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2017 Business Healthcare Services Guide

Healthcare in Today’s Workplace Meeting employee needs with old and new options

Better Hiring and Recruiting

Employee

Retirement Accounts for Small Business

Infill Building:

What Laws Apply? $4.95 INBUSIN ESSMAG.COM

THIS ISSUE Arizona Technology Council


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APRIL 2017

COVER STORY

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Healthcare in Today’s Workplace

In Business Magazine explores healthcare options and decisions employers are implementing for their workforce as well as new directions in which healthcare and healthcare-related services are expanding. FEATUREs

30

Business Fronts for 2017

From one quarter in, Mike Pongon offers new perspectives on the year ahead.

36

Better Hiring and Recruiting

David Dourgarian shares best practices that combine brand awareness, technology and gut instinct. DEPARTMENTS

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Guest Editor

David Allazetta, CEO of UnitedHealthcare of Arizona and New Mexico, introduces the “Healthcare” issue.

10 PARTNER SECTION Spring 2O17 • aztechcouncil.org

IN THIS ISSUE 2 Festival Was Just the Start 4 Stronger Foundation 5 For Arizona’s Future 6 Council Launches Initiative to Create Mega PAC Congressional Connection for the Tech Industry 7 Board Gains Talents of Five

WHO WE ARE The Arizona Technology Council is Arizona’s premier trade association for science and technology companies.

Phoenix Office 2800 N. Central Ave., Suite 1920 Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: 602-343-8324 • Fax: 602-343-8330 info@aztechcouncil.org

Tucson Office

The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park 9040 S. Rita Rd., Ste. 1150 (near I-10 & Rita Rd.) Tucson, AZ 85747 Phone: 520-382-3281 • Fax: 520-382-3299 tucson@aztechcouncil.org

MANAGEMENT AND STAFF Steven G. Zylstra President + CEO Leigh Goldstein COO + Vice President, Programs + Events

Lauren Witte Manager, Marketing + Communication

Deborah Zack Senior Director,

Membership Services

Brian Krupski Director of Membership Services Melissa Craven Executive Assistant to President + CEO

Alex Rodriguez Vice President, Southern Arizona Regional Office, Tucson

Alison Boelts Manager, Operations + Events, Southern Arizona

Don Rodriguez Editor Ron Schott Executive Emeritus, Phoenix Don Ruedy Executive Emeritus, Tucson Justin Williams Executive Emeritus, Tucson Jeremy Babendure, Executive Director, Ph.D. Arizona SciTech Festival and Arizona Technology Council Foundation

Arizona Technology Report

Arizona Technology Council: The Voice of the Technology Industry

President’s Message With all the public conversations lately about keeping manufacturers in the United States, it’s time for a reality check: A lot of the jobs we typically equate with this sector will never come back. If you think this has anything to do with bad trade deals, think again. The reason is, 20 years of lean manufacturing have created incredible improvement in productivity and efficiency. Six Sigma and kaizen are just a few of the techniques and philosophies that manufacturing has been focused on for the past few decades. And, yes, technology most definitely has played a part in this change. Consider what self-driving vehicles are going to do to the transportation industry, one of the largest employers in the U.S. economy. From taxi drivers to long-haul truckers — all are at risk of ultimately losing their way of earning a living. And that’s just one industry! These workers will need to find other ways to operate in the new economy. We shouldn’t try to bring back jobs that literally no longer exist because of reasons that I’ve cited. What we now must be focused on as a nation is training and retraining the massive number of people who are going to be displaced in the next 20 years. We should be concentrating on upskilling and retraining, and getting prepared for this enormous displacement that’s going to happen not only in transportation and manufacturing but in a multitude of areas as we undergo the digitalization of everything. Every aspect — whether it’s government, industry or education — will have to be partners in addressing this profound societal change that we are undergoing. I don’t know if you want to call it evolution but, at minimum, this is progress. Every time society has gone through some change like this — whether it was agrarian to industrial or industrial to digital — there have been disruptions. There have been 20 to 30 years of chaos that occur. I think we all should get ready for it because it’s coming, and no one will be untouched. At the Arizona Technology Council, our members already are preparing or leading the way. As Intel’s research focus on the Internet of Things (IoT) is based in Chandler, members of our IoT Committee share information that can help organizations create business solutions in this sensor-enabled, analytics-driven world. Our Additive Manufacturing Committee is exploring innovation that’s replacing machinists with use of new technology. Member companies, which include Lyft, Uber, Google and Total Transit, are involved in self-driving cars as Arizona has quickly become a center of autonomous vehicle activity after Gov. Doug Ducey made it clear our state welcomes disruptive technologies. Ready for the changes that are fast approaching? We encourage you to join our conversations at the Council. Preparing for your future is definitely something you don’t want to get around to “someday.”

Steven G. Zylstra,

Initiatives, Arizona Technology Council Foundation

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SPECIAL SECTION PRESENTS

2017

Business Healthcare Services Guide Associations & Government Employee Benefits Consultants Dental Insurance Individual & Group Health Insurance Hospitals Urgent Care Workplace Bundled Health Programs Workplace Wellness Workplace Ergonomics

Join us for our event on May 5, 2017 • www.inbusinessmag.com

49

Bernie Clark, Joaquin Gamboa and Gay Meyer respond to In Business Magazine’s burning business question of the month.

11

Briefs

President and CEO, Arizona Technology Council

Susan Farretta Director of Educational

aztechcouncil.org

Feedback

2017 Business Healthcare Services Guide

“CEOs Are Business Experts? Not Always,” “Smartphone as Supercam,” “The Medium Is the Message,” “The New Temp,” “Local Standouts Recognized for Achievements and Philanthropy,” “Transparent Last-Mile Delivery” and “Healthier-Snack Market”

13

By the Numbers

PwC’s 2017 M&A Integration Survey underscores challenges of combining in unfamiliar territory.

14

CRE

“Phoenix Shows Strength as Investment Market,” “GCU’s West-side Commercial Hub,” “Florida REIT Attracted to Tempe” and “Camelback Corridor Is Hot Area”

16

Technology

“Technology Innovation for the Legal Market,” “Fundraising Platform” and “How to Make a Good First Impression with a Website”

18

Healthcare

“Paid Sick Leave Impacts Preventive Care” and “The Evolution of Data in Healthcare”

20

From the Top

As a woman owner of an aerospace company, Qwaltec CEO Shawn Linam is challenging the odds against women in STEM-related fields.

22

Legal

Attorney explains how to guard against common legal issues when redeveloping and restoring infill properties.

31

Books

New releases give fresh insights on business thinking.

32

Nonprofit

The old philosophy of “back to business as usual” after a campaign is old news.

38

Assets

2017 Mercedes-Benz GLE Coupe Plus: We make the case for a mailed thank-you over an emailed one.

40

Power Lunch

Tommy Bahama: Menu as Lifestyle Plus: The gourmet burger joint has become its own genre.

66

Roundtable

Employee retirement accounts are good for small businesses, too. ON THE AGENDA

33

Spotlight

Stewardship Summit — Arizona Forward Priority: Healthcare — In Business Magazine

34

Calendar

Business events throughout the Valley

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Respondents to Alliance Bank of Arizona’s 2017 Arizona Leaders in Business Survey named healthcare costs a top business challenge, moving this issue up by 10 percentage points over the inaugural 2016 survey and into this year’s list of top three business challenges. info.alliancebankofarizona.com/az-leaders-in-business-survey


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April 2017

Read conference calls in real time.

In Business Magazine is a collaboration of many business organizations and entities throughout the metropolitan Phoenix area and Arizona. Our mission is to inform and energize business in this community by communicating content that will build business and enrich the economic picture for all of us vested in commerce.

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS Kristen Merrifield, CEO Alliance of Arizona Nonprofits (602) 279-2966 www.arizonanonprofits.org Jack Lunsford, President & CEO Arizona Small Business Association Central Office (602) 306-4000 Southern Arizona (520) 327-0222 www.asba.com Steven G. Zylstra, President & CEO Arizona Technology Council One Renaissance Square (602) 343-8324 www.aztechcouncil.org

Now, Deaf and hard of hearing participants can be actively involved in multi-party calls. Relay Conference Captioning (RCC) is free to Arizonans, streaming live text to any Internet-connected computer, tablet or mobile device worldwide.

Doug Bruhnke, Founder & President Global Chamber® (480) 595-5000 www.globalchamber.org

LEARN MORE ABOUT RELAY CONFERENCE CAPTIONING AT ARIZONARCC.COM

Phaedra Earhart, President NAWBO Phoenix Metro Chapter (480) 289-5768 www.nawbophx.org

Agency: LAVIDGE • Job: 16-AZRELAY-0031 • Client: AZ Relay • Contact: tfritz@lavidge.com Publication: In Business Magazine • Size: 4.875” x 4.875” • 4color

Anne Gill, President & CEO Tempe Chamber of Commerce (480) 967-7891 www.tempechamber.org Our Partner Organizations are vested business organizations focused on building and improving business in the Valley or throughout Arizona. As Partners, each will receive three insert publications each year to showcase all that they are doing for business and businesspeople within our community. We encourage you to join these and other organizations to better your business opportunities. The members of these and other Associate Partner Organizations receive a subscription to In Business Magazine each month. For more information on becoming an Associate Partner, please contact our publisher at info@inbusinessmag.com.

ASSOCIATE PARTNERS Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce ahwatukeechamber.com Arizona Chamber of Commerce & Industry azchamber.com Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce azhcc.com The Black Chamber of Arizona phoenixblackchamber.com Chandler Chamber of Commerce chandlerchamber.com Economic Club of Phoenix econclubphx.org Glendale Chamber of Commerce glendaleazchamber.org Greater Phoenix Chamber of Commerce phoenixchamber.com Greater Phoenix Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce gpglcc.org Mesa Chamber of Commerce mesachamber.org North Phoenix Chamber of Commerce northphoenixchamber.com Peoria Chamber of Commerce peoriachamber.com Phoenix Metro Chamber of Commerce phoenixmetrochamber.com Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce scottsdalechamber.com Surprise Regional Chamber of Commerce surpriseregionalchamber.com WESTMARC westmarc.org

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WE PUT SOME OF THE VALLEY’S TOP BUSINESS EXPERTS IN ONE PLACE. Business Resource Center. You need timely, relevant information to help you manage your business. But finding it can be a hassle. That’s why SRP has partnered with local business organizations to bring you professional insights on everything from marketing and human resources to financing and forecasting. All in one place. All from experts in their fields. SRP is happy to provide this free service, because what’s good for business is good for all of us. Learn more at srpbizresource.com.


April 2017

VOL. 8, NO. 4

Publisher Rick McCartney

Editor RaeAnne Marsh

Art Director Benjamin Little

Contributing Writers Adam Baugh

Cyleste C. Collins, Ph.D. Bennett Curry Andrew Denney Dennis Desmond David Dourgarian Nancy Ham Mike Hunter Alexis Krisay Gregg Nahass Mike Pongon Linda Quinn, Ph.D. Richard Tollefson Amanda Ventura ADVERTISING

Operations Lou ise Ferrari

Business Development Louise Ferrari

Maria Mabek Kelly Richards Cami Shore

Events Amy Corben

More: Visit your one-stop resource for everything business at www.inbusinessmag.com. For a full monthly calendar of business-related events, please visit our website. Inform Us: Send press releases and your editorial ideas to editor@inbusinessmag.com.

President & CEO Rick McCartney

Editorial Director RaeAnne Marsh

Senior Art Director Benjamin Little

Financial Manager Donna C. Mitchell, CPA

Office Manager Brittany Barnum

Accounting Manager Todd Juhl Corporate Offices 4455 E. Camelback Road Building C, Suite 135 Phoenix, AZ 85018 T: (480) 588-9505 F: (480) 584-3751 info@inmediacompany.com www.inmediacompany.com Vol. 8, No. 4. In Business Magazine is published 12 times per year by InMedia Company. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to InMedia Company, 4455 E. Camelback Road, Building C, Suite 135, Phoenix, AZ 85018. To subscribe to In Business Magazine, please send check or money order for one-year subscription of $24.95 to InMedia Company, 4455 E. Camelback Road, Building C, Suite 135, Phoenix, AZ 85018 or visit inbusinessmag.com. We appreciate your editorial submissions, news and photos for review by our editorial staff. You June send to editor@inbusinessmag.com or mail to the address above. All letters sent to In Business Magazine will be treated as unconditionally assigned for publication, copyright purposes and use in any publication, website or brochure. InMedia accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or other artwork. Submissions will not be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. InMedia Company, LLC reserves the right to refuse certain advertising and is not liable for advertisers’ claims and/or errors. The opinions expressed herein are exclusively those of the writers and do not necessarily reflect the position of InMedia. InMedia Company considers its sources reliable and verifies as much data as possible, although reporting inaccuracies can occur; consequently, readers using this information do so at their own risk. Each business opportunity and/or investment inherently contains certain risks, and it is suggested that the prospective investors consult their attorney and/ or financial professional. Š 2017 InMedia Company, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this magazine June be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without written permission by the publisher.

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DAVID ALLAZETTA, UNITEDHEALTHCARE OF ARIZONA AND NEW MEXICO

To Our Health

David (Dave) Allazetta is the CEO of UnitedHealthcare Employer & Individual for Arizona and New Mexico. His previous experience includes the position of vice president of sales and marketing for UnitedHealthcare’s Nevada operations, which include Health Plan of Nevada, Nevada’s largest health maintenance organization. Allazetta is certified as an Academy of Healthcare Management Professional (PAHM) and maintains his state licensure in health, life, property, casualty and surety insurance. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education and psychology from San Diego State University and a master’s in business administration from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Healthcare across the U.S., and certainly here in Arizona, is evolving quickly, particularly as it becomes evident that wellness is a key to overcoming many of the potential healthcare challenges we may face as we age. New technologies such as wearable devices, mobile apps and Web-based tools are being introduced to consumers and workforces, aimed at meeting each individual on their wellness journey and guiding them toward a healthier self. Today, America spends more each year on healthcare per capita ($9,086) than any other country. Yet, our rates of chronic conditions, obesity and infant mortality are higher than other high-income nations, according to the Commonwealth Fund. That’s why UnitedHealthcare spends $2.9 billion annually on technology and innovation. By making quality healthcare more accessible and affordable through the use of technology, UnitedHealthcare is empowering consumers to take charge of their health like never before and helping people live healthier lives. In this month’s cover story, In Business Magazine editor RaeAnne Marsh spoke with several of our community’s leading companies to help fill in the current picture of healthcare options and decisions employers are implementing for their workforce. The article also explores new directions in which healthcare and healthcare-related services are expanding and the many options in wellness benefits. The related Feedback question explores the subject from yet another angle, as three of our community’s businesses share their experience with the value of healthcare as an employee benefit in attracting and retaining talent. Phoenix’s increasing adoption of adaptive reuse prompted the Legal feature on legal aspects property owners may be dealing with in such projects. And the Roundtable feature this month helps small businesses understand the potential of employee retirement plans. Debuting in this issue is a new content department to add to the regular lineup of Healthcare, Technology and By the Numbers — commercial real estate, a vital economic sector, merits its own page as In Business Magazine focuses on aspects of real estate acquisition, management and development that impact our economy. The opening article is on the office investment outlook here in Phoenix. This April issue also includes In Business Magazine’s annually updated Business Healthcare Services Guide — which is a listing by category of hospitals, urgent care facilities, benefits providers and other resources to serve business owners and their employees — with an introduction by Greg Vigdor of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association. It’s my pleasure to help bring you this issue of In Business Magazine, with the varied mix of content to inform and assist in growing our business community. Sincerely,

David Allazetta CEO UnitedHealthcare of Arizona and New Mexico

Story Ideas/PR: editor@ inbusinessmag.com

Health & Business There was a time when, if healthcare was provided to employees, it was farmed out and as much a part of business

best practices and even products to empower our workforce and bottom line — all at the same time.

as a service call. Today, it is integral to each of our businesses

We thank David Allazetta for leading this issue and being a part of our

and much more than just a line item. Healthcare has become

upcoming Priority: Healthcare event on May 5th. UnitedHealthcare, Blue

a part of how we employ, incentivize and retain people to

Cross Blue Shield of Arizona and Delta Dental (among many others) are

build our companies. In this issue, we take an advance look

supporting this important event and providing great information for local

at what businesses need to be focused on, what some local

businesses both in the pages of our Healthcare Guide and at the event

leading companies are doing to improve benefits, company

itself.

Healthcare

MAGAZINE

Services

APR. 2017

IN BUSINESS

2017 Busine ss

HEALTHCARE

Healthcare

in Today’s Wor Meeting

employe

APRIL 2017

Better Hiring and Recruiting

e needs

• INBUSINESSMAG.COM

Council

kplace

and new

options

Employee

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THIS ISSUE

Arizona Technology

with old

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Apply?

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CONNECT WITH US:

—Rick McCartney, Publisher

Let us know what you think of this issue of In Business Magazine. Email our publisher at feedback@inbusinessmag.com.

Business Events/ Connections: businessevents@ inbusinessmag.com Marketing/Exposure: advertise@ inbusinessmag.com Visit us online at www.inbusinessmag.com

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VALLEY LEADERS SOUND OFF

important is healthcare as an employee benefit in attracting and retaining Q: How talent for your business?

Let us know what you want to know from the Valley’s top business leaders. editor@inbusinessmag.com

For all past Feedbacks go online to inbusinessmag.com and see what Valley executives think on various business topics.

Executive Vice President, Advisor Services Charles Schwab & Co. Sector: Financial Services

Chief People Officer Zocdoc Sector: Technology, Healthcare

Assistant Vice President, HR Regional Operations USAA Sector: Insurance

Bernie Clark is a member of Charles Schwab’s Executive Council and leads Advisor Services, which serves independent Registered Investment Advisors across the U.S. He oversees custody, practice management and consulting services to 7,000-plus independent investment advisory firms with $1.3 trillion (as of year-end 2016) under management. He has been named by Investment Advisor magazine as one of the 25 most influential people in the industry.

2017 Busine ss

Healthcare

Services

APR. 2017

MAGAZINE

HEALTHCARE

Healthcare

in Today’s Wor Meeting

APRIL 2017

employe

Better Hiring and Recruiting

• INBUSINESSMAG.COM

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

GAY MEYER

Charles Schwab & Co. schwab.com

IN BUSINESS

10

JOAQUIN GAMBOA

Schwab is committed to the well-being of our employees and their families. Part of that commitment means listening to employees about what is important to them when it comes to benefits. Today, our team spans generations. Baby Boomer, Generation X and Millennial employees have unique perspectives, and we consider all of them as we evolve benefit programs. Recent employee feedback indicated that, of all benefits, our medical plan is the most valued. This year, we made a special Health Savings Account contribution of $300 available on top of our annual contribution of either $500 or $1,000 per employee. Also new, our Paid Parental Leave is available to eligible full- and parttime employees regardless of gender, allowing employees paid time off following the birth or adoption of a child. Employees with primary responsibility for the child receive six weeks of leave, and those with secondary responsibility receive one week of leave. Our employees are our most valued asset. We will continue to offer modern benefits to attract and retain the best people to serve our clients.

FEEDBACK QUESTION:

APR. 20 1 7

BERNIE CLARK

e needs

Employee Retireme nt Accounts for Small

THIS ISSUE

Arizona Technology

Council

with old

Business

kplace

and new

options

Infill Building:

What Laws

Apply?

