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10 YEARS AUSTRALIA’S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE Photo Review A U S T R A L I A Issue 50

PhotoReview

A U S T R A L I A

Dec-Feb 2011/12

$9.95 Incl. GST

DEC-FEB 2011/12

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RICHARD BARRY

Richard Barry „

Guy Finlay „

Baron Wolman „

Oh, you beautiful babe

Ethics & Editing „

Shooting Reflections

GUY FINLAY

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Travel Gear Guide

Playing peekaboo with Beckham

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Ten Year Retrospective

BARON WOLMAN

The Rolling Stone years

HOW TO: REVIEWS „Sony A77 & A65 „Panasonic Lumix G3 & GF3 „Olympus PEN E-P3 & E-PL3 „Panasonic Lumix FZ150 „Fujifilm Finepix F550 EXR „Plus 4 lenses

„Shoot reflections „Ethics & editing „Travel gear guide

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contents

Photo Review 10 YEARS AUSTRALIA’S LEADING PHOTOGRAPHY MAGAZINE

We encourage submissions to: The Editor edmail@photoreview.com.au T: (02) 9948 8600 Office 4 Clontarf Marina, Sandy Bay Road Clontarf NSW 2093

A U S T R A L I A

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RICHA D BARR RICHAR BAR RR RY

Oh, you beautiful babe

INSIDE

Cover image by Richard Barry See page 14.

GUY FINLAY

Playing pe ee ek kab abo a bo b oo with Becka ka am BARON WOLMAN

The he Rollin ng Sto Sto tone ne Years

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REVIEWS „Sony A77 & A65 „Panasonic Lumix G3 & GF3 „Olympus PEN E-P3 & E-PL3 „Panasonic Lumix FZ150 „Fujifilm Finepix F550 EXR „Plus 4 lenses

Editorial Capt’n Norris reflects on his 10 years at the helm of Photo Review and the evolution of photography over that decade.

HOW TO: „ „ Handle Ha dle le eth hics hic cs & ed editing editing dit ditin diti dit itin tiiin ttin ng „Shoot oott refl flect fle e tio ons „ Travel ge ear guid id de e

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Products & Trends How we used to do photography 10 years ago and how we do it now have undergone the twin discontinuities of digital technology and the demise of the friendly local photo store.

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Photo Challenge Our ‘Habitat’ Photo Challenge elicited some great images, as illustrated by the double-page spread in this issue. This time round we’re looking for summery, picture-postcard images of where you live.

INSPIRATION 14

RICHARD BARRY OH, YOU BEAUTIFUL BABE Perth photographer Richard Barry credits one very happy accident with giving birth to his very own baby boom...

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GUY FINLAY PLAYING PEEKABOO WITH BECKHAM The life of a paparazzo isn’t all glitz and glamour!

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BARON WOLMAN AND THE ROLLING STONE YEARS As ground-floor opportunities go, they don’t get much better than being asked by 21-year-old Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner if you’d like to be part of something new!

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contents

BUYERS GUIDE DLSRS 54

SONY SLT-A77 & A65 COMPARED

MIRRORLESS INTERCHANGEABLES 55

PANASONIC LUMIX DMC-G3 & GF3 COMPARED

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OLYMPUS E-P3 & EPL3 COMPARED

INSIDER LENSES 36

ETHICS AND EDITING How much editing should you do before declaring images have been edited?

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PANASONIC 14mm F2.5 ASPH

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OLYMPUS 12mm F2.0 MSC

PHOTOGRAPHY AND PHOTOGRAPHERS: 10 YEARS WITH PHOTO REVIEW

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OLYMPUS 9 – 18mm F/4.0-5.6

If you want to be famous in this world, don’t become a photographer, says Steve Packer!

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SONY DT 16 – 50mm F/2.8 SSM

RETROSPECTIVE A DECADE OF EVOLVING TECHNOLOGY We look back at significant changes in imaging technology and make some surmises about future possibilities.

