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CREATIVE EUROPE IN THE UK - 2018 Support for the UK’s cultural, creative and audiovisual sector

CREATIVE EUROPE IN THE UK 2018 Support for the UK’s cultural, creative and audiovisual sectors

Creative Europe Desk UK is led by

In partnership with

With support from the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the European Commission.

www.creativeeuropeuk.eu @CEDUK_Culture #creativeeurope


Front cover image: National Theatre Wales is a partner in Open Access, a pan-European opportunity for emerging and mid-career artists to gain insight into live arts and transmedia creation. Image: National Theatre Wales' production Tide Whisperer. Credit: Jennie Caldwell.Â


CONTENTS WHAT IS CREATIVE EUROPE?

04

INTRODUCTION

06

MAP: WHERE DO THE FUNDS GO?

08

CULTURE SUB-PROGRAMME

10

COLLABORATING ACROSS EUROPE

12

14

COOPERATION PROJECTS

SMALL COOPERATION PROJECTS

EUROPEAN YEAR OF CULTURAL HERITAGE-COOPERATION PROJECTS

LARGE COOPERATION PROJECTS

16 18 20

EUROPEAN PLATFORMS

22

EUROPEAN NETWORKS

24

TRANSLATING EUROPEAN LITERATURE

26

28

LITERARY TRANSLATION

MEDIA SUB-PROGRAMME

38

PRODUCING FOR THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET

40

DEVELOPMENT

SINGLE PROJECT AND SLATE FUNDING

42 44

VIDEO GAMES

46

TV PROGRAMMING

48

EXPORTING UK FILMS AND IMPORTING EUROPE’S BEST

50

DISTRIBUTION

52

SELECTIVE DISTRIBUTION

54

AUTOMATIC DISTRIBUTION

56

SALES AGENTS

58

INVESTMENT IN UK FILMS

60

PROMOTION OF AUDIOVISUAL WORKS ONLINE

62

HONING SKILLS AND BUILDING NETWORKS

64

TRAINING COURSES

66

MARKETS, NETWORKS AND INDUSTRY EVENTS

68

REWARDING CULTURAL EXCELLENCE

30

32

34

INTERNATIONAL CO-PRODUCTION FUNDS

70

EUROPEAN PRIZES AND INITIATIVES

CROSS-SECTOR

CROSS-SECTOR SUPPORT

36

MODULES FOR MASTERS DEGREES IN ARTS AND SCIENCE

ATTRACTING AUDIENCES

72

36

74

CULTURAL AND CREATIVE SECTOR GUARANTEE FACILITY

37

FILM FESTIVALS

CINEMAS

FILM EDUCATION

76 78

CREATIVE EUROPE DESK UK

WHAT WE DO AND HOW WE HELP

GET IN TOUCH

80 82


WHAT IS CREATIVE EUROPE? Running from 2014 to 2020 and with a budget of €1.46 billion, Creative Europe offers support to European projects with the potential to travel, reach new audiences and share skills and best practice. Creative Europe’s MEDIA subprogramme supports film, television, new media and video games. It offers funding, training and networking opportunities for producers, video game developers, distributors, sales agents, audiovisual training providers, organisers of festivals, markets and networks, film education specialists and cinema exhibitors.

04

Creative Europe’s Culture sub-programme supports the cultural and creative sectors by funding collaborative projects and initiatives across all art forms in order to drive innovation, development of practice and participation across fields such as visual art, dance, theatre, literature, performance, music, heritage, architecture, design, circus, festivals, craft and fashion. There is also support for publishers to translate European works.

The cross-sector strand offers support for the creative sector as a whole, including occasional and targeted calls and a Cultural and Creative Sector Guarantee Fund.


COOPERATION PROJECTS €18.6m

EUROPEAN PLATFORMS €3.2m

CULTURE

LITERARY TRANSLATION €0.5m

€22.3 million

CREATIVE EUROPE IN THE UK 2014-2018 €89.5 million DISTRIBUTION €12.7m

AUDIENCES €2.6m

REFUGEE INTEGRATION €0.5m

CROSSSECTOR

€1.7 million CREATIVE HUBS €1m

PRODUCERS €15.3m

MEDIA

€65.5 million

190 UK FILMS RELEASED IN EUROPE €30.4m

TRAINING & NETWORKS €4.4m

MA MODULES IN ARTS AND SCIENCE €0.2m

376 UK

organisations supported

From 2014 to 2018, €89.5 million has been awarded to 376 UK-based cultural and creative organisations and audiovisual companies, and helped to distribute 190 UK films in other European countries. 05


INTRODUCTION In 2018, a total of €15.9 million was invested in the UK’s creative, cultural and audiovisual sectors through Creative Europe. This included €3.5 million through the Culture sub-programme and €12.2 million through the MEDIA sub-programme, €5.9 million of which supported distributors of UK films in other European countries. This publication takes a look back at the results and success stories from 2018. The sector demonstrated strong resilience during a period of uncertainty with application levels largely unaffected. In total 96 UK companies and organisations were selected for funding during 2018. Together they received 9% of the total funds awarded Europe-wide. This is testimony to the strength of UK’s links with other European countries and the desire to work with international partners proving to be strong enough to withstand challenging political contexts. The announcement in March, that if the UK leaves the EU in an orderly manner with a deal, it will continue to participate as normal in the remaining years of Creative Europe, until the end of 2020, was well received. This was then reaffirmed in the proposed Withdrawal Agreement negotiated with the European Commission in November. In light of this and the repeated reassurances from the government of the value of certain EU programmes and the UK’s willingness to participate in them post-Brexit, the Desk continued its activity to promote the programme in the UK and to encourage companies 06

and organisations to apply despite uncertainties. In 2018, we published an independent report Impact of Creative Europe in the UK which provided much needed evidence on the positive effects this cooperation programme is having on the UK’s cultural, creative and audiovisual sectors and helped support the ambition of preserving the UK’s participation in the programme. Across Europe, 2018 was designated as the European Year of Cultural Heritage and the Creative Europe Desk UK attended launches in Milan and locally in the four UK nations. Online activity was promoted alongside regular events as well as publicising a special call which saw four UK-based organisations supported (see page 18). In September, we brought together 120 professionals from across the screen, arts, and the creative industries along with policy-makers at the Barbican for our CONNECT! event – a forum on the value of networks. The event saw a keynote speech delivered by Dawn Walton, Artistic Director of the Creative Europe-supported Eclipse Theatre, who touched on the local and international networks they had


63

UK films were distributed in Europe with €5.9m

5

more UK organisations supported than 2017

31%

of Cooperation Projects has at least one UK partner

12

books by UK authors were translated

9%

of Europe-wide funds went to UK

184

AV UK professionals trained through MEDIA

participated in to help develop audiences and raise the profile of black independent artists. A panel on the power of the collective voice championed the role of networks in driving social change, while other discussions examined practical issues around networks, exploring how collaboration within Europe is critical for building audiences, developing skills, as well as innovating and adapting. Many exciting projects received the support of Creative Europe in 2018: In the film world, it was the year of two major award winners, Cold War and The Favourite, backed by the programme from early script stages through to distribution and achieving impressive box office results. The MEDIA sub-programme also backed the distribution of over 60 UK films in Europe with Aardman’s animated feature film Early Man receiving nearly €1 million for its distribution in 12 countries. VOD services MUBI, Walter Presents and BFI Player were also supported to champion European films and TV, while 42 UK Europa Cinemas did the same on the big screen. In the Culture sub-programme, UK-led projects awarded in 2018 demonstrated how UK organisations can lead a partnership to explore pertinent sector challenges, such as British Council led project Europe Beyond Access, which will support disabled artists to break the glass ceilings of the contemporary theatre

and dance sectors. Creative Carbon Scotland were awarded funding for Cultural Adaptations, which aims to develop new skills and knowledge in the cultural sector on climate change adaptation. Eclipse Theatre’s Slate – Black.Arts.World. project addresses the need to increase the visibility and mobility of Black and Ethnic Minority artists. The UK’s outward-facing cultural, creative and audiovisual sectors offer valued partners with substantial expertise and innovative solutions to the projects they participate in. They enter 2019 with resolve, not put off by the political context of the UK’s decision to leave the EU, but fiercely committed to continue engaging in valuable partnerships with European friends, positively contributing to and enhancing their value. Brexit may require some adaptation to the way these partnerships are made possible but it will not diminish the enthusiasm of UK organisations to engage in them.