$4.95 INBUSINESSMAG.COM

Guide

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Get a year of In Business Magazine Subscribe now at inbusinessmag.com

At Zocdoc, our mission is to give power to the patient. This mission resonates with candidates and team members who are motivated to help Zocdoc simplify the healthcare experience and enable patients to easily access the care they need. Naturally, they expect the same level of care from us when it comes to their own health. That’s why we prioritize offering premium health benefits to our team, which includes covering 100 percent of healthcare insurance costs for our full-time employees and their dependents, and giving them a dedicated day off — an Unsick Day — to take care of their preventive care appointments. By taking an active role in our team’s health and making preventive care a priority, we prove to candidates and team members that we are serious about putting their well-being first. We know that a healthy workplace means a happy and productive workplace, so we go to great lengths to ensure this remains a fundamental part of our culture as we recruit and retain the best people. Zocdoc zocdoc.com Joaquin Gamboa is the chief people officer, chief legal officer and head of new business at Zocdoc, bringing with him nearly 20 years of domestic and international experience working with technology-focused businesses that range from startups to Fortune 100 companies. At Zocdoc, Gamboa leads the People, Business Development, and Legal teams.

We believe that offering great healthcare benefits is critical in attracting and retaining talent for our organization. We believe people of all ages want to be a part of an organization that believes in them and is concerned about their well-being. USAA believes in taking care of the people who take care of our members. Our main benefits package includes medical and dental care and short- and long-term disability, along with a variety of nonhealthcare elements. Our work/life benefits help maximize our employees’ time and simplify their lives. Our wellness programs include physical fitness and personal trainers, onsite health clinic with a nurse practitioner, physical and massage therapy services, recreation programs and facilities, a work/life referral specialist and a concierge service. To equip our employees to provide the outstanding member service critical to delivering on USAA’s mission, we foster a culture of authenticity through mental and physical recovery focusing on our commitment to wellness, with tranquil relaxation rooms and rooms for such play activities as foosball and table tennis. USAA usaa.com Gay Meyer is responsible for HR operations for the Phoenix campus and the development of an integrated strategy across all USAA regions to include Colorado Springs, Tampa, Plano and Addison. She has more than 28 years’ experience — including international — in Organizational Effectiveness and Change Management and is passionate about helping leaders create more efficient, agile organizations by understanding change impact and the benefits of early adoption.

Sign up for the monthly In Business Magazine eNewsletter at www.inbusinessmag.com. Look for survey questions and other research on our business community.


QUICK AND TO THE POINT

BYTES

by Mike Hunter

Smartphone as Supercam The ShowOff Super Mount enables hands-free photos and videos from the user’s smartphone — up to 30 feet away — by combining Bluetooth technology with an advanced magnetic system. It also provides real-time updates while working if attached to a computer or monitor, and gives GPS navigation in the car if mounted to the rearview mirror. The ShowOff Super Mount uses an innovative magnet system to secure phones to clothing, motorcycle tanks, rearview mirrors, and more. There are no tangled cords, chargers, or memory sticks, and

CEOs Are Business Experts? Not Always.

Naphtali Hoff writes about a reporter interviewing a successful and rather terse bank president. When asked about his success, the president said, “Right decisions.” And how does one make right decisions? He answered, “Experience.” So, how is experience gained? He replied, “Wrong decisions.” Research conducted by the Arizona Commerce Authority with CEOs of young, high-growth Arizona companies (those with revenues of at least $500,000) identified similar fundamental challenges. In addition to conversations about sales and marketing, organizational structure and strategic direction, CEOs sought opportunities to learn from and network with peers for advice and counsel. A recent study by the Stanford Graduate School of Business at Stanford University’s Rock Center for Corporate Governance further confirmed that two-thirds of CEOs do not receive external coaching or leadership help. However, 80 percent of those CEOs expressed a desire for it. The ACA addresses this need with the CEO Corner Office, a four-month (eight sessions of two-and-a-half hours) executive program to develop and engage Arizona’s CEOs. The program helps in three ways. There is a learning component with facilitated business case study discussions, topics are applicable to each participant’s business, and participants are trained to ask and receive peer-to-peer feedback. Case study topics include scaling a business, financial literacy, vision, courage, communications and evolving as a CEO. A graduate of the inaugural CEO Corner Office cohort reflected, “It was a very good experience to be able to share issues within my business with peers that were going through the same issues or had moved past some of the issues I dealt with. I also appreciated the various perspectives that different industry leaders had and how those perspectives could help me see another dimension to solving my own issues.” The CEO Corner Office offers participants a continuum of engagement opportunities with each other and the ACA, including a post graduate program, CEO Hot Topic Zone gatherings, All Graduate Networking event, peer-to-peer mentoring and an annual lunch with ACA’s leadership team. Non-competitive cohorts are formed several times annually. The next Greater Phoenix cohort begins on June 6. —Bennett Curry, vice president of the Arizona Commerce Authority azcommerce.com/small-business/professional-development

users don’t have to learn new software in order to access and edit their videos. Safe for all modern smartphones, its magnets will not harm the technology or the memory of the phone. showoffyourlife.com

The Medium Is the Message SnapComms recently launched CommsTools.com as a free online resource that can help employers get a message across successfully to their workforce (or help anyone looking for ideas on how best to communicate to a wider group). Getting employee attention is extremely hard nowadays as staff contend with bloated email inboxes and information overload. “CommsTools.com helps communicators find the best ways to engage their audiences, whether that means adopting new software, or just sticking with reliable email campaigns,” says SnapComms CEO Sarah Perry. “Every week it seems there is a new tool or app that is the ‘latest and greatest’ way to communicate with employees; a silver bullet to all communications woes that rarely lives up to its hype. But what are often forgotten are some of the simplest ways to communicate with employees; communicators just need to be reminded of what those methods are.” commstools.snapcomms.com • snapcomms.com

The New Temp Facilitating opportunities in the growing gig economy, the mobile app called Shiftgig connects businesses with people who want to work short-term jobs or shifts — such as those who manned many positions at local stadiums for Spring Training. In fact, Intuit released a study earlier this year (its second annual “Dispatches from the New Economy: The On-Demand Workforce”) that found 3.9 million Americans are now working in the on-demand or gig economy primarily to supplement existing income, fill near-term financial needs and build a sustainable future. Shiftgig enables them to have flexibility over their schedules and to decide which jobs they are most interested in working. shiftgig.com

The top areas that CEOs use coaching to improve are sharing leadership/ delegation, conflict management, team building and mentoring, according to Stanford University’s 2013 Executive Coaching Survey. gsb.stanford.edu/cldr

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QUICK AND TO THE POINT

Local Standouts Recognized for Achievements and Philanthropy ACHIEVEMENTS The recent announcement by the Ethisphere® Institute — the global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices that fuel corporate character, marketplace trust and business success — of its 2017 World’s Most Ethical Companies® named several businesses in our community. This designation recognizes organizations that align principle with action by working tirelessly to make integrity part of their corporate DNA, efforts that shape future industry standards by introducing tomorrow’s best practices today. ethisphere.com Ethisphere Institute 2017 World’s Most Ethical Companies in our community are: Phoenix-based ON Semiconductor Corporation is one of only six companies being honored in the Electronics and Semiconductors category, highlighting its leadership among global companies in ethical business standards and practices. onsemi.com Phoenix-based Avnet earns this distinction for the fourth consecutive year. avnet.com And for Minneapolis-based U.S. Bank, the fifth largest commercial bank in the United States, this marks the third consecutive year it has earned this recognition. usbank.com

PHILANTHROPY OnTrac, a logistics company specializing in contracting small parcel shipping services in the Western United States, announced in March that the Chandler corporate office raised $540 for the American Cancer Society. The money was raised based on the total number of laps that OnTrac employees completed during their second annual Relay For Life event held the previous month. And the effort inspired RouteSmart Technologies, one of OnTrac’s solution providers, to also support the cause with a matching donation. ontracinternational.com • routesmart.com Cable One, Inc provided a $100,000 donation to Hance Park Conservancy, whose mission it is to work with the City of Phoenix to activate and unite the community by promoting the creative use of public space and a vibrant arts and culture experience at Margaret T. Hance Park in Downtown Phoenix. The funds will go toward the construction of a multi-purpose amphitheater at the city-owned park. The donation represents the largest single contribution provided to the Hance Park Conservancy to date. cableone.net

Lehi Valley Trading Company lehivalley.com • snackworthy.com

Transparent Last-Mile Delivery Courier service Dropoff recently expanded into Phoenix with its proprietary technology platform for last-mile, same-day delivery for businesses large and small. Among the features its technology enables are real-time tracking and confirmation of order status with easy Web and mobile ordering, along with signature verification once the delivery is completed, and transparency as to price even before the order is placed. Noting the company offers its clients complete visibility regarding their driver, co-founder and CEO Sean Spector explains this allows Dropoff’s customer to contact the driver directly if issues arise rather than having to sit on hold with dispatch. Driver selection, itself, involves an intense training and vetting process. Drivers, Spector notes, are an extension of not just Dropoff’s brand but also that of its clients, “so we want to make sure they’re represented well.” Dropoff aims to be the first national brand for same-day delivery. “We want to work with regional and national clients, so we have to be in multiple cities,” Spector says, explaining, “If your business has multiple locations, you want

one [delivery] solution rather than a different solution in each city.” Phoenix is one of the cities that was chosen for this stage of the company’s expansion, according to Spector, because it’s a growing city with a vibrant community, it ranks well for population size among the top 50 metropolitan statistical areas, and existing clients in Dallas and Miami also have operations here. And climate didn’t hurt. “We tend to prefer warmer-weather cities because there are more days to deliver. Having no real inclement weather is a positive for us and our clients because their deliveries don’t get delayed.” —RaeAnne Marsh Dropoff dropoff.com

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Millennials in the Market: Eighty-seven percent of millennials surveyed by Lehi Valley Trading Company stated that they look for/expect healthier options when purchasing value snacks. snackworthy.com

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The family-owned company, grown over 30 years from its roots as farm stands in the citrus fields of Mesa’s Lehi Valley, is, according to Kaufman, “one of the early adopters to recognize this trend and is in the process of further supporting it.” It is also on track to achieve an SQF Level 2 certification — considered the gold standard in the industry, and one that, according to Kaufman, not many achieve — which is an audited substantiation that the company is following best practices in food safety and preparation. —RaeAnne Marsh

MAGAZINE

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A void in the snack market?! Yes, and local snack manufacturer Lehi Valley Trading Company is stepping into that space with Snackworthy®, its new product line of healthier options — aimed at a market segment whose overall buying power, observes Lehi Chief Sales Officer Howard Kaufman, is estimated to now be surpassing that of the baby boomers. “The millennial market is estimated at 100 million consumers, and they tend to look for great quality and great value.” Snackworthy’s wide variety of high-quality snack items includes many of the top snack categories regularly purchased by millennials, as identified by the company’s Millennial Research and also based on Lehi’s best sellers. The extensive assortment includes nuts and seeds, dried fruit, candy, chocolate, popcorn, granola/ snacks and trail mix. Lehi’s decision to modify its approach to product innovation “was driven by a list of 101 unworthy ingredients commonly found in a lot of snack food,” Kaufman says, citing artificial sweeteners as one example. Committed to a “clean line of snacks,” Lehi is focused on creating new products that, says Kaufman, “taste great and are better for you.”

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METRICS & MEASUREMENTS

Can Today’s Business Leaders Choreograph M&A Success? PwC’s 2017 M&A Integration Survey underscores challenges of combining in unfamiliar territory by Gregg Nahass

With increasingly diverse and multigenerational workforces, and most industries undergoing some form of digital disruption, today’s business leaders find it more prudent to buy than to build talent and capabilities they need to join the ranks of the disruptors. By definition, that means many of today’s deals require integrating a completely different type of organization with capabilities far outside the acquirer’s core. Dealmakers are more ambitious than ever before. They’re using mergers and acquisitions not only to improve the bottom line, but to stretch their business, adding new and often unfamiliar capabilities. Reaching into unknown territory for growth is, of course, riskier than combining organizations that have a lot in common. PwC’s 2017 M&A Integration Survey found that companies are getting better at achieving certain goals, but they’re still struggling to reach others — namely, because their expectations are changing. The report explores in detail the challenges that today’s dealmakers are facing, as well as a sneak peek into what dealmakers are getting right about integration and where they need to improve.

REDEFINING M&A SUCCESS

Companies are achieving greater financial and operational success with their deals, but strategic success is getting harder to come by. Transformational deals continue to increase, based on 54 percent of responses, which is a direct

correlation to the decreasing percentage of respondents who report “deal success.” Financial results and synergies captured are improving, based on respondents who reported “very favorable” or “favorable” results for profitability (82 percent), cash flow (83 percent), revenue capture (83 percent) and cost capture (90 percent). In addition, the speed of deal integration has improved, with 88 percent of respondents reporting that the time to achieve leadership alignment took six months or less.

TOP INTEGRATION CHALLENGES

Integration across functions and geographies remains the most difficult of challenges for business leaders to overcome during a deal. People integration also remains a big challenge, with a decrease in respondents (45 percent) reporting “significant success” in retention; and very few across the board reporting favorable results when it comes to employee morale (31 percent) and understanding (33 percent). PwC’s 2017 M&A Integration Survey pwc.com/us/en/deals/ma-integration-survey.html

Transformational Deals on the Rise The shift in deal type from absorption to transformational deals continues to increase, as companies look at new markets, channels, and products as a way to fuel much-sought-after growth.

The Integration Team Is Getting to Work Earlier Survey results suggest a higher probability of achieving deal goals when planning starts early and integration is executed rapidly, as respondents report at what point their integration team got involved. Point at which Integration Team Got Involved

Dedicating Resources to Cross-Functional Areas Can Increase Deal Success Companies should dedicate resources to cross-functional areas to choreograph efforts across functions and geographies.

% Companies in 2016 / 2013

% Companies % High-Performing Engaging Deals

Cross-Functional Team

Deal Screening

32 / 21

Post-Letter of Intent

24 / 17

Communications

70

90

During Due Dilience

21 / 44

Business Processes & Systems Integration

65

90

Between Signing (deal announcement) and Close

21 / 14

Legal Entity

64

70

Go-to-Market

20

30

After the Deal Closed

2/4

Source: PwC’s 2017 M&A Integration Survey

View online version at inbusinessmag.com for Deal Performance Indicators chart.

Finding the right reasons and the right incentives for retaining key people during the transition and for the long-term is a challenge. Retention has become harder, with 56 percent of companies reporting success in 2010 down to 45 percent in 2016.

Gregg Nahass is a partner with PwC, and principal author of its 2017 M&A Integration Survey released last month. PwC’s tri-annual M&A Integration Survey, now in its 20th year, has tracked the integration strengths and weaknesses of public-company M&A since 1997. pwc.com

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PROPERTY, GROWTH AND LOCATION

Phoenix Shows Strength as Investment Market Healthcare

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CAMELBACK CORRIDOR SUBMARKET, CLASS A ONLY Direct Net Vacancy Absorption 1999

7.9%

188,067

2000

11.7%

118,712

2001

17.8%

-81,421

2002

19.6%

103,661

2003

20.1%

12,562

2004

16.8%

176,687

2005

11.0%

126,441

Camelback Esplanade and Via West at Biltmore Center. At 3131 and 3133 Camelback, Lincoln Property Company has already implemented strategic asset improvements, resulting in an average 93 percent annual occupancy rate and a rise in asking rents from sub $30 to more than $34 per square foot. Other developers are also getting into the game by razing obsolete assets to make way for new construction, including the mixed-use Camelback Collective office and hotel project underway on Camelback Road between 28th and 29th streets. At a time when many believed Phoenix would be entering into a cycle dip, this activity signals optimistic investor sentiment that is occurring at varied levels across the Valley, and creating tremendous opportunity in the year ahead. —Dennis Desmond, senior managing director in the Phoenix office of JLL (www.jll.com/phoenix), which provides office, industrial and retail brokerage, tenant representation, facility and investment management, capital markets, multifamily investments and development services.

GET REAL

by Mike Hunter

GCU’s West-Side Commercial Hub

Florida REIT Attracted to Tempe

Camelback Corridor Is Hot Area

Continuing its efforts to turn

Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II, Inc.

With a $24.65 million purchase, Lincoln

underutilized assets on the west side

of Tampa, Fla., purchased a mission-critical

Property Company has added 2777

of Phoenix into bustling commercial

network intensive data center facility in

Camelback to its Class A Phoenix office

enterprises, Grand Canyon University is

the heart of Metropolitan Phoenix. “The

portfolio. The 104,618-square-foot

developing a major commercial hub in an

investment provides this non-traded real

building is located at 28th Street and

area of town that had fallen on hard times.

estate investment trust a fully stabilized

Camelback Road, in a section of the

The land at 27th Avenue and Camelback

property with a long-term institutional

Camelback Corridor undergoing a wave of

112,776

Road is now home to more than 2,700

quality tenant to add to their growing

new development. “The land surrounding

21.0%

57,663

Grand Canyon University employees; a

portfolio,” says Mindy Korth, executive

2777 Camelback is enjoying a major revival,

18.1%

64,875

newly opened 325,000-square-foot,

vice president with Colliers International

thanks to multiple new development

four-story office complex; a completely

in Greater Phoenix, who helped handle

projects,” says Lincoln Property Company

renovated GCU Hotel; and the new Canyon

the transaction. “The property is uniquely

Executive Vice President David Krumwiede.

