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University of Kent The Registry, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 (0)1227 764000 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Undergraduate Prospectus 2011 The UK’s European university Undergraduate Prospectus 2011

Open Days in 2010 Canterbury Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

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How to reach us Canterbury and Medway have good road and rail links to Gatwick and Heathrow airports. The Channel ports at Dover and Ramsgate are approximately 30 minutes from Canterbury and just over an hour from Chatham; and the Channel Tunnel stations at Ashford and Ebbsfleet are within easy reach. Canterbury By rail London (Victoria) to Canterbury East: journey time approx 85 minutes. London (St Pancras) to Canterbury West: journey time approx 60 minutes. London (Charing Cross or Waterloo) to Canterbury West: journey time approx 90 minutes.

Addresses Medway By rail

Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office

London Victoria and Charing Cross or Kent coast to Chatham: journey time approx 55 minutes.

The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 (0)1227 827272 F: +44 (0)1227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

By road From London, the north and west: M25, M2. Follow signs for Gillingham, then the Historic Dockyard and Chatham Maritime via the A289 and the Medway Tunnel. From the East, turn off the A2, A289, the Gillingham Northern Link Road, follow signs for the Medway Tunnel. For satellite navigation, the postcode for central campus is ME4 4EU.

By bus From Chatham Station to Chatham Maritime/ Compass Centre, journey time approx 15 minutes.

European Office The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 824921 F: +44 1227 827115 E: euroff@kent.ac.uk

International Office The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 827994 F: +44 1227 823247 E: international-office@kent.ac.uk

By bus Acknowledgements

London Victoria to Canterbury bus station. Canterbury bus station to the University, regular service, journey time approx 15 minutes.

By road From London, the north and west: M25, (M20), M2, A2. Canterbury central ring road, A290 Whitstable Road, St Thomas Hill, approx one mile (1.6km) up the A290, University entrance on right (signposted) near top of hill.

Open minds: at Kent, we will encourage you to ask tough questions, think for yourself and draw your own conclusions, something which stems from what we call critical thinking.

Broad horizons: situated at the heart of Europe, with campuses in Canterbury, Medway, Brussels and Paris, studying at Kent will help you develop an international outlook on the world and open up a range of opportunities for future work and study.

For satellite navigation, the postcode for the nearest buildings to the visitor’s car park are CT2 7NF or CT2 7NN.

Open Days in 2010 Canterbury Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

Published by the University of Kent 2010 Š. Design by UffindellWest and University of Kent Design and Print Centre. Photographs by Simon Jarratt, Martin Levenson, Mike Dye, Jim Higham. Illustration on p99 taken from 'Men at Work' by Elizabeth Akehurst, Alison Hollis, Liz Mason, istockphoto.com, www.sxc.hu. Printed by Belmont Press Ltd If possible please recycle this prospectus when you have finished using it. Thanks to all the staff and students who helped to make this prospectus.

TT COC 002168


Students voted Kent one of the UK’s top ten universities National Student Survey 2009 1


Contents Why come to Kent? Fantastic locations Academic excellence Welcoming environment First-class facilities Kent: the UK’s European university International opportunities Excellent job prospects Our students Come and visit

4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20

Courses

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Honours degrees listed in alphabetical order Honours degrees by schools and centres American Studies American Studies Anthropology and Conservation Anthropology Biological Anthropology Conservation Medical Anthropology Social Anthropology Architecture Architecture Interiors Arts Art and Film Audio Design and Production Design: Creative Events: Design and Production

2

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28 30 44 64 140 162 34 122 36 40

72

Design for Performance 74 Experience Design 76 Drama and Theatre Studies 80 Film Studies 96 Fine Art 98 History & Philosophy of Art 116 Music Technology 144 Visual and Performed Arts 178 Biosciences Biochemistry 42 Biology 46 Biomedical Sciences 48 Business Accounting and Finance 24 Business Administration 50 Business Studies 52 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management 86 International Business 124 Management Science 134 Marketing 136 Computing Computer Science 58 Computing – Joint Honours 62 Information Technology 118 Web Computing 182 Economics Economics 82 Engineering and Digital Arts Computer Systems Engineering 60 Digital Arts 78 Electronic and Communications Engineering 84 Multimedia Technology and Design 142

English English Literature 90 European Culture and Languages Classical & Archaeological Studies 54 Comparative Literature 56 English Language and Linguistics 88 European Studies 94 Foundation Programme for International Students 102 French 104 German 106 Hispanic Studies 112 Italian 126 Philosophy 150 Religious Studies 160 History History 114 War Studies 180 Journalism 128 Journalism Law Law 130, 132 Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science Actuarial Science 26 Mathematics and Statistics 138 Pharmacy Pharmacy 148 Physical Sciences Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics 38 Forensic Sciences 100 Pharmaceutical Chemistry 146 Physics 152