Agnieszka Moody, Director, Creative Europe Desk UK

Christoph Jankowski, Head of Culture, Creative Europe Desk UK-England and Culture Advisor, UK

07


“In this climate where we so desperately need belonging, it’s never been as important to have networks.” Dawn Walton, Eclipse Theatre

08


WHERE DID THE FUNDS GO IN 2018? MEDIA CULTURE CROSS-SECTOR

Dawn Walton gave the keynote speech at CONNECT! Creative Europe Desk UK Forum on the Value of Networks. Image by Linda Nylind.

09


10


SMALL €1.6m

EUROPEAN YEAR OF CULTURAL HERITAGE €0.2m

COOPERATION PROJECTS €2.8m

€3.5m

EUROPEAN PLATFORMS €0.5m

LITERARY TRANSLATION €0.2m

LARGE €1m

11


12


COLLABORATING ACROSS EUROPE

A production of Parrabbola’s A Winter’s Tale. Parrabbola is a partner in Shaking the Walls, a Cooperation Project led by Poland’s Gdanski Teatr Szekspirowski. Image © Greg Goodale.

13


COOPERATION PROJECTS Cooperation Projects continues to be the Culture sub-programme’s largest funding opportunity. It encourages organisations across Europe to work collaboratively with the aim of developing capacity and reaching new audiences in the cultural sector. In 2018, 42 organisations received almost €2.8 million as part of the Cooperation Projects strand with 12 of them receiving funding as lead applicants. Out of all successful Cooperation Project applications in 2018, 31% had at least one UK partner. These 41 projects cover a wide geographical spread, involving 38 out of the 40 other participating countries, demonstrating UK organisations’ vast connections across Europe and beyond. 2018 saw a 24% rise in the number successful UK organisations in Cooperation projects when compared to the previous year. Scotland-based organisations have seen a notable surge in successful applications compared to previous years with seven organisations awarded, including four as leads. Despite uncertainties related to the prospect of the UK leaving the EU, demand for the Cooperation Projects continues to be high. The UK submitted the second highest number of lead applications, showing how well-networked the sector is and how partnership working and flexibility to experiment are valuable to organisations.

€2.8m to 38 UK organisations for European partnerships

London community arts space The Albany is a partner in small Cooperation Project ID: BABYLON, with France, Italy, Germany and Slovenia. Image: The Albany Young Company.

14


“Our hope is that by bringing young people together within the project, they’ll feel a greater sense of transnational identity and values.” Kate Farrell, Head of Marketing and Communications, The Albany

15


SMALL COOPERATION PROJECTS Small Cooperation Projects involve at least three partners from three of the countries participating in Creative Europe. Partnerships can apply for up to €200,000 for projects that last up to four years. On the opposite page are the organisations in the UK and the funded projects they were involved in. More details on all of these projects can be found on our website: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/funded-projects

We aim to connect innovative string-focused ensembles from across Europe, to celebrate and develop our shared heritage, and to discover together new, accessible ways for diverse audiences to experience the power of our music-making” Jenny Jamison, Chief Executive, Scottish Ensemble

Scottish Ensemble leads small Cooperation Project The Bridge with partners in Estonia, Norway and Germany. Image © Hugh Carswell

16

30

UK organisations supported in 2018


PROJECT NAME

UK PARTNER ORGANISATION LOCATION

TOTAL € AWARDED LEAD / (IN ENGLAND) PARTNER TO PROJECT

REGION

A Woman’s Work Ffotogallery Wales Wales Lead Audience Segmentation System in European Theatres The Audience Agency England London Partner Café Europa Leith Theatre Trust Scotland Partner Cultural Adaptations Creative Carbon Scotland Scotland Lead Extended Universe Boundless Theatre England London Lead ID: Babylon The Albany England London Partner Imagining Sustainable Glass Network Europe North Lands Creative Glass Scotland Lead International Contemporary Dance Company 2018-2020 Gwyn Emberton Dance Wales Partner Introspection Music Experience Raw Material Music and Media Education England London Partner New Vortex Jazz Club England London Partner Jazz Connective Performances Birmingham England Midlands Partner LAND Activate Performing Arts England South West Partner Literature Across Frontiers at University of Wales Trinity Saint David Wales Lead Literary Europe Live Plus Cwmni Theatr Arad Goch Wales Partner Materials Designers Matter Organisation England London Partner Memory of Water Fablevision Scotland Partner MusXchange 2018-20 National Youth Orchestras of Scotland Scotland Partner On The Point Fabrica England London Partner Open Access National Theatre of Wales Wales Partner Performances beyond 2 shores Shubbak Festival England London Partner PUSH+ Imaginate Scotland Lead Roundabout Europe The Seachange Trust England South East Partner Shaking the Walls Parrabbola England London Partner Shift Key BE Festival England Midlands Partner Slate: Black. Arts.World. Eclipse Theatre Company England North Lead Supporting & Promoting Arts in Rural Settlements of Europe Take Art England South West Lead Teen Ambassadors across Europe Dialogue Community Performance England South West Partner The Bridge Scottish Ensemble Scotland Lead The Chorus Project Upstart Theatre England London Partner The Perennial Biennial Liverpool Biennial of Contemporary Art England North Lead

198,000 165,173 200,000 199,999 198,653 200,000 199,292 196,706 199,978 199,100 197,876 200,000 200,000 199,793 200,000 199,876 199,930 200,000 199,353 199,815 199,174 199,407 155,000 199,887 198,653 199,884 200,000 200,000

17


18


EUROPEAN YEAR OF CULTURAL HERITAGE-COOPERATION PROJECTS 2018 saw a one-off additional call for Cooperation Projects that reflected the purpose of the European Year of Cultural Heritage. Partnerships of at least three organisations could apply for a grant of up to €200,000. Four organisations from the UK were successful as part of these projects that reinforce a sense of belonging to a common European space. More can be found on our website: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/funded-projects

REGION

TOTAL € LEAD / AWARDED PARTNER TO PROJECT

PROJECT NAME

UK PARTNER ORGANISATION LOCATION

Roots and roads: traditional heritage stories to connect contemporary European audiences

Beyond the Border Storytelling Festival

Wales

Partner

GOfBaroque

European Union Baroque Orchestra

England

London

Partner

200,000

North Atlantic Tales: Untold Routes and Roots

SICC Productions

England

North

Lead

200,000

Journey to the Beginnings

University of Southampton

England

South East

Partner

200,000

(IN ENGLAND)

60,000

Dorset-based Activate is a partner in Cooperation Project LAND, bringing together arts organisations that have a specialist interest in working in the landscape. Image: Artists Waterlanders, presented at Activate’s Inside Out Dorset Festival 2018.

