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Valley’s Most Comprehensive Guide for Corporate Events

Marketing a Business The real story to success Trends in

Flexible Working Wise Up about Your

Real Estate Asset Endorsements,

Testimonials and the FTC

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FEBRUARY 2017

COVER STORY

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Marketing a Business: The Real Story to Success

In our wildly diverse society, marketing campaigns must be designed to fit lifestyles, multi-taskers and enthusiasts. In Business Magazine editor RaeAnne Marsh connected with locally based marketing professionals to bring our business readers their experience and insights. FEATURE

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Real Estate: The Surprising Cost of Inaction

Mortenson principal Tammy Carr explores the cost of businesses overlooking the underperformance of their real estate and facility assets. DEPARTMENTS

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Guest Editor

Louie Moses, president and creative director of Moses, Inc., introduces the “Marketing” issue.

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Feedback

Bob Meyer, Erik Olsson and Stefanie Teller respond to In Business Magazine’s burning business question of the month.

PARTNER SECTION TEMPE CHAMBER

ADVANTAGE Winter 2O17 • tempechamber.org

Women in Business Speaker Series – “Be the Change! Learn, Lead, Grow” The Tempe Chamber’s Women in Business Council presents a four-part speaker series that will guide participants on how to be a more effective professional and confident individual by developing as a leader and growing into a position of greater value and happiness. The sessions will train attendees on Communication, Leadership, Goal Setting and Taking Action. Powerful expert speakers will inspire, educate and motivate participants to grow and succeed in their personal life and professional career. Each session takes place from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. at Western International University, 1601 W. Fountainhead Parkway in Tempe. To attend, visit http://bit.ly/WIBSS17 or call 480-967-7891.

JAN. 20 – COMMUNICATION

FEB. 3 – GOAL SETTING

What Is “Positive Change” and How Do We Use Communications to Effect It?

Briefs

“Serving Business in the 3-D World,” “TURO Rent-A-Car,” “Human Capital Maximized,” “E-Fraud Risk in Global Retail” and “Personal Care Purchases by Mouse”

Local attorney explains how endorsements and testimonials can get businesses in trouble with the FTC.

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Books

New releases give fresh insights on business thinking.

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Nonprofit

Boards that apply science and art to campaigns see unexpected hurdles as opportunities.

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Assets

2017 Ford Raptor Plus: Get ready for tax time.

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Power Lunch

Flower Child Plus: Not all Italian is pasta-heavy.

Speaker: Susan Brooks High Performance Coach What is the difference between goals and dreams? How can you be more than “interested” in achieving your goals? What will change when your goal is achieved? Addressing these questions with specific tools and information will be the focus of this engaging and highly interactive Goal Setting session. According to Forbes, only 8 percent of people actually achieve their goals. This program will help you be one of them! Susan Brooks is a high-performance coach for women business owners who works to create innovative and customized strategies and systems that work. She was the co-founder of Cookies From Home, a multi-million-dollar, award-winning business that she built and ran with her husband for more than 30 years. Today, she uses her years of business experience and expertise to coach women business owners to greater profitability by creating a financially sustainable company that will thrive in a competitive marketplace.

JAN. 27 – LEADERSHIP FEB. 10 – TAKING ACTION

Learning to Lead, Inspiring Others to Follow

Use Your Experience to Get Results

Speaker: Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick, Maricopa Community Colleges Chancellor Whether it’s leading a team or reshaping a large organization, there are best practices that ensure success. How do you lead your most valuable asset through change in order to significantly reshape an organization? How can you, as an employee, lead from where you are and be a champion for change? Dr. Harper-Marinick is chancellor of one of the largest community college systems in the nation. She oversees operations for the system, which serves 200,000 students and nearly 10,000 faculty and staff members across 10 colleges. She sets the vision for the strategic plan, guides policy development, and oversees initiatives and outcomes related to workforce, economic and community development; civic and global engagement; and increasing student success.

Speaker: Jodi Low Leadership Development Jodi Low is an accomplished corporate trainer, inspirational speaker, and the founder and CEO of U & Improved. She has trained thousands of entrepreneurs and executives on how to take action to build a booming business, master a mindset for success and achieve the lifestyle they desire. In 2015, she was honored by the Phoenix Business Journal as an “Outstanding Women in Business” and by the Phoenix Suns and National Bank of Arizona with the “Amazing Women” award.

T E M P E C H A M B E R A D VA N TA G E

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

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Tempe Chamber of Commerce

SPECIAL SECTION

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By the Numbers

Survey gives insights on the flexible job market and predictions for 2017.

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Technology

“Driven by Computer” and “A Pathway to Filling Arizona’s Technology Jobs”

Presents

Valley

A Guide to Your Next Great Event

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Healthcare

“Specialized Response to PT Clinic Growth,” “Posture Impacts Productivity,” “Wellness Benefits” and “Wearable Devices Integrate with Wellness Program”

FEATURING Children’s Museum of Phoenix • EMP Management • Merestone • Phoenix Convention Center Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse • Thunderbird Executive Inn

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Meetings & Conventions Guide

FEB. 20 1 7

Legal

How to Set Goals that Deliver Results

Speaker: Joanna Allhands, Arizona Republic Editor You’ve heard the phrase “talk is cheap,” but is that really true? Or are we just talking to each other in the wrong ways? The reality is, talk is valuable — if speakers can use it to break impasses, find consensus and effect positive change. Join Arizona Republic digital opinions editor Joanna Allhands as she offers tips to speaking effectively in a busy, polarized world. Joanna Allhands is The Arizona Republic’s digital opinions editor, which means she oversees opinion content on the web, in video and through social media. Allhands joined The Republic in 2004 as an editorial writer focusing on Mesa and Tempe. She covered the Southeast Valley in various opinion writing and editing roles until 2012, when she moved into her current job. Allhands is an Indiana native, Purdue fan and cold-weather wimp who sees truth in the movie “Office Space.” More importantly, she’s a new mom and proud member of Generation X.

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From the Top

Take Charge America CEO David Richardson drives organizational change and industry-leading services to respond to nation’s student loan crisis and ensure the organization’s viability.

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Roundtable

Think tank argues corporate tax reform is too important for the U.S. economy to be held up for small business interests.

ON THE AGENDA

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Spotlight

Job Fair — Hire Live ‘Vehicle Technology’s Impact on Community Planning and Development’ — Arizona Association for Economic Development

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Calendar

Business events throughout the Valley

A highlight of Arizona Lottery’s fiscal year 2016 is the momentous $206 million transfer to the lottery’s beneficiaries — a 17-percent increase from fiscal year 2015, or nearly $30 million — a result of the record-breaking sales driven by the historic $1.586 billion Powerball. Thanks to the attractive jackpot amount, “Powerball” was the most Googled term in 2016.


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February 2017 In Business Magazine is a collaboration of many business organizations and entities throughout the metropolitan Phoenix area and Arizona. Our mission is to inform and energize business in this community by communicating content that will build business and enrich the economic picture for all of us vested in commerce.

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS Kristen Merrifield, CEO Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits (602) 279-2966 www.arizonanonprofits.org Jack Lunsford, President & CEO Arizona Small Business Association Central Office (602) 306-4000 Southern Arizona (520) 327-0222 www.asba.com Steven G. Zylstra, President & CEO Arizona Technology Council One Renaissance Square (602) 343-8324 www.aztechcouncil.org Doug Bruhnke, Founder & President Global ChamberÂŽ (480) 595-5000 www.globalchamber.org Phaedra Earhart, President NAWBO Phoenix Metro Chapter (480) 289-5768 www.nawbophx.org Anne Gill, President & CEO Tempe Chamber of Commerce (480) 967-7891 www.tempechamber.org Our Partner Organizations are vested business organizations focused on building and improving business in the Valley or throughout Arizona. As Partners, each will receive three insert publications each year to showcase all that they are doing for business and businesspeople within our community. We encourage you to join these and other organizations to better your business opportunities. The members of these and other Associate Partner Organizations receive a subscription to In Business Magazine each month. For more information on becoming an Associate Partner, please contact our publisher at info@inbusinessmag.com.

ASSOCIATE PARTNERS Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce ahwatukeechamber.com Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry azchamber.com Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce azhcc.com The Black Chamber of Arizona phoenixblackchamber.com Chandler Chamber of Commerce chandlerchamber.com Economic Club of Phoenix econclubphx.org Glendale Chamber of Commerce glendaleazchamber.org Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Greater Phoenix Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce gpglcc.org Mesa Chamber of Commerce mesachamber.org North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce northphoenixchamber.com Peoria Chamber of Commerce peoriachamber.com Phoenix Metro Chamber of Commerce phoenixmetrochamber.com Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce scottsdalechamber.com Surprise Regional Chamber of Commerce surpriseregionalchamber.com WESTMARC westmarc.org

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WE PUT SOME OF THE VALLEY’S TOP BUSINESS EXPERTS IN ONE PLACE. Business Resource Center. You need timely, relevant information to help you manage your business. But finding it can be a hassle. That’s why SRP has partnered with local business organizations to bring you professional insights on everything from marketing and human resources to financing and forecasting. All in one place. All from experts in their fields. SRP is happy to provide this free service, because what’s good for business is good for all of us. Learn more at srpbizresource.com.


February 2017

VOL. 8, NO. 2

Read conference calls in real time.

Publisher Rick McCartney

Editor RaeAnne Marsh

Art Director Benjamin Little

Contributing Writers Andrea Aker

Cleveland Brown Tammy Carr Sara Sutton Fell Mike Hunter Vojtek Karpuk Joe Kennedy Richard Tollefson

Now, Deaf and hard of hearing participants can be actively involved in multi-party calls. Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) is free to Arizonans, streaming live text to any Internet-connected computer, tablet or mobile device worldwide.

Steven Zylstra ADVERTISING

Operations Louise Ferrari

Business Development Louise Ferrari

Maria Mabek Kelly Richards Cami Shore

LEARN MORE ABOUT RELAY CONFERENCE CAPTIONING AT ARIZONARCC.COM

Agency: LAVIDGE • Job: 16-AZRELAY-0031 • Client: AZ Relay • Contact: tfritz@lavidge.com Publication: In Business Magazine • Size: 4.875” x 4.875” • 4color

Events Amy Corben

More: Visit your one-stop resource for everything business at www.inbusinessmag.com. For a full monthly calendar of business-related events, please visit our website. Inform Us: Send press releases and your editorial ideas to editor@inbusinessmag.com.

President & CEO Rick McCartney

Editorial Director RaeAnne Marsh

Senior Art Director Benjamin Little

Financial Manager Donna C. Mitchell, CPA

Office Manager Lesia Schneiter

Accounting Manager Todd Juhl Corporate Offices 4455 E. Camelback Road Building C, Suite 135 Phoenix, AZ 85018 T: (480) 588-9505 F: (480) 584-3751 info@inmediacompany.com www.inmediacompany.com Vol. 8, No. 2. In Business Magazine is published 12 times per year by InMedia Company. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to InMedia Company, 4455 E. Camelback Road, Building C, Suite 135, Phoenix, AZ 85018. To subscribe to In Business Magazine, please send check or money order for one-year subscription of $24.95 to InMedia Company, 4455 E. Camelback Road, Building C, Suite 135, Phoenix, AZ 85018 or visit inbusinessmag.com. We appreciate your editorial submissions, news and photos for review by our editorial staff. You June send to editor@inbusinessmag.com or mail to the address above. All letters sent to In Business Magazine will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication, copyright purposes and use in any publication, website or brochure. InMedia accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or other artwork. Submissions will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. InMedia Company, LLC reserves the right to refuse certain advertising and is not liable for advertisers’ claims and/or errors. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of InMedia. InMedia Company considers its sources reliable and verifies as much data as possible, although reporting inaccuracies can occur; consequently, readers using this information do so at their own risk. Each business opportunity and/or investment inherently contains certain risks, and it is suggested that the prospective investors consult their attorney and/ or financial professional. © 2017 InMedia Company, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine June be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission by the publisher.

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LOUIE MOSES; MOSES, INC.

The Art of Marketing

Louie Moses is the creative director and president of Moses, Inc. He founded his agency in 1984 at the tender age of 23. Since its inception, Moses’s agency has built such brands as Joe Boxer, The Phoenician Resort, Arizona Office of Tourism, US Airways, Peter Piper Pizza, Nintendo Wii and Fender. Moses has won every major creative award in the world, from Clios and London International Awards to Addys and Emmys. Communication Arts magazine called Moses, Inc. the most creatively awarded agency in Arizona. Fast Company magazine called him the “Posterchild for creativity.” And Adweek called the agency “Arizona’s Favorite” in 2013. Moses has been selected as Ad Person of the Year and Tourism Person of the Year. He is a member of the Art Director’s Club of New York. And Moses’s little garage band, Random Karma, has opened for national bands like The Flaming Lips, Gin Blossoms and Bret Michaels.

Behind every successful company is a solid connection to its consumer, and that takes effective marketing. It’s the last legal means to gain an unfair advantage over your competition. As a card-carrying creative person, I’ve spent my entire career coming up with ideas and connecting great companies with their consumers. There’s never been a time in our lives when we have more ways to connect and deliver a message, tell a story or just have a conversation. The first 100 years of advertising saw companies talk “to” their consumers. It was really just a monologue. Today, we have the opportunity to have a “dialogue,” and the people can participate. How has that changed marketing? Broadcasting has become narrowcasting, facts are quickly checked, and our collective hearts are open to products and services that enhance our lives. The canvas is huge for all of us creative thinkers to paint on, and I love the choices of ways to tell stories. It also gives us the ability to promote human development and do great work that does good. The perfect blend of art and commerce is really the art of marketing. We’ve never been a more diverse society and that is exactly why marketing campaigns are designed to fit lifestyles, multi-taskers and enthusiasts. For this issue’s cover story, In Business Magazine editor RaeAnne Marsh connected with marketing professionals right here in our Valley whose work can be recognized far beyond our local borders, to share their experience and insights into marketing as a pillar of a business’s operations. This month’s Legal feature addresses another aspect of marketing, giving readers the legal perspective on endorsements, influencer marketing and liability for misleading ads. Real estate is also often a central concern for businesses — from where to locate to how to maintain the facility for optimum productivity. A local authority discusses these issues and more in the feature “Real Estate: The Surprising Cost of Inaction.” Other articles shine a spotlight on the growing phenomenon of flexible work arrangements, challenges of meeting employment needs of the technology sector, risk of fraud in global commerce, and more, as In Business Magazine continues to serve the local business community as a partner in the growth of our economy. A special section in this February issue is the Meetings and Conventions Guide, the Valley’s most comprehensive guide for businesses planning corporate events. It is my pleasure to work with the professionals at In Business Magazine to help bring relevant and useful information to you. I hope you enjoy this issue. Sincerely,

Louie Moses Creative Director, President Moses, Inc.

CONNECT WITH US: Story Ideas/PR: editor@ inbusinessmag.com

Marketing: The Saviour It is true, many businesses see marketing as either the saviour

I want to thank the Valley’s foremost marketing guru, Louie Moses.

or the sorest subject out there. In our industry, we see marketing

He and his company have endured incredible changes and advances

budgets come and go as though it is the most flexible line item

in marketing and technology to achieve a top-notch reputation. He is

in the budget. However, as our experts tell you in our cover story

a leader in our industry and his insight and experience makes him a

this month, marketing is instrumental in creating awareness of

true leader for us as businesspeople to pay close attention to. Many

your product or services. The chief take-away is to mix it up and

changes through technology have added to the complexities for

leverage multiple marketing platforms, including print, digital,

businesses in marketing themselves. Louie provides some profound

social media and more.

advice to us all.

—Rick McCartney, Publisher

Let us know what you think of this issue of In Business Magazine. Email our publisher at feedback@inbusinessmag.com.

Business Events/ Connections: businessevents@ inbusinessmag.com Marketing/Exposure: advertise@ inbusinessmag.com Visit us online at www.inbusinessmag.com

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VALLEY LEADERS SOUND OFF

your company’s marketing strategies, what is a dramatic tactic you tried Q: Regarding in these past two years, and what outcome did you derive from it?

FEEDBACK QUESTION: Let us know what you want to know from the Valley’s top business leaders. editor@inbusinessmag.com

For all past Feedbacks go online to inbusinessmag.com and see what Valley executives think on various business topics.

FEB. 20 1 7

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ROBERT L. “BOB” MEYER

ERIK OLSSON

STEFANIE TELLER

President and CEO Phoenix Children’s Hospital Sector: Healthcare

President and CEO Mobile Mini Sector: Storage

What some may define as a “dramatic” marketing tactic has quickly become common sense for Phoenix Children’s: We are creating instant online communities between parents, patients and care teams. This includes live Facebook Q&A videos with our clinical staff and live Periscope video of surgeries underway at the hospital. Both of these give our audiences a chance to see behind the curtain, and get questions answered in real time by our staff. So far, we use Facebook Live as an avenue for Valley parents to get insider access to our hospital’s best and brightest. They can use the scheduled video sessions as ways to learn about pediatric medical topics (e.g., headaches in children, allergies, etc.) and comment or ask questions however they see fit. More than a dozen patients’ families indicated that watching our live-streamed surgery on Periscope influenced them to come to our hospital for the same procedure. Live social sharing takes the “scary” out of healthcare, and adds a new layer of transparency to the great work underway at Phoenix Children’s.

With 30 years in the storage industry, we understand the importance of market expertise, knowing our customers and maintaining a strong local presence. Our go-to market growth plan is designed around local market potential and current activity. We recently designed and launched a marketing tool that creates real-time zip code level projections for current and known future construction projects. This level of detail drives the deployment of our team, and, as a result, we have created 30 percent more sales territories. Our sales representatives capitalize on our cutting-edge technology to target specific companies and projects within their territories. Depending on the stages of a project and the type of work being performed, we can also predict our customers’ needs, and proactively reach out to existing and potential new customers. The implementation of this sophisticated technology, along with superior customer service from our local teams, has provided our sales force powerful data to identify opportunities, support local partnerships and more effectively service our customers.

Corporate Director of Public Relations & Marketing Sundt Construction, Inc. Sector: Construction

Phoenix Children’s Hospital phoenixchildrens.org Robert L. “Bob” Meyer serves as CEO for Phoenix Children’s Hospital, recognized as a leading children’s hospital for its high volume and quality care. Under his leadership, the organization has clarified its vision for quality, growth and integration. With a focus on bringing care closer to home, Phoenix Children’s has grown from a single campus to offer services in a dozen clinical locations statewide and growing.

Mobile Mini mobilemini.com Erik Olsson, president and chief executive officer, joined Mobile Mini in April 2013. Prior to joining Mobile Mini, Olsson was the president and chief executive officer of RSC Holdings, and has held several global leadership positions in Sweden and Brazil as well as the United States. Olsson earned a degree in Business Administration and Economics from the University of Gothenburg.