49 Grill restaurant; with a business,

positioned adjacent to the ‘fiber highway’

“This is a significant accomplishment in the

economic and education innovation

of Greater Phoenix and there are very few

high-barrier-to-entry Camelback Corridor

center to come. gcu.edu

options for future development in the

submarket — and one that we will support

surrounding area.”

as we upgrade 2777 to an even higher

colliers.com/en-us/greaterphoenix

standard of quality.” lpc.com

2006

9.9%

82,490

2007

11.2%

-30,510

2008

17.2%

-261,065

2009

22.8%

-43,450

2010

30.0%

-120,063

2011

33.8%

-198,399

2012

29.6%

195,329

2013

23.6%

315,700

2014

21.6%

2015 2016

APR. 20 1 7

After a slowdown that pushed large Phoenix office building sale activity down from 33 deals in 2015 to 22 deals in 2016, the office market got off to a strong start in the new year. Robust population growth, an expanding job market and strong corporate performance have helped institutional America overcome its uncertainty about buying this “late” in the real estate cycle. Instead, investors see that Metro Phoenix office vacancy rates have dropped from 27 percent at the peak of the recession to 18 percent today, and average rental rates have increased by 23 percent — from $19.91 to $24.48 per square foot. These positive factors have reinforced the view that our real estate cycle is not wrapping up, but is prospering, with significant runway ahead. The re-emergence of the Camelback Corridor is a textbook example of this shift. In the last 36 months, the submarket has enjoyed more than $700 million in new investor activity, due in part to rapidly rising rental rates. Since their recessionary lows, Class A rents within the Camelback Corridor have increased 34 percent, to an average $34.33 per square foot, and vacancy rates have dropped by almost half, from 33.8 to 18.1 percent. In response, major institutional investors are purchasing — and completing deferred improvements at — some of the submarket’s most prominent projects. Case in point: LBA at the

14

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In its recent Upside Potential rankings, online real estate investment management firm HomeUnion rated Phoenix one of the top investment markets in the United States. homeunion.com


APRIL SUN

MAY

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

SAT

SUN

JUNE

MON

TUE

WED

1

2

WAS

3

WAS

4

COL

8

9

DET

10

DET

11

PIT

15

NYM

16

NYM

17

NYM

18

CWS

23

CWS

24

CWS

25

PIT

30

PIT

31

1

4:05

2

SF

3

4

1:10 9

CLE LA

17

SF

11

LA

18

SD

25

1:35

1:10 23

5

SF

12

SD

19

SD

26

6:40 10

1:10

16

SF

30 COL 1:10

SF

13

SD

20

SD

27

SF

7

6:40

8

7

LA

12:10

LA

14

6:10

1:10

LA

22

LA

21

SD

22

SD

28

COL

29

COL

28

MIL

29

6:40

5:10

6:40

1:40

5:10

TUE

COL

3

CIN

10

11

ATL

17

18

4

1:10

WED

THU

FRI

LA

5

6:10

LA

6

7:10

LA

7:10 13

12

7

SUN

SAT

CIN

8

MON

COL

6

PIT

12

PIT

13

19 26

5:40

CIN

14

ATL

15

ATL

13

WAS

22

WAS

20

STL

29

STL

27

7:10

4:35

10:35

23 WAS1:10 24 ATL 6:40 25 30 STL11:15 31

CIN

19

ATL

26

4:10 6:40

CIN

20

CIN

21

ATL

27

STL

28

4:10 12:40

9:35 4:15

5:15

1:05

4:10

6:40

CHC

14

MIN

21

SF

28

15

NYM

22

6:40

11:10 1:10

HOU

CHC

2

LA

9

SD

20

SD

11

MIL

27

MIL

18

6

MIL

12

13

PHI

19

PHI

26

7

8

6:40

FRI

DET

DET

20

COL

21

COL

22

27

STL

2

MIA

3

SD

9

MIL

10

PHI

17 24

28

STL

29

12:40

4:10

5:40

6:40

23

PHI

STL

30

COL

12:10

6:40

PHI

1:05

6:40

12:40

MIL

7:10

4:05

COL

MIA

10:10

6:40

16

4:10

5:40

SAT

MIA 12:40

15

4:10

PHI

SD

14

10:35

1:10

SD

6:40

1:10

HOU

16

NYM

23

LA

30

6:40

CHC

THU 3

LA

HOU

17

4

NYM

24

LA

31

LA

HOU

18

NYM

25

9:10

LA

12:40

5

PHI

7:10

6:40

CHC MIN

19

MON

TUE

WED

THU

SF

FRI 1

SF

26

CHC MIN

10

SF

17

COL

4

12:10

LA

5

5:10

SD

11

SF

18

1:10

4:10

5:10

SAT

COL

2

SD

9

SF

16

MIA

23

KC

30

5:40

3

5:10

5:10

6:40

SUN

6:05 12

6:40

11:10

4:10

SF

SAT

7:15 11

6:40

5:10

6:40

CHC

FRI

11:20 10

6:40

4:10

29

5

1:10

7:10

5:10

MIA

10:10

5:10

25

5:05

12:40

4:10

THU

SEPT/OCT

6:40

1:10

5:10

4:15

SF

8

WED

4:10

4

PIT

WED

5:05

7

TUE

1

PIT

6:40

5:10

MON

COL

5:10

7:10

MIL

SUN

9:35

TUE 1

6

6:40

1:10 16

COL

6:40

12:40

4:05

7:10

9

5

SAT

AUGUST

MON

1 2

WAS

12:40

6:40

1:05

FRI

10:05

6:40

6:40

6:40

11:10

JULY SUN

6:40

21

6:40

4:05

6:40

SD

6:10

6:40

CLE

5:10

15

7:10

7:10

6:40

CLE

6:40

14

7:15

7:10

6:40

6

6:40

7:15

7:10

LA 1:10 24

SF

THU

7:10

COL

12

SD

19

SF

26

6:40

1:05

24 MIA1:10 25 1 KC12:15

COL

13

SD

20

8

SF

27

COL

14

COL

SD

21

22

SF

28

29

15

12:40

12:40

SF

6:05

6:40

5:15

SD

5:10

7:15

6:10

COL

5:10

6:40

6:40

7:10 6:40

LA

7

7:10

6:40

7:10 6:40

LA

6

MIA

5:10

KC

4:15


INNOVATIONS FOR BUSINESS by Mike Hunter

Technology Innovation for the Legal Market The cost and risk of paper records are a severe business burden. Law firms and corporate legal departments, as a result, are migrating to a fully electronic matter file to improve efficiency and security for their clients; alleviate compliance and audit processes for the firm; and deliver increased mobility, collaboration and productivity for attorneys. DocSolid, a market leader in enterprise scanning, workflow and paper reduction solutions for the legal market, and NetDocuments, a market leader in SaaS document and email management (DMS) provider for law firms and corporate legal departments, have effected a strategic technology integration. DocSolid’s KwikTag Legal® solution now enables NetDocuments customers to seamlessly transition from paper-dependent matter management to a fully electronic matter file in the NetDocuments DMS, allowing firms to improve information governance and compliance while reducing the cost and risk of paper records. This solution will be offered in both licensed and subscription pricing models. netdocuments.com

How to Make a Good First Impression with a Website A brand has one chance to make a first impression. In this fast-paced digital world, there are many opportunities for a potential customers or stakeholders to learn about a company and have that first impression before any actual conversation even happens. That means a company’s digital presence has to be rock solid, and it all starts with a website. No matter what purpose the website serves, it is vital to consider what it says about the company’s brand. Here are three ways a website can make a great first impression to capture users’ interest and keep them coming back for more.

SAY NO TO AUTO-PLAY

Fundraising Platform RallyUp.com is an innovative new type of fundraising platform for nonprofits. From online charitable fundraising for Fortune 500 companies to school fun-runs, Arizona-based RallyUp is helping organizations simplify all aspects of fundraising campaigns. The company focuses on nextgeneration philanthropy that involves donors more directly in the causes they love. Founded in 2013 by veteran technology entrepreneur Steve Bernat, RallyUp has built a name for itself as the leading online nonprofit fundraising platform. Its creative online campaign types include peer-to-peer, events, auctions, raffles and others, and the technology simplifies the complexities of social fundraising. With online fundraising quickly gaining popularity,the company’s battle-tested technology platform is used by some of the largest corporations and nonprofits in the world, including a Fortune 100 social responsibility campaign that raised more than $7 million in one week. rallyup.com

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RallyUp was the technology provider behind Nike and the Michael J. Fox Foundation’s highly publicized sweepstakes initiative last October that raised $7 million for Parkinson’s Disease research.

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Once a user reaches the site, there should be a clear path for him to find the information he needs and stay involved. One way to direct traffic is to implement a navigation bar prominently on each page of the website. A well-designed and well-thought-out navigation strategy will keep users interested and build trust with the site’s audience. Visitors are more likely to leave a website altogether than to spend time looking through it to find what they are looking for. A company website works hard to capture its

The website is an extension of the business’s brand and should accurately reflect the core values of the organization. Consider what the website’s messaging, colors and overall energy say about the company. Is it aiming to be the thought leader in its industry? It might be time to consider a website design that portrays this to the audience and supports additional content. Is the organization looking to attract a younger audience and customer base? It may be worthwhile to add aspects of color and large visual imagery to the site. If the business or organization follows branding guidelines, it is best to stick with the tones and specific colors provided. However, if there’s more of a free range, the business may find inspiration in the feelings it wants users to feel when they visit the site. For example, Pantone’s color of the year is Greenery, a fresh and zesty yellow-green, which could make a great addition to a site’s color palette refresh. Ensuring a website makes a great first impression is extremely valuable in keeping the interest of the audience and maintaining the reputation of the business’s brand, but there are other ways as well to make a website user-friendly. —Alexis Krisay, partner and president of strategic marketing at Serendipit Consulting (www.serendipitconsulting.com), a Phoenix-based boutique public relations, marketing and branding firm.

MAGAZINE

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NAVIGATION SUCCESS

REFLECT THE CORE VALUES OF THE BUSINESS

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There is nothing worse than visiting a site in a coffee shop or at the office and have a video or song suddenly blasting through the speakers. At that moment, while the site visitor is awkwardly attempting to shut off the sound, chances are good that she will simply close the browser and leave that website. Rather than risk having this cause users to not return to the website, businesses should, instead, design a homepage to have engaging and captivating elements without completely overwhelming visitors. If video or music is important to the site, businesses should not hesitate to include it on the homepage — but they should let the user decide whether to engage by clicking or hovering to begin playing.

traffic; in order to not lose that traffic, businesses should engage the users with interesting content and keep the navigation simple.

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YOUR BENEFIT IN BUSINESS

WELL WELL WELL

Paid Sick Leave Impacts Preventive Care More than 20 million Americans have gained health insurance coverage through the Affordable Care Act

The Evolution of Data in Healthcare

and do not have to pay for 15 preventive screenings recommended by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Yet, despite this advantage, many are not utilizing these lifesaving screenings and are contributing to the nation’s soaring healthcare costs, which reached a whopping $3 trillion in 2014. A study by researchers from Cleveland State University and Florida Atlantic University into factors contributing to the low rates of preventive care use illuminates the importance paid sick leave benefits play in the lives of employees and, ultimately, in public health.  Regardless of sociodemographic factors, the researchers found that workers who lack paid sick leave were significantly less likely to have received preventive healthcare screenings in the last 12 months — even among those previously told they have a condition such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease that places them at higher medical risk — and 1.6 times less likely to have received a flu shot. “Our findings demonstrate that even when insured adults are provided with free preventive screenings, paid sick leave is a significant factor associated with actually using the screenings,” says LeaAnne DeRigne, Ph.D., lead author and an associate professor in the School of Social Work within FAU’s College for Design and Social Inquiry. “American workers risk foregoing preventive health care, which could lead to the need for medical care at later stages of disease progression and at a higher cost for workers and the American healthcare system as a whole.” The two most common ways to offer paid sick leave are by mandating employer-funded benefits and through a universal social insurance program funded through taxes such as the Healthy Families Act, introduced in Congress in 2015. —Cyleste C. Collins, Ph.D., assistant professor at Cleveland State University, and Linda Quinn, Ph.D., college associate lecturer in the Department of Mathematics at Cleveland State University bit.ly/csu-paid-sick-leave

APR. 20 1 7

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In recent years, we’ve seen a sizable shift toward a data-driven healthcare system, but we still have some distance to go before it becomes the norm. Providers are beginning to decipher how to efficiently leverage the right data sets — and technologists are still in the process of building systems capable of sharing that data across the entire healthcare network in a meaningful way. Once we reach that point, everyone in the industry will be able to make more informed decisions regarding patient care, thereby improving patient outcomes, reducing costs and increasing efficiency. Data collection isn’t all that new in healthcare; however, we’ve historically shied away from using our data for anything outside of the treatment room. Until recently, there wasn’t technology for — nor a premium placed on — integrating and sharing data beyond a clinic’s walls. But that’s all changed within the last decade or so, as the healthcare industry has started harnessing the wider-reaching potential of the data we collect. To incentivize meaningful use of patient data, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has paid more than $40 billion through programs such as Meaningful Use and the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) to providers who have adopted certified electronic health records (EHR) technology and established quality data reporting practices. This caused a swift adoption of EHRs but resulted in a data overload with minimal context or integration. We, essentially, developed islands of electronic data that lacked common organizational structure, which isn’t useful because their siloed nature hinders seamless data exchange and understanding among providers. The more recent push toward interoperability — the development and adoption of technological systems and software capable of not only communicating with one another,

but also seamlessly exchanging data and effectively using it — is starting to connect those islands, although it’s a work in progress. Interoperability is particularly important as we shift to a performance-based payment environment in which providers are reimbursed for demonstrating quality — rather than quantity — of care. True value-based care requires extensive use of data and greater collaboration among providers in order to make more informed decisions that improve operational efficiency, care delivery and outcomes. Though the healthcare industry as a whole is still figuring out how to best cleanse, merge, read, analyze, share and act upon the massive amount of data at our disposal, there is good news: Providers and healthcare organizations are showing greater commitment to the largerpicture goal of achieving interoperability — and they’re beginning to harness outcomes data at scale to improve health for entire populations, thereby advancing the industry’s ability to foresee, prevent and treat illnesses and injuries. To move forward in our data collection efforts, we need this level of technological readiness. The entire healthcare community must demand technology that not only makes data collection easy, but also seamlessly communicates and shares that data across all systems in the network. While challenges such as infrastructure limitations, cybersecurity and unknown integrity of fragmented data are still somewhat obstructing our path, this new focus on valuebased care is exactly what the industry needs to overcome these hurdles. And when providers and patients alike advocate for the technology to propel the quality care movement forward, we’ll see significant improvement in IT systems that interconnect and bring true meaningful use to our data. —Nancy Ham, CEO of WebPT (www.webpt.com)

“Compared to 22 similarly developed countries, the United States is the only one that does not mandate employers to provide paid sick leave benefits or include paid sick leave in a universal social insurance plan,” says LeaAnne DeRigne, Ph.D., lead author of a study on factors affecting preventive healthcare use and an associate professor at Florida Atlantic University. bit.ly/csu-paid-sick-leave


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MINDING THEIR BUSINESS

Shawn Linam: Challenging the Odds in Aerospace Qwaltec is one of few woman-owned companies in STEM-related fields by Amanda Ventura

• Shawn Linam cofounded Qwaltec with two other NASA expats, Robert Bassham and Sonny Garza. • Qwaltec specializes in providing aerospace systems engineering, mission readiness, and technical training and program management for government and commercial programs. • Rep. Kyrsten Sinema invited Linam to attend the Joint Session of Congress earlier this year for her work as an advocate of STEM efforts and advancing Arizona’s aerospace industry.

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Women account for 20 percent of engineering school graduates and 11 percent of practicing engineers, according to the Society of Women Engineers.

Qwaltec qwaltec.com

IN BUSINESS

APR. 20 1 7

those with the best paddle-work make their way through the brackets. Admitting she was initially against having a Ping Pong table, she says she now sees it as one of the best things in the office. In addition to running a rapidly growing space systems operations company, the Qwaltec CEO volunteers to inspire young girls to do the same as the STEM Director of the Girls Rule Foundation. Linam brings to the effort the experience of her life-long series of confrontations with self-confidence. As a teenager, she found teachers generally unsupportive. It was her father who made the seventh grader stay up at night to go over variables and parabolas, until a light bulb went off. Since then, she has powered through moments of doubt and has come to firmly believe it is important to “consciously seek out women and men who tell you, ‘You can do it’ and avoid those who tell you, ‘You can’t.’” Linam confronted other “weaknesses” while attending Mississippi State University, such as getting faint at the sight of blood while considering a run at medical school. She ultimately found that biomedical engineering clicked. However, she still put up a masculine façade to fit in with her male counterparts. “It was when I joined NASA that I realized I didn’t need to check my femininity at the door,” Linam says. “I’m a believer that anyone can do anything. Some just have it easier than others. Girls need that message that they can do it. Selfesteem is so important.” Passionate about her industry, she likes to share a statement from President Barack Obama’s speech at the White House Science Fair in 2015: “[Science] is more than a school subject or the periodic table or the properties of waves. It is an approach to the world, a critical way to understand and explore and engage with the world, and then have the capacity to change that world.” As the STEM director for Girls Rule Foundation — a Phoenix-based nonprofit providing empowerment, leadership and educational workshops and programs — Linam works to inspire girls in grades 7 to 12. “I feel empowered while empowering these girls,” she says. “I want them to know how to find that well of self-confidence, even when the odds seem to be against you.”

APR. 2017

A SATELLITE VIEW

Shawn Linam started her career training astronauts to use the robotic arm on the Space Shuttle. In 2001, she co-founded Qwaltec, a satellite operations and mission readiness firm, which she doubled in size in two years. Headquartered in Tempe, Qwaltec has an office in Maryland as well as employees in California, Colorado and New Mexico. It has subcontracted on projects with the heavy-hitters of aerospace, including Lockheed Martin, Orbital ATK, General Dynamics and NASA. Last October, her company landed a $19 million defense contract with the Navy. But it wasn’t an easy journey to the C-suite for Linam, who struggled with the same self-confidence issues that typically drive women away from careers in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. In fact, just getting a job in these male-dominated fields isn’t even half the battle; more than a third of young women drop out of STEM courses due to a lack of confidence and nearly half of the remaining women will eventually leave a career in their field of study, according to University of Missouri and Wisconsin studies, respectively. “I don’t know that there was a specific moment I learned to be ‘confident,’” Linam says. “It was a series of moments and is still a work in progress.” Owning a company was her biggest leap of faith. However, turning that company into a business required clients — and closing a deal was something outside of Linam’s comfort zone. “I felt like my knowledge and communication were not effective when meeting with a potential customer and that one mistake would cost me the sale,” she recalls. “I started observing and listening closely to men whom I considered good at the sales and marketing. When I paid close attention to their sales pitches, I realized I was every bit as knowledgeable and competent as they were and that it was the relationship, not necessarily being a walking Wikipedia, that mattered.” Linam’s confidence paid off. Within the first six months of Qwaltec, it received four contracts. There was enough work to keep the founders afloat while bringing on additional employees, which has grown to number 40. In building her workforce, she has been open to learning from her employees in creating a company culture in an industry that takes itself very seriously. A case in point is the ongoing Ping Pong tournament at Qwaltec headquarters, complete with a golden Ping Pong trophy passed around as

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LAW MATTERS TO BUSINESS

Adaptive Reuse: Breathing New Life into Old Buildings

How to guard against common legal issues when redeveloping and restoring infill properties by Adam Baugh

witheymorris.com

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The number of projects that involve renovating buildings and turning them into new spaces has climbed steadily since the recession due to newer adaptive-reuse programs. Identifying potential legal issues early can prevent major pain later.

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eliminates the idea of starting with a blank slate of vacant land. Consequently, the developer is challenged not only by the building preservation and remodel, but also by existing site constraints like lack of parking, existing access, on-site circulation, building setbacks and more. Some of the best examples of adaptive reuse have struggled to solve the challenges faced with small sites that are often under-parked and overused. The same challenge also exists with current ADA standards retrofitting to older, existing buildings. Identifying possible code deficiencies and their potential solutions early can help one prepare legal arguments to address them. Whether by variance, interpretation, shared parking model or rezone, a variety of legal options exist that can serve as useful tools in solving common problems with adaptive reuse endeavors. The same logic applies to current building code and engineering standards. Buildings constructed 50 years ago were designed with entirely different code standards, which can make functional changes impractical. As an example, a recent four-story office building was converted into an indoor storage facility but required massive structural analysis and reengineering. Early issue-spotting can prevent major legal problems later in the case of construction defect, negligence or personal injury. Finally, it is important to study the municipality’s adaptive reuse program and criteria to ensure the project meets the minimum requirements, such as building size, historical significance, incentive area and qualifying criteria. In some instances, there may be a legal standard and test that must be satisfied prior to obtaining formal approval of the program. It is suggested that developers know the program parameters and hire land use and zoning counsel familiar with that particular municipality’s processes, regulations, norms and likely solutions. Zoning attorneys work directly with city officials, business owners and architects to provide development guidance, streamline the process, reduce the time frame and offer cost savings. An effective zoning attorney with local familiarity and strong municipal relationships is often the key factor in creating a successful project.

APR. 2017

Adam Baugh is an owner at Withey Morris, PLC, where he has been practicing land use and zoning law since 2007. He is a seasoned and successful lawyer who regularly works with city councils, planning commissions, and neighborhood groups in representing landowners, developers and businesses in obtaining land use entitlements.