19


LARGE COOPERATION PROJECTS Large Cooperation Projects involve at least six partners from six participating countries. Partnerships can apply for up to €2 million for projects that last up to four years. Here are the organisations in the UK and the projects they were involved in. More about all of these projects can be found on our website: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/funded-projects TOTAL € LEAD / AWARDED (IN ENGLAND) PARTNER TO PROJECT

PROJECT NAME

UK PARTNER ORGANISATION LOCATION

REGION

Audience DEvelopment STrategies for organizations in Europe cultural

Colchester Mercury Theatre

England

South East

Partner

The Audience Agency

England

London

Partner

Create to Connect Create to Impact Artsadmin

England

London

Partner

Dancing Museums The democracy of beings

England Midlands Partner

Dance4

1,154,723 2,000,000 561,246

EMERGENCE From shared experience to new creativity: Living Heritage/Reframing Memory

Victoria and Albert Museum

England

London

Partner

Europe Beyond Access

British Council

England

London

Lead

1,998,192

712,264

European Music Market Accelerator

Un-Convention Hub

England

North

Partner

1,511,856

Future Songwriting

Musical Futures

England

London

Partner

419,805

MAPPING - A Map on the aesthetics of performing arts for early years

Polka Theatre

England

London

Partner

1,998,000

RESHAPE - Reflect, Share, Practice, Experiment

British Council

England

London

Partner

598,603

20


Manchester’s Un-Convention is a partner in large Cooperation Project European Music Market Accelerator, which explores lifelong training for music industry professionals. Image: Š Brendan Clayton

21


EUROPEAN PLATFORMS European Platforms is a funding strand that supports the promotion of new and emerging talent through co-development, co-production and programming. Platforms cover diverse art forms, such as live music, architecture, poetry, media art, classical music, contemporary dance, pop music, photography, maker and design labs, interdisciplinary sound art, opera and ballet. This strand is now closed for applications until 2020. However, it is possible for currently supported European Platforms to add new partners each year. In 2018, 10 of the Platforms with UK partners moved successfully into the next year of their Framework Partnership Agreements More on all of these projects can be found on our website: www.creativeeurope.eu/funded-projects

PROJECT NAME European Photography Platform

1854 MEDIA

England

London

Partner

Aerowaves

Aerowaves

England

London

Lead

PARRALEL - European Photo Based Platform

22

TOTAL € UK PARTNER REGION LEAD / AWARDED ORGANISATION LOCATION (IN ENGLAND) PARTNER TO PROJECT

Contemporary Dance Trust England London Partner (The Place)

474,763 500,000

Derby Quad

England

Midlands

Partner

Fedora Platform

English National Ballet

England

London

Partner

499,995

Sadler’s Wells

England

London

Partner

European Media Art Platform

FACT (Foundation for Art and Creative Technology)

England

North

Partner

432,000

Magic Carpets

Folkestone Fringe

England

South East

Partner

500,000

500,000

Versopolis

Ledbury Poetry Festival

England

Midlands

Partner

471,782

Distributed Design Market Platform

Limewharf Annexe

England

London

Partner

500,000

Classical Futures Europe

The Barbican Centre

England

London

Partner

500,000

Future Architecture

Artifice Books

England

London

Partner

500,000


Artist Siobhán Ní Dhuinnín residency in Folkestone as part of the Magic Carpets Platform, which unites 13 European partners including the UK’s Folkestone Fringe. Image © Mindaugas Drigotas / Nanook.

“For Folkestone Fringe, Magic Carpets is all about the future: the opportunities that come with having a Europe-wide network of like-minded organisations, and the collective development of our young curators and artists.” Diane Dever, Co-Director, Folkestone Fringe 23


24


EUROPEAN NETWORKS Being involved in European cultural networks gives UK organisations access to European conversations and provides valuable opportunities to meet peers and potential partners to collaborate with. Many cultural networks are supported by Creative Europe through the European Networks funding strand. These networks aim to support their members to better operate transnationally, build their capacity to work across Europe and adapt to change. Networks encourage linguistic and cultural diversity, strengthen competitiveness, and promote skill sharing and good practice among members. Take a look at our website for a list of networks, many of which are supported by Creative Europe: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/european-networks

The Trans Europe Halles network of independent cultural centres has been a doorway to ideas, knowledge and long-term relationships that have sustained my local endeavour in ways that were not otherwise available when only looking around and connecting in my own small place.” David Boyd, Director, Beat Carnival

Trans Europe Halles network founder Philippe Grombeer with Belfast-based Beat Carnival Director David Boyd at a Trans Europe Halles meeting in Amsterdam: “The Future Is Not What it Used To Be”.

25


14 26


TRANSLATING EUROPEAN LITERATURE

British author Sunjeev Sahota’s EUPL-winning novel The Year of the Runaways is being translated into Croatian, Hungarian, Macedonian, Romanian and Slovenian with funding from Creative Europe’s Literary Translation strand. Image © Janie Airey.

09 11 27


LITERARY TRANSLATION Creative Europe’s Literary Translation funding opportunity supports publishers and publishing houses to translate works from one European language to another. Selected works are also supported in their production and promotion. Five independent publishing houses from England and Wales were awarded €245,000 to produce, promote and translate slates of fiction, poetry and plays. The fund aims to support cultural and linguistic diversity in Europe, promote the transnational circulation of high-quality literary works, as well as to improve access to these literary works so that they can reach new audiences. The translation of books for which the authors have won the EU Prize for Literature is particularly encouraged. Here are the funded organisations in the UK in 2018 and the projects they were involved in. More details on these projects can be found on our website: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/funded-projects PROJECT NAME

UK PARTNER ORGANISATION LOCATION

TOTAL € AWARDED TO PROJECT

Book Island Translated Children’s Fiction Project

Book Island

England

18,829

Orenda Books Translated Literature Programme

Orenda Books

England

57,794

MacLehose Press Publishing Programme

Quercus Editions

England

97,649

Harvill Secker: Five Contemporary European Novels in Translation

Random House

England

45,697

Voices from the Margins: Keeping Wales in Europe through Translation

Parthian Books

Wales

25,003

In addition, the UK has to date seen more translations of its authors into other languages than any other country. This includes books by Jacqueline Wilson, Ali Smith, Kazuo Ishiguro and Sunjeev Sahota.

28

12

UK books to be translated from English


“The Creative Europe funding will make it possible for Parthian to continue its mission of finding exciting translations that expose our readership to new voices. The process of applying raised our awareness of quality books from Denmark and Greece, two countries new to Parthian’s translation slate. This funding allows us to foster relationships with new authors, publishers, and readers internationally.” Eddie Matthews, Associate Editor, Parthian

Wales-based Parthian Books received €25,000 for Voices from the Margins: Keeping Wales in Europe through Translation. Image: A previous Parthian Baltic project in which one novel and seven poetry collections from Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania were translated.

29


Nominated by Save Britain’s Heritage, Grimsby Ice Factory was selected as one of Europa Nostra’s: seven most endangered heritage sites, part of their activity for the 2018 European Year of Cultural Heritage. Image © Andy Marshall/World Monuments Fund Britain.