Sundt celebrated its 125th anniversary by creating a book featuring the company’s 125 most transformative projects. The process of creating the book was as innovative as the contents. Ideas were suggested by employees and retirees, and we engaged graphic design students from several colleges and universities in a competition to create the look of the book’s five chapters. The winners were awarded scholarships and their bios were included in the book. The book’s 3-D cover was designed and printed by Sundt’s engineers. The book earned Sundt a significant amount of media attention and desired publicity. We hand-delivered copies to our clients, many of whom have projects featured in its pages. “The 125” won a Gold Addy Award from the Phoenix Chapter of the American Advertising Federation. A secondary benefit of creating “The 125” is that it encouraged us to document and preserve our historical projects. That information is now available for use in marketing materials and proposals. “The 125” was a dramatic marketing tactic that successfully furthered employee pride, client relations, publicity and more. Sundt Construction, Inc. sundt.com Stefanie Teller is a communications professional with nearly 20 years of experience developing and executing successful public relations and marketing campaigns, brand management, content strategy, crisis communications, writing and editing, corporate messaging and employee communications. She is a specialist in the architecture/engineering/ construction industry and currently works as Director of Public Relations & Marketing for Sundt Construction, Inc., a full-service general contractor headquartered in Tempe, Arizona.

Sign up for the monthly In Business Magazine eNewsletter at www.inbusinessmag.com. Look for survey questions and other research on our business community.


QUICK AND TO THE POINT

BYTES

Serving Business in the 3-D World

Photo courtesy of Eco3D

Grown in three short years from a few friends working part-time out of a ramada in Papago Park to the largest company of its kind in North American, with 60-plus employees, Eco3d provides a digital model of the physical world — from topographical to structural, mechanical and architectural conditions — for a wide range of clients. The technology that enables this service is Lidar, a surveying method that uses laser light to detect objects and range for digital measurement. “It’s the fastest-known measuring technology on earth,” says Ken Smerz, Eco3d’s president and CEO, adding it provides an accuracy that was previously unattainable. Having a digital model is a benefit to those who work with anything that needs to be measured in applied value — such as architects, engineers and contractors — whether it’s large square-footage or multiple locations, and includes forensic work, providing dimensional data that can be analyzed. For instance, Smerz offers, Starbucks is always updating its assets all across the country. The company also works with owners who see the value of having a 3-D model of their property to replace 2-D blueprints, giving them greater value in analyzing the daily operation, Smerz notes. Lidar’s laser-scanning capability also helps save on labor and material expenses by enabling faster results. Smerz relates that his company did a laser scan of Sky Harbor’s Terminal 3 in just two weeks. While the company also creates 2-D plans for clients, Smerz is most eager to talk about the company’s work in 3-D. In fact, while technology has enabled the digitizing of the physical environment, Smerz attributes his company’s explosive growth to the expectations of the millennial generation — and 3-D gaming in particular. “We live in a 3-D world, but we’ve been drawing like cavemen forever,” he observes.

Smerz also credits the team of people who make up Eco3d, which includes 3-D gamers as well as architects, engineers, surveyors and contractors. And there’s diversity beyond the fields they represent; Smerz says that, while the company does hire local talent, the team currently represents 11 different countries that include Russia, Iran and Mexico. “They seek us out; they’re the type of people who will travel for an opportunity,” he says. “We look for raw talent, then we train them up.” Smerz is eager to let people see what Eco3D does, offering tours even to competitors. A believer in the philosophy “A high tide floats all boats,” Smerz feels there is tremendous room for growth, with only about six percent market penetration at this time. “What we do in measuring our existing physical world will lead to greater use of virtual and augmented reality. It’s the infrastructure for those technologies to further grow.” —RaeAnne Marsh

by Mike Hunter

TURO Rent-A-Car One’s personal picks come to life with Turo — an innovative way for a person to rent exactly what he wants in the exact area he needs the car. The customer simply signs up, finds the car he wants, checks availability … and is on his way. For business or pleasure, this new app and online service can provide an economical and impressive ride for the user. Cars are individually owned and the owners “OK” each request within hours to ensure the ride. Available in most larger cities in the U.S., Turo is quickly becoming a great alternative to the big rental companies where getting what you want can be a hassle. Anyone can list his vehicle for hire very easily by signing up and completing a few steps to qualification and completion. The car owner sets price, availability, etc. Turo covers the car with $1 million in liability insurance and 24/7 roadside assistance throughout the trip, so owners can monetize idle time and just watch the dollars roll in. turo.com

Eco3D eco3dusa.com

Human Capital Maximized iSolved Human Capital Management was designed for today’s employer. Advanced features such as employee self-management, executive dashboard and reports writer are combined to create an incredible user experience, making iSolved a convenient solution for the small to midsized company. From payroll, benefits enrollment, time and attendance to HR data, iSolved is all in one place, anytime, from anywhere. With iSolved’s human resources capabilities, business owners can handle everything from hire to retire. From the simplest payroll to the most complex union reporting, labor distribution or complex tax filings, iSolved makes processing payroll easy while enabling the business owner to more efficiently collect, manage and process employee time and attendance data. isolvedhcm.com

The estimate of U.S. retail e-commerce sales for the third quarter of 2016 was $101.3 billion, an increase of 4.0 percent from the second quarter of 2016 and 15.7 percent from the third quarter of 2015. E-commerce sales in the third quarter of 2016 accounted for 8.4 percent of total sales. —Census Bureau of the U.S. Department of Commerce bit.ly/ec-current

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QUICK AND TO THE POINT

BRING YOUR TEAM LEADERSHIP IS ENGAGEMENT LEADERSHIP IS TEAM BUILDING LEADERSHIP IS INNOVATIVE LEADERSHIP IS EMPOWERING LEADERSHIP IS INFORMING LEADERSHIP IS FOCUSED LEADERSHIP IS INSPIRING LEADERSHIP IS MAKING A DIFFERENCE LEADERSHIP IS FAST PITCH!

E-Fraud Risk in Global Retail Online shopping has become a mainstay for consumers. In 2016, e-commerce spending exceeded $22 trillion. By 2025, an additional 1.8 billion consumers will enter the market, spending an estimated $30 trillion. Because the Internet is a borderless world, international e-commerce is expected to grow significantly in the coming years. In fact, just 40 percent of e-commerce sales in the United States were domestic in 2016. By 2018, the number of cross-border shoppers is predicted to grow by 50 percent. E-commerce merchants who are not looking beyond the domestic market are missing a tremendous opportunity. Consumers are looking for the best deals and products online — regardless of where in the world that search takes them. However, cross-border e-merchants experience fraud costs 22 percent higher than the average multi-channel merchant. U.S. retailers lost $32 billion to fraud in 2014 — a 39-percent increase from 2013 — and international e-commerce merchants have the highest fraud costs as a percentage of annual revenues. Their costs are 85 percent higher than

international merchants that operate physical stores only. As international e-merchants contend with several types of fraud — losses are attributed to friendly fraud (30 percent), lost or stolen merchandise (30 percent) identity theft (22 percent) and fraudulent requests for return/ refund (17 percent) — retailers must address fraud on multiple fronts and use layered solutions. Multi-layered fraud solutions can reduce false positives by roughly 13 percent and cut the average monthly number of successful fraud attempts by more than 50 percent. The most successful merchants in online marketplaces are those with a robust, secure and flexible payment infrastructure, as well as a relationship with a processor that is well-versed in guiding companies through every country’s cross-border policies and requirements. Effective fraud management is every bit as important to a Web-based business’s success as transaction and payment processing. —Cleveland Brown, CEO of global payment processing provider Payscout, Inc. Payscout, Inc. payscout.com

Personal Care Purchases by Mouse BE A LEADER. Team tickets available for SVPAZ Fast Pitch. March 28, 2017 Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts 10 tickets for $650 available at svpaz.org/arizona/fast-pitch Includes a one hour SVPAZ training for your team. #svpfastpitch

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Local startup The Bathroom Sink taps into a niche that spans demographics with a simple premise: People want to save time and cut back on errands. Inspired by co-founder and CEO Joe Doucett unexpectedly running out of toothpaste one morning, The Bathroom Sink helps avoid such inconvenience by predicting when a user will use up a personal care item such as shampoo, deodorant, et cetera. The Bathroom Sink sends an email prompt, and if the member accepts it, he can immediately reorder that product. “Amazon is our retail and delivery partner,” says Doucett, explaining The Bathroom Sink is integrated with Amazon through a program the online giant offers to companies that meet specified criteria. Instead of a car trip to the store, the Bathroom Sink member can refill with the click of a mouse. The Bathroom Sink has its own site populated with assorted products — based on surveys with members and social media, and research into popular items — and the members’ final

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checkout is through Amazon. Additional items may be added to the site, at members’ request, if they are available on Amazon. The program also allows members to plan ahead, calendaring delivery in preparation for anticipated need, such as hosting visiting guests. Currently, only 3 percent of the $50 billion in sales in the personal care industry takes place online, but that is expected to double by 2018 and possibly triple by 2020. The company built up a following organically, mainly through Facebook and Instagram, according to company co-founder, Doucett’s sister Jenna Rutschman, who brought 13 years’ marketing experience to her role in charge of marketing and product development. “It seemed to resonate with people quickly.” —RaeAnne Marsh The Bathroom Sink thebathroomsink.com

Three-dimensional digital representations of the physical world are increasingly in demand in such varied applications as construction of a new development and forensic analysis of disasters.


METRICS & MEASUREMENTS

The Rise of Flexible Working Survey gives insights on the flexible job market and predictions for 2017 by Sara Sutton Fell

It’s undeniable — flexible work options are now offered by employers, sought after by job seekers and utilized by employees. When it comes to flexible work — telecommuting, flexible schedules, professional part-time work or freelancing — there are several things businesses should know about the rise of flexible work, and predictions for 2017 and beyond. The big picture of just how far work flexibility has come is more clearly understood when comparing today’s participation in flexible work options with that of 10 years ago. In the U.S. in 2007, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 9 percent of employed people worked from home occasionally. Today, it’s 38 percent. The BLS also reported in 2007 that 7 percent of workers had freelanced; that number is now 34 percent. And in 2007, the BLS found that 25 percent of workers in the U.S. had flexible schedules. Today? 64 percent say their employers will accommodate flexible work schedules. Additionally, the vast majority of companies in the U.S. — 80 percent — currently offer flexible work arrangements of one kind or another.

DO BUSINESSES BENEFIT?

Aside from offering employees better work-life balance, how do businesses benefit from offering flexible work? Fifty-eight percent of U.S. companies report increased profits from flexible work. And there is a host of related benefits. These include improved productivity, reduced turnover and absenteeism, a more diverse candidate pool and workforce, improved operational continuity during emergencies, and a lessened environmental impact.

Most Popular Flexible Work Options

WHERE ARE THESE FLEXIBLE JOBS?

FlexJobs’ data in 2016 showed that these 10 categories — in this order — had the most flexible job openings over the course of the year: medical & health, customer service, administrative, sales, computer & IT, education & training, accounting & finance, project management, software development, and data entry. And over the last 10 years, these categories have remained fairly consistent, offering a large number of flexible work options.

BIGGEST TRENDS IN FLEXIBLE WORK TO WATCH IN 2017

Reduced and Flexible Work Hours: Sixty-three percent of workers say they expect the standard eight-hour workday will be obsolete. The Gig Economy: Among people who currently hold a “traditional” job, more than half think they’ll be out on their own within five years. Flexible Work Legislation: 1 Million for Work Flexibility is tracking the rise in legislation related to flexible work, in the U.S. and abroad. Cities, states and countries (including New Zealand, Germany, the United Kingdom, Vermont, New Hampshire and San Francisco) are enacting laws that give workers the right to request flexible work options, and protect flexible workers from related discrimination. Flexible work is clearly on the rise. And, while most companies offer flexible work options, the smartest employers are designing work flexibility programs that align with business goals, tracking results and ROI, and making the most of this new way of working.

Most Popular Flexible Career Fields

Remote Job Categories on the Rise

Every year for the past five years, FlexJobs

These are the top 10 career fields selected

An analysis of more than 100,000 job

has surveyed thousands of job seekers to

by FlexJobs members when filling out

listings in the 50-plus job categories in

find out why work flexibility is important

their resume profiles on the site in 2016.

FlexJobs’ database identified five of the job

to them and what they’re looking for. In

Employers, take note — these fields are

categories where the number of remote

2016, when asked to choose which types of

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flexibility they’re most interested in, survey

work flexibility:

(20 percent or more) from January to

respondents said:

1. Data Entry

December 2016.

1. Telecommuting (86 percent)

2. Administrative

• Project Management

2. Flexible schedule (73 percent)

3. Writing

• Accounting & Finance

3. Partial telecommuting (49 percent)

4. Editing

• Computer & IT

4. Part-time (48 percent)

5. Customer Service

• HR & Recruiting

5. Alternative schedule (48 percent)

6. Project Management

• Research

6. Freelance (44 percent)

7. Computer & IT 8. Education & Training 9. Account Management 10. Marketing

The percentage of workers in “alternative work arrangements” rose only slightly in the decade from 1995 to 2005, from 9.3 percent to 10.1 percent. The following decade, from 2005 to 2015, showed a more dramatic increase, to 15.8 percent.

Sara Sutton Fell is CEO and founder of FlexJobs, a leading online service for professionals seeking telecommuting, flexible schedule, part-time and freelance jobs, with flexible job listings in more than 50 career categories and opportunities ranging from entry-level to executive and freelance to full-time. Fell has also launched two additional partner sites, Remote.co (remote.co) and 1 Million for Work Flexibility workflexibility.org), to help provide education and awareness about the viability and benefits of remote working and work flexibility. Sutton Fell is also the creator of The TRaD Works Conference (trad.works), dedicated to helping companies leverage the benefits of telecommuting, remote and distributed teams. flexjobs.com

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INNOVATIONS FOR BUSINESS

TECH NOTES

by Mike Hunter

Driven by Computer My test ride last month in a self-driving car was boringly uneventful — which is exactly what the goal was. Waymo’s cars first hit the streets last April after logging one billion miles in a simulator where common and uncommon scenarios were imagined and tested, aiming to program the cars to drive like a responsible adult and not careen like a ride at Disneyland. One billion miles can cover a lot of situations, but real life can still throw some unexpected ones in front of the car. Waymo’s cars now have more than 2.5 million miles on our city’s streets, proving their viability as well as collecting even more experience. The test crew’s favorite story is one of their cars coming upon a wheelchair-bound woman in the middle of the road chasing a duck with a broom. While that specific event was unforeseen, the car’s artificial intelligence had been “taught” to pause for oncoming cars and other moving objects in the road, and processed this situation with those criteria — and safely paused until this moving object was out of the road. Each car is equipped with three sensors that provide the data it uses to guide its reactions. Cameras allow it to recognize shapes and colors of traffic controls such as stop signs and traffic lights. Radar, which can see around objects for 360 degrees around the car, provides information on how fast other objects are moving and in what direction. And the laser system Lidar gives a three-dimensional version of the real world, allowing an exact understanding of dimensions, such as how high a curb is and whether a human form is likely an adult or a child. The system is programmed to put that data into context, predicting, for instance, the potential that a child or dog might run into the street after a ball, and what conditions might result from the appearance of traffic cones in the roadway. Other factors that come into play in real-world driving include local traffic laws and even the nuances of local driving habits. And the car not only judges what other vehicles and living beings potentially may do, but communicates to them its own potential moves — not just all the legally required turn signals but also “nudging forward” to hint its movement before accelerating from a stop. waymo.com

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A Pathway to Filling Arizona’s Technology Jobs In March 2015, President Barack Obama announced the TechHire initiative as a way to build a pipeline of tech talent for bringing new jobs to local economies, facilitating business growth and giving residents a pathway to the middle class. The key behind the effort is, the talent comes from the training and placement of undereducated youths ages 18 to 29 into the technology field. The ultimate goal is to provide a steady workforce in areas of great need in the technology sector while reducing unemployment among these youths. Led by the Arizona Commerce Authority and the Arizona Technology Council, Arizona seized on the initiative and created a coalition of top organizations and resources. They include the Arizona Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO); workforce investment groups supported by Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act funds in Pima, Cochise and Maricopa counties; Pima, Cochise and Maricopa community colleges; Arizona State University; The University of Arizona; University of Advancing Technology; Goodwill; Chicanos Por La Causa; Salvation Army; and Tucson Urban League. Arizona has been recognized as one of 50 TechHire communities, but didn’t receive a federal grant. Not receiving the funds didn’t deter us from moving forward. We vowed to use existing resources from each organization to carry on the activities we could economically manage. I was recently invited to represent Arizona at the first TechHire Summit held at the White House. The summit brought TechHire communities from around the country together to share their experiences. My key takeaway was, the biggest roadblock to success is getting technology companies to trust and hire new trainees from TechHire job training programs. The simple reason for this challenge is that organizations are focused on running efficiently and innovating tomorrow’s products and services. The onboarding, hiring and training process, especially with undereducated youths, takes a lot of resources. Many businesses feel that, despite a need for talent, the risk of bringing in an inexperienced technology professional is more of a time investment than it can afford. We are tackling this issue by leveraging the TechHire coalition’s existing relationships to help hiring organizations understand the bigger picture. Together, we can establish the message

that the long-term impact of this initiative will vastly improve Arizona’s economy because it reduces unemployment and gives citizens with limited prospects chances for lucrative careers in technology. Companies such as AmEx, GoDaddy, Charles Schwab and Logicalis are already hiring undereducated youths from programs similar to TechHire, such as Year Up. This gives hope we can overcome the challenges of getting the privatesector technology companies engaged. Arizona has one major advantage over other TechHire communities: We formed this coalition as a state while most communities joined as a county or city. This gives us the backing of organizations across Arizona and a plethora of resources to leverage. The fact that the Arizona state government has also lent its support provides possible incentives for organizations to participate. As the economic development and workforce opportunity organizations in our TechHire coalition slowly integrate the programs to identify talent and begin training, it’s up to the rest of the coalition to solidify the message. Together, we are confident we can make a difference and open our middle class to those who otherwise might be left behind. —Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council. Zylstra is responsible for strategy, operations and accomplishment of the council’s policy development. A vocal spokesman for the value that technology can provide in raising social and economic standards in Arizona, he has served in numerous technology advisory roles to Arizona governors and currently serves on several association, industry and community boards. Arizona Technology Council aztechcouncil.org

Steven Zylstra represented Arizona at the first TechHire Summit, held in Washington, D.C., this past December. The TechHire initiative was announced by President Barack Obama in March 2015 as a way to build a pipeline of tech talent for bringing new jobs to local economies, facilitating business growth and giving residents a pathway to the middle class.