Creative Director DarrenRiches Waldren Aaron Publisher David O’Sullivan dosullivan@photoreview.com.au Publication Manager Pauline Shuttleworth pshuttleworth@photoreview.com.au Accounts Manager Heather Hampson mpaccounts@photoreview.com.au Media Releases edmail@photoreview.com.au

Design by itechne [www.itechne.com] Impressive Print Solutions aaron@impressiveprint.com.au phone (03) 9421 8833 Distributed by NDD Photo Review website by itechne

WHAT TO TAKE ON HOLIDAY Advice on what to pack in your camera bag for your next holiday trip.

Contributor Steve Packer

Photo Review Australia is printed on Monza SatinSatin Recycled Paper with Monza Satin Recycled Pacesetter PaperPaper with with ISO 14001 Environmental Accreditation Printed by Pegasus Print Group

TIPS 50

Trade News Editor Keith Shipton keiths@photoreview.com.au

Subscriptions One year (4 issues) $29.00 $36.00 including GST and delivery in Australia. See page 33 35 this issue or phone: (02) 9948 8600 or online: www.photoreview.com.au

SHOOTING: REFLECTIONS Some practical and creative tips on how to approach a popular photographic subject.

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Technical Editor Margaret Brown mbrown@photoreview.com.au

Advertising Phone (02) 9948 8600 pshuttleworth@photoreview.com.au

TECHNIQUE 40

Editor Don Norris dnorris@photoreview.com.au

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PANASONIC LUMIX DMC-FZ150

All content in Photo Review Australia is protected under copyright and cannot be reproduced in any form without written consent from the publisher.

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FUJIFILM FINEPIX F550 EXR

Photo Review Australia is published by

ADVANCED COMPACTS

NET EFFECT 64

OUR WEBSITE FINDS Are fully photographically focussed!

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Media Publishing Pty Limited ABN 86 099 172 577 Office 4 Clontarf Marina Sandy Bay Road, Clontarf NSW 2093 Australia Ph: (02) 9948 8600 Fx: (02) 9948 0144 Em: edmail@mediapublishing.com.au Photo Review website: www.photoreview.com.au

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Inspiration

Richard likes to stylise traditional newborn pictures to give parents something unique.

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Inspiration

Oh, you beautiful babe PERTH PHOTOGRAPHER RICHARD BARRY CREDITS ONE VERY HAPPY ACCIDENT WITH GIVING BIRTH TO HIS BABY BOOM. By Steve Packer

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single photograph launched Richard Barry’s photography business, and there’s no polite way to describe it: ‘Friends asked me to take photos of their baby, Jeshua,’ says Barry. ‘We were in a borrowed studio when Jesh suddenly did a pee and I happened to capture the stream of yellow globules shooting out. ‘It’s not an especially beautiful shot, nor is it technically great – it’s at 1/125th of a second, for those who are interested – but Jesh has a big grin on his face and it’s one of those funny shots you show to friends to give them a laugh.’ When Jeshua’s mum put the photo on Facebook, Barry’s phone started ringing. ‘It was her friends asking if I would photograph their kids too. Within three months I’d done shoots for close to 20 clients, and that’s how Richard Barry Photography was born.’ Eighteen months later, the Perth business, specialising in newborn, baby and maternity portraits, is growing more strongly than ever, and Facebook continues to be the foundation of its success. ‘Without a doubt it remains my most significant marketing tool,’ he says. ‘At least three times a week I pick out a shot I’ve done for a client over the past few days, put it in my Facebook gallery, and family and friends of the family pass it on. Eventually, other potential clients find their way to my pages and usually get in touch with me through Facebook or my website. I’m regularly doing three to six jobs a week.’ Barry believes Facebook is important for any photographer starting a new business. ‘You ignore it, and other online social networking services such as Twitter, at your peril. If you’re not focusing on Facebook the way a gardener focuses on a garden, nurturing and tending every aspect of the relationship you have with your fan base, you will not grow quickly enough to sustain a business. It’s an extraordinary medium and if you ignore it, or don’t understand how to use it, you will miss out to people who do. ‘I spend about an hour a day on Facebook. It’s the number one marketing tool. Your own website is number two.’ Barry recently spent $850 on a display advertisement in a maternity magazine and got one phone call from it in a month. At the same time, he put a $15 advert on Facebook and gained four clients in a week. He now spends about $60 a week on Facebook advertising. ‘If you treat Facebook like a business platform and take care of it, it will work for you,’ he says. Richard's editorial style images of pregnant mums have proven popular.