30


REWARDING CULTURAL EXCELLENCE

31


EUROPEAN PRIZES AND INITIATIVES Through Creative Europe, the European Commission also supports a variety of prizes and initiatives to increase the visibility of Europe’s culture and audiovisual sectors. These reward achievement, highlight excellence and raise awareness of culture and heritage. Celebrating the diversity of cultural heritage across Europe at national, regional and local level, 2018 was designated the European Year of Cultural Heritage. Involving a range of events and activities, including many across the UK’s nations and regions, it enabled people to become closer to the cultural heritage that surrounds them. In recognition of music as an important pillar of European culture, with its high economic significance and audience reach, Music Moves Europe was developed with focuses around policy, funding, dialogue and talent. In 2018, a pilot programme was launched – Music Moves Europe: Boosting European music diversity and talent – with actions for targeted EU funding for music post-2020. Other European Prizes and initiatives include:

• • • • • • •

European Capitals of Culture European Heritage Days European Heritage Label EU Prize for Cultural Heritage / Europa Nostra Awards EU Prize for Contemporary Architecture / Mies van der Rohe Award European Border Breakers Awards (music) EU Prize for Literature

British electronic pop musician Youngr won a 2018 European Border Breakers Award (EBBA): the music award for emerging artists who have seen outstanding success across Europe. Image: © Ben Houdijk

32


33


34


One of only four successful applicants, Birmingham City University joins Maynooth University (Ireland), University of Nova Gorica (Slovenia), and Politecnico Milanoone (Italy) in receiving funding from a one-off cross-sector call supporting MA modules that combine Arts and Science. Image: Birmingham City University.

35


CROSS-SECTOR SUPPORT In addition to MEDIA and Culture sub-programmes, Creative Europe has a cross-sector strand that offers support for the creative sector as a whole through one-off funding calls and a Guarantee Facility.

MODULES FOR MASTERS DEGREES IN ARTS AND SCIENCE In 2018, Birmingham City University was one of four successful applicants to the cross-sector strand’s Modules for Masters Degrees in Arts and Science, which supports higher education institutions in the design and implementation of pioneering modules to be included in existing Masters degrees. This very competitive call saw 32 applications. It supports an interdisciplinary approach by nurturing cross-sectorial curricula that combine technology with art. PROJECT NAME

UK PARTNER ORGANISATION LOCATION

REGION

Student Open Innovation Lab (SOIL)

Birmingham City University

Midlands

36

England

(IN ENGLAND)

TOTAL € AWARDED TO PROJECT 201,818


CULTURAL AND CREATIVE SECTOR GUARANTEE FACILITY The Cultural and Creative Sector Guarantee Facility has unlocked €600 million in affordable loans from the private sector. Since rolling out in 2016, financial institutions are gradually becoming involved, with 10 agreements signed with banks in seven countries so far. While no UK banks participate at the time of writing, they remain eligible to apply to the fund, which has a budget of €121 million from Creative Europe and €61 million from the European Fund for Strategic Investments. To date, two UK SMEs have made use of the Guarantee Facility, receiving loans totaling €776,449 from IFCIC a French based financial intermediary with products are available to European film and TV producers.

€776,449 loaned to 2 UK SMEs

37


TV PROGRAMMING €898,750

SLATE FUNDING €210,000

DEVELOPMENT €600,000

SINGLE PROJECT €390,000

SALES AGENTS €176,064

38


TRAINING €357,735 ACCESS TO MARKETS €315,000 VIDEO GAMES €300,000

TRAINING & NETWORKS €0.7m

PRODUCERS €1.8m

FILM & TV €1.5m

63 UK FILMS RELEASED IN EUROPE €5.9m

€12.2m

DISTRIBUTION €3.3m THEATRICAL DISTRIBUTION €1.4m SELECTIVE DISTRIBUTION €749,400

FILM EDUCATION €126,300 AUDIENCES €0.5m

PROMOTION OF AV WORKS ONLINE €1.9m AUTOMATIC DISTRIBUTION €455,442

FILM FESTIVALS €96,000 EUROPA CINEMAS €262,964 39


40


PRODUCING FOR THE INTERNATIONAL MARKET

Creative Europe supported The Favourite under the previous MEDIA programme in 2003, with a €50,000 Single Project grant awarded to Scarlet Films to aid its development. The film was released in the UK on 1 January 2019 by Fox Searchlight.

41


DEVELOPMENT Production companies and video game developers in the UK benefitted from €1.8 million of funding in 2018, encouraging them to experiment with new ideas and refine their projects in order to strengthen their prospects when pitching to potential investors. This year saw the release of a number of British films and co-productions which have received development funding from MEDIA under previous years. Supported feature films included Colette, Lean on Pete, Cold War, Outlaw King, Calibre, On Chesil Beach and The Favourite.

“Many drafts, revisions and polishes were done [on The Favourite] which ultimately led to Scarlet’s partnering with Element Pictures and to the attachment of director Yorgos Lanthimos. The unswerving support of the MEDIA programme and the UK Film Council/BFI in a very long development period kept the project and its profile alive.” Ceci Dempsey, Producer, Scarlet Films

Posters courtesy of Wellington Films Ltd / Netflix and Fox Searchlight UK.

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Q&A with Wildgaze Films Tell us about your company! Wildgaze Films is an independent production company specialising in commercial international film and television, based in London. Wildgaze is run by producing partners, Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey, who made Oscar history by being the first female producing partnership to receive two Best Picture Oscar nominations, in 2010 for An Education (their first production) and in 2016 for Brooklyn, for which we also won the BAFTA for Outstanding British Film. What are your company’s ambitions and how has Creative Europe funding supported these? We will continue to build our reputation for high quality, commercially successful feature films and television, building on our strong talent relationships.

“The Creative Europe grant allows greater flexibility in development and we have often used the money for exploring the options of how we might best mount the film creatively and financially.” What have you most recently received funding for? We received Single Project development funding for Dark Matter, an emotional and terrifying ghost story set in the Arctic, to be directed by Francis Lee (God’s Own Country).

What stage is the project at now? We’re currently budgeting and researching location options, while awaiting the director’s draft of the script, which Francis Lee will be completing May/June 2019, following shooting his current film. Has anything surprised you in terms of what it has allowed you to do? The support and flexibility of the MEDIA funding has been very beneficial. For example, we received the Slate Funding in 2012, and were appreciative that we were able to swap out one of the projects we’d applied for (which was no longer going ahead) with a European feature documentary project instead, which had been very challenging to finance. This became My Nazi Legacy, which premiered at Tribeca, followed by a number of film festival screenings including the London Film Festival and was distributed by Altitude Films in the UK and played across Europe to great acclaim. Who should apply for funding and what advice would you give to potential applicants? Producers at a similar stage – when the script is developing well but there is work to be done, location scouting, casting, financiers to be brought on – this is when the project is strong enough for applying but early enough for funding to be most helpful. We’d advise other producers to use the opportunity the application gives you to clarify your approach to the film – pitching to distributors, focusing on your audience, marketing the project, the influence and reach your project can have and how it sits within the European film landscape - these are all good questions to be asked at this stage and can be a constructive process to go through. Utilise the support of the MEDIA team at Creative Europe Desk UK too, as they have always been incredibly helpful and supportive.