YOUR BENEFIT IN BUSINESS

Specialized Response to PT Clinic Growth Emma Kingston’s recent launch of PT Clinic Marketing after two year’s success with AZ Healthcare Marketing is a response to the growth of that specialized facet of the healthcare industry. “The more I was engaged in the medical community, the more I saw that [physical therapy] clinics are really taking off, and changing the way they practice,” she says. The growing #ChoosePT movement is rebranding physical therapy clinics to be a first choice that patients can go to without first getting a referral from their primary care physician, and that can help people be pain-free without drugs. “Therapists are highly educated in their field,” Kingston notes. “They are not just a service; they are medical practitioners, so you can rely on them for advice.” AZ Healthcare Marketing, focused in Arizona, works with physician practices to create a custom website as part of its full Web service. Its wholly owned subsidiary PT Clinic Marketing — with websites designed specifically for physical, speech and occupational therapy practices and which Kingston plans to expand globally — is more the semi-custom field, enabling the clinic to get its site

by Mike Hunter

Wellness Benefits MJ Insurance has added a new position of wellness coordinator to its Arizona benefits consulting team, charged with developing and employing wellness initiatives for its clientele. Bringing experience and education in wellness and exercise to this new position, Amanda Marenghi will use data-driven strategies to provide them with the necessary tools and understanding to deliver a well-rounded program to their employees that takes into account the unique culture and work environment of each business.

set up and running in two weeks and at considerably less expense. Explains Kingston, “We have content and structure; they can add their own photos and text.” Key aspects of the design are making sure the website is easy to navigate, is mobile friendly, and has the crucial HIPAA-aware elements. “PT clinics are marketing to the community, and going to social media more,” Kingston says. She emphasizes that physical therapy clinics — and medical marketing in general — must be very aware of HIPAA codes, from encrypted contact forms to using a secured server. —RaeAnne Marsh AZ Healthcare Marketing azhealthcaremarketing.com PT Clinic Marketing ptclinicmarketing.com

Posture Impacts Productivity A new product addresses a health and productivity issue that affects a large segment of the workforce – poor posture. The UpRight Trainer is a small wearable that attaches to the upper or lower back and employs advanced smart sensors to vibrate gently when the user slouches, reminding him to correct his posture and, ultimately, training him to improve his posture. UpRight recently released the results of its Corporate Wellness Initiative, conducted in partnership with Ernst & Young Israel. By introducing healthy posture habits into the workplace through training with UpRight, findings show improved employee health, productivity and mood. After just a few weeks of consistent training with UpRight, 75 percent of E&Y Israel employees participating in the study experienced improved posture and decreased back pain. As a result of improved posture habits from training with UpRight, more than half of the participants felt more productive and alert while at work. Nearly half of the adult labor force in America suffers from head, back or neck pain, which negatively impacts their enjoyment of life

WELL WELL WELL

With more than a decade of experience offering onsite and near-site consulting — including feasibility analysis, integration of wellness programs, strategies to maximize clinic utilizations and data integration with its proprietary analytical tools — MJ Insurance is also in the process of developing a population health solution that will soon be integrated with its analytics platform and wellness offering. mjinsurance.com

Wearable Devices Integrate with Wellness Program Last year, UnitedHealthcare and Qualcomm introduced UnitedHealthcare Motion as a pilot program that integrates new wearable devices with wellness programs and allows people to earn financial rewards for being active. The program was built around Qualcomm Life’s 2net™ Platform* for medical-grade connectivity that features multiple safeguards to help keep data secure. Following the successful test, the program has been expanded to 40 states – which includes Arizona – and will now include access to additional customized activity trackers through a “bring-your-

and ability to work. The estimated cost to U.S. employers from lost working days and reduced productivity for back pain alone is more than $7 billion per year, and more than 70 percent of these costs come from exacerbation of existing problems. It is recognized that employers can foster cost-saving and life-saving behavioral changes by empowering their workforce with appropriate tools and training. Employees benefit from being supported to prioritize their physical wellbeing, and a healthier staff provides huge long-term financial benefits and immediate cost savings. —Mike Hunter UpRight uprightpose.com

own-device” (BYOD) model. The program is now available to self-funded employers with five or more eligible employees and companies with fully insured health plans with 101 or more eligible employees. All UnitedHealthcare Motion devices enable employees to earn up to $4 per day in deductible credits based on F.I.T. goals, which stands for frequency of walking goals (six times per day with 300 steps within five minutes at least one hour apart), intensity (3,000 steps within 30 minutes) and tenacity (10,000 total steps each day). Employers can obtain premium savings based on program participants’ combined F.I.T. results. Studies show people who consistently achieve the F.I.T. goals tend to improve their health and reduce their medical expenses. qualcomm.com • uhc.com

Media Planet reported that, according to technology consultancy Endeavors Partners, employers are expected to incorporate more than 13 million wearable and fitness tracking devices into their wellness programs by 2018. bit.ly/workplace-wearable

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MINDING THEIR BUSINESS

David Richardson: Shifting Course to Meet Evolving Needs Take Charge America CEO drives organizational change, industry-leading services to respond to nation’s student loan crisis and ensure the organization’s viability by Linda Capcara

TAKE CHARGE AMERICA STUDENT LOAN COUNSELING: BY THE NUMBERS • $450 average monthly payment reduction • 69% enrolled in Income-Driven repayment plans • 75% consolidated multiple federal loans into one loan • 26% qualified for Public Service Loan Forgiveness This information is according to latest figures from 2016.

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For nearly 30 years, nonprofit credit counseling and debt management agencies such as Phoenix-based Take Charge America have helped consumers nationwide repay millions in credit card debt while educating them about the path to longterm financial independence. The core of the business model has remained largely the same, yet with the introduction of newer technologies and efficiencies that allow counselors to meet the needs of more people. It may seem counterintuitive, but the Great Recession threw the industry its largest curve ball. While excessive credit card debt was a major challenge, it wasn’t necessarily the primary financial challenge for many individuals and families. Increased college tuition, coupled with diminished state funding for universities, resulted in young adults taking out student loans at record levels. They also graduated into an economy with few job opportunities and few means to repay the loans. Traditional credit counseling didn’t meet the needs of this growing sector of student loan borrowers who were overwhelmed by the complexities of the repayment process. It was a “Wild West” of sorts, with misinformation abundant online and few unbiased resources for advice. The need for objective guidance was clear, yet the best course of action to serve these borrowers wasn’t, says Take Charge America CEO David Richardson. “All debt is not the same. We had a highly experienced team of credit counselors who were experts at navigating the credit card world, not the student loan world, which came with completely different parameters, players and regulations.” Richardson was faced with one of the agency’s largest operational decisions, just a year into his role at the helm. For the first time in decades the agency had to shift course, requiring new counselor skillsets and training, new regulatory considerations and entrance into a completely new market. Success in this effort would require a significant financial investment and an organization-wide commitment to reallocating time and resources — both of which are limited for nonprofits of any size. Failure in this effort could drain resources too much, impacting the viability of credit counseling and the organization as a whole. “This move was risky. We didn’t have a blueprint to follow and were unsure how the public would respond. Identifying a need and pinpointing a solution are two different things,” says Richardson. “However, we knew we had to respond to the evolving needs of consumers. That’s core to our mission as a financial education agency.” Richardson planted the seeds for a nationwide student loan counseling service in 2013. By this time, U.S. student loan debt topped $1 trillion and even eclipsed credit card debt levels — a trend that continues.

Richardson directed the development of a new business plan, tapped external resources to avoid overwhelming current employees’ workloads, and allocated funding to trial various approaches and fee structures for the counseling. He also proactively invested in new counselor training focusing on federal student loans specifically. With some experimentation, the service took shape over the following months, and was fine-tuned over the following years. “We learned a lot in the early days and discovered we couldn’t simply replicate the credit counseling process. Student loan borrowers had different needs, acquired the debt differently, and worked with servicers who operated by different rules,” he shares. “There were also many fly-by-night companies that tried to make a quick buck off struggling borrowers. We had to differentiate ourselves from this pack and promote ourselves as advocates who solely acted in clients’ best interests.” To help advance the industry as a whole and instill more public trust, Take Charge America packaged these learnings into counseling protocols that it shared with the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, of which it is a member. The learnings have since been distributed across numerous agencies in a move to establish industry best practices. Fast forward to today. Some 44 million Americans owe nearly $1.3 trillion in student loans, according to the Federal Reserve. What’s more, the U.S. Department of Education reports that more than 40 percent of all borrowers are late or in default. “We’ve found a model that works and is helping student loan borrowers identify the right repayment paths for their situations,” said Richardson. “But as you can see, we’re just getting started. The need for comprehensive, unbiased student loan counseling is growing daily.” Richardson’s initiative to launch the new service is paying off for consumers and the organization alike. Take Charge America has counseled thousands of borrowers nationwide, and it has developed a partnership with a major university to assist troubled borrowers. The service line helps the agency avoid stagnation and offers a new path for growth, all while better assisting consumers with their debt problems. Take Charge America takechargeamerica.org

According to the Institute for College Access & Success, seven in 10 seniors who graduated from public and nonprofit colleges in 2015 had student loan debt, with an average of $30,100 per borrower. In Arizona, 56 percent of seniors graduated with an average of $23,780 in debt.


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LAW MATTERS TO BUSINESS

Endorsements, Testimonials and the FTC

Businesses need to be alert as to how endorsements and testimonials can get them in trouble with the FTC by Vojtek “VK” Karpuk

Vojtek “VK” Karpuk is an attorney with Jennings, Strouss & Salmon, P.L.C. He focuses his practice on corporate and securities law, intellectual property law, government relations and advertising law. jsslaw.com

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The fast-forward button on a DVR and other advancements make it easier for consumers to avoid advertisements on traditional media platforms, leading more and more businesses to rely on endorsements, testimonials and reviews on social media platforms to market their products and services. While favorable reviews of an advertiser’s product on Twitter or a picture of a celebrity holding the advertiser’s product in an Instagram message can benefit the advertiser, recent Federal Trade Commission enforcement actions, including the recent settlement with Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, Inc., should serve as a reminder and a warning that the FTC will continue to undertake enforcement activity against businesses, their advertising agencies and public relations firms that fail to comply with the Commission’s rules governing advertisements. The FTC is the federal agency tasked with the responsibility of enforcing consumer protection laws. The primary statute relied upon by the FTC in this area is the FTC Act, a federal law that contains a very broad prohibition of the use of “unfair or deceptive acts or practices” in sales methods, advertising claims, and marketing and promotional activities. However, the FTC is not alone. Consumer advocacy groups are also monitoring advertisements on social media sites for unfair and deceptive practices, and reporting the responsible parties to the FTC. As with other forms of advertising, endorsements and testimonials must be truthful and not misleading, and they must contain claims that are substantiated. Endorsements and testimonials must also reflect the honest findings, opinions and experiences of the endorser. The FTC has taken, and will continue to take, action against advertisers who fail to clearly and conspicuously disclose any material connection between the advertiser and the endorser that would affect how the consumer evaluates the endorsement or testimonial. A material connection can involve an advertiser paying for an endorsement, offering free merchandise or providing early access to its products. A material connection can also arise from the expectation of some benefit in the future, such as receiving a sweepstakes entry for a chance to win a cash prize in exchange for a favorable endorsement made in a social media post. A material connection that may be less obvious, but equally important, involves statements made on social media sites by

an advertiser’s employees or by the employees of its ad agency or public relations firm. For example, if a company encourages its employees to promote its product, or that company’s ad agency asks its employees to generate excitement on social media sites about its client’s product, then the company and the ad agency must inform their respective employees to clearly and conspicuously disclose their connections to the company to comply with the disclosure requirements. Failure to disclosure material connections is what triggered the FTC’s action against Warner Bros. According to the FTC’s complaint, Warner Bros. deceived consumers during a marketing campaign for its video game by failing to adequately disclose that it paid online “influencers” thousands of dollars, provided the influencers with a free advance copy of the video game, and told the influencers how to promote the game. An advertiser can be held liable for false or misleading statements its employees or other individuals make about the advertiser’s products or services on social media sites. To mitigate potential liability, an advertiser should establish policies to educate its social media affiliates, endorsers and employees on proper advertising standards to ensure that all advertisements are truthful, not likely to mislead, substantiated, and contain clear and conspicuous disclosures, including disclosures regarding any material connections between the advertiser and the endorser. Finally, the advertiser should monitor and review its social media affiliates, endorsers and employees to ensure they comply with the advertiser’s policies, and take appropriate action to correct any non-compliance. The FTC’s 2009 Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising and the Commission’s Endorsement Guides: What People Are Asking (updated in 2015) provide helpful information for advertisers and endorsers. Both guides are available on the FTC’s website (www.ftc.gov). This article is intended to be an overview of the issues discussed herein. It is not intended as legal advice and should not be relied upon as such. It is recommended that individuals or businesses engaged in, or considering, a digital advertising campaign consult with legal counsel who is familiar with the relevant legal requirements of the given industry and, specifically, the advertisement of the given products or services.

In 2015, the Federal Trade Commission imposed civil penalties totaling to $21.8 million, and 844,036 consumers received compensation totaling more than $22.3 million. ftc.gov • ftc.gov/node/943403


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Marketing aTheBusiness real story to success


There are new twists in the age-old effort to attract customers by RaeAnne Marsh Behind every successful company is ‌ a great product or service? Well, yes, that helps. But the more basic ingredient is a great story about that great product or service. And that’s marketing.


It starts with defining the objective, says Jenavi Kasper, vice president and marketing manager at National Bank of Arizona. Is it brand awareness or trying to drive a specific action, such as driving traffic to the company’s website? “An awareness campaign is going to look very different from a campaign in which your objective is a measurable ROI,” she points out. Defining the goals — and, along with that, determining a budget — enables a company to choose the optimum media mix for a campaign, so as to, ultimately, maximize ROI. “After establishing specific campaign goals, it’s vital to identify your target audience and conduct research. Learn as much as you can about your audience, especially where and how they like to consume information,” advises Veronique James, founder and CEO of Scottsdale-based The James Agency. Armed with that information, a company can focus its efforts and dollars on the outlets that are most likely to reach the campaign’s target demographic. Underscoring that point, Matthew Clyde, president and founder of Phoenix-based agency Ideas Collide, notes, “Today’s consumer is in control and more savvy than ever before.” For a company to really engage and be a leading, its marketing strategy must start with knowing and understanding the consumer it needs to reach and influence — then, from there, it can customize. marketing strategies and programs to resonate and make an impact. “There isn’t a simple check list anymore,” he emphasizes.

“It requires detailed planning, research and execution. The more customized and targeted your marketing strategies are to you and your brand, the more your product/service will resonate and excel.” Video can be a striking element of a marketing campaign. In fact, there are those who assert that “video content is king,” according to Jim Manley. But the CEO of film company Manley Films & Media notes the crucial ingredient is a compelling story. “Our clients’ brands and image are everything to them. So their video marketing content must reflect that.” In order to “get” them, he says, “From the second we begin working with them, we listen. Then we listen some more. We have to understand their unique message and then convey that through video storytelling.” It’s also important that the message be consistent. An example Manley cites is the series of videos his company recently put together for the Fiesta Bowl organization. “From TV commercials to social media videos highlighting their charity work to press conferences to parade and gameday festivities, every video was unique. But, every single story carried the Fiesta Bowl branding and what I call their heartbeat. The viewer can look at any one of those 34 videos and see a consistent look throughout and a consistent message of, ‘Hey, this is an organization that cares deeply about Arizona and making it a better place to live.’”

“An awareness campaign is going to look very different from a campaign in which your objective is a measurable ROI” —Jenavi Kasper Vice President and Marketing Manager National Bank of Arizona

Ten ‘Most Important’ Marketing Strategies These are among varied options that businesses can choose in developing a comprehensive plan. Veronique James, founder and CEO of The James Agency, addresses this from the perspective of an agency that works with varied client businesses. 1. W  ebsite: Develop a site that is responsive and optimized. 2. S  earch Engine Optimization: Conduct keyword research and ensure that your website content is well-written and specific.  3. Email Marketing: Create an organic list of opted-in users from other marketing channels, and develop an email calendar.  4. Digital Advertising: Run targeted ads across multiple digital channels, such as search ads, display marketing and native advertising.  5. Traditional Advertising: Utilize print, radio, TV and out-of-home.  6. Public Relations: Develop a public relations calendar that includes editorial opportunities and company news; write and distribute press materials; develop a targeted media list; and strategically pitch media, monitor and share earned coverage.  7. Social Media: Claim standardized usernames, develop monthly content calendars, regularly engage with followers and consider paid social media. 8. Video: Tell your brand story through engaging and relatable visual content.  9. Strategic Brand Alignment: Partner with organizations that share your brand’s values and target demographic.  10. Special Events: Gain community attention and media coverage by holding groundbreaking ceremonies, grand openings, anniversary celebrations, etc.  —Veronique James

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Staying Agile “Marketing agility is about being flexible, fast and responsive to changes in the marketplace and consumer behavior.” —Veronique James Founder and CEO The James Agency

“In today’s fast-paced digital world, it’s more important than ever to continually evaluate the effectiveness of your marketing campaign and adjust when necessary,” James says. An overall marketing plan is important to provide a framework, but she notes it should be viewed as an outline rather than something set in stone. “Marketing agility is about being flexible, fast and responsive to changes in the marketplace and consumer behavior.” That, of course, requires knowledge of how the campaign is doing in reaching its objectives. Manley notes that, for television, if there’s a call to action in a commercial (“And, hopefully, there is”), those calls or website clicks can be tracked and traced back to the commercial. Analytics tools available to business owners are numerous and, James points out, many are free. One that she describes as simple to install is Google Analytics, which tells business owners where website traffic is coming from and identifies the marketing channels that result in the most conversions and lowest acquisition costs. There’s an old saying that “you can find statistics to support anything.” So it’s important that businesses view the analytic data in the appropriate context — and that other professionals they hire are doing so as well. Cautions Kasper, “First, if you hire an agency or

a consultant, you need to make sure you are invested in the process. Nobody knows your business, your customer or your market better than you. Second, you need to be available to articulate what your business goals are so you and your marketing team know how to measure success. You won’t be able to know if your marketing efforts are successful if you never knew what you were trying to achieve in the first place.” As Manley puts it, “Tracking response is something that must be part of the mindset from the get-go.” To start a new campaign, he pushes clients to define the audience, set goals and write down desired outcomes — and then he builds the script, storyboard and shoot around those goals and expectations. In analyzing the videos’ efficacy, he says the most basic measurements are views or impressions, which give an idea of how many times a video was played. “Keep in mind, lots of rallying effort around a video helps drive those metrics up,” he says, noting that one of the Fiesta Bowl Charities’ most successful videos was supplemented with great media coverage. Speaking from his experience with video, her says, “We can track performance, acquire data and make tweaks to campaigns within hours of releasing a video if necessary. That’s agility.”