Politics and International Relations European Studies 94 Politics and International Relations 154 Professional Practice Applied Professional Practice 32 Primary Dental Care 156 Psychology Psychology 158 Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research Criminal Justice Studies 66 Criminology 68 Cultural Studies 70 92 Environmental Social Science Health and Social Care 108 Health and Social Care Practice 110 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities 120 Social Policy 164 Social Sciences 166 Social Work 168 Sociology 170 Sports Studies Sport and Exercise Management 172 Sports Science 174 Sports Therapy 176 Additional courses Additional courses listed in alphabetical order

184 187

Studying at Kent Course structure Foundation programmes General entry requirements Choosing a course and applying

214 216 220 222 226

230 The campus from the air 232 The Canterbury campus 234 236 Canterbury and the region Accommodation 238 Sport 240 Arts 242 Music 244 Kent Union 246 Student Learning Advisory Service 248 IT services 250 Templeman Library 252 Personal support services 254

The Medway campus The Medway region Accommodation Student life Student Learning Advisory Service Library and IT services Student advice and support

Europe University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges

International students

Where can I study? Canterbury

Where can I study? Medway

Where can I study? Other locations

258 260 262 264 266 270 272 274

278 280 282 286 288

Support for international students Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students Finance for international students

290 294

Returning to learning

296

Fees and funding

304 306 310

Fees and costs Financial support

Kent gives you added value Jobs and employability University funding for students International opportunities Working in industry

314 316 320 324 328

Quick reference guide, glossary and index

330

Honours degree quick reference guide Glossary Index

332 354 362

Visiting the University

368

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Fantastic locations Canterbury: campus with an a friendly and vibrant superb facilities. and life excellent social of the city, it ce Within walking distan l open spaces, qui tran and en gre rs offe a cosmopolitan and s bar and lively cafĂŠs 0). p23 e atmosphere (se

Medway: at location near a lively campus in a gre with amazing de, ksi the redeveloped doc ĂŠs, its own pub, buildings, first-class caf a great sense and life ial soc a buzzing 8). p25 e (se of community

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“I never thought I would go to university but it is the best experience of my life. I am so glad I came to Kent, it is the place for me, I love it� Alison Small Health and Social Care

Brussels: of Brussels with a site in the centre cialist spe rs offe t (see p280), Ken international degrees in the area of ropean double studies, numerous Eu opportunities nt elle exc and degrees, s in highly eer car and for internships s. prestigious organisation

United Kingdom London Heathrow Gatwick

Medway Canterbury

Tonbridge

Brussels Belgium

France Charles de Gaulle Eurostar Ferry

Paris Orly

Paris: ation in the historic set in a magnificent loc e (see p280), we heart of Montparnass duate study tgra pos of ge ran offer a your year re sha you options where Paris. and ry between Canterbu

5


Academic excellence Kent has some of the best teaching staff in the country. For three years running, National Teaching Fellowships have been awarded to Kent academics in recognition of their outstanding work. In the 2009 National Student Survey, we scored 88% for the quality of our teaching and 87% for overall satisfaction with our courses.

“I cannot fault the teaching at Kent, the staff are very talented people who are incredibly friendly and for whom it never seems too much trouble to answer any questions you have or to give you a bit more guidance if you need it.” Jess Thomas Drama and Theatre Studies

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In the Government’s 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE), Kent was ranked 24th out of 159 institutions for worldleading research, with eight of our subject areas (half of our departments) in the top ten nationwide. We are among the best research-intensive universities in the UK, with over 55% of our

research deemed in the RAE to be world-leading or internationally excellent. Of our staff, 97% work in departments containing worldleading research, which means our teaching is informed by some of the best research in the world.


“At Kent I am taught by leading experts in the field.” Michael Banda Physics

“When I told my parents I had an offer from Kent they immediately said ‘Yes!’ because of its good reputation.” Emilia Lanitou English Language (Linguistics) 7


Welcoming environment At all of Kent’s campuses you will find a welcoming and supportive environment – whoever you are and whatever your background. We organise a Welcome Week for all new students where current student volunteers help you settle in to your new life. You are invited to go on guided campus tours and tours of the surrounding area, to attend themed evenings and take

part in sports activities. Your academic school also hosts events to ensure that the start of your academic life goes smoothly. There are many student societies run by Kent Union and UMSA which give you a chance to try something new or develop a current interest. Once at Kent, you will also have access to a wide range of personal support services, see p254 and p274. “You don’t know anyone when you first arrive so it is scary, but Welcome Week takes care of everything; you spend it getting to know people. On my second day, my room-mate arrived, we clicked straightaway and I am still living with her today.” Vikki Nixon American Studies

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“On the Open Day, I really got the sense that the University wanted me to be there. I was really impressed by everyone’s attitude.” Luke Eaton Computer Science