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SINGLE PROJECT AND SLATE FUNDING 10 UK production companies secured €600,000 worth of funding in 2018 for the development of their film, TV and digital platform projects. Nine of these companies received Single Project funding, sharing a total of €390,000. Origin Pictures received Slate funding for the second time under Creative Europe, having previously being awarded a grant in 2016. The previous slate included Catherine the Great, a drama series which also went on to receive TV programming support. Single Project COMPANY

UK NATION

PROJECT TITLE (PROJECT TYPE)

AMOUNT €

Banyak Films

England

Into The Wild (Documentary)

25,000

Enlightenment Productions

England

Polarized (Fiction)

50,000

Hot Property

England

Fight (Fiction)

50,000

Kapers Animation

England

Spiked! (Animation)

60,000

Kindle Entertainment

England

Longbow Girl (Fiction)

perfectmotion England Goats & Sheep (Fiction)

50,000 30,000

Poorhouse International

England

Le Diable Au Corps (Fiction)

50,000

Two Step Films

England

I Am Spartakiarde (Documentary)

25,000

Wildgaze Films

England

Dark Matter (Fiction)

50,000 390,000

Slate Funding COMPANY

UK NATION

PROJECT TYPE

Origin Pictures

England

Fiction

AMOUNT € 210,000 210,000

“Slate funding has allowed us to activate our detailed development plans. It has boosted our company in two ways: given us further confidence in our projects and also provided a significant budget to resource the work, to put together the very best creative teams and to immerse ourselves in the creative process.” Fionnuala Deane, Managing Director, Dog Ears 44

€600,000 awarded to ten UK producers


UK animation company Dog Ears received Creative Europe funding towards the development of three projects in 2016, including science fantasy show Exogirl. Image courtesy of Dog Ears.

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VIDEO GAMES The gaming sector now accounts for more than half of the UK’s entire entertainment market*, making it more lucrative than video and music combined. Two UK companies received a total of €300,000 to potentially contribute to this upward trend. They were granted the maximum amount available through this funding opportunity which supports the early stages of a game’s development, from concept to the first playable prototype. In total, 30 projects were selected Europe-wide receiving a total of €3.7 million. * Source: The Entertainment Retailers Association (ERA)

COMPANY

UK NATION

PROJECT TITLE

AMOUNT €

No Code

Scotland

Stranded 150,000

Revolution Software

England

Parzival’s Stone VR 150,000 300,000

Maid of Sker is a first-person survival horror, set in a remote hotel with a macabre history from Welsh folklore. Video game developer and publisher Wales Interactive received funding in 2017. Image courtesy of Wales Interactive.

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“It’s a great achievement for our studio to have The Maid of Sker chosen as one the UK projects to win Creative Europe support. The fund has been a vital step in getting this game into production and our team are relishing the opportunity to create a narrative-led horror game that reflects Welsh culture”. David Banner MBE, Managing Director, Wales Interactive

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“Catherine the Great, which we produced with New Pictures for Sky and HBO, is an ambitious European production, which shot mainly in Lithuania and Latvia, involving significant crew numbers from the local talent base. MEDIA support has been hugely beneficial, not only in helping with the development of the project, enabling us to get it into production, but also contributing production finance which has played a key part in allowing us to achieve the highest production values.� David M. Thompson, Executive Producer, Origin Pictures 48


TV PROGRAMMING The production support available for fiction, creative documentary and animated TV programmes encourages international distribution, helping UK programmes reach wider audiences abroad. Three UK production companies have received grants in 2018 totalling €898,750 to help co-finance programmes targeted at international audiences. Two UK companies also received funding as co-beneficiaries on two co-produced animated pre-school series. Interstellar Ella was submitted by Grid Animation (Belgium) and Tinker Labs (UK) while Circle Square was submitted by Kavaleer Productions (Ireland) and The Brothers McLeod (UK). COMPANY

UK NATION

PROJECT TITLE (PROJECT TYPE)

AMOUNT €

Orange Eyes

England

Zog (Animation)

172,750

Origin Pictures

England

Catherine The Great (Fiction)

500,000

Spring Films

England

Meeting Gorbachev (Documentary)

226,000 898,750

€898,750 awarded to three UK producers

Focusing on the final years of her three-plus decades in power, Catherine the Great stars Helen Mirren in the titular role. Produced by Origin Pictures and New Pictures, the former also received Slate funding to develop the project. Image courtesy of Hal Shinnie/Sky/HBO.

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EXPORTING UK FILMS AND IMPORTING EUROPE’S BEST

New Title Page HONING SKILLS AND BUILDING NETWORKS

Creative Europe supported the release of Michael Pearce’s Beast in Greece, Denmark, Poland and France.

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Alice Rohrwacher’s Happy as Lazzaro centres on pure-hearted teen Lazzaro who is content living as a sharecropper in rural Italy, until an unlikely friendship with the marquise’s son changes his world. Modern Films Entertainment received €103,000 towards releasing the film in the UK. Distributors received a total of €645,200 to support the film’s release in 29 countries. Image courtesy of Modern Films Entertainment.

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“Receiving support through MEDIA’s distribution fund has allowed us to acquire leading European films competing at top festivals, which is important for us in order to build audience awareness from the initial international buzz. Given our focus on stories and filmmakers challenging the status quo and addressing pressing social issues, a financial boost based around our release strategies is an essential tool to working in the UK market.” Eve Gabereau, Managing Director, Modern Films Entertainment

€1.4m

for the UK distribution of 27 European films

DISTRIBUTION The MEDIA sub-programme commits nearly 40% of its annual budget to helping European films travel across borders. This is achieved through three funding opportunities: Selective Distribution, Automatic Distribution and the Sales Agents scheme. All three schemes support distribution of European non-national films, i.e. coming from a country different than that of the distributor or sales agent. In 2018 these grants allowed UK distributors and sales agents to release 27 non-national European films in the UK, and supported the releases of 63 UK films in other European countries.

€5.9m

for the European distribution of 63 UK films

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SELECTIVE DISTRIBUTION In 2018, four UK-based distributors received grants totalling €749,400 to release 15 different European films in the UK through this scheme. These grants resulted in a greater number of prints and expanded marketing campaigns, aiming to increase the audiences for these films. Curzon Film World led the way, with nine of their releases being supported through the scheme, including the Oscar-nominated Cold War from Polish director Pawel Pawlikowksi. Two UK distributors, Modern Films Entertainment and Bulldog Film Distribution, received Creative Europe support for the first time. FILM TITLE DISTRIBUTOR AMOUNT € Border (Gräns)

MUBI UK

67,400

UK RELEASE UK BOX OFFICE £ DATE (TO MAR 2019 END) 08/03/2019

146,265

Cold War (Zimna wojna)

Curzon Film World

67,400

31/08/2018

1,147,733

Dogman

Curzon Film World

46,300

19/10/2018

188,161

Foxtrot

Curzon Film World

30,400

01/03/2019

42,762

Girl

Curzon Film World

46,300

15/03/2019

23,895

Happy as Lazzaro (Lazzaro Felice)

Modern Films Entertainment

103,000

15/03/2019

tbc

Mug (Twarz)

Bulldog Film Distribution

30,400

07/12/2018

8,685

Sunset (Napszallta)

Curzon Film World

46,300

tbc

The Apparition (L’Apparition)

MUBI UK

30,400

03/08/2018

tbc 23,806

The House That Jack Built

Curzon Film World

46,300

14/12/2018

65,315

The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Curzon Film World

103,000

03/11/2017

857,615 15,485

The Workshop (L’Atelier)

Curzon Film World

17,200

16/11/2018

Transit

Curzon Film World

30,400

tbc

tbc

Under the Tree (Undir trenu)

Eureka Entertainment

17,200

10/08/2018

60,031

Utøya - July 22 (Utoya 22. Juli)

Modern Films Entertainment

67,400

26/10/2018

19,706

749,400

In 2018, distributors of Girl, Lukas Dhont’s debut feature and winner of the Caméra d’Or at Cannes as well as the First Feature Competition at the BFI London Film Festival, received €616,700 to support the film’s release in 28 European countries. Image courtesy of Curzon Artificial Eye.