Jenavi Kasper, vice president and marketing manager at National Bank of Arizona, approaches this from the perspective of a company focused on its own business. Interestingly, they share the same view of No. 1. 1. M  ake sure your website is easy to navigate, has the information your customers are looking for and is responsive, so it looks good no matter the device. 2. Be your authentic self and don’t be afraid to tell your story — customers are savvy enough to know when you’re using “marketing speak.” Don’t try to be everything to everyone. 3. Know your goals before you spend any money or time on marketing or advertising. 4. Leverage customer testimonials and utilize the content on your website and social media. 5. Be consistent with your message and your channels. Don’t spread yourself too thin. 6. Keep on top of consumer trends in your industry. You need to be wherever your customers are. 7. Utilize a diverse marketing channel mix. Don’t just send an email or pay for a print ad. You need to get in front of your audience multiple times through multiple channels with the same exact message several times before it will begin to resonate. 8. Be accessible to your employees and your customers. Accessibility is what builds creditably, and people won’t trust what they don’t perceive to be credible. 9. Articulate your value proposition. What is the one thing you offer no one else does? What do you do best? 10. Don’t forget about the basics. Know your audience, know your message, and be true to yourself. —Jenavi Kasper

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Keeping Balance with Technology “No matter how often or how fast technology changes, one thing has always remained the same. Since the caveman days, storytelling has ruled.” —Jim Manley CEO Manley Films & Media

“As technology continues to evolve, it can be daunting to try to keep up,” James says, acknowledging the challenge business owners face. Speaking as an agency to businesses, she adds, “While it’s important to stay on top of the trends, business owners need to remember that not all tech innovations and social media platforms are pertinent to every business.” And that is not just a rationalization for the sake of small-business owners with limited resources. Kasper makes the same point for National Bank of Arizona: “You don’t need to be on every social media site or new bit of technology — you only need to be where your customers are.” With that, however, she also believes there is a basic level of online presence necessary to any business, which starts with its website and includes managing reviews and its online reputation. Whether it’s due to relevance or expertise, most companies can’t utilize every platform well. James suggests that business owners focus their efforts, instead, on technology that directly impacts their business and resonates with their clientele. “Read news articles, stay up to date on industry trends and be an early adopter of tech developments that have the opportunity to affect your bottom line. For instance, if you’re a restaurant brand, consider third-party delivery services like UberEATS or Amazon Prime Now.” Says Manley, “No matter how often or how fast technology changes, one thing has always remained the same. Since the caveman days, storytelling has ruled.” Applying that observation to his medium, he says,

“You don’t need to be on every social media

“We can track performance, acquire data and

site or new bit of technology — you only

make tweaks to campaigns within hours of

need to be where your customers are.”

releasing a video if necessary. That’s agility.”

—Jenavi Kasper

“After establishing specific campaign goals, it’s vital to identify your target audience and conduct research. Learn as much as you can about your audience, especially where and how they like to consume information” —Veronique James

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“A memorable story that compels those who watch it to take action is and always should be the number one goal of marketing.” But always with a well-thought-out campaign. “Simply ‘spraying’ video content around your various digital channels won’t produce results.” It’s indisputable, however, that technology — and the social media explosion it has spawned — has resulted in a world that is increasingly interconnected. People can access information from almost anywhere in the world. “For companies that sell their products online,” James says — also pointing out the percent of total sales made online is increasing year over year — “and have a global reach, this is especially valuable.”  Addressing the point that, to be a strategic marketer and relevant brand, a company needs to remain connected to the global marketplace, Clyde notes, “Often, emerging or disruptive services come from other countries and regions.” Whatever a company’s brand or business may be, it’s important that its decision makers be aware and draw insight from how their brand may be impacted — globally, nationally and locally. “Currently, we are seeing this with conversational commerce and how other markets are using bots and messenger platforms to conduct commerce,” says Clyde. He notes that, although this is now emerging here with Amazon Echo and Google Home, it has been on the radar for many years prior in other regions. “Conversational commerce is now impacting brands from local business merchants to larger institutions.”

—Jim Manley

“...between 80 and 70 percent of millennials prefer to spend their hard-earned cash on socially conscious brands and true authentic experiences, rather than on material goods.” —Matthew Clyde

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


Consumer Research “The more brands can be transparent and give details on their product and service, the more the brand can engage, grow and win in the modern marketplace.” —Matthew Clyde Founder and President Ideas Collide

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

As much as businesses are into researching their target consumer, consumers are returning the compliment. Says Kasper, “It’s getting to the point now where customers won’t make a purchasing decision before they go online and research any given product or service.” It is well recognized that this is especially true for the important demographic of the millennial and digital native generations. Observing that information contained in editorial content is more powerful than any print ad could ever be, Kasper says, “Your customer expects to be able to find reviews and feedback from past customers, especially if you are a B2C company.” Companies can provide such information on their own review sites or social media sites, so Kasper suggests, “Don’t be afraid to ask satisfied clients for their testimonial. And don’t be afraid to let your customers know the people behind the business and talk about how what you do makes a positive impact in the community.” Technology may have changed the medium of the message, the ease of sharing it, and the extent of its reach, but marketing professionals agree that positive and strong word of mouth is still at the foundation of any marketing strategy. “Consumers trust content and reviews from family, friends and even strangers more so than they trust the brands themselves,” Clyde explains. “The more brands can be transparent and give details on their product and service, the more the brand can engage, grow and win in the modern marketplace.” James offers a brief history of how marketing has attempted to influence consumers’ purchase decisions: For many years, the first touch point that brands had with consumers was out of home or direct marketing campaigns. The next step was in store, on the shelf, or at the point of sale, coined the First Moment of Truth. Now, purchasing decisions are made well before consumers visit a store. Today, there is a new moment that falls between initial advertisement and the point of sale, known as the Zero Moment of Truth. During this phase, consumers are reading reviews online, asking friends for advice on social media and comparing prices. Because of the high value consumers place on authenticity, social media, native advertising and

influencer marketing have become increasingly important pieces of any successful marketing plan, James explains. “Millennials are constantly connected and value the ability to interact with brands. Be sure to claim standardized usernames across all social media platforms, establish a consistent posting schedule and regularly engage with followers to help establish your brand’s credibility. Forming partnerships with social media influencers also can help build trust in your brand.” Another element consumers — especially millennials — are looking at is a business’s social consciousness. In fact, says Clyde, “Depending on the source, from Forbes Magazine to CNBC, between 80 and 70 percent of millennials prefer to spend their hard-earned cash on socially conscious brands and true authentic experiences, rather than on material goods.” Put another way, millennials are more likely to patronize companies that give back. “So, if you’re interested in targeting millennial customers, it’s smart to align your business with a social cause,” James says. Charitable giving has value in and of itself, but businesses are finding they can coordinate their giving with a cause that directly relates to their business and resonates with their customers. “For instance,” she says, “if you own a restaurant, partner with a local food bank on a campaign. If your clientele is predominantly female, work with a women’s shelter or women’s health organization to help share your message. Find ways to allow your customers to be an active part of your give back campaign, such as donating a percentage of profits or hosting an event.”  Observing that attentive customer service and brands’ embracing of a strong-social conscious agenda is essential in winning over a new, powerful consumer demographic, Clyde notes, “The key to earning their loyalty by being authentic and stimulating a positive social response.” Ideas Collide ideascollide.com The James Agency thejamesagency.com Manley Films & Media manleyfilms.com National Bank of Arizona nbarizona.com

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OUR SUBJECT IN-DEPTH

Tammy Carr is a principal with Mortenson, a national leader in building, development and real estate optimization services, leading its business development efforts in the Arizona marketplace. With more than 18 years’ project experience spanning multiple markets — including municipal, healthcare, manufacturing, industrial, hospitality and corporate sectors — she mentors the team on business acquisition and clear, consistent and effective messaging. Among the numerous Valley organizations with which she is involved are NAIOP Commercial Real Estate Development Association, Greater Phoenix Economic Council, Urban Land Institute’s Women’s Leadership Initiative and Arizona Association for Economic Development. Among her industry awards is NAIOP’s 2014 Principal Member of the Year. mortenson.com

Editor’s note: For links to the studies and articles cited, please see the article online at inbusinessmag.com.

FEB. 20 1 7

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Real Estate: The Surprising Cost of Inaction Are executives overlooking the real cost of underperforming real estate and facility assets? by Tammy Carr

With real estate and facilities as two of the largest expenses (and assets) for the average organization, it may be surprising to learn a sizable portion of that spend is going toward wasted energy and lost productivity associated with unsuitable and inefficient performance of the physical work environments. This is not just an issue for Fortune 500 companies; increasingly, “middle market” companies, institutions and agencies are finding that conducting assessments of their holdings yields valuable data and results in actionable plans that have a significant impact on their bottom lines. Across industries and commercial real estate (CRE) segments, leadership is paying closer attention to the composition, scope, condition and value of their real estate portfolios. How can executives minimize the drain on capital and expenses associated with the underperformance of their commercial corporate real estate portfolio and its impact on employee attraction and retention? A comprehensive portfolio assessment will analyze both the visible and hidden costs to an organization. Fundamentally, with this knowledge, executives are able to develop and implement strategies that will optimize their portfolio and maximize return on their facilities and real estate footprint. Too often, however, executives are paralyzed by the initial financial investment and/or staff investment that may be required to engage in reversing the trend, even if the internal rate of return may meet or exceed their requirements. The truth is, inaction can quietly kill a bottom line. In fact, hundreds of examples exist that illustrate a variety of ways in which a facility upgrade/renewal/replacement can positively affect a company’s profitability by contributing to overall operating cost efficiency, employee productivity and worker retention.

IGNORED COST DRIVERS: OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE The cost of maintaining a space that has deferred maintenance and/or higher-than-average operations and

maintenance (O&M) costs, can be surprisingly high. During a recent real estate and facility assessment for a corporate customer, our analysis uncovered inefficiencies within its 10-year-old building resulting in $1.09/square foot annual costs, simply due to subpar energy and systems performance. A renovation or new space investment offers the opportunity for businesses to take advantage of the latest technology to lower utility costs. LED lighting, daylight harvesting techniques, high-efficiency boilers and other mechanical system improvements should all be reviewed for potential ROI. With one of our clients, for example, a small step such as implementing new daylighting controls for a fourfloor corporate office reduced energy use from lighting by 45 percent over standard code, with a three-year payback period. It is important for firms to conduct the necessary legwork to benchmark their own performance for O&M costs against their peers. Factors such as location, age, size and type of facility must be considered in the calculation. For the majority of our customers, we typically find they are meeting expected targets in one area, only to be underperforming in other areas. Rarely do firms exceed benchmarks without having begun their operational renewal process with a specific plan and targets in place. Without this understanding, businesses are missing a big piece of the puzzle required to determine the true costs of waiting to make investments with attractive returns.

UNDERAPPRECIATED COST DRIVERS: PRODUCTIVITY, INNOVATION, RECRUITING & RETENTION

Additionally, while the initial investment involved with a project may seem overwhelming, the truth is it can pale in comparison to an organization’s employee-related costs, which typically amount to 70–90 percent of a company’s overall operating costs, according to Gensler Consulting in The LEADER magazine.

According to the GSA’s Innovative Workplaces report, businesses lose approximately $1 million per year for the average office building (370 employees) due to poor space planning alone. bit.ly/gsa-innovative-workplaces


BETTERING YOUR BUSINESS

But do employee-related costs have anything to do with a potential facility project? In short, they have everything to do with it, as numerous studies have shown that office design can have a positive impact on both the productivity and well-being of employees. Undertaking a new project offers a business the opportunity to leave outmoded environments behind and construct modern office spaces that can improve employee health, productivity and retention. According to the Innovative Workplaces report from the U.S. General Services Administration, businesses lose approximately $1 million per year for the average office building (370 employees) due to poor space planning alone. And those aren’t the only costs. In fact, Gensler’s U.S. Workplace Survey 2016 found that innovative businesses are five times more likely to prioritize modern workspace best practices, and employees operating in these modern workplaces are more likely to innovate. Investing in the workplace does not pay off in just employee performance; it can also help businesses keep those high-performing employees around, as a 2012 study reported in the Journal of Vocational Behavior found that changes to the work environment can increase an employee’s commitment to the organization. This is important because labor market growth is slowing in the U.S., and constantly recruiting and training new talent is costly. In the U.S., the labor force is expected to grow only 0.5 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which means the supply and demand shift will be favorable for employees to seek out the best possible workplace environment. Meanwhile, the cost of turnover for average workers making less than $75,000 a year, which covers 9 in 10 workers in the U.S., is roughly equivalent to 20 percent of the worker’s salary. Expect the price tag to increase to 150 percent of salary for turnover of knowledge workers earning around $75,000. Rather than paying those costs over and over again, businesses need to focus on improvements that incentivize employee satisfaction and loyalty. A study commissioned by HASSEL also found that an appealing workplace can double a business’s chances of landing potential employees and a “modern workplace aesthetic” can triple an employer’s appeal. Not only can an organization drastically reduce the costs of turnover, but additionally increase productivity and engagement in employees by providing them with a workspace that suits their needs. Knoll found in a study that a $200,000 investment in workspace capability upgrades, including the quality of meeting spaces, can substantially reduce annual costs with total payback after two years.

IDENTIFY THE TRUE COST OF INACTION

Today, employees may sit in cubicles or half partitions; they may work in an activity-based design or have their own private office — the options are abundant. Each company has different needs and objectives, and it’s essential to find the workplace environment that aligns with the firm’s objectives, while ensuring employee satisfaction and retention within its industry. A facility conditions assessment done right — coupled with benchmarking data and expert analysis — will deliver visibility into hidden annual expenditures, provide insight into potential future surprises, and identify information critical to market valuation for underutilized facilities or properties. Whatever the situation, it’s important to know what underperforming space is costing relative to the income statement. This analysis is essential to planning investments for maximum effectiveness and ROI.

The Entrepreneur’s Playbook Big new ideas rarely make great businesses … Laboring on a business plan can be a waste of time … You are going to need dramatically more start-up money than you think you do. Counterintuitive concepts like these have helped the world’s best entrepreneurs succeed. Yet most of us only learn them the hard way. Len Green, an experienced investor, entrepreneur and business professor, shares inside secrets and proven tactics for launching a business. Based on his popular Ultimate Entrepreneurship course, the book explains how to locate sure-bet opportunities for improving products; get serious about positioning, distributing, and licensing; find funding; take calculated risks and minimize failure; and much more. The Entrepreneur’s Playbook: More than 100 Proven Strategies, Tips, and Techniques to Build a Radically Successful Business Author: Leonard C. Green Publisher: AMACOM

Pages: 224 Available: 3/9/17

$21.95

The Compassionate Achiever A powerful, practical guide for cultivating compassion — the scientifically proven foundation for personal achievement and success at work, at home and in the community. For decades, we’ve been told the key to prosperity is to look out for number one. But recent science shows that, to achieve durable success, we need to be more than just achievers; we need to be compassionate achievers. New research in biology, neuroscience and economics has found that compassion — recognizing a problem or caring about another’s pain and making a commitment to help — not only improves others’ lives but can transform our own. Based on the most recent studies from a wide range of fields, The Compassionate Achiever reveals the profound benefits of practicing compassion, including more constructive relationships, improved intelligence and increased resiliency. The Compassionate Achiever: How Helping Others Fuels Success Author: Christopher L. Kukk Publisher: HarperOne

Pages: 256 Available: 3/7/17

$26.99

Time, Talent, Energy Business leaders know that the key to competitive success is smart management of scarce resources. That’s why companies allocate their financial capital so carefully. But capital today is cheap and abundant, no longer a source of advantage. The truly scarce resources now are the time, the talent and the energy of the people in one’s organization — resources that are too often squandered. There’s plenty of advice about how to manage them, but most of it focuses on individual actions. What’s really needed are organizational solutions that can unleash a company’s full productive power and enable it to outpace competitors. Time, Talent, Energy: Overcome Organizational Drag and Unleash Your Team’s Productive Power Authors: Michael C. Mankins and Eric Garton

Pages: 256

Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press

$32

In the U.S., the labor force is expected to grow only 0.5 percent between 2014 and 2024, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which means the supply and demand shift will be favorable for employees to seek out the best possible workplace environment. bit.ly/labor-force-2024

Available: 3/7/17

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INVESTING IN COMMUNITY

The Art and Science of Fundraising Campaigns Mar

UP NEXT MONTH The Quiet Phase of Campaigns

EXPECT THE UNEXPECTED
 The smooth path to generating revenue from initial campaign gifts in a timely manner is often challenged when donors: • Give less than expected — at least with their first gift; • Take longer to commit; • Support a project other than the one recommended; • Experience family health issues, legal situations or business challenges; or • Use complex financial resources that impact timing of gifts (cash, assets, donor advised funds, foundations or planned gifts). The key to navigating these cash flow and scheduling delays — the art — is offering creative solutions, ranging from incremental and cumulative giving options to new initiatives that still meet the campaign’s goals — or even adjusting the roll-out strategy of capital projects based on cash flow.

Richard Tollefson is founder and president of The Phoenix Philanthropy Group, an Arizona-based international consulting firm serving nonprofit organizations as well as institutional and individual philanthropists. phoenixphilanthropy.com

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Boards that apply science and art to campaigns see unexpected hurdles as opportunities by Richard Tollefson

Successful fundraising campaigns don’t happen without planning. In the early stages, they draw heavily upon discipline, rigor, organizational tools and processes — the science of good campaigns. Art also plays a crucial role — the art of adaptation and fluidity. No one knows that more than San Diego State University’s Mary Ruth Carleton, vice president of university relations and development, and Sacramento State’s Vince Sales, vice president of university advancement. Both have prepared their nonprofit boards and executive leadership teams to adapt to the inevitable challenges that come hand-in-hand with campaign initiatives, despite the best-laid plans.

SCIENCE LESSONS

Executives sitting on nonprofit boards who champion campaign science help ensure success from the start. They acknowledge the need for internal assessments, external market research, goal setting, planning and timelines. They understand that, like corporate projects, campaigns should be grounded in solid budgeting and revenue analysis. They support marketing research and campaign theme development, coaching for volunteer leaders, and investments in prospect and wealth screening tools to identify donors. They support science. “It helps to have a plan,” says Sales of his university’s campaign, now in its second-year “quiet” phase. “This is not a sprint. There is a plan — a science and an art — to making the campaign successful over the eight-year period we have identified as our strategic focus.”

ART LESSONS

Some things, however — ranging from executive and volunteer leadership changes to economic downturns — cannot be planned for. Consider San Diego State’s $500 million campaign that kicked off in 2007 at the start of the worst economic recession in U.S. history. “We lost 30 percent of our endowment, our staff was cut from 100 to 75, and we had mandatory work furloughs,” says Carleton. “Trying to keep everything positive was a challenge, but we envisioned where we wanted to go, put our heads down and kept doing what we said we were going to do. We stuck to the plan.” When the campaign concludes in summer 2017, Carleton’s team is on track to surpass its goal by $300 million. The key, she says, was the art of communication. “Early on, our president briefed board members about the complexities of San Diego State so that they could articulate to donors what the university was about.” Board members also received scripts to aid in talking to the public and were introduced personally to

students. “That really inspired the board — hearing a student’s dreams — and kept up a passion for the campaign.” Says Carleton, “We formed a group of development and senior staff to regularly meet with deans to go over issues, what the concerns were, how we could work together better, and how we could support them.” Sales worked in a similar fashion, sharing as much information as possible with constituents. “We created Campaign Colleges — training sessions six times a year — for deans, development staff and board members.” Topics have included how to set up a conversation with a major donor, the tools and technology used by development staff to identify donors and determine capacity, and branding and messaging. “We had to be flexible and respond to our stakeholders,” says Sales of volunteers’ early requests for campaign communications, messaging and branding materials (usually revealed during the later public phase of a campaign). “We saw this as an opportunity for engagement, not a departure from the plan. We wanted to give them the tools to talk about the campaign and, at the same time, create a mechanism for their input.” Carleton agrees that adaptability is an art form, especially when unidentified fundraising opportunities arise and demand immediate prioritization. “We raised money for projects not even on our radar.” Among them: a veteran’s program with a housing component, a foster youth program, a basketball practice facility and a new engineering building. “It was key that we were nimble and able to adapt to new ideas.” Indeed, organizations whose leaders start with science, then convene regularly to discuss campaign hurdles and approach them with realism, open-mindedness and an eye toward opportunity, are able to weather unforeseen circumstances, seize unforeseen opportunities and still meet their goals. Because, at some point, as Sales and Carleton have illustrated, it’s “going to get messy” — and that’s where good art comes into play.