“I’ve enjoyed all the opportunities that have been thrown at me. I’ve joined societies and sports clubs, worked in industry, learnt new skills, had fun and made lots of friends along the way. You feel valued as a student here, you are not just another statistic.” Rachel Wellington Forensic Sciences 9


First-class facilities Our excellent facilities are available to all our students – no matter where you’re based. Academic resources include libraries with over 1.3 million books, periodicals and journals, well-equipped laboratories and studios and a learning advisory service. There is a great social scene across all campuses, with

Did you know? e free connections All study bedrooms hav and the web. rk to the University netwo all study pus cam ry rbu nte Ca On the Skype and ire, ew Fre e vid bedrooms pro rk points wo net ss ele IPTV. There are wir ry and Medway rbu nte Ca h bot oss acr ds of open access campuses, and hundre 7. 24/ le ilab ava PCs, many

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opportunities to get involved in sport and music, and a theatre, nightclub and cinema on the Canterbury campus. And because we value our students as individuals, you also have access to a highly-effective careers service, a medical service, counselling support and other student support services.


“The course facilities are amazing. In all my years of doing this game, I would never have dreamed of being able to use the equipment that we have here.” Mark Marler Audio Design and Production

Did you know? is a 340-seat The Gulbenkian Theatre programme full a ts theatre that presen , music, dance and every ter m of comedy Cinema shows an nki lbe Gu The drama. -mainstream non and m new mainstrea e and foreignhiv arc releases as well as s. film ge gua lan

Did you know? include two multiKent’s sports facilities courts, cricket ash squ ls, hal purpose dance studio, a a ll, wa g nets, a climbin outdoor tennis/ , atre gym and cardio the fields, an artificial g yin pla rts, cou l bal net ch volleyball ‘3G’ football pitch, a bea n. Kent students ilio pav rts court and a spo pus facilities cam offalso have access to a regional centre k, Par ay dw Me as h suc . for sporting excellence

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Kent: the UK’s European university Kent is known as the UK’s European university, with our Canterbury campus situated in the UK city closest to the European continent. Proximity to airports, the Channel ports, and the Eurostar terminals at Ashford and Ebbsfleet means quick and easy access to Paris, Brussels and Lille. We have long-standing partnerships with top-ranking continental European institutions (many of which are the number one

university in their country) and, as a result, most academic schools offer opportunities either to study or work in Europe. Many Kent departments and staff run a range of innovative projects and cutting-edge research in collaboration with other European universities, also participating in research projects within the EU’s Framework and other programmes. Due to our proximity to continental

Europe and strong partnerships with French institutions, Kent has numerous exchange and bilingual double-degree opportunities in France. In addition, the University of Kent in Paris project means that students on a range of MA Humanities programmes can spend their spring term studying at Kent’s centre in the historic and cultural heart of Paris.

European exchanges yer in Kent has been a key pla hange exc t den stu us sm Era the was one and 7 198 ce sin e programm countr y to the in es siti ver of the first uni ity label for ual E-q s iou receive the prestig grammes. pro ge han exc ean rop Eu

er and European Credit Transf m Accumulation Syste Transfer and The European Credit (ECTS) is used in tem Sys Accumulation t was the first Ken all Kent degrees and ce the European odu intr to sity ver uni UK (an internationally Diploma Supplement aid mutual to ent um approved doc ognition of understanding and rec European degrees).

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“Kent was ranked in the top 10 for student satisfaction in The Times Good University Guide 2010 and had one of the best scores in the UK for student experience in the recent International Student Barometer survey. At Kent we are committed to internationalisation and we are proud to call ourselves the UK’s European university.”

Did you know? Britain’s only Kent ‘can claim to be ’, according to international university iversity Guide Un es Tim y nda Su the 2007.

student European students and activities of our new In 2008-09, roughly 10% e, coming from rop Eu from re we students As a result, es. ntri cou 26 different EU used -foc ean rop there are many Eu ieties at Kent. soc and bs clu t den stu ia, the Erasmus These include Club Ital ciety, the Hellenic So an rm Society, the Ge Society. ic pan Society and the His

nt at Brussels The University of Ke versity with Kent is the only UK uni capital of ‘the ls, sse Bru in a centre cialist spe rs offe Europe’, which taught in English. postgraduate degrees main institutions Brussels is home to the as well as , ion Un ean rop of the Eu TO, NGOs, and NA as h suc organisations contribute to ich wh of think-tanks, many ssels centre. See Bru our at ng chi tea the p281 for details.

rees European double deg es offer dual Many of our programm ations. lific qua ean rop Eu UK and itics and Pol in BA the e These includ (bidiplôme) (with International Relations MA in European Sciences Po Lille), the iversity of Siena, Un the th (wi ce Gover nan University of an oni iell Jag Italy and the o offers a als t Ken Kraków, Poland). ised PhDs. erv sup tly join of ber num

13


International opportunities Kent’s links with prestigious universities and leading business organisations around the world open up a range of possibilities for our internationally minded students. From a period of study at a top university in France, to an exciting work placement at a high profile business in Japan, Kent literally offers a world of opportunities to internationalise your education.