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“Creative Europe support makes a significant contribution to Curzon’s ability to champion European film. It not only helps us take acquisition risks and mount ambitious releases of non-national European films, but also encourages collaboration with European partners such as sales agents and filmmakers.” Louisa Dent, Managing Director, Curzon Artificial Eye 56


AUTOMATIC DISTRIBUTION Every year distributors across Europe report to the MEDIA sub-programme on cinema admissions for the non-national European films they released in the previous year. These admission figures form the basis for the calculations of the Automatic Distribution scheme grants, which can be used to pay minimum guarantees or print and advertising costs of new non-national European acquisitions. At the time of going to print the results for this scheme in 2018 were not yet published. The annual average generated by UK distributors in previous years is â‚Ź455,442 and we have included this in our totals for 2018. With the grants generated in previous years UK distributors acquired distribution rights and released 10 films in 2018, including Loro (Curzon Film World), Summer 1993 (New Wave) and The Breadwinner (Studiocanal).

The Automatic Distribution funding received by Curzon Film World has supported the acquisition and release of various European films in the UK, including Italian/French co-production, Loro. Image courtesy of Curzon Artificial Eye.

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SALES AGENTS This scheme is linked to an agent’s performance in selling European films. The funding awarded depends on the amount of cinema admissions generated by the films sold in the previous calendar year and can be used for acquisitions (sales guarantees) as well as the promotion and marketing costs of non-national European films. At the time of going to print the results for this scheme in 2018 were not yet published. The annual average generated by UK sales agents in previous years is €176,064 and we have included this in our totals for 2018.

Through this scheme, HanWay Films received support to sell Sebastian Schipper’s Roads, his follow-up to feature to 2015’s Victoria about two friends journeying across the open road. Image courtesy of HanWay Films.

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“This funding is an invaluable support for HanWay’s strategy of investing in European films, and facilitates non-English language filmmakers, reaching as wide an audience as possible. Furthermore the funding enhances the cultural and economic wellbeing of the UK film industry and its relationship with Europe. Something we need all the more of in these uncertain times!” Gabrielle Stewart, Managing Director, HanWay Films 59


INVESTMENT IN UK FILMS Europe-wide, €33 million was spent in 2018’s distribution and sales agents schemes,18% of which was used for British films. Through the Automatic Distribution and Sales Agents schemes, the distribution of 63 UK films across Europe was supported by a total of €5.9 million during 2018. The highest beneficiaries included Early Man (€991,700), The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society (€465,354) and King of Thieves (€438,621). FILM TITLE AMOUNT € 47 Metres Down 5,035 A Quiet Passion 53,963 Beast 72,023 Beats 7,566 Breathe 257,432 Canaletto & The Art of Venice at the Queen’s Gallery 5,333 Colette 9,678 Crooked House 95,018 Daphne 20,665 David Hockney at the Royal Academy of Arts 26,256 Denmark 3,352 Early Man 991,700 Earth: One Amazing Day 27,701 England is Mine 3,027 Final Portrait 183,960 Finding Your Feet 162,874 Ghost Stories 13,035 God’s Own Country 69,645 Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami 25,104 Hampstead 25,226 Judy 20,475

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Just Charlie King of Thieves Lady Macbeth Land Lean on Pete Let Me Go Maradona Mary Shelley McKellen: Playing the Part McQueen Normal People Obey On Chesil Beach Paddington 2 Red Joan Slumber Sorry We Missed You Swimming With Men The Children Act The Commuter The Death of Stalin The Escape

1,400 438,621 36,922 26,091 294,694 1,752 27,423 22,358 780 53,395 18,076 8,561 95,323 353,982 70,419 24,533 233,413 91,995 152,643 73,810 356,038 19,771

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society The Happy Prince The Journey The Limehouse Golem The Man Who Invented Christmas

465,354 37,875 32,032 10,000 22,149

The Man Who Killed Don Quixote The Mercy The Party The Trip to Spain Their Finest Time Trial Trespass Against Us Tulip Fever Viceroy’s House Vita & Virginia Waiting for Anya Walk With Me Walking to Paris Whitney

4,126 101,606 49,509 16,271 7,739 6,250 11,000 32,000 198,594 180,016 8,360 28,839 25,000 20,000

You Were Never Really Here

208,128 5,945,916


Images from top left, clockwise: Beast. Image courtesy of BAC Films, France Breathe. Image courtesy of Bim Distribuzione, Italy God’s Own Country. Image courtesy of Fil Rouge Media, Italy On Chesil Beach. Image courtesy of Atlantic Film, Finland The Children Act. Image courtesy of Scanbox, Sweden The Death of Stalin. Image courtesy of Grand Teatret, Denmark The Happy Prince. Image courtesy of FilmTrade, Greece Tulip Fever. Image courtesy of ThimFilm, Austria You Were Never Really Here. Image courtesy of Constantin Film, Germany

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PROMOTION OF AUDIOVISUAL WORKS ONLINE €8.6 million a year is available through this scheme to support the digital distribution of European audiovisual works to a wider, international audience. This includes projects that experiment with new models of distribution. In 2018, four projects from the UK were selected to receive funding, sharing a total of €1,828,103. This equated to 21% of the programme-wide budget. Supported initiatives include a social media campaign for BFI Flare, London’s LGBTQ+ Film Festival and Gruvi, an interactive advertising and audience targeting platform. Streaming platforms MUBI and Walter Presents both continued to receive support for the second year running. COMPANY

PROJECT TITLE

UK NATION

British Film Institute

Flare Live – A Facebook Live Campaign To Engage LGBTQ+ Audiences

England

Global Series Network

Walter Presents UK & International England

Gruvi

The Audience Project (TAP)

MUBI UK

MUBI, Delivering European Cinema Globally England

England

AMOUNT € 337,340 493,638 105,741 891,384 1,828,103

In addition, three UK companies have received funding as co-beneficiaries on projects led by other countries. They are: • Kinescope Film & Media - European Cinema & VOD Initiative (led by Carbec Media in France) • Film & Campaign - Moving Docs (led by European Documentary Network in Denmark) • Sheffield Doc/Fest - AVA – Video on Demand (led by reelport in Germany)

21%

of EU-wide funding awarded to UK

62

Gruvi is a technology based media agency focused on the audiovisual industry that helps entertainment companies reach and engage online audiences. The Audience Project (TAP) engages with existing and new audiences for to help launch European films. TAP’s database collects, organises and disseminates information on audiences so that producers, distributors and exhibitors can improve the quality and effectiveness of their digital marketing efforts.


“The Creative Europe grant has enabled us to incorporate a raft of important updates and technologies to ticketing tools that improve the conversion rates from our advertising of independent film. The process of raising the grant has also raised Gruvi’s political profile within the communities of European distribution, exhibition and production.” Ben Johnson, CEO, Gruvi

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Nearly 120 Europe-wide initiatives are funded each year by Creative Europe with the aim of bringing audiovisual professionals together to learn, exchange ideas, raise finance, build networks and make connections. This is all done through two funding opportunities: Training and Access to Markets. [QUOTE] “Creative Europe funding helps the Film London Production Finance Market connect filmmakers with financiers. Every year the event hosts over a thousand one-to-one meetings, bringing together those with great projects and those with the power to bring them to the big screen.” Helena Mackenzie, Head of Inward Investment & Business Development, Film London [FULL PAGE IMAGE] PRODUCTION FINANCE MARKET [CREDIT LINE] Image: Film London’s Production Finance Market (PFM) is a two-day annual film financing event supported by Creative Europe’s Access to Markets scheme. Taking place in October in association with the BFI London Film Festival, the event sees over 800 networking and pitching meetings between financiers and producers attracting more than €xx of production value. To date, some xx or more films and companies have benefited directly from the PFM. Image © Film London

HONING SKILLS AND BUILDING NETWORKS

An international co-production market at the International Film Festival of Rotterdam, CineMart, creates a platform to offer filmmakers the opportunity to launch their ideas to the international film industry and to find the right connections to get their projects financed. The 2018 edition saw the selection of UK project Nathan Won’t Ride by Dean Loxton and Lions Den Films.