Organizations that haven’t conducted campaigns in more than a decade often benefit by taking 12 to 18 months to build a stronger development program and cultivating donors prior to committing to a comprehensive campaign.


BY MIKE HUNTER

FEBRUARY 2017

SAVE THE DATE

Upcoming and notable Venture Madness 2017 Mar.

8

HireLive

Arizona Association for Economic Development

Job Fair Thurs., Feb. 9 | 9:00a – 12:30p This is a career fair for sales and management positions. Candidates can come anytime during the event and speak with as many of the employers as they wish. It is recommended that candidates come to the event dressed in professional attire. “Be prepared with multiple copies of your resume and be ready to meet with hiring managers,” says Dan Sparks, vice president of sales for HireLive, a national career service company specializing in sales, retail and management career fairs and with more than a decade of experience connecting job seekers with industry-leading companies that are currently hiring. Candidates will also be given a Career Guide book of all the companies’ positions, qualifications and info to all candidates when they arrive. There are sales managers, recruiters, general managers, retail managers and decision makers onsite for candidates to speak with face to face. Among the positions available are inside sales reps, outside sales reps, account executives, retail managers, account managers, insurance sales, customer service, technical sales, sales managers, pharmaceutical sales, telesales, sales trainer, merchandiser, mortgage brokers, financial planner, route sales, retail sales, retail management and human resources. Benefits offered by some or all of the companies involved, according to Sparks, are base plus uncapped commission pay structure, flexible work schedule, full benefits, 401k, stock options, company car or gas allowance, president club trips and other incentives, and opportunity for immense growth. Free

Luncheon; Topic: Effects of Self-Driving Cars Tues., Feb. 14 | 11:30a – 1:15p “Vehicle Technology’s Impact on Community Planning and Development” will be the topic at this month’s luncheon. Speakers will be Eric Anderson, transportation director for Maricopa Association of Governments; Stephen Conschafter, AICP, LEED AP, urban designer and planner for SmithGroupJJR; and Phil Raher, general manager for Local Motors. The trio will address autonomous vehicles and new transportation partners entering the state, as well as Arizona being on the forefront of the trend toward self-driving. They will share their views on vehicle technology, transportation planning and urban design, and how this future reality will change everything, from the way we attract talent and develop sites to the planning needed from municipalities. Driverless vehicle technology is in its infancy but the wide-reaching effects will ripple into all aspects of how we engage with the built environment. Leading urban planners are consulting with municipalities, architects and city planners in helping rethink everything from parking densities, communal garages and the effects of shared ownership. Retail businesses will need to plan for the future of the drive-thru and, perhaps, how to interact with a vehicle with no driver. The typical adage of “location, location, location” will be challenged as driving time becomes that of a passenger rather than active engagement in the process. AAED, founded in 1974, has a mission to serve as Arizona’s unified voice advocating for responsible economic development through an effective program of professional education, public policy and collaboration. Members and their guests: $40; non-members: $55; after noon on Feb. 9: $60

Holiday Inn & Suites 1600 S. Country Club Dr., Mesa

Phoenix Country Club 2901 N. 7th St., Phoenix

hirelive.com

aaed.com

FEBRUARY 2017

Wed. – Fri., Mar. 8 – 10

Three jampacked days of powernetworking with serious investors, high-impact inspiration for attendees’ business, amazing sessions and some memorable fun. investsouthwest.org Global Growth: Tips from the C-Suites Mar.

Wed., Mar. 22

22

The Global Chamber brings together CEOs of Metro Phoenix companies, growing globally, to share tips for more success, less risk — including legal techniques. globalchamber.org Expert HR Series Mar.

Tues., Mar. 28

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Mountain States Employers Council presents “Flex and Remote Work: Does the Office Have an Advantage?” scottsdalechamber.com Boots to Business REBOOT Mar.

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Tues. – Wed., Mar. 28 – 29

This is an entrepreneurial education program offered to veterans by the U.S. Small Business Administration in partnership with the Institute for Veterans and Military Families at Syracuse University (IVMF). boots2business.org

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Thu., Feb. 2 — Groundhog Day Tue., Feb. 14 — Valentine’s Day

Mon., Feb. 20 — Presidents Day

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FEBRUARY 2017 Tues. – Thurs., Feb. 7 – 9

7:00a – 5:00p

24-Hour HAZWOPER OSHA Training Seminar Class Compliance Solutions These highly interactive, instructor-led seminars meet or exceed OSHA’s mandated training requirements under 29 CFR 1910.120(e) - HAZWOPER (40-, 24-, 16- and 8-hour) as well as states with their own OSHA plans. $465

Sun., Feb. 19

Tempe Gardens

8th Annual Fresh Brunch Benefiting 1-n-10

1625 W. Fountainhead Pkwy., Tempe Fri., Feb. 10

csregs.org

10:00a – Noon

Roundtable Action Planning: Media

Greater Phoenix Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce

Thurs. – Fri., Feb. 16 – 17

8:00a – 7:00p

The U.S. Commercial Service and the Arizona District Export Council present “Discover Global Markets: Advanced Manufacturing.” This conference brings together trade experts, industry professionals and U.S. commercial diplomats via panels, one-on-one meetings and extensive networking to address opportunities and demand for advanced manufacturing.

This is the chamber’s signature fundraising event for one∙n∙ten, which has been serving the Valley’s Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) youth for 24 years, providing programs and services that promote self-expression, selfacceptance, leadership development and healthy life choices. Now in its fourth year, Promise of a New Day (POND) housing program provides supportive housing for 40 youth — but, with 40 percent of homeless youth identifying as LGBTQ, the need requires an even stronger community response.

Free

$425

$100

ASU SkySong

Double Tree Resort Paradise Valley

Arizona Biltmore

1475 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale

5401 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale

2400 E. Missouri Ave., Phoenix

empowered-phxx.com

globalchamber.org

oneten.ejoinme.org/tickets

PHX Discover Global Markets: Advanced Manufacturing

Empowered PhXX

Global Chamber

Leaders of the Phoenix Entrepreneurial Ecosystem come together in an interactive roundtable format to discuss working with the local media to get additional exposure for women-owned businesses and change the Phoenix culture around female entrepreneurship.

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Wed., Feb. 8

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11:30a – 1:00p

14 Tues., Feb. 14

16

Family Business Forum

Peoria Chamber of Commerce

Arizona Community Foundation

The featured speaker is from the U.S. Department of Labor, to give the straight facts on all the things happening right now that are affecting individuals’ business.

The Pakis Center for Business Philanthropy presents this 11th installment of the Family Business Forum: “Lessons Learned through Two Generations: Preparing the Rising Generations with Family Councils.”

Members: $20; non-members: $30

Free

Arizona Broadway Theater

Debi Bisgrove Community Philanthropy Center (DBCPC)

7701 W. Paradise Ln., Peoria

2201 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix

peoriachamber.com

azfoundation.org

Sat., Feb. 11

17

19

11:30a – 1:30p

Luncheon

Fri., Feb. 17

11:30a – 1:00p

Friday Forum – Active Shooter Awareness & Response Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce

6:00p – 9:00p

23rd Annual Tribute to Leadership Gala YWCA This is a special evening set aside to recognize individuals and corporations that have generously donated their time and talents to the community. This is a highly prestigious honor. The 2016 Award recipients will join more than 200 Tribute to Leadership alumni, including Cindy McCain, Deborah Bateman, Tracy Bam and Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

The course provides basic familiarization of the active shooter phenomenon and takes participants through simulated scenarios. Segments include recognizing the potential active shooter mindset through a study of actual shooting events. Students will learn how to react when police arrive as well as measures to adopt during a workplace or public shooting that may speed resolution, reduce the risk of injury and save lives. Free Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce

$350 The Scottsdale Resort

7501 E. McCormick Pkwy., Scottsdale

7700 E. McCormick Pkwy., Scottsdale

scottsdalechamber.com

ywcaaz.org

FEB. 20 1 7

10:30a – 1:00p

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For more events, visit “Business Events” at www.inbusinessmag.com

Please confirm, as dates and times are subject to change.


Wed., Feb. 22

Sun., Feb. 26

7:30a – 9:00p

1:30p – 4:00p

Expert HR Series

3rd Annual Mardi Gras Celebration

Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce

Apache Junction Chamber of Commerce

“Managing Employee Health Issues, Disabilities and Job Accommodations: A Practical Guide to the ADA.” Employers juggle a difficult balance between meeting legal requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and meeting business needs. There is no such thing as “one size fits all” when trying to accommodate an employee’s health issues and disability. This session will cover when an employee may need a reasonable accommodation, the obligation to go through the interactive process, and when an accommodation may pose an undue hardship or direct threat.

This is a fundraiser for the Pinal County Veterans Memorial. Music to listen and dance to will be by Howard Schneider and his Dixieland All Star Band. There will be prize drawings, a 50/50 drawing, and food and beverage to purchase. Prizes for best costumes.

$20

Gold Canyon Golf Resort

Mountain States Employers Council

$5

7975 N. Hayden Rd., Scottsdale

6100 S. Kings Ranch Rd., Gold Canyon

scottsdalechamber.com

ajchamber.com Wed. – Thurs., Feb. 22 – 23

1:00p – 6:00p

Tues., Feb. 28

Digital Summit Phoenix 2017

Business Resource & Networking Luncheon

TechMedia

North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce

Join Digital Summit Phoenix for leading-edge digital media and marketing content, mixed alongside top-flight networking with Internet execs, online marketers, entrepreneurs and digital strategists. 

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$295

Monthly networking opportunity with fellow chamber members and the businesses/fields they represent, as well as other business owners and community leaders.

Chateau Luxe Event Venue

Members: $20; non-members: $25

1175 E. Lone Cactus Dr., Phoenix

Location: TBD

digitalsummitphoenix.com

northphoenixchamber.com

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10:30a – 1:30p

Workshops, held prior to lunch being served, are opportunities for attendees to gain a powerful edge on their competition. Topics range from technology, marketing, sales and accounting to legal issues. Guest Speaker: Lory Lanese Members: $25 non-members: $35 63 E Boston, Chandler

The HRC Arizona Gala is Arizona’s way of recognizing heroes who have moved equality forward, while supporting the Human Rights Campaign. As the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender civil rights organization, HRC envisions an America where LGBTQ people are ensured of their basic equal rights, and can be open, honest and safe at home, at work and in the community.

Sat., Feb. 25

Arizona Technology Council The inaugural MedTech Conference brings together healthcare innovators, influential policy-makers and other healthcare service professionals. Designed to showcase Arizona’s innovative medical technology, the conference seeks to advance industry discussion from key perspectives through expert panel sessions, keynote speakers and product exhibits to provide opportunities in education, business development, capital formation and networking.

aztechcouncil.org

Arizona Gay Chamber of Commerce

100 N. 1st St., Phoenix

hrcazgala.org

1:00p – 6:30p

7201 E. Princess Blvd., Scottsdale

6:00p – 10:00p

Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel

2017 MedTech Conference

Speer Education

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$225

chandlerchamber.com

Members: $50 for conference only; non-members: $75 for conference only; with Lunch & Learn, add $25

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Human Rights Campaign Arizona Gala 2017

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Thurs., Feb. 23

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Sat., Feb. 25

Women In Leadership Luncheon

SoHo63

11:00a – 1:00p

9:00a – 1:00p

53rd Annual Lost Dutchman Days Parade Apache Junction Chamber of Commerce One of the largest parades in Arizona, with more than 50 years of celebrating the local heritage, this parade is a highlight to the Lost Dutchman Days weekend every February. It offers rodeo, carnival, vendors, live entertainment and more. This is a chance for businesses and nonprofit organizations to join in and expose their cause to more than 10,000 spectators. Free 567 W. Apache Trail, Apache Junction ajchamber.com

If your event is directed to helping build business in Metro Phoenix, please send us information to include it in the In Business Magazine events calendar. Full calendar online. Events@inbusinessmag.com

33 20FEB.1 7 INBUSINESSMAG.COM


WE VALUE WHAT WE OWN

BY MIKE HUNTER

2017 Ford Raptor Is Tough The all-new Ford Raptor is a thing to behold. The bold and rugged look has always been an attention getter, but this rendition is truly rough around the edges. With its twin-turbo, intercooled DOHC 24-valve, high-output 3.5-liter EcoBoost® with direct fuel injection, this beast will deliver more power than the previous 6.2-liter V8 at a whopping 450 horsepower and 510 lb.-ft. of torque. With better running clearance than its predecessors, this is not a dinosaur. But it will likely roam the forest (or mud or sand) like one. With the all-new four-wheel-drive, TORQUEON-DEMAND, it combines the best attributes of clutch-driven, on-demand all-wheel drive with durable, mechanical-locking

2017 FORD RAPTOR MSRP: $50,155 City: 15 mpg Hwy: 18 mpg Trans: 10-speed automatic, manual shifters

four-wheel drive. This Raptor also sports 3.0-inch FOX Racing Shox™ with custom internal bypass technology. This technology provides great off-road performance and a smooth ride on-road. The 10-speed automatic transmission includes manual shifting mode that allows for smooth four-wheel drive dependability. True to the authenticity behind this off-road beast is the all-new Terrain Management System™, which allows the driver to select from six preset modes to optimize driving dynamics to environmental conditions. Available mode settings include street, Baja, mud and sand. As is expected, this Ford is chock full of features, making for the feel of a luxury ride — albeit a bit more rugged. The interior is comfortable in a sporty sort of way, with metallike trim and chrome interior accents. The 7-speaker audio system performs beautifully and can make the road or off-road experience all that much better. The tech-savvy dashboard will keep everyone aboard either informed or entertained. However, this rugged beast is also a utility vehicle with its expansive bed and tailgate. Perfect for hauling and onboarding that necessary gear when out and about in the natural terrain. Ford ford.com

0-60: 6.7 sec

Dare-It-Yourself Tax Prep Through technology, there are some great programs that small-business owners can purchase to do-it-yourself if you dare. Here are our

H&R Block Premium & Business Aimed at small businesses, there is support for major forms and schedules, including unlimited business state programs and guidance for preparation and filing of tax returns for corporations, S corps, partnerships, LLCs and nonprofits. Also includes free and unlimited tax advice from an expert. $79.95

TaxAct Premium

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taxact.com

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When Ford introduced its SVT Raptor in 2010, the word “Ford” was spelled out on its grille in place of the manufacturer’s Blue Oval badge — a first on its North American editions since 1983.

Photos courtesy of Ford (top and far left), H&R Block, TaxAct, TurboTax (bottom)

pics for the top trusted software programs.


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An online registry for equipping High School clubs on their path to graduation

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BY MIKE HUNTER

MEALS THAT MATTER

Flower Child – A Natural Choice

$12

MOTHER EARTH BOWL Ancient grains, sweet potato, portobello mushroom, avocado, cucumber, broccoli pesto, leafy greens, red pepper miso vinaigrette, hemp seed $9 with all-natural chicken $14

Mangia Mia “Mangia” is Italian for “eat.” Here is a list of some of the Valley’s best Italian restaurants for lunch, where it is not all about pasta and heavy meals. Cibo

FEB. 20 1 7

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Kale Apple Slaw, gluten-Free Mac & Cheese, Grilled Asparagus and Wild Mushroom. Designed with a countryside farmhouse atmosphere, it’s a peaceful, light and sunny space with an open ceiling and an open kitchen. Diners can choose from any number of natural teas and lemonades that combine ingredients like acai and hibiscus. They are mildly sweetened and the perfect alternative to a soda (which is not served here). The service is pleasant and attentive. Tables are maintained with silverware and napkins, a convenience for “to stay” patrons over typical self-serve dining. Flower Child iamaflowerchild.com 5013 N. 44th St., Phoenix • (602) 429-6222 10460 N. 90th St., Scottsdale • (480) 240-4400 100 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix • (480) 212-0180

Brio Tuscan Grille — Scottsdale and Gilbert

Cibo — Phoenix Set in an old Downtown

Marcellino Ristorante — Scottsdale

Hard to go wrong here. Brio is a

Phoenix home complete

The patio is a great vantage

traditional modern Italian hot spot

with hardwood floors,

point to enjoy the activity

in the heart of urban Scottsdale, at

exposed brick walls

at South Bridge and the

Scottsdale Quarter, and in Gilbert,

and stained glass, this

bridge over the canal to

at SanTan Village. The lunch menu

urban pizzeria café

Scottsdale Waterfront. Chef

includes splits of flatbreads and

uses locally grown and

Marcellino and Sima take

salads and Mediterranean-inspired

imported ingredients

rightful pride in authentic

seafood dishes.

that delight in simple

Italian cuisine served in

15301 N. Scottsdale Rd.,

Italian lunch items and

an atmosphere created to

Scottsdale

is a creative setting for a

further its enjoyment.

(480) 607-1100

business lunch.

7114 E. Stetson Dr.,

2150 E. Williams Field Rd., Gilbert

603 N. 5th Ave., Phoenix

Scottsdale

(480) 917-9177

(602) 441-2697

(480) 990-9500

brioitalian.com

cibophoenix.com

marcellinoristorante.com

Flower Child is one of 16 dining concepts from restaurateur Sam Fox, which range from full-service to modified self-serve establishments and even include the non-stationary and aptly named food truck The Rocket.

Photos courtesy of Flower Child/Fox Restaurant Concepts (top and far left), Cibo (bottom)

FLYING AVOCADO Smoked turkey, gouda, romaine, tomato, avocado hummus

Expanded from its debut location at the corner of 44th Street and Camelback Road, Flower Child validates the theory that happy food and healthy food can come together in harmony — which they do at this peaceful, casual kitchen. Serving locally sourced foods, all natural and mostly gluten free, this hot spot is a lunch destination to reckon with. On the menu is The Rebel, a grass-fed steak with charred onion, Port Salut cheese, arugula and horseradish yogurt on a house-made whole wheat, flax and chia seed wrap. The Asian Avocado Salad is another favorite, with kale, edamame, Easter egg radish, cucumber and pickled mushrooms tossed in a sesame vinaigrette. Diners are talking about the Spicy Salmon Nabemono, which is a salmon filet, roasted mushroom, daikon, miso, sweet potato, spinach and sesame seed hot dish, or “hot pot” as it is called. The menu is designed to be fast casual, with patrons ordering “to stay” or “to go.” Bowing heavily to sustainability, the offerings are vegan, vegetarian and gluten-free for the most part, available in combinations made up of hummus, vegetable grain plates (sides) and a protein of steak, allnatural chicken, salmon or organic tofu. Sides include the Red Chile Glazed Sweet Potato with bok choy and sesame seed, the


TEMPE CHAMBER

ADVANTAGE Winter 2O17 • tempechamber.org

Women in Business Speaker Series – “Be the Change! Learn, Lead, Grow” The Tempe Chamber’s Women in Business Council presents a four-part speaker series that will guide participants on how to be a more effective professional and confident individual by developing as a leader and growing into a position of greater value and happiness. The sessions will train attendees on Communication, Leadership, Goal Setting and Taking Action. Powerful expert speakers will inspire, educate and motivate participants to grow and succeed in their personal life and professional career. Each session takes place from 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m. at Western International University, 1601 W. Fountainhead Parkway in Tempe. To attend, visit http://bit.ly/WIBSS17 or call 480-967-7891.