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tips: shooting

shooting tips:

ReflectionssnoitcefleR SOME PRACTICAL AND CREATIVE TIPS ON HOW TO APPROACH A POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHIC SUBJECT.

By Margaret Brown

Left: This shot, taken in the foyer of the Harpa Concert Hall in Reykjavik, which was opened in August 2011, shows how reflective surfaces have been used to emulate the crystalline shapes and patterns that inspired the design, while introducing light and emphasising the spaciousness of the building. Below: An example of the naturalistic approach to photographing reflections, this shot was taken in Bell Gorge in the Kimberley region of Western Australia.

eflections are all around us and are found in many situations and guises, ranging from the mirror images you see in the landscape to those bounced back from city office blocks. Design-wise they satisfy two important parameters: repetition and symmetry. They also introduce light and a sense of spaciousness into built environments, which is why architects and interior designers often use reflective surfaces. Capitalising on the benefits of reflective surfaces in your pictures isn’t quite as easy as simply pointing the camera at the subject and tripping the shutter. You have to train yourself to see potential in each situation that presents itself and decide how you will approach each subject. Essentially, there are two approaches you can take. The most straightforward simply involves recording the reflection in a naturalistic way. This usually involves making the reflection a part of a larger subject, as shown in the illustrations on this page. The second approach is to see the graphical elements in the reflection and concentrate upon them. The end result will often be an abstract picture that may not necessarily be initially recognisable as a reflection. Whichever approach you take, some essential requirements are necessary to obtain good shots.

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tips: shooting

1. Watch the Weather. Mirror-like reflections in the landscape can seldom be found when it’s windy as even a slight breeze will ruffle the surface of the water. You’re most likely to find them early in the morning before the sun’s heat begins to generate air movements. They can also be found in places where the breeze can’t reach the water. Act quickly when the right conditions appear because they are often fleeting. A breeze can spring up in seconds and the perfect reflection will be lost – although the shot may still be worth taking.

These shots were taken 17 seconds apart and show how even a slight breeze can change the appearance of the reflections. Photographed at Qeqertarsuaq on Disko Island on the west coast of Greenland.

2. Find the Right Angle. It can often take a while to find the shooting angle that displays the reflection to its best advantage. Be prepared to shift your shooting position and take a number of different exposures to get the most aesthetically pleasing results. Remember the angle of the light changes constantly throughout the day. Waiting for 30 minutes or coming back at a later time (or on the next morning) could give you the shot you want.

Reflections from large glass windows can produce interesting pictures – and enable you to include human figures without attracting attention. This shot used the north-facing windows of Sydney’s Opera House. Note how the reflection is darker than the ambient lighting.

3. Focusing and Exposure. Focus depends a lot on the distance between the subject and the reflection. Be prepared to experiment until you find the right balance – and consider using a smaller aperture setting (such as f/11 or f/16) if there’s a wide distance between the nearest and farthest points in the scene where you want optimal sharpness. Experiment by focusing first on the subject, then on the reflection. You will probably see slightly varied results, and your preference will depend on where you want to direct the viewer’s attention. In most situations, reflected light has a similar intensity to the subject that creates the reflection. However, when the reflecting surface is darker than the subject it can make the picture appear unbalanced. Try taking a spot meter reading on an area that doesn’t contain the actual reflection, yet is still close to some part of it. Then before taking the shot, focus your camera on the reflection and press the shutter button. The result should be an exposure with a good balance between the subject and the reflection. 4. Filters. A polarising filter can help you to control the amount of surface shine from the water, and a graduated neutral density filter will help ensure that the sky isn’t overexposed. But both must be used with caution. At one angle, a polariser can remove a reflection completely; rotate it a little more and the reflection can appear stronger, with its colours more intense. Graduated ND filters can help you balance exposures but may also produce slightly unnatural

An aperture of f/8 and shutter speed of 1/45 second were used for this shot of an iceberg near midnight on the approach to Ilulissat in Greenland. In this case, the camera was focused on the iceberg. Because the shot was taken from a moving boat, features in the foreground are slightly more blurred than they would have been if a smaller aperture was used. Another instance where the reflection is darker than the ambient lighting.

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Preview: Photo Review Dec-Feb 2011/12 Issue 50