One of the unexpected successes arising out of the last recession is the rebirth and renewed interest in older, historically significant buildings. In many ways, they have enjoyed a renaissance in being repurposed again. This process, known as adaptive reuse, is the tailoring of old structures for new purposes other than those initially intended. As old buildings outlive their original purposes, adaptive reuse offers a process to modify these buildings for new uses while retaining their historic features. Many municipalities are adopting adaptive reuse programs to revitalize existing buildings to preserve local history, contribute to economic vitality, promote small business and create more vibrant neighborhoods. But before new life is breathed into old buildings, there are a number of legal and practical considerations worth bearing in mind. Deed restrictions and CC&R research should be some of the first legal considerations to explore. Buildings and land uses initially intended for a distinct purpose years ago may have use restrictions that limit a property’s utility today. While this issue may be less common from one commercial building conversion to another, it is often a factor when converting an older residence into an office, studio or commercial enterprise. It is important to study the title report and associated documents to verify whether the proposed use is permitted within, or prohibited by, the governing association documents or property deed restrictions. The underlying zoning and attendant stipulations or conditions of approval are a second critical legal factor. The existing zoning and approval stipulations are the legal basis for the land use. Proper due diligence should discover potential legal pitfalls by analyzing the underlying zoning, permitted uses, applicable development standards and any restrictive stipulations of approval. Additionally, it is important to identify whether the zoning approval is tied to a specific plan of development that could impact building renovations, architectural modifications or footprint changes. Parking requirements, development standards and code provisions are a third practical factor to evaluate. With adaptive reuse, the building is to be preserved, which effectively

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Healthcare in Today’s Workplace Meeting employee needs with old and new options by RaeAnne Marsh

Whatever may happen on the government front, healthcare remains an important concern of doing business for employers. Competitive benefits — which includes a good health plan — is a key tool in recruiting and retaining talent, says Brian Cassidy, managing principal of Phoenix-based CCBG Architects. In fact, he says, for architecture firms and similarly licensed professionals, “the expectation is, if you’re an employee, you get excellent health benefits.” CCBG offers coverage to every full-time employee, paying 90 percent of the premium, and makes it also available to the employee’s family but at the employee’s expense.


Valuing healthcare as an employee benefit is an attitude echoed across the business spectrum, from startup to established business giant. Says Scott Salkin, CEO of Allbound, “It’s tough as a startup, especially with limited funds and a limited number of employees, often resulting in fewer options and higher premiums. But I’ve always looked at health benefits as a huge competitive advantage, and something you can’t overlook even at an early stage.” And Jason Riggs, Salt River Project’s director of Total Rewards, shares, “SRP recognizes that our people are one of the biggest reasons we’ve been as successful as we have been. With that said, a top priority for the company is to ensure that we provide a benefits package that is attractive, responsive, sustainable and beneficial to our employees.” Arrowhead Health Centers, whose success in creating a healthcare program for its employees that improved care outcomes while cutting costs spawned Redirect Health as a separate entity that helps other businesses also achieve those results, offers free healthcare to its employees and their families. CEO Ken Levin explains Arrowhead’s leadership “came to the realization that we could reframe healthcare as being an expense of being in business, to become an asset to recruit and attract the best employees in the marketplace.”

What Workers Want

It follows that companies using healthcare benefits as a recruitment and retention tool consider their employees’ healthcare concerns and needs in putting together their healthcare benefits offerings. Noting, “Happy employees tend to be less stressed and, as a result, physically healthier as well,” Salkin says, “We’ve managed to offer pretty

decent coverage options through one of the larger PEOs, and hope to improve coverage and the amount we’re able to cover as we grow. But we also look at other contributors to overall health — like unlimited PTO, flexible work hours, teamwork, a good culture and pleasant work environment.” SRP’s medical, dental and vision plans provide broad coverage for employees and their families, including preventive screenings, a HealthSavings Account option and a large network of providers. It also offers a wellness program intended to help employees address health concerns in a proactive manner — from annual health screenings to educational luncheons on health-related topics to providing healthy-choice meals in the company’s cafeterias and even to a financial planning benefit. “This benefit provides employees with a professional resource to help them get a better understanding of their personal finances, which we think can help reduce their stress,” Riggs says. Law firm Fennemore Craig has found that employees’ healthcare concerns include affordability and quality of coverage. “Our firm’s healthcare concerns include managing cost while helping to protect employees’ personal and financial well-being,” says Steve Good, director and managing partner. “In many ways, these objectives align. However, like most employers, controlling healthcare costs and future increases are a priority. We routinely address aspects of the health plans that deliver the maximum return on investment for both employees and the firm, including network accessibility and discounts, preventive care, wellness, disease management, education, care outcomes and fee transparency.” When an employee utilizes a network provider, Good explains, the savings is often 30 percent or greater for both the employee and the plan. The firm, therefore, tries to ensure plan participants have access to high-quality, in-network providers in all six of its locations. But the firm also focuses on encouraging plan participants to be compliant with preventive care guidelines for their gender and age. “Where we see shortfalls in utilization of these tools, we increase participation around the importance of the tests in our wellness communications.  “The wellness program is crucial in encouraging our workforce to make little steps that increase their overall well-being,” Good continues, noting it benefits the individual as well as the organization if the needle moves even just a little to prevent chronic lifestyle-related conditions. And when disease does affect an employee, resources within the plan help to encourage best practices and medical care compliance. “Educating employees to help them become more knowledgeable consumers of healthcare includes offering tools to evaluate costs for procedures among multiple providers and allow review of the quality and effectiveness of those providers.”

“It’s tough as a startup, especially

with limited funds and a limited number of employees, often

resulting in fewer options and higher premiums. But I’ve always looked at

health benefits as a huge competitive advantage, and somet hing you can’t

overlook even at an early stage.” — Scott Salkin, CEO of Allbound

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“Educating employees to help them become more knowledgeable consumers of The full, free healthcare Arrowhead offers its employees and their families is not free to Arrowhead, but David Berg, founder of Arrowhead Health Centers and co-founder and chairman of the board of Redirect Health, estimates the return on investment at four to one “because they’re a more engaged, productive team.” The core of the employee program is the same healthcare delivery system that Arrowhead provides all its patients. “We don’t let the patient’s or employee’s conditions exacerbate to where it becomes an expensive endeavor,” Levin says. And there is neither co-pay nor deductible. “Out-of-pocket expenses are a barrier to early entry to care,” he notes. Removing barriers to following a health plan improves patient compliance, which “is how people get better faster,” Levin says.

Demographics Differ

healthcare includes offering tools to evaluate costs for procedures among multiple providers and allow review of the quality and effectiveness of those providers.” — Steve Good, Director and Managing Partner of Fennemore Craig

There is no uniform “what the employee wants” across all workforce populations. SRP’s diverse workforce includes professional roles and fieldwork roles, and Riggs shares, “While our plans are designed to benefit every employee, we do see some differences amongst our employees in regard to how employees approach their benefits.” For example, he says, a professional views the benefits in a different light than does a fieldworker, especially with consumer choice for medical. “We tend to see our professionals use our HighDeductible Health Plan (HDHP) and Health-Savings Account (HSA), whereas the fieldworker may opt for the more-certain ExclusiveProvider Organization (EPO) plan.” Cassidy finds the older employees, especially aged 60 or more, are more concerned with the quality of the plan; younger employees bring a different mindset. “They’re healthier, and a lot don’t have kids or are single.” Common to all ages, however, seems to be a need for ease of use. Additionally, his company plan includes a flex benefit account that allows the employee to prepay some expenses as a pre-tax payroll deduction, but it takes work to understand and use it effectively, so, he says, “Not a lot participate.” Recognizing that employees’ individual circumstances — and therefore healthcare needs — vary, Good says Fennemore Craig is contemplating a defined contribution approach that puts more choice in each employee’s hands as to how he or she will spend the healthcare dollars provided by the firm. “For some people, that may mean certain networks. For others, a richer prescription program. For others, alternative healthcare options. The desire (and, arguably, expectation) for customization and individualization is especially prevalent among the growing number of millennials in the workforce.”

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New Directions in Healthcare

Dental coverage has long been included in healthcare benefits. What has been emerging lately, however, is a recognition that dental is not a compartmented issue but an integral part of a person’s health. In fact, the better care a person takes of his mouth, the better his overall health. People with gum disease, for instance, are more likely to have heart disease, cardiovascular disease or suffer from a stroke, relates Delta Dental President and CEO Allan Allford, who reports nearly 65 million Americans have gum disease. And the tie-in to overall health makes a valuable contribution to the trend for integrated healthcare. “Dentists are able to detect more than 120 diseases,” Allford notes, naming cancer and diabetes among them. “Those diagnoses lead to a discussion of ‘what’s next’ and helps the primary care physician with those diagnoses.” Although “being at work is not the primary concern; being healthy is the primary concern,” Allford notes the two go hand in glove and points out, “The better condition employees’ mouths are in, the better condition their overall health will be and the fewer hours they’re going to miss.” Along with helping employers raise awareness of the importance of oral health, Delta Dental offers programs to incentivize employees to receive more preventive care, such as excluding the costs of preventive care services from deductions for the annual benefit maximum. It also provides employers a report to help them understand how their employees are using their dental benefits such as preventive options and upfront diagnostic measures. Its range of benefit plans accommodates the varying needs of businesses of different sizes. This includes employers with 25 or fewer employees, long an existing client base but one that Delta Dental is giving increased attention with a small-business unit launched earlier this year. “It’s an opportunity for us regarding educating and growing our market share,” Allford says. Increasing attention to wellness in the healthcare picture has put increasing attention on stress and its negative impact on a person’s well-

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being — physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. “The No. 1 reason people are out of balance and actually are sick is stress,” says Sumit Banerjee, founder of Sumits Yoga. “The ancient system of yoga gives people a tool to help with that.” As a market segment, he says, yoga has been mainstream for a while and is doing really well. Banerjee gives workshops and seminars on mindfulness and meditation on how to cope with stress at work, and also offers corporate discounts for groups to come to the studio. “We encourage people to come; it helps build teamwork,” he says. He notes the workplace is a pressure environment, with stress and crises and deadlines, but there are also a lot of distractions so people have a tough time focusing on projects and goals. “Using mindfulness, principles of yoga and meditation, helps them relax and focus more — which helps increase productivity.” Ross Weisman says he and his co-founders chose to focus specifically on meditation with Current Meditation, which they opened in Phoenix’s Arcadia neighborhood last year with the goal of making it easier for people to add meditation to their daily routine. The length of the class, how frequently classes are held and how they are actually structured is all designed to make it easy for people to fit meditation into their schedule, Weisman says. “Obviously, you don’t sweat doing meditation.” Noting that, in addition to the individual physiological benefits of reducing stress and anxiety, benefits show up in the workplace, Weisman points out there is scientific backing that meditation boosts creativity

and problem solving, as well as relationship building as people become better communicators. Weisman sees a strong market for businesses like his. And Current Meditation has begun to expand its own focus to encourage businesses to book a private class for group meditation. To larger companies, Current Meditation will offer the option of going to them, although, having put a lot of care into the studio’s ambience, “We like the idea of them coming to us.” Physical therapy is another healthcare segment with a rising profile. There is a #ChoosePT movement that is rebranding physical therapy clinics to be a first choice where patients can go without a referral. Arizona is one of the states that allows this direct access, which also helps minimize an individual’s cost of copays and medical bills. T.O.P.S. Physical Therapy and Osteopractics fits into the healthcare picture by providing injury prevention and rehabilitation services to the general population, explains owner Amy M. Brannon, PT, DPT, FAAOMPT, Cert-DN, Cert-SMT, Dip. Osteopractic. “We pride ourselves on looking at the whole picture of a person, and not just the focal injury point,” Dr. Brannon says. For example, an injury in the elbow can be coming from muscle imbalances in the low back, thus it is important to look at the whole overall patient. “We also have a great ability to help prevent injury, bring patients back from an injury, and make people better than they were prior to the injury.” Sharing, “We have the honor of working with many fire and police men and women. They have become the foundation of our business and have excelled in their professions based on getting better, faster,” Dr. Brannon says the practice has expanded to working with the general public but its niche is working with industrial athletes and desk jockeys. “We work with various businesses in understanding what their needs are, and helping to provide injury prevention screenings to minimize the loss of time at work from injury.” They also look at the mechanics being used, and try to provide input as to where movements can be changed or improved to help minimize injury. “T.O.P.S. takes time out to go visit work locations and observe the movements being performed, which not only helps us to treat those who are attending PT, but also helps to provide input on how to make changes.” Telemedicine has become, in a short span of time, a foundational part of many healthcare programs. The innovative sector is, itself, experiencing innovation. Local company Akos is designed as a community of physicians dedicated to making healthcare better —Allan Allford, President and through smart technology, seamless design, a patientCEO of Delta Dental of Arizona centric operating model, grassroots strategy and the collective power of a preferred provider network, explains Swaraj Singh, M.D., founder of Akos who also has previous experience creating an app-based healthcare service. “Akos brings together top clinical talent, high-quality customer service, and top-notch technological resources to power a new type of

“Dentists are able to detect more than 120 diseases . . . Those diagnoses lead

to a discussion of ‘what’s

next’ and helps the primary

care physician with those diagnoses.”

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“According to the American

telemedicine practice,” he says. “This new formula of telehealth makes Akos a disruptive driver in healthcare, more specifically in the telemedicine industry.” Unlike traditional telemedicine models, Akos uses a grassroots strategy and the collective power of a preferred provider network to help patients navigate their healthcare concerns from start to finish. To access Akos, patients download the free app to their smartphone or tablet and provide a brief medical history and symptoms before speaking with a virtual care coordinator. From there, a care coordinator will assess the patient’s symptoms and connect the patient to the boardcertified physician, in their area, who best meets their needs. If the care coordinator determines the condition cannot be treated through virtual care, the patient will not be charged by — Swaraj Singh, M.D., Founder of Akos Akos and instead, will be directed via a virtual care coordinator to an Akos preferred healthcare provider nearest to the patient for immediate care. “The structured triage enables faster healthcare delivery,” Dr. Singh says. — not just those using clinic services — create financial modeling that Akos also works with employers to discover what works for them. “This combines year-to-date trends and performance with predictive cost trends personalized approach allows us to customize programs,” says Dr. Singh, for the future, and can help identify risk and engagement opportunities explaining his Return to Work Program for employers streamlines the way within the employee population. “The businesses we serve need accurate work-related injuries and illnesses are handled, minimizing cost of ER and timely reporting, now more than ever. Analytics helps us plan, and Urgent Care visits and reducing claims and risks, which, in turn, helps strategize, adjust and prove our value, and save our clients dollars while employers lower E-MOD ratings and insurance costs. keeping their benefited members healthy,” Ducar explains. “According to the American Medical Association, telemedicine platforms, Redirect Health, which was spawned as a disruptor out of the concept’s like Akos, allow physicians to treat 70 percent of clinical encounters seen success with a local business, was founded in 2013 to apply those methods today, virtually,” Dr. Singh says. to other businesses, helping employers build affordable, high-quality Healthcare Solutions Centers, which has been providing innovative and healthcare plans using a self-insurance model. The company’s healthcarecustomizable on-site and near-site clinics to businesses with 200 or more first approach focuses on eliminating what it identifies as the waste, excess employees since 2003, “is embracing technology to enhance the patient and inflated pricing of traditional health insurance while providing real, care experience,” says company president Frances Ducar, FNP-C.  quality healthcare. The model allows employers of all sizes to cut healthcare The clinics provide a comprehensive and unique approach to healthcare expenses, build quality benefits packages and gain a competitive edge in by integrating preventative care, biometrics, wellness, on-site lab draws, attracting top talent, while its concierge-style care logistics team helps discounted radiology and access to a provider 24/7 through its patientmembers access the care they need. friendly telemedicine app. “Telemedicine also allows healthcare to reach With its business program expanded to 28 states, Redirect Health has across state lines, making the employee’s physical location irrelevant. identified a new market opportunity and is now piloting iEverydayCARE Patients are also able to access their healthcare information at all in Maricopa County to improve access to healthcare for individuals and times through the patient portal app, which provides an interactive and families. It offers another option to employees who may be opting out of empowering healthcare xperience,” Ducar says. “These applications, as well their company’s plans due to what they feel are high deductibles, high coas the convenience of the clinics, allow for the breaking down of traditional pays and increasing monthly premiums. barriers to healthcare by making busy schedules a non-issue to receiving quality care.” Akos akosmd.com Free for the employees, Healthcare Solutions Centers’ services are Allbound allbound.com CCBG Architects, Inc. ccbg-arch.com designed to be convenient and comprehensive and to save the employer Current Meditation becurrent.com money, especially if the company is self-insured. Notes Ducar, “Out-ofDelta Dental of Arizona deltadentalaz.com pocket costs to the company are avoided and there is a vested interest in Fennemore Craig, P.C. fclaw.com prevention of catastrophic health events. HCS also utilizes an innovative Healthcare Solutions Centers hcsonsite.com data analytics tool to find gaps in care and uses predictive modeling to Redirect Health redirecthealth.com identify potentially large claims before they happen.” By using this analytics Salt River Project srpnet.com software, HCS is also able to view claims data from all health plan members

Medical Association,

telemedicine platforms, like

Akos, allow physicians to treat

70 percent of clinical encounters seen today, virtually,”

Sumits Yoga sumits-yoga.com

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RISKS & REWARDS

Business Fronts for 2017 From one quarter in, new perspectives on the year ahead by Mike Pongon

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It’s been a unique start to 2017. The first quarter brought us an interesting mix of uncertainty coupled with overall steady conditions and solid job growth. As we move into the second quarter, the opportunity for meaningful, dynamic gains is very real, and I advise business leaders to think boldly about growth. In fact, it’s time that they step on the gas as they examine their industry and market conditions, hire new people and plan for new products and service lines. Point B has taken a close look at high-priority industry and service sector drivers for the remainder of 2017 to help businesses navigate the year successfully.

HEALTHCARE

Mike Pongon is the CEO of Point B Inc, an integrated management consulting, venture investment and property development firm. With more than 600 associates serving clients in a diverse set of industry and functional areas across the U.S., Point B has helped organizations form, execute and thrive for the past 22 years. pointb.com

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Mergers become streamlined. We can expect to see additional mergers to gain efficiencies and reduce competition among not only providers and health plans, but between groups joining/aligning to form a combined health plan and delivery system. Also, as the existence of standalone provider systems shrink, merger and affiliation candidates are more limited and competitive. Parties need to act fast, as many acquirers are on their second or third round with efficiencies of experience under their belts. Health promotion initiatives see an increase. In an effort to keep healthcare costs at bay and address the high cost of caring for chronic conditions, there will be a growing focus on health promotion initiatives and patient adherence programs, affecting both payors and providers of healthcare services. In addition, with higher deductibles, the patient as “payer” is incented to engage with recommended health promotion programs more than ever.

An overhaul of the ACA takes center stage. With the “repeal and replace” of the ACA underway, healthcare organizations can be proactive by enhancing strengths and identifying the gaps that require attention throughout the organization to help lay the groundwork for the next set of challenges facing this constantly evolving healthcare industry. For example, many provider organizations are bracing for the potential of an influx of newly uninsured.

RETAIL

Customers want things (even) faster. Consumers’ demands for immediacy, particularly by millennials, coupled with shifts to instant delivery and same-day service, will drive an even greater number of retailers to offer more orderonline-and-pick-up-in-store, curbside, and drive-thru options (would you like fries with that blouse?). Loyalty is still king. Omnichannel retailers will strive to engage consumers with loyalty programs to better measure cross-channel behavior and harness the same power of analytics in brick and mortar environments as they have for online customers. Employee satisfaction is even more critical in the fast-paced retail world. With workers asking for more predictable schedules, and some cities looking to mandate predictability, retailers will revisit labor optimization models to ensure they work not just for the customer and the bottom line, but that they also drive employee satisfaction. Organizations will also need to develop strategies for implementing new compensation structures as they begin to become more relevant and even mandated.