JAN. 20 – COMMUNICATION

FEB. 3 – GOAL SETTING

What Is “Positive Change” and How Do We Use Communications to Effect It?

How to Set Goals that Deliver Results

Speaker: Joanna Allhands, Arizona Republic Editor

Speaker: Susan Brooks High Performance Coach

You’ve heard the phrase “talk is cheap,” but is that really true? Or are we just talking to each other in the wrong ways? The reality is, talk is valuable — if speakers can use it to break impasses, find consensus and effect positive change. Join Arizona Republic digital opinions editor Joanna Allhands as she offers tips to speaking effectively in a busy, polarized world. Joanna Allhands is The Arizona Republic’s digital opinions editor, which means she oversees opinion content on the web, in video and through social media. Allhands joined The Republic in 2004 as an editorial writer focusing on Mesa and Tempe. She covered the Southeast Valley in various opinion writing and editing roles until 2012, when she moved into her current job. Allhands is an Indiana native, Purdue fan and cold-weather wimp who sees truth in the movie “Office Space.” More importantly, she’s a new mom and proud member of Generation X.

What is the difference between goals and dreams? How can you be more than “interested” in achieving your goals? What will change when your goal is achieved? Addressing these questions with specific tools and information will be the focus of this engaging and highly interactive Goal Setting session. According to Forbes, only 8 percent of people actually achieve their goals. This program will help you be one of them! Susan Brooks is a high-performance coach for women business owners who works to create innovative and customized strategies and systems that work. She was the co-founder of Cookies From Home, a multi-million-dollar, award-winning business that she built and ran with her husband for more than 30 years. Today, she uses her years of business experience and expertise to coach women business owners to greater profitability by creating a financially sustainable company that will thrive in a competitive marketplace.

JAN. 27 – LEADERSHIP

Learning to Lead, Inspiring Others to Follow Speaker: Dr. Maria Harper-Marinick, Maricopa Community Colleges Chancellor Whether it’s leading a team or reshaping a large organization, there are best practices that ensure success. How do you lead your most valuable asset through change in order to significantly reshape an organization? How can you, as an employee, lead from where you are and be a champion for change? Dr. Harper-Marinick is chancellor of one of the largest community college systems in the nation. She oversees operations for the system, which serves 200,000 students and nearly 10,000 faculty and staff members across 10 colleges. She sets the vision for the strategic plan, guides policy development, and oversees initiatives and outcomes related to workforce, economic and community development; civic and global engagement; and increasing student success.

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

FEB. 10 – TAKING ACTION

Use Your Experience to Get Results Speaker: Jodi Low Leadership Development Jodi Low is an accomplished corporate trainer, inspirational speaker, and the founder and CEO of U & Improved. She has trained thousands of entrepreneurs and executives on how to take action to build a booming business, master a mindset for success and achieve the lifestyle they desire. In 2015, she was honored by the Phoenix Business Journal as an “Outstanding Women in Business” and by the Phoenix Suns and National Bank of Arizona with the “Amazing Women” award.

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Proposition 206 Has Unintended Consequences for East Valley Care Providers by Shana Ellis, President and CEO, The Centers for Habilitation; Executive Committee Member, Arizona Association of Providers for People with Disabilities Caring for individuals with developmental and intellectual disabilities requires education, ongoing training and passion; like any skilled profession, it’s not for everyone. As a result, service providers, like The Centers for Habilitation (TCH), and our families value the care provided by direct-care professionals entrusted to work with our members on a daily basis. Since 2009, my organization, as part of our statewide association, has been advocating for the restoration of state funding that was previously cut. These cuts have made it next to impossible for TCH, along with other care providers across the East Valley and state, to pay our direct-care employees more for the essential care they provide — which they deserve. Service providers are currently experiencing staff turnover rates as high as 80 percent, and direct-care workers’ pay is often below what big box stores or fast food chains can offer their employees. Prop. 206 will make it even more difficult for us and the entire provider network to

New Faces at Tempe Chamber of Commerce

Joanne Stockdale Named Business Development Director of the Tempe Chamber of Commerce The Tempe Chamber of Commerce hired Joanne Stockdale as its new Business Development Director in December. She will be responsible for the organization’s membership sector, overseeing its business support services and developing corporate partnerships. Stockdale is an experienced business development professional with excellent communication skills and a strategic approach to her work. She has managed and directed a variety of fundraising responsibilities, including corporate sponsorships, individual giving and capital campaigns as well as volunteer management and

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recruitment of community and committee leaders. “We are excited to welcome Joanne to our team,” said Anne Gill, president and CEO of the Tempe Chamber. “She has a great deal of experience and knowledge and will be a valuable asset as we grow our organization into a stronger advocate for the business community.” Stockdale recently relocated to the East Valley from Michigan, where she implemented successful strategies in her director positions at Recovery Allies of West Michigan, Haggai Institute, the American Heart Association and Biblica.


retain existing staff and recruit replacements as staff can still choose to work at big box stores or fast food chains and make the same amount of money for arguably less stressful work. Continuity of care for individuals with disabilities creates trust for the individual receiving care and peace of mind for the family. While increasing the minimum wage may have sounded like a simple solution to this problem, it will actually make the current state of affairs for this community worse. The cost and reimbursement of our services is determined by the State of Arizona. This means care providers cannot increase the cost of our services to cover the increase to wages. Absent appropriate increases in state funding to cover the higher employment costs of Prop. 206, care providers will be unable to absorb the cost of increased wages. Absent appropriate increases in state funding to cover the higher employment costs of Prop. 206, care providers will be unable to absorb the cost of increased wages. Many service providers are planning to reduce services or close, leaving staff out of a job and many of the 30,000 individuals with disabilities having lost their caretaker. If no state funding is made available, the state is in jeopardy of losing the network it relies upon to serve this vulnerable population. TCH and other service providers want and need to increase the wages of our direct-care workers — not only are they worth it, but the ability to recruit and retain more professionals to provide quality and consistent care to individuals with disabilities is critical at this juncture. We want to continue to serve this vulnerable population, but need Arizona’s legislature and Governor Ducey to increase funding for the care of those with disabilities as soon as possible during the 2017 legislative session, otherwise the passage of Prop. 206, coupled with the funding cuts of the past, will jeopardize the health and safety of Arizona’s most vulnerable residents.

Tempe Chamber of Commerce Hires Christopher Samuels as Communication Director The Tempe Chamber of Commerce has named its new Communication Director. Christopher Samuels started in the position last month and will be responsible for the media outreach and communications from the Tempe Chamber. He will disseminate information and educational programming to the business community. “We are so pleased to announce the hiring of Chris,” said Anne Gill, president and CEO of the Tempe Chamber. “He brings experience and enthusiasm to the position and to our team. He wants to share the stories of Tempe businesses

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

to help advocate for the growth and success of our community.” Samuels graduated with a B.A. in both Communications and International Studies from the University of Utah. He has worked as a journalist with the Deseret News in Salt Lake City and the Utah Chronicle. He has received additional training in photojournalism and marketing. Samuels also served as a Constituency Intern with Scotland’s Parliament in Edinburgh, where he worked with local and national government officials to resolve community issues.

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Business is BOOMING!

Each month we celebrate members who have joined the chamber, opened a new business, reached a milestone or expanded. If you are interested in hosting a ribbon cutting for your business, please contact Natalie at 480.736.4281 or nataliecole@tempechamber.org.

Red Roof Inn • 2135 W. 15th St., Tempe

Caliente Construction • 485 W. Vaughn St., Tempe

Café Rio • 715 S. Rural Rd., Tempe

MAS Wireless • 2227 S. 48th St., Suite B-D, Tempe

Sweetest Season • 1870 E. Apache Blvd. Tempe

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NextNet Partners • 7855 S. River Pkwy. #121, Tempe


Proposition 206 – What Employers Need to Know On November 8, Arizona voters adopted Proposition 206, which increases the state minimum wage and requires employers to provide paid medical leave to workers. Details of the Prop. 206 provisions are as follows:

Arizona Minimum Wage Increase Prop. 206 increases the existing state minimum wage of $8.05 per hour to $10.00 in 2017, $10.50 in 2018, $11.00 in 2019 and $12.00 in 2020. Beginning in 2021, the state minimum wage will increase each year by the cost of living. Businesses with employees that receive tips may pay workers up to $3.00 per hour less than the minimum wage, as is currently the law.

Paid Medical Leave Beginning on July 1, 2017, Prop. 206 also requires employers to provide employees with “earned paid sick time” for the following: • an employee’s medical care • an employee’s mental illness • an employee’s physical illness • an employee’s injury or condition • an employee’s need to care for a family member with a mental illness • an employee’s need to care for a family member with a physical illness • an employee’s need to care for a family member with an injury or condition • a family member who needs medical care • a public health emergency • an absence due to abuse of a child or vulnerable adult

Timeline

A small business currently exempt under the state minimum wage law would be covered as an employer for the purposes of the sick time requirements. A person receiving public benefits who is engaged in work activity as a condition of receiving public assistance is covered as an employee for purposes of the sick time requirements. A person who is employed by a parent or a sibling or who is employed performing babysitting services in the employer’s home on a casual basis would not be covered as an employee. Employees earn at least 1 hour of sick time for each 30 hours worked; employees in companies with fewer than 15 employees are not entitled to accrue or use more than 24 hours of sick time each year. Employees in companies with 15 or more employees are not entitled to accrue or use more than 40 hours of sick time each year. An employer may select higher limits for accruing or using sick time. An employee may use sick time as it accrues, except that an employer may require an employee hired after July 1, 2017, to initially wait 90 days before using accrued sick time. Unused sick time does carry forward to the following year. The employer may elect to pay the employee for the unused sick time at the end of the year and provide the employee with the required amount of sick time for use in the following year. An employee is not entitled to payment for 24 unused sick time upon leaving employment.

The employee is not required to find a replacement worker to cover the hours for which sick time is taken. The employer can require reasonable documentation for three or more consecutive days of sick time. An employer would not be allowed to interfere with, restrain or deny any rights protected under Prop. 206, nor could an employer retaliate or discriminate against an employee because the employee exercised those rights. Prop. 206 contains additional employer notice and recordkeeping requirements and enforcement and civil penalty provisions. An employer is required to treat information regarding health, domestic violence, sexual violence, abuse and stalking as confidential. The Industrial Commission of Arizona will enforce and implement the sick time statutes. Lastly, local governments are not prohibited from enacting a law providing for greater paid sick time rights. Employers may adopt a more generous sick time policy. The sick time requirements would not apply to employees covered by a current collective bargaining agreement or to a valid collective bargaining agreement if the requirements are expressly waived in the agreement.

Employers should note the dates on which the new requirements take effect.

The Arizona Minimum Wage increases to $10.00/hour.

JAN. 1, 2017

• domestic violence • sexual violence or stalking

The Arizona Minimum Wage increases to $10.50/hour.

JULY 1, 2017

Employers must implement “earned paid sick time.”

JAN. 1, 2018

The Arizona Minimum Wage increase to $12.00/hour.

JAN. 1, 2019

The Arizona Minimum Wage increases to 11.00/hour.

JAN. 1, 2020

JAN. 1, 2021

The Arizona Minimum Wage adjusts annually with the Consumer Price Index.

Should you have questions about the new laws or any other business issues, please contact the Tempe Chamber of Commerce at (480) 736-4280.

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

T E M P E C H A M B E R A D VA N TA G E

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Tempe Chamber Members Support Sustainable Business The Pledge was developed to help businesses learn how to reduce waste, energy and water usage and to develop sustainable purchasing programs. With the launch of this program, the goal of the Tempe Chamber of Commerce is to help make businesses and the communities in which they operate more resilient and sustainable. This comprehensive online resource and planning tool helps large and small businesses reduce their footprint. It is also a meaningful way to get additional exposure for your organization through online education, telling your story, and appearing in the Pledge Member directory. Sign up for free at http://tempe.pledge.green. Pledge members will be added to the online Pledge Directory and will be recognized throughout the year at events, newsletters and social media campaigns.

Explore tips and resources in the “What You Can Do” section for a lot of great ideas. Many are easy to implement and won’t cost you a dime. Others may require some investment, but are designed to save you money in the long run. Never underestimate the value of being able to demonstrate to your clients that

you’re a sustainable company. Early supporters include the City of Tempe, Waste Management, Arizona State University, SRP, APS, Special Moments, House of Tricks, Printing Specialists, Architekton, Bryan University, Acceler8 and Dynamic Worldwide Training Consultants.

Ken Blanchard College of Business | College of Education | College of Nursing | College of Arts & Sciences | College of Fine Arts & Production

Campus • Evening • Online

A R I Z O N A’ S P R I VAT E U N I V E R S I T Y S I N C E 1 9 4 9 Get started today! 855.287.0174 | www.gcu.edu/inbusiness Grand Canyon University is regionally accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. (800-621-7440; http://www.ncahlc.org/ ).

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T E M P E C H A M B E R A D V A N TA G E


GiveToPCHF.org

Te m p e C h a m b e r. o r g

T E M P E C H A M B E R A D VA N TA G E

7


Board of Directors Chairman of the Board: Brian Wood Chair-Elect: Dawn Hocking

Tempe Chamber Staff Anne Gill, President and CEO president@tempechamber.org Sean Donovan, Vice President, Media and Program Development sean@tempechamber.org Julie Flanigan, Director of Finance julieflanigan@tempechamber.org Christopher Samuels, Communication Director chris@tempechamber.org Joanne Stockdale, Business Development Director joanne@tempechamber.org Natalie Cole, Membership Coordinator nataliecole@tempechamber.org Mark Tarabori, Membership Relations Specialist marktarabori@tempechamber.org Lety Rodarte, Administrative Assistant lety@tempechamber.org

Treasurer: Bill Goodman Vice-Chairs: Peter Adams, Paul Mittman, Glenn Williams Immediate Past Chair: Tim Ronan Directors: Peter Adams, Kjell Andreassen, David Bonkowski, Tracy Bullock, Jihan Cottrell Bill Goodman, Misty Howell, Jenna Rowell, Lynda Santoro, Robert Nyal Sewell, Manny Tarango, Brad Taylor, Glenn Williams Ex-Officios: Andrew Ching, Angela Creedon, Joe Hughes, Stephanie Nowack, Lou Silverman Committee Chairs: Tracy Bullock, Patricia DiRoss, Gwen Gustafson, Cliff Jones, Paul Quinn, Tim Ronan, Lou Silverman, Mike Stinson Tempe Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box 28500 Tempe, AZ 85285 (480) 967-7891 • www.tempechamber.org

6_13013

75x4.875

Put your business on the road to sweet success

4C

Apply for a Wells Fargo Equipment Express® loan today Growing your business is how you’ll achieve the dreams you have for yourself and your family. Wells Fargo is here to help. Our Equipment Express loan is a flexible way to purchase the new or used vehicles or equipment you need to move your business forward. Stop by or call and speak to your banker today. Finance cars, trucks, trailers, commercial vehicles, or other business equipment

© 2014 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (1211586_13013)

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T E M P E C H A M B E R A D V A N TA G E


Presents

Valley

A Guide to Your Next Great Event

FEATURING Children’s Museum of Phoenix • EMP Management • Merestone • Phoenix Convention Center Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse • Thunderbird Executive Inn


CONSIDER US THE LAST RESORT. BECAUSE YOU’LL NEVER NEED TO LOOK ANYWHERE ELSE You’ll know you’ve made the right choice before the meeting even begins. Because we listen. We never rest. Our facilities and support staff handle your meeting with effortless elegance. And we stay focused on you, your vision and your clients. It’s how we work. So it never feels like work to you. It just feels right.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT KIERLANDMEETINGS.COM OR CALL 480.624.1000

© 2014 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All rights reserved. Westin is a registered trademark of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates.


The Meeting Market

Planning Tips to Avoid Common Meeting Mistakes

As special events like Super Bowl show us over and over again, such events give the Valley tremendous positive national and even global exposure as a place to hold a convention. New properties like Mountain Shadows in Paradise Valley continue to expand the area’s potential, as do revitalization efforts such as Roosevelt Row, a formerly rundown neighborhood that’s now a booming arts district where many of downtown’s coolest independent businesses are located. Our market offers tremendous variety for meeting planners, who are seeing the Valley as

execute on a successful conference, convention or

Venues attract locals and long-distance

a viable option for events. Hotels continue to show strong demand, which is the first level of how to take the temperature of the industry. Business may be booking at a short-term pace, but venues are getting a lot of calls checking spring and summer. And in the summer, of course, the market attracts us locals who see an opportunity to take advantage of easy access to a beautiful resort while also taking advantage of value. The market includes Paradise Valley, Phoenix venues with a Scottsdale address and the Native American communities on the city’s —RaeAnne Marsh borders.

With the large array of details it takes to plan and trade show; small details that make a large impact often slip through the cracks. The following are tips to avoid common mistakes of a business conference. Book soundproof conference rooms. One of the largest complaints at business meetings is frequent interruptions. It’s often difficult to control outside noise, but many cities across the U.S. have invested in soundproofing options that eliminate the pandemonium of the outside world. Monitor meeting room temperatures. There is nothing worse than being stuck in a freezing cold, or burning hot, room when not being dressed properly for it. Research shows that the optimal work environment for people is 72–77 degrees Fahrenheit. Within this range, attendees will not only be comfortable but be able to work as optimally as possible. Provide a map of all meeting areas. Larger conventions create unneeded anxiety for those who are unfamiliar with the area or layout of the location. Ensuring that each attendee is provided a map of the meeting rooms before the convention is ideal in pacifying frustrations and getting the attendees where they need to go.  Provide healthy snack options at break times. Eating healthy is an easy way to make sure all the

Presents

Valley

Your A Guide toEvent t Next Grea

About Our Guide We hope you will enjoy this comprehensive compilation of the Valley’s top sites for business events, conventions and meetings. Our Valley is home to some of the best properties, with state-of-the-art technology and facilities to ensure the success of your next great event. In Business Magazine has compiled this guide so companies can compare amenities and make choices for their local

Children’s

FEATURING Convention • Phoenix Merestone ement • Inn Executive • EMP Manag Phoenix • Thunderbird Museum of Steakhouse rn Town & Rawhide Weste

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

Center

events. This guide will be online at www.inbusinessmag.com for a full year.

conference attendees are at their peak performance at the sometimes (unnecessily) long meetings and presentations. Recent studies have shown that eating healthy can increase an individual’s productivity and focus. It’s a good idea, then, for the organizer to tailor a snack selection to be inclusive of those who may crave some healthy options.

