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Darren T. Case is a tax and estate planning attorney for Tiffany & Bosco, P.A. He is a co-author of the Arizona Estate Planning & Probate Handbook and former president for the Central Arizona Estate Planning Council. tblaw.com

Michael Marsh is a commercial real estate broker in the Phoenix office of Lee & Associates. Marsh specializes in the representation of landlords and tenants in the leasing and sales of office properties, working with a variety businesses and entrepreneurs within the community. lee-associates.com

FEB. 2018

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Do I risk what I have for more? This is the ultimate question that nearly every successful entrepreneur faces following the building of wealth through their business. The mantra of “If you’re not growing, you’re dying” has been preached to entrepreneurs at every business seminar or within every best-selling business success book, so one would assume that continued growth is always the answer. But there is a psychological component that many successful entrepreneurs may be ignoring when answering the question. At such a pivotal moment when the entrepreneur may, ultimately, risk all the wealth he or she has created within the business, perhaps it is time for the entrepreneur and his or her advisors to dig deeper with their analysis. Undoubtedly, an entrepreneur has put his or her blood, sweat, and tears into the business, as well as investing all personal assets. This does not leave the entrepreneur much time or money to analyze psychological factors involved throughout the business lifecycle. For example, the psychological drive and pleasure derived through building one’s business is closely tied to the entrepreneur’s accumulation of personal wealth from the business. This point is exemplified in The Last Taboo: Money as Symbol & Reality in Psychotherapy & Psychoanalysis, in which Peter A. Olsson, M.D., notes, “Almost all human beings covet phenomenal monetary success in conscious or unconscious fantasy.” Once an entrepreneur has reached a level of success, however, and has begun to enjoy the financial fruits of his or her labor, the entrepreneur may become too satisfied with that wealth and then become psychologically driven by the fear of losing it — so much so that the entrepreneur has become his or her own worst enemy in deciding whether to expand the business. The psychological ridiculousness that often can be found deep within an entrepreneur’s fears can be beneficially analyzed through the “theory of loss aversion.” As noted by Dan Grech in Money Talks: in Therapy, Society, and Life citing the work of psychologists Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, who generally conceived that people will do nearly everything and anything simply to avoid the pain of loss, including making decisions that work against their own self-interest. Such theory ultimately earned the pair a Nobel Prize in economics. Couple this with the related nascent field of neuroeconomics — which, essentially, displays through the use of an MRI machine that the area of the brain that processes financial loss is, in fact, the same exact area of the brain that processes literal physical pain — and it is easy to understand why entrepreneurs may fear the risk of pain that comes with business growth.

When entrepreneurs become uneasy regarding painful business decisions, the most common path they take is seeking guidance from their team of advisors. On the personal side, entrepreneurs consult with their financial advisor, accountant and estate planning attorney, which often brings clarity to their individual wealth. On the business side, many entrepreneurs, when examining a growth strategy, will seek assistance from a commercial real estate broker. Given that real estate is generally the second-largest cost for companies, just behind payroll, there is a real potential to negatively impact future cash flow and greatly impact flexibility in other key areas. While it certainly would be perceived as insane for any of these advisors to recommend psychological help to their entrepreneur client in making business decisions, the advisors simply being armed with the knowledge of such fields makes it possible to better understand how entrepreneur clients may act against their own best interests. But if the answer as to whether the entrepreneur should expand the business is psychologically influenced, and the entrepreneur is often his or her own worst enemy, what should advisors be doing to uncover the underlying deep-seated issues and fears? What advisors can do to help clients is, ultimately, to better understand how entrepreneurs experience pain or behave in bizarre manners in order to avoid it. This allows advisors to educate entrepreneurs on the psychological difficulties and show empathy toward the challenging decisions that come with growth. This, in turn, allows the entrepreneur and his or her advisors to clearly review the process to limit the number of surprises and, ultimately, set expectations of what constitutes success, regardless of whether it involves the entrepreneur risking what he or she has for more or maintaining the status quo. And considering the entrepreneur often has put everything into building the business, having advisors dig deeper into their concerns and fears, psychological or otherwise, is the level of service that enables the entrepreneur’s continued success, however it is defined.

Pivotal moments for successful entrepreneurs often come when least suspected. Following years of relentless determination overcoming obstacles and setbacks, an entrepreneur may be enjoying a comfortable level of success that others may never achieve but, when faced with the decision of potential risk through growth versus maintaining the status quo, deep-seated psychological issues may impede continued success.


February 2018 Issue of In Business Magazine  
February 2018 Issue of In Business Magazine