Compared to Q2 2016, employers in the West report a slightly stronger Net Employment Outlook, while employers in the Northeast, Midwest and South anticipate a relatively stable hiring pace, according to the latest ManpowerGroup Employment Outlook. manpowergroup.us/meos


BETTERING YOUR BUSINESS FINANCIAL SERVICES

Technology investment is strong. There will be more focused investments in Fintech (Financial Technology) and the use of technological innovation (e.g., artificial intelligence, blockchain, mobile payments, etc.) for financial services organizations this year, making technical due diligence and system testing more important than ever before. Cybersecurity threats become omnipresent. As financial institutions continue to migrate to an “all-digital” environment, the risk factor for cybersecurity breeches will increase exponentially. The likelihood of a potential breech and its negative impact on financial institutions will move cybersecurity to the top of the list on executive agendas. We’ll see a continued focus on growth once interest rates begin to rise and regulatory demands are eased. As we get further into a post-election world, the outcomes of these two events will mean more capital to spend on strategic initiatives that focus on long-term growth and success. This will lead to renewed innovation efforts and the exploration of multi-dimensional business models to drive new revenue streams.

PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT

Best practices will need to be shared across industries. The trend of applying best practices across industries, such as the development of “urban resorts,” will continue. Great projects will deliver innovative places that meet the evolving needs and expectations of consumers by blending the best across industry business models and development practices. Technology plays a bigger role. Developers will need to take advantage of advancements in construction methods and technology to develop more efficient, flexible projects. For example, using crosslaminated timber (CLT) construction is cost-effective, can speed up construction, and provides desirable design aesthetic attributes. Multiple use is the new black. Never before has it been more important to create spaces with flexible design and adaptability for multiple uses and product types. Consumers are becoming used to traveling to fewer places offering more experiences, and developers will need to plan and execute based on this focus in 2017.

VENTURE INVESTMENT

Innovation in the enterprise takes a step forward. More companies will continue to add corporate venture capital, intrapreneurial and incubatory capabilities as they push for new and more provocative ways to innovate. However, those who try without leveraging venture capital experience will be susceptible to early costly mistakes that become realized in future years. Mergers and acquisitions come home to roost. Companies have been stockpiling cash, and this surplus will manifest itself in significant M&A activities in 2017. Organizations will need a defined strategy, strong discovery and assessment processes, cultural integration methodologies and a robust transition playbook for optimum success. Series A funding becomes a challenge. Large VC funds will continue to raise a larger portion of available VC dollars. This will make it more challenging for startups to find Series A funding unless they have clear IPO paths, or can tap into other financing sources, such as direct corporate and family office capital. Point B Inc. pointb.com

Doughnut Economics Economics is the mother tongue of public policy. It dominates our decision-making for the future, guides multi-billion-dollar investments, and shapes our responses to climate change, inequality and other environmental and social challenges that define our times. Pity then, or more like disaster, that its fundamental ideas are centuries out of date yet are still taught in college courses worldwide and still used to address critical issues in government and business alike. In Doughnut Economics, Kate Raworth sets out seven key ways to fundamentally reframe our understanding of what economics is and does. Along the way, she points out how we can break our addiction to growth; redesign money, finance and business to be in service to people; and create economies that are regenerative and distributive by design. Doughnut Economics: Seven Ways to Think Like a 21st-Century Economist Author: Kate Raworth Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

Pages: 320 On shelves & online

$28

Managing Oneself Peter Drucker is widely regarded as the father of modern management, offering penetrating insights into business that still resonate today. But Drucker also offers deep wisdom on how to manage our personal lives and how to become more effective leaders. In these two classic articles from Harvard Business Review, Drucker reveals the keys to becoming one’s own chief executive officer as well as a better leader of others. “Managing Oneself” identifies the probing questions one needs to ask to gain the insights essential for taking charge of one’s career, while “What Makes an Effective Executive” outlines the key behaviors one must adopt in order to lead. Together, they chart a powerful course to help one carve out one’s place in the world. Managing Oneself: The Key to Success Author: Peter F. Drucker Publisher: Harvard Business Review Press

Pages: 128 On shelves & online

$19.99

Gen Z @ Work A generations expert and author of When Generations Collide and The M-Factor teams up with his 17-year-old son to introduce the next influential demographic group to join the workforce — Generation Z — in this essential study, the first on the subject. They were born between 1995 and 2012. At 72.8 million strong, Gen Z is about to make its presence known in the workplace in a major way — and employers need to understand the differences that set them apart. They’re radically different from the millennials, and yet no one seems to be talking about them — until now. This generation has an entirely unique perspective on careers and how to succeed in the workforce. Gen Z @ Work: How the Next Generation Is Transforming the Workplace Author: David Stillman and Jonah Stillman Publisher: Harper Business

Nationwide, employers in all 13 industry sectors expect to add staff in Q2 2017. Industries reporting the strongest second quarter hiring intentions are: Leisure & Hospitality (+28%), Wholesale & Retail Trade (+21%), Transportation & Utilities (+20%) and Professional & Business Services (+19%). manpowergroup.us/meos

Pages: 320 On shelves & online

$28.99

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INVESTING IN COMMUNITY

Life After a Campaign UP NEXT MONTH Cultivating Mobile Philanthropists

AVOIDING VOLUNTEER BURN OUT What can nonprofits do to avoid overtaxing their volunteers during major campaigns that can last seven to eight years? Smits suggests: Avoiding lengthy commitments. “It’s not a good idea to ask someone if they want to be on a steering committee for seven years,” he says. Ask volunteers, instead, for a two- to three-year volunteer commitment. Be ready to solicit new recruits throughout the campaign cycle. Considering dual campaign co-chairs: a set to begin the campaign and a set to conclude the campaign. Setting term limits for campaign boards, councils and advisory groups. “You have a natural cleansing of the organization with term limits — especially necessary after a campaign,” says Smits.

Richard Tollefson is founder and president of The Phoenix Philanthropy Group, an Arizona-based international consulting firm serving nonprofit organizations as well as institutional and individual philanthropists. phoenixphilanthropy.com

until they’ve paid off their current campaign pledges,” says Smits. “If you go after them too many times for too much, you will cause donor fatigue.” • Continue donor prospect management practices. Prospect management, screening and qualification doesn’t end after a campaign. “You always have people in the donor lifecycle,” says Smits. “You identify them, find out their interests, cultivate them and steward them. Then you start all over.” After campaign conclusion, Méndez’s team recognized the need for an integrated donor prospect database linking the university’s multiple campuses and the development of prospect assignment and management policies/protocols. • Apply lessons learned from the previous campaign. At campaign close, the board, executive leadership team and volunteers should participate in a debriefing about what worked well, what didn’t and what changes could improve the next campaign. Consider sending surveys to participants asking for campaign feedback, and continue the practices that worked well — for example, processes, procedures and meeting protocols. Says Méndez, “Before this campaign, fundraising was very much the president’s project.” The largescale fundraising effort, however, required the cultivation of a campus-wide culture of philanthropy. The training of executive leadership, chancellors, deans, directors and even alumni about their role in fundraising, Méndez says, has changed the university’s protocol. “We have continued with monthly meetings of constituents at different campuses who now share donor prospects. We also continued our distinguished alumni awards and alumni engagement opportunities because we need to build that group of prospective donors.” As to the notion of falling back into a less disciplined approach to fundraising after a campaign? Not a chance. Today’s nonprofits are not afforded such a luxury, and, as Smits points out, it makes little sense. “What you want to do is raise the level of fundraising from pre-campaign levels. You never want to go back to the way things used to be.”

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Life after a successful campaign is filled with rewards and benefits. New buildings, improved facilities, innovative programming, expanded services, research and scholarships, and working capital infuse nonprofits with a sense of momentum. Campaigns also bring enhanced visibility, strengthened reputation and increased community impact that makes future fundraising less challenging. What’s more, leadership and staff — many not originally trained as fundraisers — have honed their fundraising skills and are comfortable with the role of philanthropy, paving the way for future campaigns. Skeptics who witnessed the campaign’s successes are now believers, bolstering the organization’s culture of philanthropy. It’s a win-win-win. But wait. While it may be tempting to ride the wave of excitement and coast to the next campaign, that old-fashioned mindset is a surefire recipe for disaster. “There is no break,” says Margarita Méndez Escudero, associate vice president of development and alumni for Puerto Rico’s Ana G. Méndez University System. “You can never go into a slowdown or shutdown, because you need to satisfy the needs of constituents, enhance your programs and continue on.” Méndez says her team finished their successful $29.4-million campaign (above goal) and immediately began planning the next. “The last thing you do in a campaign is start planning the next one,” agrees Peter Smits, vice president emeritus at California State University, Fresno, and senior consultant at Phoenix Philanthropy. He led the university’s first-ever major campaign, surpassing its $200-million goal. To ensure momentum into the next campaign, executives sitting on nonprofit boards need to be sure their organizations: • Retain staff. “When you have a successful campaign, high performers can be poached by other organizations,” warns Smits. How to keep them? Acknowledge their work publicly during and after the campaign. And provide opportunities for continued growth. Méndez’s team completed a staffing assessment post-campaign, identifying those who might benefit from additional training, moving some to different positions, and identifying staff fundraising strengths. • Steward and maintain existing donors. “You may have hundreds or thousands of new donors,” says Smits. “Keep them engaged in the life of the organization and make sure they know you did with their money what you promised — share stories of students and faculty that demonstrate donors’ investments in your campaign were worthwhile.” Those smaller donors who stepped up at the end of the campaign? They are ripe for cultivation during your next major initiative. The larger donors? “Never go back to them for another gift

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BY MIKE HUNTER

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Arizona Forward

Stewardship Summit ‘Connecting Community Design and Public Health’ Wed., April 26 | 8:00a – 3:00p Statewide mayoral roundtable on “Building Healthy Communities” and a statewide business roundtable will address what companies large and small are doing to support healthy communities and healthy lifestyles in Arizona. Attending will be Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton, Tucson Mayor Jonathan Rothschild, Winslow Mayor Robin Boyd and Coconino County Supervisor Liz Archuleta. Keynote speaker is John Auerbach, executive director of Trust for America’s Health. Leading a nonprofit organization that makes disease prevention a national priority, Auerbach will present resources to connect community design with improved public health outcomes. He is closely monitoring changes to the healthcare system in the U.S., and will touch on “Repeal and Replacement” of the Affordable Care Act. Panels will include “Community Design, Transportation & Public Health: Arizona Success Stories,” with Bob England, M.D., director of Maricopa County Health Department, and Rachel Zenuk, MPH, of the Pinal County Public Health Community. Health Assessments and Improvement Plans across Arizona consistently show that transportation is a key element in improving an entire host of social determinants that impact health. Dr. England and Zenuk will showcase transportation intervention strategies that urban and rural county health departments are facilitating in Arizona that are improving public health outcomes, promoting social equity, improving the local economy and better protecting the environment.

In Business Magazine

Priority: Healthcare – Strategies to Making It Work! Fri., May 5 | 11:00a – 1:30p In Business Magazine’s annual healthcare symposium brings together experts and leaders of local healthcare companies to address the thorny issues business owners and decision makers face in determining healthcare benefits for their employees. This is an especially hot topic now, with uncertainty at a high level. Through keynote speaker and in-depth panel presentations, the symposium’s program will answer questions relative to healthcare coverage; provide insight from top leaders on what to expect from insurers, providers and government oversight; and discuss options for saving money. The goal is to help business owners understand how to use healthcare as a tool to build business. Panel topics are “The Future of Obamacare,” “Effective Strategies for Business” and “Alternative Opportunities & Your Bottom Line,” with top healthcare and business leaders, moderated by “Arizona Horizon” host Ted Simons. The presentations will take place concurrent with a served luncheon. An EXPO will take place both preceding and following the luncheon — a high-level and engaged forum at which healthcare companies will be showcasing the products and services they offer to businesses.

$150

$65

Sheraton Grand Phoenix

Omni Scottsdale Resort & Spa at Montelucia

340 N. 3rd St., Phoenix

4949 E. Lincoln Dr., Scottsdale

arizonaforward.org

arizonaforward.org

SAVE THE DATE

Upcoming and notable 2017 Cybersecurity Summit May

Thurs., May 4

4

The Cybersecurity Summit, an opportunity for government and business leaders to learn about the threats, vulnerabilities and consequences related to data security and privacy matters, is presented by the Arizona Technology Council, Arizona Commerce Authority and Arizona Cyber Threat Response Alliance/Arizona InfraGard. aztechcouncil.org Leadershipcast Live 2017: Powered by Purpose May

May 5

5

Leadercast is a simulcast presented by Gilbert Chamber of Commerce on how defined values drive a strong culture and intentional leadership inspires amazing results. gilbertaz.com

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APRIL 2017 NOTABLE DATES

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Sat., April 1 — April Fool’s Day

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 Mon., April 10 – Tues., April 18 — Passover 30

Tues., April 18 — Tax Day Sat., April 22 — Earth Day

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APRIL 2017 Thurs., April 6

11:30a – 8:00p

8th Annual Golf Tournament Gilbert Chamber of Commerce Activities include a putting contest, Pro for Hire and Golf Ball Launcher to shoot a dart ball up to 350 yards. $150 Seville Golf and Country Club Tues., April 4

6683 S. Clubhouse Dr., Gilbert

10:30a – 1:00p

gilbertaz.com

ATHENA Leadership Awards ATHENA Valley of the Sun

Thurs., April 6

The new ATHENA Valley of the Sun chapter will honor American Ambassador Barbara Barrett and other outstanding women business leaders. ATHENA Valley of the Sun is the new independent Arizona Chapter of Athena International. Since the program’s inception in 1982, more than 7,000 exemplary leaders in over 500 communities across the world have received the prestigious ATHENA Award, which is presented to women who are honored for professional excellence, community service and actively assisting other women.

Young Executive Series

1450 S. Cooper Rd., Chandler

Chandler Chamber of Commerce’s golf tournament celebrates the spirit of volunteerism that moves so many people to give of their time, talent and treasure in support of excellent caregiving and human kindness.

$75

chandlerchamber.com

$400

Sat., April 8

5:00p – 7:00p

7:30a – 1:00p

15th Annual George Rozsa Classic

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Social networking event to allow young business professionals to connect. $10 The Cooper 202

Marriott Tempe at the Buttes

Whirlwind Golf Club

2000 W. Westcourt Way, Tempe

5692 W. North Loop Rd., Chandler

athenaaz.com

chandlerchamber.com

4

5

7 Fri., April 7

8:30a – 10:00a

‘Up Your Sales Game’ Business Bootcamp

Glendale Chamber of Commerce The 36th Annual Luke Shoot-Out Golf Tournament is a salute to our troops. $115; additional luncheon guest: $25

Tracy Bullock of Bullock Training & Development/Sandler Training will discuss the tactics of great sales people, and how to qualify or disqualify leads – to help salespeople get to their revenue goals faster.

Falcon Dunes Golf Course

Wed., April 5

Sanderson Ford 6400 N. 51st Ave., Glendale

Managing Your Finances While Your Business Grows Globally

azhcc.com

Global Chamber Phoenix

1:00p – 2:30p

C-Level Executive present their business success story... growing from Metro Phoenix to the other metro areas and across borders, while successfully managing loans, insurance, finances, currency and more.

Fri., April 7

1:00p – 7:00p

Scottsdale Area Chamber Open Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce

Members: free; non-members: $30.00

Attracting golfers from some of the Valley’s most influential companies, the tournament is an opportunity to play a great course and enjoy business-tobusiness networking at its best.

SkySong

$175

1475 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale

McCormick Ranch Golf Club

globalchamber.org

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15100 W. Northern Ave., Waddell

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6:30a Check-In; 7:30a Shotgun Start

36th Annual Luke Shoot Out Golf Tournament

Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

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Tues., April 25

Noon – 1:00p

Ask an Expert Chandler Chamber of Commerce The seminar will focus on “Story Marketing: How to Craft and Tell Compelling Stories that Sell” with Park Howell. Lunch is provided. Members: free; non-members: $10 Chandler Chamber Office

Wed. – Fri., April 26 – 28

25 S. Arizona Pl., Chandler

Candid Conversation for Your Community

chandlerchamber.com

Times vary per day

Arizona Association for Economic Development Sat., April 8

Tues., April 25

5:00p – 10:00p

13th Annual Laughter is the Best Medicine Fundraising Gala

‘Managing the Hurdles of Global Expansion’ Virtual Event

Chandler Chamber of Commerce

Global Chamber

Chandler Chamber of Commerce’s event is known for crazy themes, fun times and much laughter, supporting Dignity Health medical centers, urgent care centers and community programs in the East Valley.

Part of the Magnificent Global Leader Virtual Event Series. John Galvin, of Galvin International, will discuss the hurdles of global expansion and approaches for effectively overcoming them. Hosted and moderated by Patty Azar, CEO of Vision Alignment.

$500 Sheraton Grand at Wild Horse Pass 5594 W. Wild Horse Pass Blvd., Chandler chandlerchamber.com

8 Tues., April 11

Highlighting the conference will be a kick-off address by Michael Bidwell, president of the Arizona Cardinals. There will be sessions on how today’s buildings impact what is built in the future, how taxes drive relocation decisions, how labor markets and demographics effect expansions and relocations and how the growth of companies can translate into an economic boom. In addition to educational programming, the conference features AAED’s annual EDDE Awards banquet recognizing Arizona’s top economic developers.

9:00a – 10:00a.

Members: $395; non-members: $525

Members: free, non-members: $30

The Nautical Beachfront Resort

Online

1000 McCulloch Blvd N., Lake Havasu City

members.globalchamber.org

aaed.com

11

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19 Wed., April 19

8:30a – 1:15p

25

28

10:00a – 1:00p

Workforce Symposium

West Valley Healthcare Career Expo

Arizona Association for Economic Development

WESTMARC & Career Connectors

“Partnering for Progress – Economic Development to Workforce Reality” workforce symposium will include panel discussions on “Drilling Deeper to Build a Labor Pipeline” and “Community College Partnerships: Three Industry Experiences.” Ioanna T. Morfessis, president and chief strategist for IO. Inc., will provide the keynote address. She will discuss global innovation, technology and the trends that are impacting the nature of work and the workers required to perform it.

This event is a collaboration of all major healthcare organizations in the Phoenix West Valley to connect current and future workforce with employers and education opportunities. Approximately 20 healthcare organizations, 10 healthcare schools and 200-plus healthcare professionals will be in attendance.