—Michael Lentin, owner and

CEO of CitiQuiet, market leader in soundproof windows CitiQuiet citiquiet.com

FEB. 2017

47


Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

900,000

62,000

Scottsdale

n/a

n/a

> 100,000

14,000

Tempe

n/a

n/a

67,000

5,600

Mesa

n/a

n/a

49,000

5,000

Phoenix

6

1200

20,000

277

Embassy Suites by Hilton 5001 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 949-1414 embassysuiteshilton.com

Scottsdale

21

11,200

30,000

312

Courtyard Scottsdale Old Town 3311 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 429-7785 marriott.com

Scottsdale

4

1,360

2,200

180

Crowne Plaza Hotel Phoenix – Airport 4300 E. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 273-7778 ichotelsgroup.com

Phoenix

6

5,376

9,300

180

Crowne Plaza Phoenix 2532 W. Peoria Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85029 (602) 943-2341 ihg.com

Phoenix

13

5,400

13,000

250

DoubleTree by Hilton Phoenix 2100 S. Priest Dr. Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 967-1441 doubletree3.hilton.com

Tempe

12

7,493

30,000

270

Venue

# of Meeting Rooms

n/a

City

n/a

# of Sleeping Rooms

Total Meeting Space

Largest Room

# of Meeting Rooms

City

Venue

Phoenix

Conference Centers

Convention & Visitors Bureaus (con’t)

Black Canyon Conference Center 9440 N. 25th Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85021 (602) 944-0569 blackcanyonconferencecenter.com

Greater Phoenix Convention & Visitors Bureau 125 N. 2nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 254-6500 visitphoenix.com

Desert Willow Conference Center 4340 E. Cotton Center Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 431-0001 desertwillowconferencecenter.com Poco Diablo Resort & Conference Center 1752 Arizona 179 Sedona, AZ 86336 (928) 282-7333 pocodiablo.com Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center 15249 N. 59th Ave. Glendale, AZ 85306 (602) 978-7987 thunderbirdexecutiveinn.com See profile on page 59

Phoenix

Phoenix

Sedona

21

11

10

5,169

5,435

3,300

51,000

40,000

8,500

n/a

n/a

137

Mesa Convention Center 263 N. Center St. Mesa, AZ 85201 (480) 644-2178 mesaconventioncenter.com Phoenix Convention Center 100 N. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 262-6225 phoenixconventioncenter.com See profile on page 55

Glendale

24

3,450

> 40,000

134

Hotels Camby Hotel 2401 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 468-0700 thecamby.com Glendale

2

12,788

40,000

n/a

Mesa

15

19,000

40,000

n/a

Phoenix

90

46,000

160,000

n/a

Convention & Visitors Bureaus Glendale Convention & Visitors Bureau 5800 W. Glenn Dr. Glendale, AZ 85301 (623) 930-4500 visitglendale.com

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FEB. 2017

Tempe Tourism Office 222 S. Mill Avenue, Suite 120 Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 894-8158 tempetourism.com Visit Mesa 120 N. Center St. Mesa, AZ 85201 (480) 827-4700 visitmesa.com

Convention Centers Glendale Civic Center 5750 W. Glenn Dr. Glendale, AZ 85301 (623) 930-4300 glendaleciviccenter.com

Scottsdale Convention & Visitors Bureau 4343 N. Scottsdale Rd., Suite 70 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 421-1004 experiencescottsdale.com

Glendale

17

95,000

612,500

8,500

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


Children’s Museum of Phoenix In the heart of Downtown Phoenix, the Children’s Museum of Phoenix is one of the top three children’s museums in the country and offers a spectacular space for your next special event. Housed in the historic Monroe School Building, the Museum features three floors of creative, hands-on exhibits that will entertain and delight. Originally built in 1913, this grand building has been lovingly restored to its natural beauty and renovated to welcome a new generation of children and adults. Inside, you will find original exposed brick and ceiling rafters, hardwood floors, walls coated with VOC-free paint and many spaces that use green and recycled

SPECIAL VENUE PROFILE

AT-A-GLANCE Company Name: Children’s Museum of Phoenix Venue / Hotel Address: 215 N. 7th St., Phoenix, AZ 85034

materials, including a sparkling CD wall and a oneof-a-kind silverware chandelier. This unique facility accommodates any type of gathering, from formal sit-down dinners, cocktail parties and business meetings to convention kick-offs, team-building events and parties where adults can let their inner child come out and play! The Museum’s special events team will work with you to make your event a one-of-a-kind creation to amaze and amuse your guests. If you’re looking for a venue that is different from the others, you’ve come to the right place. Contact our Special Events Team at (602) 253-0501 or events@childmusephx.org.

Phone: (602) 253-0501 Website: www.childrensmuseumofphoenix.org Most Distinguishing Feature: Iconic Three-Story Climber Total Exhibit Hall/Space (in sq. ft.): 48,000 Largest Contiguous Space (in sq. ft.): 4,000 Year Established Locally: 2008 Number of Events in 2015: 141 Nearest Hotel: Sheraton Grand Phoenix Event Planning Services: Yes Food & Beverage on Property: Yes Transportation & Access: No Parking / Valet: Yes

ADVERTISING PROFILE

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

FEB. 2017

49


City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

6,800

159

10,000

242

Embassy Suites Phoenix Biltmore 2630 E. Camelback Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-3992 embassysuites3.hilton.com

Phoenix

8

3,696

10,000

232

Renaissance Phoenix Downtown Hotel 50 E. Adams St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 333-0000 marriott.com

Phoenix

20

20,000

50,000

524

Renaissance Phoenix Glendale Hotel & Spa 9495 W. Coyotes Blvd. Glendale, AZ 85305 (623) 937-3700 renaissanceglendale.com

Glendale

17

3,400

115,085

352

Scottsdale Marriott Suites Old Town 7325 E. 3rd Ave. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945-1550 marriott.com

Scottsdale

13

1,400

9,755

249

Sheraton Crescent Hotel 2620 W. Dunlap Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85021 (602) 943-8200 sheratoncrescent.com

Phoenix

17

8,064

40,000

349

Sheraton Phoenix Airport Hotel – Tempe 1600 S. 52nd St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 967-6600 sheratonphoenixairport.com

Tempe

11

3,450

9,181

209

Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel 340 N. 3rd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 262-2500 sheratonphoenixdowntown.com

Phoenix

20

27,170

112,00

1,000

Windemere Hotel & Conference Center 5750 E. Main St. Mesa, AZ 85205 (480) 985-3600 windemerehotelmesa.com

Mesa

12

3,600

8,500

114

Phoenix

4

5,000

5,000

160

Hilton Phoenix/Mesa 1011 W. Holmes Ave. Mesa, AZ 85210 (480) 833-5555 hilton.com Hotel Palomar Phoenix, A Kimpton Hotel 2 E. Jefferson St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-6633 hotelpalomar-phoenix.com Hotel San Carlos 202 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-4121 hotelsancarlos.com Hotel Valley Ho 6850 E. Main St. Scottsdale AZ 85251 (480) 248-2000 hotelvalleyho.com Hyatt Regency Phoenix 122 N. 2nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 252-1234 phoenix.hyatt.com Phoenix Airport Marriott 1101 N. 44th St. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 273-7373 marriott.com Phoenix Marriott Mesa 200 N. Centennial Way Mesa, AZ 85201 (480) 898-8300 marriott.com

50

FEB. 2017

Tempe

Mesa

Phoenix

Phoenix

Scottsdale

Phoenix

Phoenix

Mesa

8

17

10

2

12

32

15

27

4,000

5,600

3159

702

4,000

12,000

750

1,815

10,000

25,000

10,000

1,200

13,000

48,000

24,716

58,000

224

260

242

128

243

693

364

Venue

1,800

3,500

# of Sleeping Rooms

5

11

Total Meeting Space

Chandler

Phoenix

Embassy Suites Phoenix – Tempe 4400 S. Rural Rd. Tempe, AZ 85282 (480) 897-7444 embassysuites3.hilton.com

Largest Room

Radisson Phoenix Chandler 7475 W. Chandler Blvd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (480) 961-4444 radisson.com

# of Meeting Rooms

DoubleTree Suites by Hilton Phoenix 320 N. 44th St. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 225-0500 doubletreephoenix.com

City

Hotels (con’t)

Venue

Hotels (con’t)

Wyndham Garden Hotels Phoenix 3600 N. 2nd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85013 (602) 604-4900 wyndham.com

274

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


EMP Management

EVENT PLANNER PROFILE

With more than 20 years of events, marketing Chamber of Commerce, Arizona Association and promotional experience, Amy Corben has of Industries (now part of Arizona Chamber of gone from the corporate world to owning her Commerce and Industry), Heasley & Partners, own small business here in the Valley. As a InMedia Company, Phoenix Art Museum, Phoenix marketing director for The Irvine Company in Film Festival and Scottsdale Fashion Week, Newport Beach, California, she oversaw annual among many more. She has raised hundreds of budgets exceeding $1.5 million dollars and a large thousands of dollars for charitable causes and portfolio that included neighborhood, community campaigns, and has managed as well as overseen and power shopping centers. She later re-located numerous successful events throughout the to Arizona with her family and took on a new Valley. To contact EMP Management, please visit role as senior community relations specialist empmanagement.net or call (480) 206-6654. in Community Relations for Cox Communications in Phoenix. She helped raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Cox Charities among other responsibilities that included large and small-scale events. As a small-business owner, Corben has had the opportunity to work with a wide range of clientele that include City of Tempe, City of Surprise, Arizona Meth Project, Arthritis Foundation, Consular Corps of Arizona, Debbie Gaby Charities, Governor Doug Ducey’s EMP Management and friends supporting Suns Charities 88 Slam Dunk.” Inauguration, Greater Phoenix

AT-A-GLANCE Company Name: EMP Management, LLC Address: 20701 N. Scottsdale Rd., Suites 107-233, Scottsdale, AZ 85255 Phone: (480) 206-6654 Website: www.empmanagement.net Distinguishing Features: By leveraging community contacts with sponsors, underwriters, vendors as well as a strong network of media, retail, restaurant and hospitality partners, we are able to help our clients achieve event and fundraising success Year Established Locally: 2005 Number of Events in 2015: 8 Nearest Hotel: The Fairmont Princess Scottsdale Event Planning Services: Yes

Governor’s Inaugural Ceremonies

Specializing in helping clients achieve their goals with events, marketing and promotional needs.

Arthritis Foundation Gala

Debbie Gaby’s Celebrity Catwalk

July 4th Tempe Town Lake Festival

Amy Corben, President 20701 N. Scottsdale Rd., # 107-233 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 amy.corben@cox.net | (480) 206-6654 ADVERTISING PROFILE

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

FEB. 2017

51


City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

35,920

210

Gainey Suites Hotel 7300 E. Gainey Suites Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480) 922-6969 gaineysuiteshotel.com

Scottsdale

5

2,925

8,300

162

Grand Canyon

3

3,400

4,500

250

Harrah’s Ak-Chin 15406 N. Maricopa Rd. Maricopa, AZ 85139 (480) 802-5000 harrahsakchin.com

Maricopa

4

4,020

5,000

300

Hermosa Inn 5532 N. Palo Cristi Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (602) 955-8614 hermosainn.com

Scottsdale

4

1,989

2,326

43

Hilton Scottsdale Resort & Villas 6333 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 948-7750 hilton.com

Scottsdale

13

10,000

25,000

265

Hyatt Regency Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Gainey Ranch 7500 E. Doubletree Ranch Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480) 444-1234 scottsdale.hyatt.com

Scottsdale

32

14,280

70,000

493

JW Marriott Phoenix Desert Ridge Resort & Spa 5350 Marriott Dr. Phoenix, AZ 85054 (480) 293-5000 marriott.com

Phoenix

40

33,218

311,853

950

Scottsdale

20

19,968

91,119

453

Phoenix

3

1,200

2,164

328

Arizona Golf Resort & Conference Center 425 S. Power Rd. Mesa, AZ 85206 (480) 832-3202 arizonagolfresort.com Arizona Grand Resort & Spa 8000 Arizona Grand Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85044 (602) 438-9000 arizonagrandresort.com

Mesa

Phoenix

Carefree Resort & Conference Center 37220 N. Mule Train Rd. Carefree, AZ 85377 (480) 488-5300 carefree-resort.com

Carefree

CopperWynd Resort & Club 13225 N. Eagle Ridge Dr. Fountain Hills, AZ 85268 (480) 333-1900 copperwynd.com

Fountain Hills

Crowne Plaza San Marcos Golf Resort 1 San Marcos Pl. Chandler, AZ 85225 (480) 812-0900 sanmarcosresort.com DoubleTree Paradise Valley Resort by Hilton Hotel – Scottsdale 5401 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85250 (480) 947-5400 doubletree.hilton.com Fairmont Scottsdale Princess 7575 E. Princess Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (480) 585-4848 fairmont.com FireSky Resort & Spa 4925 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 945-7666 fireskyresort.com

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FEB. 2017

Chandler

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

9

125

26

1

16

9

49

10

5,170

14,031

11,000

6,000

9,600

12,064

23,000

6,800

200,000

12,000

> 120,000

60,000

8,000

35,000

40,000

< 150,000

14,000

740

186

744

207

32

249

378

750

204

Venue

5,940

24,576

# of Sleeping Rooms

8

76

Total Meeting Space

Scottsdale

Phoenix

Largest Room

Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North 10600 E. Crescent Moon Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85262 (480) 515-5700 fourseasons.com

# of Meeting Rooms

Arizona Biltmore, A Waldorf Astoria Resort 2400 E. Missouri Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-6600 arizonabiltmore.com

City

Resorts (con’t)

Venue

Resorts

Grand Canyon Squire Inn 74 Arizona 64 Grand Canyon Village, AZ 86023 (928) 638-2681 grandcanyonsquire.com

JW Marriott Scottsdale Camelback Inn Resort & Spa 5402 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-1700 marriott.com The Legacy Golf Resort 6808 S. 32nd St. Phoenix, AZ 85042 (602) 305-5500 shellhospitality.com

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


Merestone

PRODUCTION PROFILE

Merestone is an award-winning, full-service production company that specializes in creating experiences that help you, our clients, educate, communicate, inspire and elevate the people who mean the most to your company: your employees, your customers and your vendors. From corporate events, conferences and business meetings to star-studded ceremonies, product launches and trade shows, Merestone is your single-source production company that offers in-house direct services and a versatile staff to glue it all together. Merestone is supported by a 65,000-squarefoot warehouse, located in Tempe, Arizona, and

warehouse offices in Dallas, Texas. Our extensive inventory allows us to offer many services in-house, including welding, sculpting, graphic printing, fine carpentry, scenic painting and specialty finishing. Our warehouse also houses three studios and wardrobe, make-up, rehearsal and editing bays. As a convenience for our clients, we maintain a fleet of trucks licensed to deliver all over the United States, North America and Mexico. Plus, Merestone is a licensed cargo shipper, allowing our reach to be worldwide. CALL MERESTONE TODAY!

AT-A-GLANCE Company Name: Merestone Address: 7232 E. First St., Scottsdale, AZ 85251 Phone: (480) 945-4631 Website: merestone.com Most Distinguishing Feature: Event and Meeting Production Company with Direct Service Under One Roof. Services: Audio Video, Scenic Design, Staging, Production Staff and Trucking, Content Concepts, Videography & Editing, Scripting, Studios, Pre â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Post Production, Renderings, Graphic Design & Printing, Venue & Space Definition, Negotiations, CAD Drawings, Electrical & Rigging

Image Needed

Year Established Locally: 1974 Number of Events in 2015: 2,000-3,000 Award (National & International) 250 + Industry Awards

ADVERTISING PROFILE

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

FEB. 2017

53


City

# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms

50,000

326

Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort & Spa 5594 W. Wild Horse Pass Rd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (602) 225-0100 wildhorsepassresort.com

Chandler

20

17,376

180,000

500

Talking Stick Resort 9800 E. Indian Bend Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85256 (480) 850-7777 talkingstickresort.com

Scottsdale

16

25,000

113000

495

Tempe

20

9,384

30,000

303

W Scottsdale 7277 E. Camelback Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 970-2100 wscottsdalehotel.com

Scottsdale

8

3,500

14,000

230

We-Ko-Pa Resort & Conference Center 10438 N. Fort McDowell Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85264 (480) 789-5300 wekoparesort.com

Scottsdale

15

18,000

25,000

246

Westin Kierland Resort & Spa 6902 E. Greenway Pkwy. Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (480) 624-1000 kierlandresort.com

Scottsdale

41

25,000

> 200,000

732

The Wigwam Resort & Golf Club 300 E. Wigwam Ln. Litchfield Park, AZ 85340 (623) 935-3811 wigwamarizona.com

Phoenix

25

10,800

100,000

331

Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino 5040 Wild Horse Pass Blvd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (800) 946-4452 wingilariver.com/wild-horse-pass

Chandler

10

8,000

12,000

242

Orange Tree Golf Resort 10601 N. 56th St. Scottsdale, AZ 85254 (480) 948-6100 shellhospitality.com The Phoenician 6000 E. Camelback Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85251 (480) 941-8200 thephoenician.com Phoenix Marriott Tempe at The Buttes 2000 W. Westcourt Way Tempe, AZ 85282 (602) 225-9000 marriott.com Pointe Hilton Squaw Peak Resort 7677 N. 16th St. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 997-2626 squawpeakhilton.com Pointe Hilton Tapatio Cliffs Resort 11111 N. 7th St. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 866-7500 tapatiocliffshilton.com Sanctuary Camelback Mountain 5700 E. McDonald Dr. Paradise Valley, AZ 85253 (480) 948-2100 sanctuaryoncamelback.com Scottsdale Marriott at McDowell Mountains 16770 N. Perimeter Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85260 (480) 502-3836 marriott.com Scottsdale Plaza Resort 7200 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-5000 scottsdaleplaza.com

54

FEB. 2017

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

Tempe

Phoenix

Phoenix

Paradise Valley

Scottsdale

Scottsdale

16

4

24

15

46

36

11

24

21

9,216

5,000

20,533

10,000

9,760

16,000

3,204

5,005

10,080

> 13,000

27,000

10,000

> 160,000

40,000

< 48000

65,000

8,000

14,527

40,000

125

293

160

583

354

546

583

109

266

Venue

10,000

2,365

# of Sleeping Rooms

50

7

Total Meeting Space

Scottsdale

Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia 4949 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 627-3200 omnihotels.com

Scottsdale

Largest Room

Scottsdale Resort & Conference Center 7700 E. McCormick Pkwy. Scottsdale, AZ 85258 (480) 991-9000 destinationhotels.com/scottsdaleresort

# of Meeting Rooms

The McCormick Scottsdale 7401 N. Scottsdale Rd. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-5050 millenniumhotels.com

City

Resorts (conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t)

Venue

Resorts (conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t)

Tempe Mission Palms Hotel & Conference Center 60 E. 5th St. Tempe, AZ 85281 (480) 894-1400 missionpalms.com

404

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Phoenix Convention Center Located in the center of our vibrant walkable downtown, the Phoenix Convention Center & Venues is mere steps from a variety of urban eateries, live music, professional sports, art museums and more. So whether you’re looking for restaurants featured on The Food Network or just wanting to take in some local culture, downtown Phoenix has something for everyone. The Phoenix Convention Center & Venues was named one of the top 10 convention center facilities in the country and offers 900,000 square feet of meeting and exhibit space, including a 312,500 squarefoot main exhibit hall and a 46,000 square-foot ballroom, complemented by Symphony Hall and the historic Orpheum Theatre. Just four miles from Sky Harbor International Airport, the Convention Center is within walking distance of more than 3,000 hotel rooms and accessible to 6,000 hotel rooms located along the Metro Light Rail.