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TRAINING COURSES Each year the MEDIA sub-programme supports around 60 international training programmes allowing audiovisual professionals from across the world to meet, share their experiences and learn both from experts in their field and each other. Three UK-based training providers received over €350,000 in 2018 to impart their expertise to international participants. Courses can either be run by a single organisation or through collaboration across borders by multiple partners. Almost 200 UK audiovisual professionals take part in many of the courses on offer across Europe each year, from year-long programmes designed for producers to week-long training courses for European exhibitors. TRAINING PROVIDER

COURSE NAME

AMOUNT €

Doc Society

Impact Producers Lab 50,000

Independent Cinema Office

Developing Your Film Festival 90,000

The National Film and Television School

Inside Pictures

217,735 357,735

“Thanks to Creative Europe’s ongoing support, every year, a new set of participants pass through Inside Pictures and join the ranks of its alumni, bringing increased business acumen and a broader set of contacts to bear on their own practice. The value of the networks formed on and beyond the course can be witnessed through the wealth of Inside Pictures credits across the festival circuit, and the growth of successful and sustainable film companies.” Corinne Ranaraja, Programme Director, Operations, Inside Pictures 66

184

UK professionals trained


Inside Pictures aims to support the development of an ever-stronger European film industry and to develop world-class leaders to continue driving this industry forward. Image courtesy of Inside Pictures.

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“Creative Europe’s support allows us to do yearround organisation, in-depth industry monitoring, analysis, research, connecting with filmmakers and film organisations in Europe and around the world, and inviting a vast delegation of industry Decision Makers to Sheffield for match-made meetings with creative teams.” Patrick Hurley, Head of Marketplace and Talent, Sheffield Doc/Fest 68


MARKETS, NETWORKS AND INDUSTRY EVENTS The MEDIA sub-programme supports around 60 initiatives each year aimed at facilitating exchanges and increasing the circulation and visibility of European films on international markets. Of the 53 projects supported in 2018, 45 are trade events and markets; five are online tools and three are promotional activities. The events support a range of disciplines across animation, creative documentary, virtual reality and international co-productions. ORGANISATION

PROJECT NAME

International Documentary Festival Sheffield

MeetMarket and Alternate Realities Market 2018 155,000

AMOUNT €

International Documentary Festival Sheffield

MeetMarket and Alternate Realities Market 2019 160,000 315,000

UK-based organisation Sheffield Doc/Fest were awarded two grants totalling €315,000 to organise events that allow professionals to seek finance for their projects, including MeetMarket and their Alternate Realities Market. In 2018, 65 projects were selected to pitch at the MeetMarket and 25 for the Alternate Realities Market. Over the course of two intensive days, more than 1,600 match-made meetings took place, with an average of 18 meetings per project.

Many internationally successful documentaries have found partners in the MeetMarket including Unrest, Searching for Sugarman,The Act of Killing,The Look of Silence, Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution, A Family Affair, Forever Pure, Mavis!, 5 Broken Cameras,The Story of Film, One Child Nation,The Silence of Others and many more.

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INTERNATIONAL CO-PRODUCTION FUNDS Creative Europe boosts the funding capacity of five international co-production funds that offer production and distribution support to producers working with partners outside of Europe. As a result, these international co-production funds become accessible to a wider pool of European professionals. Applications are then made directly to the fund rather than through Creative Europe. Each fund supported through this scheme has its own focus with different eligibility criteria and deadlines: • • • • •

ACM Distribution HBF+Europe IDFA Bertha Fund Torino Film Lab Audience Design Fund World Cinema Fund Europe

88 projects have been supported through these funds to date with European producers partnering with companies in 46 countries outside of Europe. South America features prominently, with Argentina (ten projects), Brazil (eight projects) and Chile (seven projects) at the top of the list. Supported films released in 2018 include Of Fathers and Sons (recently nominated for Best Documentary at the 2019 Oscars), The Heiresses, Petra,Theatre of War and Birds of Passage.

Rafiki is a Kenyan/South African/French/Dutch co-production directed by Wanuri Kahiu and was one of 11 films supported by ACM Distribution in 2018.

70

14%

of projects supported have UK involvement


“The ACM Distribution grant enabled us to take Kenyan film Rafiki to over 30 cinemas across the UK, combining it with a VOD release and events such as DJ nights and spoken word performances. Many of the audience members were black or people of colour and/or identified as LGBTQ+. They expressed how important this film is for allowing them to see representations of themselves on screen. Diversity of cinema is vital and support like this is necessary for enabling it’. Justine Atkinson, Director, Aya Distribution

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ATTRACTING AUDIENCES

The Regent Street Cinema is the birthplace of British Cinema, in 1896 it became the very first place in Britain to show moving pictures when the Lumière brothers’ Cinématographe was presented to a paying audience. The cinema is one of the few in the country to show 16mm and 35mm film, as well as the latest in 4K digital film. The cinema joined the Europa Cinemas network in 2016. It offers exclusive premieres, repertory screenings, retrospectives, documentaries, animation and experimental cinema.

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FILM FESTIVALS Film festivals play an important role in expanding audiences for European film. This is why Creative Europe supports 65 of them every year. Collectively the two UK film festivals that continued to receive support in 2018 were awarded €96,000 for placing strong emphasis on films from other European countries and delivering various outreach and audience development activities both during and outside of their festivals. ORGANISATION

FESTIVAL

AMOUNT €

Encounters Festivals

24th Encounters Festival 33,000

Leeds City Council

32nd Leeds International Film Festival 63,000 96,000

“Encounters was one of the first festivals I came across when I was getting into filmmaking as a kid... and it was always a festival I’ve wanted to get into.” Dionne Edwards, Filmmaker and Encounters Award Winner Dionne’s short film We Love Moses won the Chris Collins Best of British Award for Live Action in 2017. Dionne and her producing partner Georgia Goggin returned to the 2018 festival to deliver an industry session, and are shooting their first feature together this year.

Encounters is the UK’s leading short film, animation and virtual reality festival. The festival discovers, supports and develops new talent in filmmaking, providing a platform for emerging and established filmmakers from around the world, and continues to be a unique meeting place for the industry. At the heart of the festival lies the Encounters international competition - an official gateway to the world’s most prestigious awards; the Oscars®, BAFTAs and the European Film Awards.

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@stanandlolafilm We loved being in Bristol for #Encounters2018 - we love this festival, we love this city! Thanks to @EncountersSFF for having us xxx

@AlexzandraJack Had the great pleasure of sitting on the #Depict2018 panel for #Encounters2018. Telling a story in 90 seconds is hard and yet so many talented makers showing new, bold and imaginative ways to do it.