Members and their guests: $60; non-members: $75; after noon April 6: $85

The Colonnade at Peoria Sports Complex

Phoenix Country Club

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Members: Cost; non-members: Cost: 16101 N. 83rd Ave., Peoria

2901 N. 7th St., Phoenix

careerconnectors.org

aaed.com Tues., April 18

10:45a – 1:30p

Women in Leadership Chandler Chamber of Commerce This month’s keynote speaker is Susan Sly, best-selling author, trainer, strategist and speaker. She has appeared on CNN, CNBC, FOX, and will share the strategies that can put one back in the driver’s seat of one’s life. Members: $25; general admission: $35; at the door: add $5 SoHo 63

63 E. Boston St., Chandler

chandlerchamber.com

If your event is directed to helping build business in Metro Phoenix, please send us information to include it in the In Business Magazine events calendar. Full calendar online. Events@inbusinessmag.com

Fri., Apr. 28

6:30a – 3:00p

20th Annual Chamber Masters Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce Charity golf tournament. $125 Foothills Golf Club 2201 E. Clubhouse Dr., Phoenix ahwatukeechamber.com

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OUR SUBJECT IN-DEPTH

Better Hiring and Recruiting

Best practices combine brand awareness, technology and gut instinct by David Dourgarian

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David Dourgarian is president and CEO of TempWorks Software based in Eagan, Minn. His accomplishments within the company include launching the payroll funding and payroll processing divisions, as well as engineering a substantial software partnership with Sterling National Bank. tempworks.com

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Guide

For employers and recruiters alike, there is no better feeling than finding and landing the perfect candidate whose skills are aligned with the open position and is ideal for company culture. However, it can also be extremely frustrating when hiring and recruiting don’t work out for the best. A company’s bad hiring choices can lead to costly mistakes that benefit no one. Bad hires will ultimately impact office productivity and employee morale. While there is no guaranteed way to completely avoid hiring errors, there are ways a company can significantly reduce the risks of choosing the wrong person while ensuring that it consistently attracts ideal candidates. The following tips will make a difference when it comes to hiring and recruiting skills. Focus on the company’s brand. LinkedIn recently published its 2017 Global Recruiting Trends report (bit.ly/linkedin-recruiting-trends-pdf) that notes more than 80 percent of leaders acknowledge employer branding has a significant impact on their ability to hire talent. This report highlights how imperative it is to take the time to implement a strategy that will truly define your brand. A company should focus on positioning itself as a reliable service. When it shows that it is willing to do everything it can to retain current clients, it will attract new ones — as well as potential employees impressed by the long list of clients loyal to the brand. More work on company branding will attract the ideal candidates internally. By having a favorable employment brand, a company will increase employee loyalty and the likelihood that its top performers will continue to grow within that company. Investing in a strategy that will help the company set itself apart from the competition will reap rewards — both with new hires and current employees. Don’t be afraid to use technology to help with recruiting. While it may seem that technology is taking over the world, sometimes it can truly be a blessing. Businesses should embrace the right technology tools, as having the right tools is critical to finding the perfect candidate for an open position, and keeping them happy once they’re hired. Technology like social media platforms and online candidate profiles are a huge time-saver for companies looking for the perfect new hire. This opens the door for high-quality analytics programs, like those applied to customer data to help businesses make better strategic decisions. Recruiters can use this same technology to quickly and easily locate the best people for the job. Companies should also consider how their existing HR software impacts the hiring process. If it creates a less-thansmooth transition during a new employee’s first few days on the job, it may be time to reevaluate the service. Business

leaders should be sure to find a software solution that is constantly updating, providing both them and their employees the best service possible. Focus on quality hires. With unemployment below 5 percent for the first time since 2008, it’s easy to lose focus on a quality hire and instead focus on getting someone to fill an open position as quickly as possible. It is better in the long run, though, for companies to set time aside to emphasize metrics that have a lasting impact on their business. Factors such as the length of stay, time to hire and the satisfaction of the hiring managers determine how well the team has done with new candidates. Allowing the company to refocus on what matters most when bringing on someone new will probably show that collaboration is key. New recruits have the power to positively or negatively impact a workplace in many ways. Companies should work with their teams to make non-negotiables ahead of time and always seek out their feedback before putting out an offer, regardless of position level. Recruiting has become increasingly competitive, especially with the rise of new technology that makes the process faster and more effective than ever before. When companies recruit more effectively, they can help their team cut back on mundane and time-consuming tasks to focus on what matters most — building and strengthening client relationships. If companies don’t embrace these tools, they won’t be able to land the best recruits and take their business to the next level. Technology can do only so much; there is a time to, ultimately, go with the gut, approach hiring and recruiting from a quality over quantity perspective, and remember that the most important hires are the ones that were already made — so it is important that new ones complement the existing, unique company culture. A solid recruitment strategy is essential to great hiring, and it starts from creating a business environment that people want to be a part of.

Three Greater Phoenix cities are among the “Hardest Working Cities in American” (that is, where Americans work the hardest) in WalletHub’s 2017 survey of the country’s 116 largest cities: Scottsdale (sixth), Gilbert (14th) and Chandler (19th). wallethub.com/edu/hardest-working-cities-in-america/10424/


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Liquid Capital of Arizona is part of a network of 80 independently-owned businesses throughout the U.S., Canada and Mexico.


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BY MIKE HUNTER

2017 Mercedes-Benz AMG GLE43 Coupe

MSRP: $69,650 City: 17 Hwy: 23 Trans: 9-speed automatic

Mercedes-Benz mbusa.com

0-60 mph: 5.6 sec

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the driver feel like the master of the road as the car grips and maneuvers without discomfort. The leather-wrapped sport steering wheel fosters all the confidence needed in managing this machine to make any drive a thrill. Its standard 21-inch wheels are by far the largest in its class. Or opt for something even bigger with the optional 22s. Generous rear doors easily welcome three passengers into the widest rear seat in its class. Fold the split seatbacks down for up to 60 cubic feet of carpeted luggage space, the most of any coupe in the world. The standard Panorama roof brings in the sun and stars, giving a near-topless appeal to this “just-abouteverything” vehicle. Advanced technologies are all about safety, reducing driving stress and helping to smooth every move. Active Brake Assist uses radar to help avoid collisions. Available PRE-SAFE® PLUS helps prepare occupants for rear impacts, in addition to front collisions and rollovers. And optional Distance Pilot DISTRONIC® adaptive cruise control includes Steering Pilot. The 8-inch central screen is big yet useful, bringing entertainment, navigation, driving systems and vehicle settings to life with clear, colorful animated menus. The optional Bang & Olufsen® BeoSound™ premium sound system is the result of hundreds of hours of in-studio and on-the-road development by B&O engineers, and is a must have.

Giving Thanks with Style In today’s world, the thank-you has become an immediate email sent to express gratitude or congratulations for a special moment. For high impact, though, it’s still the mailed note or thank-you card that stands out. Here are our picks for personalized cards.

Paper Source

Specializing in all things custom, from

Online or in person with two locations,

prepackaged thank-yous to custom, and

this stationery store will personalize and

art pieces and

elaborate editions and art pieces, this

offer countless options, from personal to

prints, this store’s selection

small, local establishment is about all

business thank-yous.

of thank-you cards is vast. Some cards may

things paper. Call for an appointment.

2035 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix

be personalized. Orders may be placed

4410 N. 40th St., Phoenix

(602) 840-0738

online.

(602) 667-6227

15323 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale

Multiple locations

paperjoy.com

(480) 219-1640

papyrusonline.com

papersource.com

APR. 20 1 7

38

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

Papyrus

Paperjoy

Mercedes-Benz started the auto industry’s whole “four-door coupe” model with the shapely 2006 CLS-class, which has evolved to more of a crossover appeal that attracted all major car makers to jump in with their models.

Known for fine

Photos courtesy of Mercedes-Benz (top and far left)

Not enough? Get the AMG GLE63 S Coupe. A steal at $110,650, this handcrafted AMG 5.5L V8 biturbo engine will take a driver places she never thought she could go — and in record speed. From 0 to 60 mph in 4.1 seconds with 577 horsepower and 561 pound-feet of torque, this is a definite upgrade.

This sleek and luxurious sports coupe is a (borderline) SUV with all the bells and whistles its driver needs to enjoy a smooth ride, take rugged terrain or speed through city streets. With its strong turbo boost and its dynamic exhaust system, the 3.0-liter V6 biturbo in the AMG GLE43 elevates horsepower and torque. An exclusive red engine cover insert celebrates the 362 horsepower and 384 pound-feet of torque that exists under the hood of this beast. AMG DYNAMIC SELECT’s five modes let the driver choose from simple Comfort to the highly performance-based Sport+. Each setup dials in the adaptive AIRMATIC® suspension, steering, throttle, transmission, exhaust note and more to suit the road or driving mood. A rare breed, this sport/coupe/SUV/Crossover is a true thoroughbred. The deeply bolstered front sport seats make


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BY RAEANNE MARSH

MEALS THAT MATTER

Tommy Bahama – Menu as Lifestyle

$16.50

GRILLED SHRIMP & NOODLE SALAD Avocado, mango, heirloom cherry tomatoes, shredded cabbage, red onion, fresh herbs, roasted peanuts, peanut vinaigrette $19

tommybahama.com/restaurants/scottsdale

Time and time again, the classic hamburger beats out over many other choices on a menu. So much so that the gourmet burger joint has become its own genre for diners. Here are our current tops:

Hopdoddy Burger Bar

Joe’s Farm Grill

This interesting concept is all about custom

It is all about the counter

orders. Customers pick the type of burger

service, but this grill in the

Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar

they want and take a seat — and before

midst of Agritopia — an urban

This was one of the local original gourmet burger

you know it, it’s on the table and delicious.

farm in the heart of Gilbert — is

joints — fast, yet truly gourmet. Each burger is made

Great service and very attentive staff.

unique and does have all of the

to order and can be customized to the most discerning

There is a bar as well.

great accompaniments a great

or eclectic taste. Finest ingredients make up these

2033 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix

burger place should have.

clever combos.

(602) 242-2337

3000 E. Ray Rd., Gilbert

2502 E. Camelback Rd., Phoenix • (602) 424-9500

11055 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale

(480) 563-4745

15257 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale • (480) 285-0690

(480) 348-2337

joesfarmgrill.com

344 N. Gilbert Rd., Gilbert • (480) 387-5000 zinburgeraz.com

HEALTHCARE

2017 Busine ss

Healthcare

Services

Healthcare

in Today’s Wor Meeting

APRIL 2017

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• INBUSINESSMAG.COM

The fruit that gives us Key lime pie, a staple on Tommy Bahama’s dessert menu, takes its name from the Florida Keys — the small islands off Florida’s southern coast — but most of the “Key limes” in the U.S. today come from Mexico.

MAGAZINE

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

(480) 505-3668

IN BUSINESS

40

15205 N. Kierland Blvd., Scottsdale

The Elevated Burger

hopdoddy.com

APR. 20 1 7

Tommy Bahama

e needs

Retirement Accounts for Small

THIS ISSUE

Arizona Technology

Council

with old

kplace

and new

options

Employee

Business

Infill Building:

What Laws

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Guide

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Photos courtesy of Tommy Bahama (top and far left), Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar (bottom)

Tomato relish, chipotle aïoli, island slaw, lime sour cream

proportioned coconut crust — might be justly tempted to try the Coconut Crusted Crab Cakes, made with lump Blue Crab and served with Thai chili sauce. The Grilled Chicken & Mango Salad combines toasted almonds and macadamia nuts, feta cheese, dried blueberries, pepitas and vine-ripened tomatoes tossed with Meyer lemon vinaigrette. A surprisingly great treat with the Caribbean Rubbed Mahi Mahi is the quinoa succotash it is served over — a delightfully light and colorful dish of quinoa mixed with corn, carrots, mushrooms, green beans, and green and red onions — also with the Meyer lemon vinaigrette. Hamburgers are on the menu as well, but something different in the sandwich department is the House Roasted Pork Sandwich, with blackberry brandy BBQ sauce, cole slaw and crispy onions, served with French fries.

APR. 2017

BLACKENED FISH TACOS

Department stores include a café where customers can rest in-between purchases, and highway tourist stops include a sometimes-extensive gift store where travel-weary customers can be tempted with impulse shopping, but higher-end restaurants are usually stand-alone operations. Tommy Bahama is unique in that regard, offering dining alongside retail of its signature line of clothing and accessories to create a destination atmosphere of a tropical vacation experience. Newly remodeled, the Tommy Bahama restaurant in the Kierland Commons shopping center now boasts a larger patio for the bar and dining area on its street level. It’s a great place to take a client and enjoy the weather and people-watching. Upstairs dining offers its own airy, wide-windowed ambience. Service is friendly, helpful and well-versed with the menu — which includes new selections from Tommy Bahama’s recently released Flavors of the Southern Coast cookbook that adds Creole, Cuban and other dishes distinctive of the region from Galveston, Texas, to Key West, Florida. Those who enjoy the World Famous Coconut Shrimp — a must-have treat that’s fat and juicy inside a perfectly


Spring 2O17 • aztechcouncil.org

IN THIS ISSUE 2 Festival Was Just the Start 4 Stronger Foundation 5 For Arizona’s Future 6 Council Launches Initiative to Create Mega PAC Congressional Connection for the Tech Industry 7 Board Gains Talents of Five

WHO WE ARE The Arizona Technology Council is Arizona’s premier trade association for science and technology companies.

Phoenix Office 2800 N. Central Ave., Suite 1920 Phoenix, AZ 85004 Phone: 602-343-8324 • Fax: 602-343-8330 info@aztechcouncil.org

Tucson Office

The University of Arizona Science and Technology Park 9040 S. Rita Rd., Ste. 1150 (near I-10 & Rita Rd.) Tucson, AZ 85747 Phone: 520-382-3281 • Fax: 520-382-3299 tucson@aztechcouncil.org

MANAGEMENT AND STAFF Steven G. Zylstra President + CEO Leigh Goldstein COO + Vice President, Programs + Events

Lauren Witte Manager, Marketing + Communication

Deborah Zack Senior Director,

Membership Services

Brian Krupski Director of Membership Services Melissa Craven Executive Assistant to President + CEO

Alex Rodriguez Vice President, Southern Arizona Regional Office, Tucson

Alison Boelts Manager, Operations + Events,

Southern Arizona Editor Executive Emeritus, Phoenix Executive Emeritus, Tucson Executive Emeritus, Tucson Executive Director, Arizona SciTech Festival and Arizona Technology Council Foundation Susan Farretta Director of Educational Initiatives, Arizona Technology Council Foundation

Don Rodriguez Ron Schott Don Ruedy Justin Williams Jeremy Babendure, Ph.D.

aztechcouncil.org

Arizona Technology Report

Arizona Technology Council: The Voice of the Technology Industry

President’s Message With all the public conversations lately about keeping manufacturers in the United States, it’s time for a reality check: A lot of the jobs we typically equate with this sector will never come back. If you think this has anything to do with bad trade deals, think again. The reason is, 20 years of lean manufacturing have created incredible improvement in productivity and efficiency. Six Sigma and kaizen are just a few of the techniques and philosophies that manufacturing has been focused on for the past few decades. And, yes, technology most definitely has played a part in this change. Consider what self-driving vehicles are going to do to the transportation industry, one of the largest employers in the U.S. economy. From taxi drivers to long-haul truckers — all are at risk of ultimately losing their way of earning a living. And that’s just one industry! These workers will need to find other ways to operate in the new economy. We shouldn’t try to bring back jobs that literally no longer exist because of reasons that I’ve cited. What we now must be focused on as a nation is training and retraining the massive number of people who are going to be displaced in the next 20 years. We should be concentrating on upskilling and retraining, and getting prepared for this enormous displacement that’s going to happen not only in transportation and manufacturing but in a multitude of areas as we undergo the digitalization of everything. Every aspect — whether it’s government, industry or education — will have to be partners in addressing this profound societal change that we are undergoing. I don’t know if you want to call it evolution but, at minimum, this is progress. Every time society has gone through some change like this — whether it was agrarian to industrial or industrial to digital — there have been disruptions. There have been 20 to 30 years of chaos that occur. I think we all should get ready for it because it’s coming, and no one will be untouched. At the Arizona Technology Council, our members already are preparing or leading the way. As Intel’s research focus on the Internet of Things (IoT) is based in Chandler, members of our IoT Committee share information that can help organizations create business solutions in this sensor-enabled, analytics-driven world. Our Additive Manufacturing Committee is exploring innovation that’s replacing machinists with use of new technology. Member companies, which include Lyft, Uber, Google and Total Transit, are involved in self-driving cars as Arizona has quickly become a center of autonomous vehicle activity after Gov. Doug Ducey made it clear our state welcomes disruptive technologies. Ready for the changes that are fast approaching? We encourage you to join our conversations at the Council. Preparing for your future is definitely something you don’t want to get around to “someday.”

Steven G. Zylstra,

President and CEO, Arizona Technology Council

ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

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Members of the CSO program learn about STEM’s role at Honeywell Aerospace.

Festival Was Just the Start

Students and educators make Arizona SciTech something much bigger When the Arizona SciTech Festival debuted in 2012, it was declared a success as more than 222,000 guests attended more than 200 events. Fast forward to the February launch of this celebration of science’s sixth season: More than 800 organizations planned to stage nearly 1,500 events for an audience total exceeding 400,000. “It’s just a really great testament to the phenomenal engagement that the community has for interest in STEM, and really attending these sorts of opportunities,” says Jeremy Babendure, Arizona SciTech’s executive director. This level of support alone would be enough to give Arizona bragging rights. But wait, there’s so much more! The efforts of Babendure and his SciTech team also led to the birth of a program called the Chief Science Officers that has attracted the attention of the White House and the Governor’s Office while crafting a template for other states to follow. In addition, SciTech is turning its attention to creating a community of practice for educators.

Community of Practice participants have fun as they learn in a team exercise.

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ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

The Chief Science Officers (CSO) program began as a way to boost students’ voices in their schools and the community while increasing student interest and career awareness in science, technology, education and math (STEM) through activities and events. The number of CSOs has grown from last year’s inaugural class size of 138 from 78 schools to this year’s 220 from 120 schools. Babendure says the program is on track to have more than 300 students from 150 schools next year. Interest has gone far beyond the schools. Arizona’s Office of the Governor in late October hosted a CSO Capitol Summit where the students learned about civic action and STEM. CSOs also were given opportunities to pitch their ideas to Gov. Doug Ducey for his feedback. One idea came from Dhruv Iyer, a student at Chandler’s Hamilton High School, who proposed having a student serve as a member of state boards such as the Board of Education. Taking it further, he already has met with Board of Education President Reginald Ballantyne III and Executive Director Karol Schmidt, says Babendure, and has been invited to pitch his idea to the rest of the board. “I find that really awesome that Dhruv’s accomplished that goal,” he says. The summit was followed in late February with another collaborative day called the Cabinet Meetings at the Honeywell Aerospace site in Deer Valley. “It was more focused on workforce and careers with the intention that they’re going to take this information and, hopefully, bring elements of that experience back to their peers and really cultivate ideas that can be done around civic action,” Babendure says. The White House also has shown interest in the CSO program, leading to a May 2016 presentation where he and six CSOs met with members of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The trip prompted Dhruv to submit a letter about the event to Science magazine, which accepted it for publication. “He actually has a published article in


Science magazine, which is the hardest magazine any scientist can get into,” Babendure says. “It’s the highest impact factor.” Since then, it seems a corridor has opened for the CSOs between Arizona and Washington, D.C. President Obama’s team got wind of an idea that Sage Foreman, a student at Centerra Mirage STEM Academy in Goodyear, originally suggested at the governor’s summit. Sage was invited back to the White House to propose to the president his idea for a national field trip day. “His, of the students’, in my opinion, was the most feasible and likely the reason why he’s probably one of few that is actually implementing his idea,” says Babendure. “We now have about a dozen or more companies that are opening their doors at the end of March for students to actually take field trips and visit what they do.” While the event starts in Arizona as a pilot, he adds, the intention would be for it to become national. In addition, a few CSOs participated in the Million Women Mentors event in mid-January, where they were the only girls to attend, Babendure says, “which is crazy considering they’re focused on mentorship of girls but they wouldn’t have had any girls there to provide feedback.” Other CSOs were part of the Student Voice International Students Day in mid-November, he says. With so much attention being generated, other states want to duplicate the program yet some still may wonder about its impact. A grant from the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers program of the National Science Foundation will help evaluate the effectiveness of the CSOs in their schools and the community. “Overall, that’s helping us create something that’s replicable for these groups that are looking to take on the chief science officers in their regions,” says Babendure. Meanwhile, SciTech has shifted part of its attention to an initiative called the Arizona STEM School Community of Practice. It came about after hearing from educators expressing interest in having STEM schools, looking to develop STEM schools or already being at STEM schools. “The funniest thing is, they often will not talk with each other and they don’t think about talking to each other,” he says. “The idea is, why don’t we form a community where they work/interface with each other and share best practices related to STEM?” To bring them together, an application process generated more than 50 schools getting involved. In order to be a recognized team, each brings a principal, two educators, a parent, a student and a

Community of Practice participants have fun as they learn in a team exercise.

community partner to meetings where they help brainstorm how to progress the concept of STEM in their schools and communities. Following a kickoff in May 2016, the schools gathered at Grand Canyon University in September to showcase different elements of their STEM schools. That was followed by a conference at Centerra Mirage STEM Academy in January where speakers shared information on requested topics. The final meeting of this group will be held in April at the Burton Barr Library in Phoenix. “The nice thing is, everybody’s bootstrapping it to make it work,” says Babendure. “It’s been a great way to bring together all these different schools from the communities to partner.” Planning has begun to grow and refine the Community of Practice in the 2017-2018 school year. Compared to the newer programs coming together seemingly so fast, the Arizona SciTech Festival now can be called a tradition. “It’s really awesome to see some of these events that have been going on since the very onset continue on and having their sixth event,” Babendure says, citing such examples as Tempe’s Geeks Night Out and Night of the Open Door at Arizona State University. While the CSOs are stepping up to take more ownership by helping to produce, promote and participate in festival events, “I think the great thing is, people just now recognize Arizona SciTech is there, almost seeming like it’s always been there, so we have a lot of street credit now in terms of what we have built,” Babendure says, “and we’re really working on these new programs and opportunities, and they’re launching quickly because of the strong partnerships that have been established through the festival.”