VENUE PROFILE

Company Name: Phoenix Convention Center & Venues Venue / Hotel Address: 100 N. 3rd St., Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: (800) 282-4842, (602) 262-6225 Website: www.phoenixconventioncenter.com Most Distinguishing Feature: Largest ballroom in Arizona Total Exhibit Hall/Space (in sq. ft.): 900,000 Largest Contiguous Space (in sq. ft.): 312,500

The Phoenix Convention Center was in the international spotlight in 2015 with the NFL Super Bowl Experience. The hottest tickets in town were for The Tonight Show at the Orpheum Theatre and nationally televised NFL Honors at Symphony Hall. Phoenix recently hosted the 2016 College Football Playoff Fan Central and is looking forward to hosting the NCAA Final Four in 2017.

Year Established Locally: 1972 Number of Events in 2015: n/a Nearest Hotel: Hyatt Regency Phoenix Event Planning Services: Yes Food & Beverage on Property: Yes Transportation & Access: Yes Parking / Valet: Yes

Copper Blues Rock Pub & Kitchen

6-MINUTE WALK At the Phoenix Convention Center in Downtown Phoenix, your aendees are minutes away from the eclectic nightlife and amazing local music they deserve. So book today and watch your event take a big step in the right direction. PHOENIXCONVENTIONCENTER.COM |

800-282-4842 | ADVERTISING PROFILE

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# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms n/a

Comerica Theatre 400 W. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85003 (602) 379-2800 comericatheatre.com

Phoenix

5

40,000

80,000

n/a

2

10,000

Arizona Diamondbacks – Chase Field 401 E. Jefferson St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 514-8400 azchasefield.com Arizona Science Center 600 E. Washington St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 716-2000 azscience.org Babylon Banquet Hall 8035 N. 43rd Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85051 (623) 930-9049 babylonbanquethall.com Bentley Projects 215 E. Grant St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 340-9200 bentleygallery.com Boojum Tree 16026 N. 36th St. Phoenix, AZ 85032 (602) 867-8975 boojumtree.com The Carnegie Center 1700 W. Washington St., Suite 300 Phoenix, AZ 85007 (602) 926-3604 azlibrary.gov Castles ‘n’ Coasters 9445 N. Metro Pkwy. E. Phoenix, AZ 85051 (602) 997-7575 castlesncoasters.com The Cedars Banquet Hall 1702 E. Northern Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85020 (602) 944-2566 cedarsbanquethall.com

56

FEB. 2017

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Outside space only

21

9

1

1

2

2

2

1

n/a

39,600

n/a

10,000

22,000

10,000

1,800

3,935

3,600

45,000

> 100,000

n/a

10,000

22,000

10,000

3000 (for nonprofits only)

5,000

3,600

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

City

< 14,000

n/a

Venue

5,000

15,700

# of Sleeping Rooms

3

2

15,000 (ice rink)

Total Meeting Space

Phoenix

Arizona Center 400 E. Van Buren St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 271-4000 arizonacenter.com

Phoenix

Largest Room

Children’s Museum of Phoenix 215 N. 7th St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 253-0501 childrensmuseumofphoenix.org See profile on page 49

# of Meeting Rooms

Arcadia Ice Arena 3853 E. Thomas Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85018 (602) 957-9966 arcadiaice.com

City

Special Event Venues (con’t)

Venue

Special Event Venues

The Croft Downtown – Phoenix 22 E. Buchman St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 462-9700 thecroftdowntown.com

n/a

Cutler-Plotkin Jewish Heritage Center 122 E. Culver St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 241-7870 azjhs.org

Phoenix

2

2,500

5,500

n/a

Desert Botanical Garden 1201 N. Galvin Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (480) 941-1225 dbg.org

Phoenix

5

4,200

5,000

n/a

Phoenix

Outdoor picnicstyle only

n/a

n/a

n/a

Scottsdale

14

3,364

13,000

54

GameWorks – Tempe 5000 S. Arizona Mills Cir. Tempe, AZ 85282 602-268-1331 gameworks.com

Phoenix

4

2,500

10,000

n/a

Heard Museum 2301 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 252-8840 heard.org

Phoenix

9

5,300

< 20,000

n/a

Enchanted Island Amusement Park 1202 W. Encanto Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85007 (602) 254-1200 enchantedisland.com The Franciscan Renewal Center 5802 E. Lincoln Dr. Scottsdale, AZ 85253 (480) 948-7460 thecasa.org

n/a

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Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse is the Valley’s premier western venue, offering groups a unique journey back in time. Encompassing more than 160 acres of beautiful Sonoran Desert, Rawhide is nestled in the center of the Wild Horse Pass area, located in Chandler and in close proximity to Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe and Mesa. Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse is the perfect place to host a private event whether you are a group of 10 or 10,000, offering 14 distinct private venues, all providing a true western flare to any event. Rawhide’s Frontier Hall is the East Valley’s largest special event venue, offering 45,000 square feet of continuous indoor space adjacent to the 50,000-square-foot Sonoran Lawn. Rawhide’s Group Sales team will provide complete service, which includes planning from the vision to the execution of the event, personalized group

SPECIAL VENUE PROFILE

AT-A-GLANCE Venue Address: 5700 W. North Loop Rd., Chandler, AZ 85226 Phone: (480) 502-5600 Website: www.Rawhide.com Most Distinguishing Feature: Western Town & Steakhouse Largest Contiguous Space (in sq. ft.): 45,000 Year Established Locally: 1970 Number of Events in 2015: n/a Nearest Hotel:

menu creation, and access to top-notch unique entertainment. We look forward to welcoming you to our 1880s western town with a true taste of the Old West you’ll not find anywhere else in Arizona! For additional information, visit www. Rawhide.com or call the Group Sales Department at (480) 502-5600 for availability and menus.

Sheraton Wild Horse Pass Resort & Casino Event Planning Services: Yes Food & Beverage on Property: Yes Transportation & Access: Yes Parking / Valet: Yes

Bring your next corporate event West! Rawhide Western Town & Steakhouse in Chandler — in close proximity to Phoenix, Scottsdale, Tempe and Mesa — is the perfect place to host a private event.

Groups of 10 to 10,000 Distinct private venues available

Provide a True Western Flare to any event… Frontier Hall is the East Valley’s Largest Event Venue. • 45,000 sq. ft. of continuous indoor space • Adjacent to the 50,000-sq.-ft. Sonoran Lawn • Full-service facility with Catering & Event Planning

Contact the sales department: info@rawhide.com or (480) 502-5600

rawhide.com

ADVERTISING PROFILE

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

FEB. 2017

57


# of Meeting Rooms

Largest Room

Total Meeting Space

# of Sleeping Rooms n/a

n/a

Turf Paradise 1501 W. Bell Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85023 (602) 942-1101 turfparadise.com

Phoenix

3

n/a

n/a

n/a

University of Arizona College of Medicine 550 E. Van Buren St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 827-2002 medicine.arizona.edu

Phoenix

1

4,600

6,400

300

Valley Youth Theatre 525 N. 1st St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-8188 vyt.com

Phoenix

1

2,500

2,500

n/a

n/a

Venue at the Grove 7010 S. 27th Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85041 (602) 456-0803 venueatthegrove.com

Phoenix

1

2,250

2,250

n/a

The Wrigley Mansion 2501 E. Telawa Trail Phoenix, AZ 85016 (602) 955-4079 wrigleymansionclub.com

Phoenix

12

1,075

3,000

n/a

K1 Speed 2425 S. 21st St. Phoenix, AZ 85034 (602) 275-5278 k1speed.com MonOrchid 214 E. Roosevelt St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 253-0339 monorchid.com Musical Instrument Museum 4725 E. Mayo Blvd. Phoenix, AZ 85050 (480) 478-6000 mim.org Nina Mason Pulliam Rio Salado Audubon Center 3131 S. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85040 (602) 468-6470 riosalado.audubon.org

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

Phoenix

2

3

6

2

1,000

4,500

9,300

1,920

1,500

6,000

30,000

3,000

n/a

n/a

Penske Racing Museum 7125 E. Chauncey Ln. Phoenix, AZ 85054 (480) 538-4444 penskeracingmuseum.com

Phoenix

2

2,500

5,000

n/a

Phoenix Art Museum 1625 N. Central Ave. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 257-1222 phxart.org

Phoenix

5

6,600

8,600

n/a

Phoenix Zoo 455 N. Galvin Pkwy. Phoenix, AZ 85008 (602) 286-3800 phoenixzoo.org

Phoenix

16

4,000

4,300

n/a

Rawhide 5700 W. North Loop Rd. Chandler, AZ 85226 (480) 502-5600 rawhide.com See profile on page 57

Chandler

14

46,000

> 75,000

n/a

Secret Garden 2501 E. Baseline Rd. Phoenix, AZ 85042 (602) 268-5522 secretgardenevents.com

Phoenix

4

2,500

3,000

n/a

58

FEB. 2017

City

9,000

9,000

Venue

6,500

2,980

# of Sleeping Rooms

2

6

Total Meeting Space

Phoenix

Phoenix

Largest Room

n/a

Stand Up Live 50 W. Jefferson St., Suite 200 Phoenix, AZ 85003 (480) 719-6100 standuplive.com

# of Meeting Rooms

Herberger Theater Center 222 E. Monroe St. Phoenix, AZ 85004 (602) 254-7399 herbergertheater.org

City

Special Event Venues (con’t)

Venue

Special Event Venues (con’t)

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


HOTEL PROFILE

Thunderbird Executive Inn Thunderbird Executive Inn is located on the corner of 59th Avenue and Greenway in Glendale. The hotel is located on the campus of the renowned Thunderbird School of Global Management. The school was once an airbase established to train American, Canadian, British and Chinese pilots during World War II. Several landmark buildings, including the airfield control tower, barracks and airplane hangar, can still be seen on campus. Then, in 1946, the base was transformed into the first-ever graduate business school to focus exclusively on international management. The school is a landmark in Glendale; however, the hotel remained a secret. In 2006, Thunderbird Executive Inn opened its doors to the public. The hotel offers 134 newly renovated guestrooms, an outdoor saltwater pool and access to the YMCA. Additional amenities, such as the complimentary 24-hour snack lounge

AT-A-GLANCE Company Name: Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center Address: 15249 N. 59th Ave., Glendale, AZ 85306 Phone: (480) 945-4631 Website: thunderbirdexecutiveinn.com Most Distinguishing Feature: Located on the historic campus of Thunderbird School of Global Management with 40,000 square feet of meeting

and wireless Internet, brands the hotel as the “Hidden Gem” of Glendale. With many tiered auditorium-style meeting rooms, a 14,000-square-foot pavilion, numerous outdoor venues and a full-service catering department, Thunderbird Executive Inn is the ideal location in the West Valley for meetings and events. Call (602) 978-7987 for more information.

space, including six state-of-the-art auditoriums and 24 breakout rooms Year Established Locally: 1996 Event Planning Services:Yes Food & Beverage on Property: Yes Transportation & Access: Yes Parking / Valet: Yes

Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center | Glendale, Arizona

1 Global

Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center is a unique Arizona destination serving clients from around the world. Nestled on the historic campus of Thunderbird School of Global Management, the recently renovated Thunderbird Executive Inn will surprise and delight you with: 4134 upscale guest rooms 4More than 40,000 square feet of meeting space, including six state-of-the-art auditoriums and 24 breakout rooms 4Unique diversions such as the world famous Thunderbird Pub, located in an historic WWII military airfield control tower Whether you’re planning a conference, business meeting, training program, trade show or simply a vacation escape to sunny Arizona — our hotel and conference center is an exceptional choice.

www.thunderbirdexecutiveinn.com 1 Global Place, Glendale, AZ 85306 Inquiries: 602.978.7987 Email: hotelsales@thunderbird.edu ADVERTISING PROFILE

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FEB. 2017

59


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Allhands, Joanna, 37

Garton, Eric, 29

Low, Jodi, 37

Sales, Vince, 30

Anderson, Eric, 31

Green, Leonard C., 29

Mankins, Michael C., 29

Samuels, Christopher, 39

Brooks, Susan, 37

Harper-Marinick, Maria, Ph.D., 37

Manley, Jim, 22

Smerz, Ken, 13

Brown, Cleveland, 14

James, Veronique, 22

Marenghi, Amanda, 17

Sparks, Dan, 31

Carleton, Mary Ruth, 30

Karpuk, Vojtek, 20

Meyer, Robert L., 12

Stockdale, Joanne, 38

Carr, Tammy, 28

Kasper, Jenavi, 22

Moses, Louie, 11

Sutton Fell, Sara, 15

Clyde, Matthew, 22

Kennedy, Joe, 66

Olsson, Erik, 12

Teller, Stefanie, 12

Conschafter, Stephen, 31

Kingston, Emma, 17

Raher, Phil, 31

Tollefson, Richard, 30

Doucett, Joe, 14

Kukk, Christopher L., 29

Richardson, David, 18

Zylstra, Steven G., 16

Ellis, Shana, 38

Lentin, Michael, 47

Rutschman, Jenna, 14

1100 KFNX, 21

Flower Child, 36

AAA Phone On Hold, 10

Ford, 34

Phoenix Children’s Hospital Foundation, 43

Affinity Technology, 63

FSW Funding, 61

Alerus, 19

Global Chamber, 32

Alliance Bank of Arizona, 3

GPS Insight, 2

Apache Junction Chamber of Commerce, 33

Grand Canyon University 42

APS, 5

Greater Phoenix Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, 32

Arizona Association for Economic Development, 31

HireLive, 19, 31

Arizona Gay Chamber of Commerce, 33

Ideas Collide, 22

Arizona Relay Service, 10

Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, 66

Arizona Technology Council, 33 AZ Healthcare Marketing, 17 Bathroom Sink, The, 14 Brio Tuscan Grille, 36 California State University, Sacramento, 30 Cathy Hotchkiss, 61 Centers for Habilitation, The, 38 Chandler Chamber of Commerce, 33 Children’s Museum of Phoenix, 49 Cibo, 36

Phoenix Convention Center, 55 Phoenix Philanthropy Group, The, 30, 35 PT Clinic Marketing, 17 Qualcomm, 17 Rawhide Western Town and Steakhouse, 57

H&R Block, 34

Arizona Community Foundation, 32

Arizona Republic, The, 37

Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 12

Redirect Health, 67 Reliable Background Screening, 63 San Diego State University, 30 Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce, 32, 33

Infusionsoft, 62

SmithGroupJJR, 31

iSolved, 13

Snell & Wilmer, 68

James Agency, The, 22

SRP, 9

Jennings, Strouss & Salmon, PLC, 20

Sundt Construction, 12

Jive, 8

Support My Club, 35

Liquid Capitol, 4

Take Charge America, 18 TaxAct, 34 TechHire, 16 TechMedia, 33 Tempe Chamber of Commerce, 37 ThinkSmallBiz, 62 Thunderbird Executive Inn & Conference Center, 59 TurboTax, 34 Turo, 13 U & Improved, 37 UnitedHealthcare, 17 Vermillion Photo, 64 Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, 20 Waymo, 16 Wells Fargo, 44 Westin Kierland, The, 46 YWCA, 32

SVP Arizona, 14

Local Motors, 31 Manley Films & Media, 22 Marcellino Ristorante, 36

CHECK US OUT

Maricopa Association of Governments, 31 Maricopa Community Colleges, 37

CityQuiet, 47 Compliance Solutions, 32 Cookies From Home, 37 Cox Business, 60 Desert Schools Federal Credit Union, 21

MereStone, 53 MJ Insurance, 17 Mobile Mini, 12 Morgan Law Offices, 8 Moses, Inc., 11

Downtown Phoenix Inc., 63

Mortenson, 28

Eco3D, 13

National Bank of Arizona, 7, 22

EMP Management, 51

NewSpring Pharmacy, 62

Empowered PhXX, 32

North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce, 33

Federal Trade Commission, 20

Payscout, Inc., 14

FlexJobs, 15

Peoria Chamber of Commerce, 32

In each issue of In Business Magazine, we list both companies and indivuduals for quick reference. See the stories for links to more.

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Bold listings are advertisers supporting this issue of In Business Magazine.

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65 20FEB.1 7 INBUSINESSMAG.COM


A CANDID FORUM

BY

Corporate Tax Reform: It’s Not Big Business vs Small Business

Think tank argues corporate tax reform is too important for the U.S. economy to be held up for small-business interests by Joe Kennedy

Joe Kennedy is a senior fellow of the nonpartisan Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, a leading innovation policy think tank. itif.org

FEB. 20 1 7

66

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

Reforming the U.S. corporate tax system could provide a major boost to U.S. economic growth and competitiveness, but progress continues to stall due in large part to small-business advocates who claim that corporate-only reform is unfair and economically harmful. Our studies have found significant flaws in their arguments. Corporate tax reform is one of the most important things Congress can do to boost productivity, create more highpaying jobs and increase economic growth. Unfortunately, support for reform is being held hostage by small-business advocates who want special treatment. But when you look beyond their emotional rhetoric and focus on the facts, it is clear that one special interest should not hold up broader reform — especially when its claims are largely without merit. In fact, the vast majority of small businesses are not subject to the corporate income tax. Instead, these businesses are structured as sole proprietorships, partnerships or S corporations, and their income automatically passes through the business and appears on the owners’ individual tax returns. Because of this, small businesses are seeking reform of the individual tax system simultaneously with the corporate system — which is a much more politically difficult endeavor. While the individual tax system does also need to be reformed, that does not negate the vital need for corporate tax reform. And such reform is not inherently unfair to small businesses. To address specific aspects: Pass-throughs would still pay a lower overall effective tax rate. While it is accurate that corporate tax cuts will reduce the difference between what C corporations pay and what pass-throughs pay, pass-throughs will still have an advantage because they pay taxes only once (at the individual level), whereas individual corporate shareholders pay twice (at the corporate and individual levels). Reducing corporate tax expenditures will have a small

effect on small businesses. While eliminating some business deductions, exclusions and tax credits to pay for lower rates will result in higher total taxes for pass-throughs, the total effect is likely to be small because most tax expenditures are for individuals. Furthermore, the investment-spurring tax expenditures — which account for nearly 70 percent of tax benefits to pass-throughs — would not be changed. Most pass-through income is earned by large businesses. While the emotional support for small businesses tends to get conflated with the tax treatment of pass-through entities, pass-through income is largely skewed toward big businesses anyway. Tax law should not favor small business. Unlike most large multinational corporations, most small companies do not directly compete with foreign companies, either domestically or in overseas markets. Therefore, the effect of higher rates on small companies is limited since their competitors don’t benefit from lower rates. Small businesses will benefit from corporate tax reduction. Many small businesses are part of multinational supply chains and rise or fall on the health of their globally traded corporate customers. As corporate tax reduction enables corporations to invest more at home and sell more abroad, small businesses will benefit from the extra business. Congress has other ways of helping small business. These include tax simplification and regulatory reform. Reducing effective tax rates, especially on investment, research and innovation, is crucial for American competitiveness. Done right, corporate tax reform means greater investment by both domestic and foreign firms, enhanced competitiveness and faster productivity growth, all of which will help firms of all sizes and corporate forms. Tax reform will be a difficult political job under any circumstances, so let’s not make it tougher than it needs to be.


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February 2017 Issue of In Business Magazine  

Marketing a Business: The Real Story to Success

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