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“Watershed’s cinemas core purpose is to present Bristol audiences with the diversity of film and support from the Europa Cinemas network is essential to us in promoting European film culture. Being a member of Europa Cinemas not only encourages us to develop the exhibition of European films but also connects Watershed to likeminded colleagues across Europe to share practice, challenges and successes in engaging new and young audiences. As an independent UK cinema being part of Europa Cinemas network provides rich opportunities for professional development for staff and well as inspiring and emboldening our exhibition practice.� Mark Cosgrove, Cinema Curator, Watershed Bristol

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CINEMAS 42 cinemas across the UK are part of the Europa Cinemas network. Creative Europe supports the European cinema exhibition sector through co-financing of a pan-European network of 1,100 cinemas (nearly 3,000 screens) in 43 countries. The percentage of European screenings across the network is around 60%, much higher than in other commercial cinemas. 42 UK cinemas are members of the Europa Cinemas network, spread across 29 towns and cities in all four nations of the UK. 67% of the supported screens can be found outside London. In addition to supporting the programming of European films, the network is also a place for exchange, offering meetings, seminars, labs and exchange programmes that help to drive innovation and change. At the time of going to print the results for this scheme in 2018 were not yet published. The annual average awarded to UK cinemas through the Europa Cinemas network is €262,964 and we have included this in our totals for 2018. YEAR

UK MEMBERS

GRANT AMOUNT €

2018

42 UK Cinemas

262,964

Watershed Bristol presents a diverse programme of films, events, festivals, artist commissions, workshops and conferences with audiences and participation at its heart. Both an internationally renowned cultural cinema and the home of BFI Film Audience Network Hub for the South West, it plays a central role in developing film culture across the region.

@CurzonCinemas We’re very proud to say that 4 of those 42 UK cinemas are a Curzon: @CurzonSoho, @CurzonBbury, @CurzonRichmond and @CurzonMayfair are all part of the @EuropaCinemas family. @derbyquad We are delighted to be part of the @EuropaCinemas network 77


FILM EDUCATION This scheme supports activities aimed at increasing audiences’ knowledge of, and interest in, European audiovisual works (including archive works) as well as facilitating the circulation of European films worldwide on all distribution platforms, via international cooperation projects in the audiovisual sector. In total eight collaborative projects were supported with grants totalling €1 million, three of these included UK partner organisations. PROJECT TITLE

UK PARTNER ORGANISATIONS

Film Education; from Framework to Impact

British Film Institute (lead)

TOTAL PROJECT AMOUNT € 126,300

Moving Cinema

Centre for the Moving Image (partner)

148,563

Shortcut - Small Stories, Big Issues

The Nerve Centre (partner)

217,250

The Film Corner Reloaded - A Cultural Approach

The Film Space, The Nerve Centre (partners)

183,800 675,913

2018 saw the British Film Institute lead a project for the third time under Creative Europe. It’s Film Education; from Framework to Impact project applies the previous learning to devise a practical approach to film education that can be used across Europe. Partners include Cinémathèque Française, the Danish Film Institute and Vision Kino.

The second of three film education projects to be led by the BFI, Film: a language without borders, tested whether encounters with specially chosen films, supported by facilitated discussion and learning materials, would enable groups of schoolchildren with migration backgrounds to better engage with their peers.

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“We licensed eight features and three short films for screening and streaming in three countries - Denmark, Germany, and the UK. During 2018, we reached more than 60,000 children, in sessions in cinemas and in classrooms. Our researchers interviewed 200 teachers, reporting that films offer a ‘common space’ for children of different backgrounds to talk about stereotyping and prejudice, war, flight, and migration, and to reflect on values, culture and history. The sessions were especially effective in enabling children to express, share, and face quite difficult emotions and experiences in a safe environment.” Mark Reid, Head of UK Learning Programmes, BFI

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CREATIVE EUROPE DESK UK WHAT WE DO AND HOW WE HELP

Our aim is to make Creative Europe more accessible to UK professionals. With offices based at the British Film Institute, British Council, Creative Scotland and Welsh Government, we work with our partners to reach out to new audiences in all four nations of the UK and provide support to applicants looking to secure funding for their projects.

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In 2018, our twelve-person team delivered 83 seminars, workshops and networking events and participated in a further 86 sector events, encouraging the UK’s creative, cultural and audiovisual organisations and companies to expand their networks and collaborate with their peers across Europe as well as raising the profile of Creative Europe and improving the understanding of what’s on offer. 16 of these events were co-delivered with other Creative Europe Desks, utilising our network of 40 countries to share knowledge and best practice and better connect the UK sectors with international partners. Highlights from events we’ve participated in this year include: Great Exhibition of the North, Belfast Visual Arts Forum, Film London Games Finance Market, Hay Festival, Glasgow Short Film Festival, London Book Fair, Sheffield Doc/Fest, XpoNorth, and the Wales Arts International Forum. We also assisted with the promotion of two Europe-wide initiatives aimed at raising the profile of European cinema and the visibility of the Creative Europe MEDIA brand with the general public. European Art Cinema Day saw a simultaneous screening and Q&A of Matteo Garrone’s Dogman take place across the UK, while European Cinema Night saw MEDIA take over the Rio in Dalston for an evening dedicated to UK co-production Cold War.

guide companies through the process to a hopefully successful result. In response to an increased need for evidence on the impacts of Creative Europe in the context of Brexit, we worked with consultancy firm Drew Wylie on a comprehensive in-depth report on the Impact of Creative Europe in the UK. The report compiled and assessed compelling evidence of Creative Europe’s economic, social and cultural impacts as well as its role in improving skills, encouraging innovation and internationalisation, and developing audiences. It was well received in the UK and beyond and, we hope, has played a role in strengthening the case for the UK government’s position to strive for maintaining participation in Creative Europe beyond Brexit. We look forward to working with many more of you in 2019. Creative Europe Desk UK

Throughout the year, we have offered in-depth support to over 200 applicants, from helping with project development to offering tailored feedback and advice, we have answered over 2,000 enquiries and held nearly 400 one-to-one meetings, contributing to the success of British beneficiaries. We realise that applying for international public funding may be a daunting prospect, especially for first-time applicants. We are there to 81


GET IN TOUCH Creative Europe Desk UK offers free advice and support to UK applicants and organises a range of workshops, seminars and industry events throughout the year. Our team of specialists are based across the UK, in London, Manchester, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Cardiff and Belfast: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu/contact-us Visit our website to browse funding opportunities, be inspired by funded projects and keep up-to-date with the latest deadlines via our e-newsletter: www.creativeeuropeuk.eu Follow us on Twitter: @CEDUK_Culture and @CEDUK_MEDIA Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/CEDUKculture www.facebook.com/CEDUKmedia

Creative Europe Desk UK is led by

In partnership with Arts Council England, Creative Scotland and Welsh Government. With support from the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the European Commission. The European Commission support for the production of this publication does not constitute an endorsement of the contents which reflects the views only of the authors, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 82


Front cover image: National Theatre Wales is a partner in Open Access, a pan-European opportunity for emerging and mid-career artists to gain insight into live arts and transmedia creation. Image: National Theatre of Wales' production Tide Whisperer. Credit: Jennie Caldwell.Â


CREATIVE EUROPE IN THE UK - 2018 Support for the UK’s cultural, creative and audiovisual sector

CREATIVE EUROPE IN THE UK 2018 Support for the UK’s cultural, creative and audiovisual sectors

Creative Europe Desk UK is led by

In partnership with

With support from the UK Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport and the European Commission.

www.creativeeuropeuk.eu @CEDUK_Culture #creativeeurope

Profile for Creative Europe Desk UK

Creative Europe in the UK 2018: Results report  

Creative Europe Desk UK's 2018 report on Creative Europe's support for the creative, cultural, film, TV and video games sectors in the UK. V...

Creative Europe in the UK 2018: Results report  

Creative Europe Desk UK's 2018 report on Creative Europe's support for the creative, cultural, film, TV and video games sectors in the UK. V...

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