Members of the CSO program learn about STEM’s role at Honeywell Aerospace.

aztechcouncil.org

ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

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Stronger Foundation

Successes bring renewal of Council’s charitable unit Once a solid foundation has been created, it’s the perfect time for growth. This rule of thumb is especially true for the Arizona Technology Council Foundation, which most notably has served as home base for the Arizona Science & Engineering Fair, the High School and Middle School Science Bowls, and the Arizona SciTech Festival. The foundation has set into a motion a new era guided by new board members who bring a range of expertise to guide the organization with new objectives that they and new staff members will execute. The first step was to name Jeremy Babendure as the foundation’s executive director. It’s a natural move as he has served in the same role since the incredibly successful Arizona SciTech was launched with its first festival in 2012. “Steve and I really thought it would make a lot more sense for me to have more leadership, considering a critical part of what is happening in the foundation is with SciTech anyway,” says Babendure, referring to Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council and the foundation. Next came assembling a new board. “We really sought to bring in some new blood to the team, and a lot of them were SciTech-related sponsors or partners who have engaged for a while,” he says. “Steve and I both agreed that we really wanted to have a more proactive board and a larger board to be more helpful in terms of the growth.” These new board members include: Angie Harmon (social investments manager at FreeportMcMoRan), a long-time advisor to Arizona SciTech who adds a corporate rural perspective; Ashley Kelly (supervisor of operations planning at Arizona Public Service), who came to the board from the Manifesto Project and will help engage with rural and remote communities; Renée Levine (community affairs and education manager at Intel), who brings the larger corporate approach; Scott Salkin (founder and CEO of Allbound), who offers his entrepreneurial approach; Jeff Unruh (managing director of Alerion Capital Group and a director of the James A. Unruh Family Foundation), who carries a general philanthropy perspective and wants to grow engagement with the foundation; and Robert Witwer (vice president, aerospace advanced technology at Honeywell, and chairman emeritus of the Arizona Technology Council board), who will be working to get more engagement from STEM professionals in the community. Remaining on the board are: David Alberty (corporate controller at AFS Technologies), who has served as board chairman and treasurer; Quinn Williams (shareholder of Greenberg Traurig and director emeritus of the Arizona Technology Council board). who has served as board secretary; and Susan Schultz (CEO of The Board Institute and president of SSA Executive Search International), who has served as a director. All will be actively involved in guiding the organization through six strategic objectives with related key strategies for success. They are: • Arizona culture celebrates STEM in a positive light with strategy targeting Arizona SciTech Festival

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ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

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• Cultivate Arizona’s next generation of STEM leaders with strategy targeting Chief Science Officers (CSOs) • Support an Arizona STEM literate society with strategy targeting Arizona STEM School Community of Practice, an initiative empowering educators and other community leaders with multiple perspectives to learn from one another within a social structure based on their mutual learning goals. • Supply meets demand for STEM workforce needs with strategy targeting workforce partnerships with the Arizona Commerce Authority • Arizona is viewed as an international leader in science, technology and innovation with strategy targeting the Arizona Science Bowls • Increase access to STEM assets by Arizona’s diverse populations with strategy targeting Science for All, a partnership with Jobs for Arizona Graduates to reach the state’s most diverse and underrepresented populations. Working behind the scenes to support execution is a “fairly large team,” Babendure says. They include: Nagib Balfakih and Kaci Fankhauser, who are AmeriCorps VISTA Fellows focused on academic research and development. Susan Farretta (director, education services, Arizona SciTech Festival), who helps direct the CSO program. Sabrina Foy (accounting assistant), who provides finance and accounting support. Kal Mannis (program director of the Rural Innovation and Activation Network grant from the National Science Foundation) Dwarka Nath, an Intel Encore Career Fellow working on manuals and a database for the CSOs. Marisa Ostos (assistant director, Arizona SciTech Festival) Don Ruedy (SciTech southern Arizona liaison) Veekas Shrivastava (director of business and community partnership), who focuses on the partnerships leading to more engagement with the CSOs.


For Arizona’s Future Legislature considers dark skies, angel investment measures Two measures backed by the Arizona Technology Council hold the promise of investing in a better tomorrow for the research community while promoting economic development. At press time, the Arizona Senate had voted to support a measure that, if passed, ultimately would protect the dark sky corridor that takes hold after the sun sets. Headed to the House of Representatives was a version of SB1114 that allows construction of up to 35 illuminated billboards within 60 miles of Laughlin, Nev. That means the signs could appear in an area spanning south of Lake Havasu City to east of Kingman and north toward Hoover Dam. For years, professional stargazers have flocked to their telescopes in such places as Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff and Mount Graham in eastern Arizona for celestial research under the cloak of darkness. That investment of time also has resulted in an economic return of nearly $250 million annually for the state, according to a study released nearly a decade ago by the group Astronomy, Planetary and Space Science. That amount likely has increased since then. This cash flow is threatened, however, by illuminated billboards that are the source of what is called “sky glow.” In a large, concentrated cluster of signs, the sky glow can cause astronomers to call it a night for their research. This has led some members

of the astronomy community to label the phenomenon “light pollution.” In its second try at the Legislature, the bill was introduced by Sens. Sonny Borrelli and Steve Smith. The Council has been working with astronomers from The University of Arizona and staff from Lamar Advertising to come to a compromise that would protect Arizona’s observatories while still allowing Lamar Advertising to reach its goal of economic development in Mohave County. The bill passed out of the Senate Committee on Commerce and Public Safety with a cap of 35 — down from 50 — signs in the Mohave Valley area along with limiting the illumination to a level at least a third less than that allowed in other areas. There is a sticking point, but this is where new technology could be the savior for astronomers in the future. Under adopted amendments to the measure, operators any future signs would need to make reasonable efforts to use modern technology so there is no collective increase of sky glow in Arizona as new billboards come online. Also, components of existing outdoor advertising could be replaced with advanced technology where commercially reasonable in a bid to decrease the glow. As that bill made its way through the Senate, the House also renewed past discussions on another topic: angel

investments that can be the lifeblood of a technology community. While all states surrounding Arizona and even Mexico have created state-supported early-stage funds, many firms seeking capital in this critical stage of business development leave our state because needed funding is scarce. Some help has come through Arizona’s Angel Investment Tax Credit program, considered a success since going into effect in 2006 followed by its original sunset date being extended by the Legislature from the original 2016 until 2021. The down side is that by summer 2015, the program depleted the $20 million in credits authorized when the program was created, leading to a dramatic drop in angel investing in Arizona. Under SB1212 introduced by Sen. Karen Fann, lawmakers were asked to allow the Arizona Commerce Authority to authorize an additional $10 million — $2.5 million a year for the next four years — in tax credits to qualified investors and small businesses. Rep. Jeff Weninger introduced in the House an identical measure, HB2335. Behind the scenes, the Council and its members have worked to convince lawmakers to see the light and support investment in Arizona’s future.

New Members of Staff

Zack Marks 10 Years

Lauren Witte and Alison Boelts are the newest members of the Arizona Technology Council staff. Witte is manager for marketing and communication based at the main office in Phoenix while Boelts serves as Southern Arizona operations and events manager for the Tucson office. Before working for the Council, Witte was brand manager for Deco Communities in Scottsdale, where she developed and executed brands for residential developments in the Phoenix area and Cleveland. She also managed design for marketing collateral, print and digital advertisements, and multiple websites. Witte previously was associate director, marketing and client services at JacksonWhite law firm in Mesa. She currently is on the Multicultural Business Advisory Board of ONE Community and previously did fundraising as a volunteer for the Mesa United Way. Boelts previously served as a consultant providing services in administration, marketing and branding, writing and editing, SM and website management, graphic design and layout, and communications. Clients included the Empire Ranch Foundation, LP&G Marketing, Tucson Girls Chorus and Southern Arizona Legal Aid. She currently is a board member for Odaiko Sonora and a member of the Greater Tucson Fire Foundation Memorial Committee.

To many members of the Arizona Technology Council, Deborah Zack is the Council. That’s understandable, considering the senior director of member services is now marking her 10th anniversary on the staff. “We are celebrating her 10 years of positive impact on the tech community in Arizona,” says Steven G. Zylstra, the Council’s president and CEO. ”That’s the longest tenure of any employee.” Zack is best known for her desire and passion to serve the members by calling them or seeing them at events to check they are getting the membership value they expected. “She has developed some really good methodologies that are now used by all the membership services staff,” Zylstra says. And Zack has the results to prove it. “She is without a doubt the most successful membership services person that we’ve ever had,” Zylstra says. Congratulations, Deborah!

aztechcouncil.org

ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

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Council Launches Initiative to Create Mega PAC Anyone who follows the shaping of public policy in Arizona no doubt notices the voice of the Arizona Technology Council continuously grows stronger. An example is its annual Public Policy Guide, which lays out its agenda to state and federal lawmakers in addition to Council members. To support this massive agenda, the Council is taking the next step. While it has had a state political action committee (PAC) in place for the past six years, the organization is moving toward creating a mega PAC in Arizona. Besides the Public Policy Guide, the Council also publishes its biennial Vote TechSmart guide, which endorses candidates who support issues critical to the technology industry in each of Arizona’s 30 legislative districts. PACs are used to enable investing in the kind of candidates who support the agenda that the technology industry cares about, says Steven G. Zylstra, the Council’s president and CEO. “It’s about helping those people get elected so the leaders that favor the tech industry are the ones making the

decisions at the Legislature,” he says. “And a PAC is an essential component of that.” To obtain status of mega PAC (formerly known as a super PAC) in Arizona, a PAC needs to receive at least $10 in contributions from each of at least 500 individuals in the four-year period immediately preceding filing an application with the secretary of state. An applicant that demonstrates it meets mega PAC requirements is granted the status, which is valid for four years. • The Council’s PAC contributes to political candidates in alignment with its positions in the policy areas of: • Technology commercialization and development • Workforce development • Supply-chain development • Capital formation • Research & development and economic sustainability • Education • Reduced business tax burden and tax credits

Contributors to the Council’s PAC can be members, their staff and their families, as well as Council employees and their families. Funds must be from personal sources, not companies. To contribute, checks should be made out to the Arizona Technology Council State PAC, then mailed to Arizona Technology Council, 2800 N. Central Ave., Suite 1920, Phoenix, AZ 85004. Or call the Council’s director of finance at 602-343-8324.

Congressional Connection for the Tech Industry With a new administration and Congress coming into power, members of the technology community headed to Capitol Hill to get a sense of what lies ahead for their industry. Arizona’s was among some 20 state technology councils that joined the Technology Councils of North America (TECNA) and more than 140 technology executives and business owners representing 29 states at the sixth annual 2017 CompTIA DC Fly-In on Feb. 14–15. All attendees participated in an agenda set by the Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA), the world’s leading technology association, in addition to discussions with members of their respective congressional delegations. It was especially important that Arizona was represented at the DC Fly-In this year, says Steven G. Zylstra, president and CEO of the Arizona Technology Council, who led this state’s delegation. “We wanted to get a sense of the direction Congress may take on trade, H1B visas and corporate tax cuts,” he says. Zylstra was joined by Jarid Buck, CTO and CEO of WorkBubble; Chase Norlin, CEO of Transmosis; Tim Oergel, founder and chief academic officer of Advancing Achievers Technology & Cybersecurity University; and Scott Stewart, senior technical staff/FSO of Control Vision. They met with Sen. Jeff Flake and Reps. Trent Franks, Ruben Gallego and Paul Gosar. They also met with staff members for Reps. Andy Biggs,

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ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

Steven G. Zylstra (le), Sen. Jeff Flake and Tim Oergel

Raul Grijalva, Tom O’Halleran, David Schweikert and Kyrsten Sinema. Workforce development was the focus of this year’s CompTIA meetings. To help in the effort, Zylstra already had been working in support of the CHANCE in TECH Act, which would develop an education and workforce program specifically for technology and an IT apprenticeship model.


Board Gains Talents of Five The Arizona Technology Council has named five new members to its board of directors. They are: Chris Koziol, president of Aspect, which helps enterprises break down the walls between people, processes, systems and data sources. He has more than 30 years of progressive experience in managing and directing high-growth, mature and startup technology companies. Koziol has extensive mergers and acquisitions experience as he has participated as an operating executive in 12 strategic acquisitions. Irena Milanovic, vice president at Wells Fargo Commercial Bank. Her experience includes underwriting and advising privately held middle-market companies on various aspects of financial transactions, including commercial debt structuring, strategic capital investments,

leverage finance, investment banking, global banking and treasury management. Milanovic also has helped multinational companies with complex treasury management needs. David Pinkus, vice president of software engineering at Infusionsoft, creator of an integrated sales and marketing software solution for small business. He currently leads a team of 70 engineers building an SaaS sales and marketing automation platform. Pinkus’s experience ranges from raising venture capital as founder of his own startup to serving as CIO at a public company. James Winebrenner, vice president of worldwide sales at Viptela, which provides software-defined wide area

network (SD-WAN) technology that virtualizes WAN infrastructure. He is responsible for global go-to-market strategy and leads the field sales, channels and business development teams. Winebrenner’s experience includes global sales management and technical marketing experience in cybersecurity and network infrastructure across a range of industry verticals. Russ Yelton, CEO of Pinnacle Transplant Technologies, a regenerative medical company that operates a human tissue bank. He previously was president and CEO of the Northern Arizona Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology, where he oversaw multiple business incubation sites. Yelton also currently serves as chairman of the board of AZBIO and chair of the Flinn Bioscience Entrepreneurship Committee.

6_13013

75x4.875

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aztechcouncil.org

ARIZONA TECHNOLOGY REPORT

7


PRESENTS

2017

Business Healthcare Services Guide Associations & Government Employee Benefits Consultants Dental Insurance Individual & Group Health Insurance Hospitals Urgent Care Workplace Bundled Health Programs Workplace Wellness Workplace Ergonomics

Join us for our event on May 5, 2017 • www.inbusinessmag.com


BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE 2017

Medicaid and Why It Matters

It’s beginning to feel a lot like 2013. That was the year the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association (AzHHA) and a coalition of health, business, faith and other interests joined forces with then-Gov. Jan Brewer for the successful extension of our state’s Medicaid umbrella. At the time, hundreds of thousands of Arizona’s working poor were uninsured — in many cases, seeking care in hospital emergency rooms as their last and only option. Arizona hospitals teetered under the weight of providing more than $930 million worth of uncompensated care that year alone. More than three years later, the verdict is in: Restoring Medicaid in Arizona has been an unqualified success. More of our neighbors have access to quality health services. Uncompensated care in our hospitals is down 60 percent. And our economy has benefited from an influx of hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal treasury — resulting in a multi-billion-dollar jolt in economic impact. Unfortunately, our progress is in doubt once more. Federal healthcare reforms — namely, the American Health Care Act — would cut $880 billion from Medicaid between now and 2026. Also, beginning in 2020, the proposal would eliminate federal matching dollars that help states pay for Medicaid coverage of individuals earning 100 to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. That almost certainly would mean an enrollment freeze. Arizona has been through this before. During the depths of the Great Recession, our state froze Medicaid enrollment of childless adults. Approximately 160,000 people fell off the Medicaid rolls over the course of about 18 months between mid-2011 and the end of 2013. This led to the aforementioned spike in ER visits and uncompensated care, not to mention untold personal tragedy as individuals and families lost coverage. We all have a stake in seeing this not repeated. Remember: When patients have no coverage, the costs of their care end up being borne by all of us in the form of higher premiums. The Affordable Care Act is not perfect. Reforms are needed. But Congress and the President should heed history and Arizona’s lessons before hastily enacting changes that destabilize Medicaid. This is a critical time for healthcare in our country. Accurate information is essential. We thank In Business Magazine for this Healthcare Services Guide, a vital reader service for business owners and executives.

Greg Vigdor has served as the president and CEO of the Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association since 2013. Over more than 35 years in healthcare, he has been nationally recognized for advancing health through policy leadership. Evidence of his work in Arizona includes the passage of Medicaid Restoration and being laser-focused on quality care improvement efforts and activities supporting AzHHA’s vision of making Arizona the Healthiest State in the Nation.

Sincerely,

Greg Vigdor President and CEO Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association

PRESENTS

2017

Business Healthcare Services Guide Associations & Government Employee Benefits Consultants Dental Insurance Individual & Group Health Insurance Hospitals Urgent Care Workplace Bundled Health Programs Workplace Wellness Workplace Ergonomics

About this Guide With healthcare front and foremost on the mind of many business owners and executives, and recognizing that healthcare and wellness programs involve the whole community working together, the editorial staff of In Business Magazine has compiled the 2017 Business Healthcare Services Guide. Presented on the following pages are listings of companies in the healthcare industry, organized by category.

Join us for our event on May 5, 2017 • www.inbusinessmag.com

INBUSINESSMAG.COM

APR. 2017

51


2017 BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE Associations & Government Arizona Dental Association 3193 N. Drinkwater Blvd., Scottsdale (480) 344-5777 azda.org

Arizona Foundation for Medical Care 2700 N Central Ave. Suite 810, Phoenix (602) 252-4042 azfmc.com

Arizona Health Care Association 1440 E. Missouri Ave., Suite C-102, Phoenix (602) 265-5331 azhca.org

Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System (AHCCCS) 801 E. Jefferson St., Phoenix (602) 417-7000 azahcccs.gov

Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association 2800 N. Central Ave., Suite 1450, Phoenix (602) 445-4300 azhha.org

Arizona Medical Association 810 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix (602) 246-8901 azmed.org

Arizona Pharmacy Association 1845 E. Southern Ave., Tempe (480) 838-3385 azpharmacy.org

Employee Benefits Consultants (many offer insurance) Arizona Benefit Consultants, LLC 6245 N. 24th Pkwy., Suite 201, Phoenix (602) 956-5515 abcllc.org

Benefits By Design 4500 S. Lakeshore Dr., Suite 300, Tempe (480) 831-7700 benefitsbydesignaz.com

Blue Water Benefits Consulting 7848 E. Davenport Dr., Scottsdale (480) 313-0910 employeebenefitcompliance.com

Breslau Insurance & Benefits Paul Breslau 8362 E. Via de Risa, Scottsdale (602) 692-6832 breslauinsurance.com

Connect Benefits 1818 E. Southern Ave., Mesa (480) 985-2555 connect-benefits.com

Employee Benefits Exchange Corp. 2730 S. Val Vista Dr., Suite 132, Gilbert (480) 839-6100 ebxaz.com

FBC Services, Inc. 14201 N. 87th St., Suite 141, Scottsdale (602) 277-8477 fbcserv.com

Focus Benefits Group 4120 N. 20th St., Phoenix (602) 381-9900 focusbenefits.com

Health Insurance Express, Inc. Superstition Marketplace 1155 S. Power Rd., Suite B101, Mesa (480) 654-1200 healthinsurance-express.com

Horizon Benefits Group 6245 N. 24th Pkwy., Suite 216, Phoenix (602) 957-3755 horizonbenefits.com

Dental Insurance American Dental Plan 1645 E. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix (602) 265-6677 arizdental.com

Benefits By Design 4500 S. Lakeshore Dr., Suite 300, Tempe (480) 831-7700 benefitsbydesignaz.com

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Maricopa County Medical Society 326 E. Coronado Rd., Phoenix (602) 252-2015 mcmsonline.com

Mercy Maricopa Integrated Care 4350 E. Cotton Center Blvd., Bldg. D, Phoenix (602) 586-1841 mercycaricopa.org

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GIVE YOUR EMPLOYEES THE FREEDOM TO BE

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Winning ideas and solutions can impact your bottom line. You can count on us for innovative ideas and proven programs that lead to healthier employees and a stronger business. Plus, an expanded portfolio of products and services give employees more reasons to be fearless.

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1-877-384-BLUE Or, call your broker. Hablamos EspaĂąol azblue.com/brand


2017 BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE Breslau Insurance & Benefits Paul Breslau 8362 E. Via de Risa, Scottsdale (602) 692-6832 breslauinsurance.com

Delta Dental of Arizona 5656 W. Talavi Blvd., Glendale (602) 938-3131 deltadentalaz.com

JDH Insurance Brokerage Services Heather Wunderle 20403 N. Lake Pleasant Rd., Suite 117-234, Peoria (623) 594-0926

Matsock & Associates 2400 E. Arizona Biltmore Circle, Suite 1100, Phoenix (602) 955-0200 matsock.com

Powers-Leavitt Insurance 14301 N. 87th St., Suite 308, Scottsdale (480) 348-1100 powers-leavitt.com

Dental Insurance (con’t.)

Individual & Group Health Insurance Aetna 4645 E. Cotton Center Blvd., Phoenix (800) 225-3375 aetna.com

Amenda Insurance Associates Ltd 5046 E. Redfield Dr., Scottsdale (480) 284-6400 douglasamenda.com

American Family Insurance (no individual) Multiple Agents Valley-wide (800) 692-6326 amfam.com

Benefits By Design 4500 S. Lakeshore Dr., Suite 300, Tempe (480) 831-7700 benefitsbydesignaz.com

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona 2444 W. Las Palmaritas Dr., Phoenix (602) 864-4899 azblue.com

Bowman & Associates Insurance 16042 N. 32nd St., Phoenix (602) 482-3300 bowmaninsurance.com

Breslau Insurance & Benefits Paul Breslau 8362 E. Via de Risa, Scottsdale (602) 692-6832 breslauinsurance.com

Cigna 11001 N. Black Canyon Hwy., Phoenix (888) 705-2933 cigna.com

Farmers Insurance Group Kara Anspach 15849 N. 71st St., Suite 255, Scottsdale (480) 998-8070 farmersagent.com/kanspach

Glass Financial Group 4455 E Camelback Rd., Suite D260, Phoenix (602) 952-1202 glassfinancialgroup.com

HealthNet of Arizona 1230 W. Washington St., Suite 401, Tempe (602) 286-9194 healthnet.com

JDH Insurance Brokerage Services Heather Wunderle 20403 N. Lake Pleasant Rd., Suite 117-234, Peoria (623) 594-0926

Powers-Leavitt Insurance Agency Charlene Powers 14301 N. 87th St., Suite 209, Scottsdale (480) 348-1100 powers-leavitt.com

Reseco Insurance Advisors (no individual) Todd Newton 7901 N. 16th St., Suite 100, Phoenix (602) 753-4250 resecoadvisors.com

State Farm Arizona Multiple Agents Valley-wide (877) 331-8261 statefarm.com

UnitedHealthcare 1 E. Washington St., Suite 1700, Phoenix (888) 724-4018 uhc.com

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INBUSINESSMAG.COM


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2017 BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE Hospitals Arizona Heart Hospital 1930 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix (602) 532-1000 abrazohealth.com

Arrowhead Hospital 18701 N. 67th Ave., Glendale (623) 561-1000 arrowheadhospital.com

Banner Baywood Medical Center 6644 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa (480) 321-2000 bannerhealth.com/baywood

Banner Boswell Medical Center 10401 W. Thunderbird Blvd., Sun City (623) 832-4000 bannerhealth.com/boswell

Banner Del E. Webb Medical Center 14502 W. Meeker Blvd., Sun City West (623) 524-4000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Estrella Medical Center 9201 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix (623) 327-4000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Gateway Medical Center 1900 N. Higley Rd., Gilbert (480) 543-2000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center 1111 E. McDowell Rd., Phoenix (602) 839-2000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Heart Hospital 6750 E. Baywood Ave., Mesa (480) 854-5000 bannerhealth.com

Banner Ironwood Medical Center 37000 N. Gantzel Rd., San Tan Valley (480) 394-4000 bannerhealth.com/ironwood

Banner MD Anderson Cancer Center 2946 E. Banner Gateway Dr., Gilbert (480) 256-6444 bannerhealth.com

Banner Thunderbird Medical Center 5555 W. Thunderbird Rd., Glendale (602) 865-5555 bannerhealth.com

Cancer Treatment Centers of America at Western Regional Medical Center

Honor Health – Thompson Peak Hospital 7400 E. Thompson Peak Pkwy., Scottsdale (480) 324-7000 shc.org

Maricopa Medical Center 2601 E. Roosevelt St., Phoenix (602) 344-5011 mihs.org

14200 Celebrate Life Way, Goodyear (623) 207-3000 cancercenter.com

Maryvale Hospital 5102 W. Campbell Ave., Phoenix (623) 848-5000 abrazohealth.com

Cardon Children’s Medical Center

Mayo Clinic Hospital

1400 S. Dobson Rd., Mesa (480) 412-5437 bannerhealth.com

5777 E. Mayo Blvd., Phoenix (480) 515-6296 mayoclinic.org

Chandler Regional Medical Center

Mercy Gilbert Medical Center

1955 W. Frye Rd., Chandler (480) 728-3000 dignityhealth.org/chandlerregional

3555 S. Val Vista Dr., Gilbert (480) 728-8000 mercygilbert.org

Gilbert Hospital

Mountain Vista Medical Center

5656 S. Power Rd., Gilbert (480) 984-2000 gilberter.com

1301 S. Crismon Rd., Mesa (480) 358-6100 mvmedicalcenter.com

Honor Health – Deer Valley Hospital

Paradise Valley Hospital

19829 N. 27th Ave., Phoenix (623) 879-6100 jcl.com

3929 E. Bell Rd., Phoenix (602) 923-5000 paradisevalleyhospital.com

Honor Health – North Mountain Hospital

Phoenix Baptist Hospital

250 E. Dunlap Avenue, Phoenix (602) 870-6060 jcl.com

Honor Health – Shea Medical Center 9003 E. Shea Blvd., Scottsdale (480) 323-3000 shc.org

Honor Health – Osborn Medical Center 7400 E. Osborn Rd., Scottsdale (480) 882-4000 shc.org

2000 W. Bethany Home Rd., Phoenix (602) 249-0212 phoenixbaptisthospital.com

Phoenix Children’s Hospital 1919 E. Thomas Rd., Phoenix (602) 933-1000 phoenixchildrens.org

St. Joseph’s Hospital & Medical Center 350 W. Thomas Rd., Phoenix (602) 406-3000 stjosephs-phx.org

St. Luke’s Medical Center 1800 E. Van Buren St., Phoenix (602) 251-8100 stlukesmedcenter.com

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INBUSINESSMAG.COM


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2017 BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE Urgent Care Alliance Urgent Care 702 W. Camelback Rd., Suite 20, Phoenix (602) 845-5950 allianceurgentcare.com

Banner Urgent Care 3247 E. Bell Rd., Phoenix (602) 255-7655 bannerhealth.com

FastMed Urgent Care Multiple Valley Locations (480) 545-2787 fastmed.com

NextCare Urgent Care Multiple Valley Locations (888) 958-2128 nextcare.com

One Health Alliance Urgent Care

Surgical Specialty Hospital

6 Valley Locations (855) 887-4368 onehealthurgentcare.com

6501 N. 19th Ave., Phoenix (602) 795-6020 sshaz.com

Phoenix Children’s Hospital Urgent Care 4 Valley Locations (480) 922-5437 phoenixchildrens.com/urgent-care

Urgent Care Extra Multiple Valley Locations urgentcareextra.com

Workplace Bundled Health Programs Arrowhead Health Centers Multiple locations (623) 334-4000 arrowheadhealth.com

Workplace Wellness Absolute Health 8360 E. Raintree Dr., Suite 135, Scottsdale (480) 991-9945 absolutehealthaz.com

Healthcare Solutions Centers 4831 N. 11th St., Phoenix (602) 424-2101 hcsonsite.com

LifeCore Group 11022 N 28th Dr., Suite 280, Phoenix (602) 235-2800 myhealthdividends.com

»

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59 20APR.1 7 INBUSINESSMAG.COM


2017 BUSINESS HEALTHCARE SERVICES GUIDE

Workplace Wellness (con’t.)

Orchard Medical Consulting

Goodmans Interior Structures

T.O.P.S. Physical Therapy

Robin Orchard 3033 N. Central Ave., Phoenix (602) 942-4700 orchardmed.com

1400 E. Indian School Rd., Phoenix (602) 263-1110 goodmansinc.com

5353 N. 16th St., Suite 120, Phoenix (602) 826-0037 topsphysicaltherapy.com

Redirect Health

Other Healthcare-Related

Telemedicine Akos

13430 N. Scottsdale Rd., Scottsdale (888) 995-4945 redirecthealth.com

Workplace Ergonomics Ergoguys Products 5622 W. Orchid Ln., Chandler (602) 354-4190 ergoguys.com

ESI Ergonomic Solutions 4030 E. Quenton Dr., Suite 101, Mesa (480) 517-1871 esiergo.com

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APR. 2017

Meditation Current Meditation 4325 E. Indian School Rd., Suite 130, Phoenix (602) 522-2000 becurrent.com

Physical Therapy Fischer Institute of Physical Therapy 5750 S. 32nd St., Phoenix (602)-437-5055 fischerinstitute.com

1-844-900-2567 akosmd.com

HealthiestYou (480 779-4360 healthiestyou.com

Vision DeltaVision 5656 W. Talavi Blvd., Glendale (602) 938-3131 DeltaDentalAZ.com/Vision

Yoga Sumits Yoga 350 E. Bell Rd., Phoenix (602) 688-6511 sumitsnorthphoenix.com

INBUSINESSMAG.COM


Do you really want to tell your employees the best pediatric care is not in their network? Your employees and their families deserve the best care. Phoenix Children’s is among a select group of pediatric care providers recognized for excellence in meeting the highest standards for patient safety, quality and value. Make sure your plan includes Phoenix Children’s Hospital and Phoenix Children’s Care Network, its network of physicians, so the best is available for your employees and their families.

For more information visit:

PhoenixChildrens.org


We are working to make Arizona the Healthiest State in the Nation!

If you are passionate about healthcare in our state, subscribe to our Healthiest State Blog www.AZHealthiestState.org It's FREE!

Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association

2800 N Central Ave, Ste. 1450 Phoenix Arizona 85004 602-445-4300


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Allazetta, David, 9

DeRigne, LeaAnne, Ph.D., 18

Krumwiede, David, 14

Smits, Peter, 32

Allford, Allan, 24

Desmond, Dennis, 14

Levin, Ken, 24

Spector, Sean, 12

Auerbach, John, 33

Dourgarian, David, 36

Linam, Shawn, 20

Stillman, David, 31

Babendure, Jeremy, 42

Drucker, Peter F., 31

Meyer, Gay, 10

Stillman, Jonah, 31

Banerjee, Sumit, 24

Ducar, Frances, 24

Milanovic, Irena, 47

Tollefson, Richard, 32

Baugh, Adam, 22

Escudero, Martgarita Méndez, 32

Nahass, Gregg, 13

Vigdor, Greg, 51

Berg, David, 24

Gamboa, Joaquin, 10

Pinkus, David, 47

Weisman, Ross, 24

Boelts, Alison, 45

Good, Steve, 24

Pongon, Mike, 30

Winebrenner, James, 47

Brannon, Amy M., 24

Ham, Nancy, 18

Quinn, Linda, Ph.D., 18

Witte, Lauren, 45

Cassidy, Brian, 24

Kaufman, Howard, 12

Raworth, Kate, 31

Yelton, Russ, 47

Clark, Bernie, 10

Korth, Mindy, 14

Riggs, Jason, 24

Zack, Deborah, 45

Collins, Cyleste C., Ph.D., 18

Koziol, Chris, 47

Salkin, Scott, 24

Zylstra, Steven G., 41

Denney, Andrew, 66

Krisay, Alexis, 16

Singh, Swaraj, 24

1100 KFNX, 39

Cleveland State University, 18

Phoenix Children’s Hospital, 61

Sonora Quest Laboratories, 60

AAA Phone On Hold, 8

Colliers International, 14

Phoenix Philanthropy Group, The, 32, 39

Sumits Yoga, 24

Activate Human Capital, 63

Current Meditation, 24

Pinnacle Bank, 17

Support My Club, 23

Ahwatukee Foothills Chamber of Commerce, 35

Delta Dental of Arizona, 24, 55, 57

Pinnacle Transplant Technologies, 47

TempWorks Software, 36

DocSolid, 16

Point B Inc., 30

ThinkSmallBiz, 64

Dropoff, 12

Prosperity Financial Group, 66

Tommy Bahama, 40

Ethisphere Institute, 12

PwC, 13

Trust for America’s Health, 33

Fennemore Craig, 24

Qwaltec, 20

U.S. Bank, 12

Florida Atlantic University, 18

RallyUp.com, 16

UnitedHealthcare, 9, 50

FSW Funding, 63

Redirect Health, 24, 59

USAA, 10

Gilbert Chamber of Commerce, 34

RouteSmart Technologies, 12

Viptela, 47

Glendale Chamber of Commerce, 34

Salt River Project, 7, 24

WebPT, 18

Global Chamber, 34, 35

Scottsdale Area Chamber of Commerce, 34

Wells Fargo Commercial Bank, 47

GPS Insight, 2

Serendipit Consulting, 16

Wells Fargo, 47

Grand Canyon University, 14

Shiftgig, 10

WESTMARC, 35

Healthcare Solutions Centers, LLC, 24, 58

Show Off Your Life, 10

Withey Morris, PLC, 22

SnapComms, 11

Zinburger Wine & Burger Bar, 40

Snell & Wilmer, 68

Zocdoc, 10

Akos, 24 Allbound, 24 Alliance Bank of Arizona, 3 Ana G. Méndez University System, 32 APS, 21 Arizona Association for Economic Development, 35 Arizona Commerce Authority, 10 Arizona Diamondbacks, 15 Arizona Forward, 33 Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, 34 Arizona Hospital and Healthcare Association, 51, 62

Hopdoddy Burger Bar, 40

Arizona Relay Service, 6

Infusionsoft, 47, 64

Arizona Technology Council, 41

Jive, 8

Aspect, 47

JLL, 14, 64

ATHENA Valley of the Sun, 34

Joe’s Farm Grill, 40

Avnet, 12

Lehi Valley Trading Company, 12

Banner Health Network, 67

Lincoln Property Company, 14

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Arizona, 53

Liquid Capital, 37

Cable One, Inc., 12

Mercedes-Benz, 38

California State University, Fresno, 32

Morgan Law Offices, 6

Career Connectors, 35

National Bank of Arizona, 5

Carter Validus Mission Critical REIT II, Inc., 14

ON Semiconductor Corp., 12

CBIZ, 19

Paper Source, 38

CCBG Architects, Inc., 24

Paperjoy, 38

Chandler Chamber of Commerce, 34, 35

Papyrus, 38

Charles Schwab & Co., 10

Phoenix Children’s Care Network, 61

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OnTrac, 12

In each issue of In Business Magazine, we list both companies and indivuduals for quick reference. See the stories for links to more.

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A CANDID FORUM

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Employee Retirement Plans Are for Small Businesses, Too Benefits accrue to business owners as well as their employees by Andrew Denney Healthcare

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Andrew Denney, founder and CEO of Prosperity Financial Group, has more than 13 years’ experience in the finance industry, where he advises clients in such areas as retirement planning, asset protection, estate planning and wealth management. Denney holds Series 7 and Series 66 securities registrations with LPL Financial, in addition to a life insurance license. He has a degree in finance from Missouri State University. pfgmidwest.com

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Small-business owners probably think they have enough headaches already, what with meeting payroll, dealing with government regulations and pleasing customers. After all, setting up a retirement plan for their employees is just extra red tape and possibly expense — headaches that they can do without — right? But creating such a plan is more doable than they may realize and even comes with benefits for the small business and its owner. While I have worked with some employee retirement plans where there was in excess of $500 million in the plan, looking at the other end I’ve seen businesses with as few as 10 employees set up a plan. Yet, as a group, small businesses tend to forego retirement plans. For example, only 22 percent of workers at firms with fewer than 10 employees report having access to a workplace savings plan or pension, compared with 74 percent at firms with 500 or more, according to a Pew Charitable Trusts report. Employee-sponsored 401(k) and IRA plans are among the more popular options for businesses that do offer a retirement benefit. Those savings plans allow the employees to deposit money routinely in the accounts with a deduction taken out of their paychecks. Since these are tax-deferred retirement plans, the employees see a lower income-tax bill at the end of the year. Some employers also offer a company match, providing an even heftier balance to the accounts.

The IRS offers small-business retirement plan information on its website. bit.ly/irs-retirement-plan

But employees aren’t the only ones who benefit. There is also an upside for the small-business owner, some of which are the following: • Employee recruiting and retention. Any business wants to hang on to good employees, and offering a retirement plan helps do that. They’ll be happier knowing they’re more likely to have some financial security in retirement. A retirement benefit also serves as a recruiting tool. Imagine a job candidate who’s weighing similar offers from two businesses, but one has a retirement plan and the other doesn’t. A retirement plan separates a business from the pack. • A lower tax bill. A business can, potentially, reduce its tax burden, because a company’s contributions to the retirement plan are tax deductible. In some cases, businesses also may qualify for a tax credit to help offset the cost of starting the plan, according to the IRS. • An opportunity to invest in one’s own retirement. Like their employees, small-business owners may not want to work forever and need to set aside money for their own retirement. They’ll enjoy the same tax-deferred benefits the employees do as they build that nest egg. It’s worthwhile for small-business owners to investigate whether an employee retirement plan is more attainable than they might realize. A financial professional with experience in setting up such plans can explain to them the advantages and disadvantages, and suggest which plan would work best for their situation.


the signs of

THAT OCCURS WHEN YOU’RE TOO OVERWHELMED

hea lth care

network

Fortunately, we can help you and your company overcome conditions like this. We are Banner Health Network and we are far more than just hospitals. Banner Health Network is a 4,000-physician strong, integrated network across Arizona giving you specialty facilities, clinics, and an entire spectrum of services. We offer the highly-coordinated care employees want and the high efficiency you need to keep costs down. Choose care designed to fit the health of each and every employee in your company.

BannerHealthNetwork.com | 602.747.6305


Because no two clients are ever the same. TM

Understanding what makes you unique.® www.swlaw.com JAMES P. MELENDRES | 602.382.6555 | JMELENDRES@SWLAW.COM ONE ARIZONA CENTER | 400 EAST VAN BUREN STREET | SUITE 1900 | PHOENIX, AZ 85004 DENVER | LAS VEGAS | LOS ANGELES | LOS CABOS | ORANGE COUNTY | PHOENIX | RENO | SALT LAKE CITY | TUCSON

April 2017 issue of In Business Magazine  

Healthcare is the hot topic of our cover story this month – what businesses are doing and what’s driving their decisions, as well as what’s...

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