Did you know? w a graduate A third of employers vie dy experience with any overseas stu 65% of as more employable and icate that ind s yer plo em al internation sional work having overseas profes duates more experience makes gra i-graduate). employable (CIHE and

nal Courses with internatio opportunities rees in French, As well as language deg or Italian, s die Stu ic German, Hispan Kent give you the many other degrees at year abroad. opportunity to spend a to speak a foreign d nee not do Often you English, or you in is ion language, as tuit at Kent before can learn the language es for details.) you go. (See course pag

14


“Take the year abroad. Even if you’re worried about an extra year of university, the experiences you get from it are priceless.” Ollie Shackleton English and American Literature

USA, Japan, Study or work in the ng Ko China and Hong es offer the A number of programm r in the USA, yea a for dy chance to stu an at one of Jap or Hong Kong, China (you’ll be able our par tner universities anese the year to take a course in Jap r information, the fur For . go) before you ational ern /int .uk see www.kent.ac

e Study or work in Europ e means that The Erasmus programm smus grant for Era an e you could receiv ng or working in the period spent studyi member states. one of the EU or EEA ean Studies or rop Eu a ing tak If you are work as can you , languages degree istant in a school an English language ass .ac.uk/goabroad abroad. See www.kent Office on ean rop Eu the or contact .uk euroff@kent.ac

“My year abroad was absolutely amazing! I will certainly miss my American university and friends a lot. It certainly builds up character and makes one more independent.” Jasmin Raisanen American Studies

15


Excellent job prospects As well as giving you a first-rate academic experience, Kent equips you with essential skills to give you the edge when it comes to getting a job. Whether it’s through developing time management skills, opting for a Year in Industry degree or an Enterprise module, spending a year abroad or taking part in the Jobshop and

volunteering programmes, you have plenty of opportunities to give your CV the added extras employers look for. Kent also has its own student-centered employment skills website, RoundOne, which promotes all of the careers events and activities happening on campus. Kent ranked 17th in the country for

Did you know? gone on to Kent’s graduates have ies such as the pan com jor work for ma rclays Bank, Ba oft, BBC, IBM, Micros rs, KPMG, Lloyds ope Co use rho ate cew Pri ck Exchange, TSB, Tesco, London Sto rks & Spencer, Ma TV, 4 el HSBC, Chann Home Office, the , any Ford Motor Comp Eurotunnel, as and BMW, Sainsbur y’s, BT businesses. n ow ir the up ting set well as

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graduate starting salaries in the Sunday Times University Guide 2008, and in 2008 only 4.8% of our students were without a job or further study opportunity six months after graduating. This puts us well ahead of the national average, which is 8%. See p316.


“My lecturers are well-connected and I’m learning so many skills... I know that this course will help me to get the job I want.” Marie-Claire Newman Music Technology

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Our students We believe that any student who has the academic ability to study at Kent should have the opportunity to do so, which means we have a rich and diverse student population. As well as traditional 18-year-old school leavers with A levels from the UK, we also have students of different ages, from countries across the world (there are currently 139 different nationalities represented at the University), and

with a wide range of backgrounds, qualifications and experience. Around 15% of our full-time undergraduate students are over 21 when they start their degrees. Many of our students have such a good time at Kent they choose to stay on for graduate study. We have a thriving alumni network and our alumni office holds events as far afield as Hong Kong and the United States.

“There is a large mature student cohort on campus and it’s sometimes good to hear a different generation’s point of view in lectures or seminars.” Andrew Harris Social Sciences

“I have made friends with people who are from different backgrounds and have different ideas about life to me; you grow up so much at university, you mature and accept people. I am so glad I came to Kent.” Emma Hicks American Studies (History)

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“I love meeting people from all over the world and quizzing them about their country – it’s like having access to a global guidebook.” Katy Garbett Forensic Sciences

“I know I won’t want to leave when it comes to the end of my third year; maybe I will stay and do a Master’s!” Kat King Psychology

“I would describe my fellow students as an accomplished and talented group of people... I have often found myself learning from them as well as the lecturers over the years.” Jess Thomas Drama and Theatre Studies

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Come and visit Once you’ve read about our excellent courses and facilities, why not come and check out the University for yourself? We run Open Days in the summer and the autumn for people who want to come and look round, and sample a taste of what it’s like to study at Kent. See inside the back cover for more details.

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Come and visit Canterbury 0 Saturday 26 June 201 0 Saturday 9 October 201 Medway Saturday 10 July 2010 2010 Saturday 16 October eting you! We look forward to me ays www.kent.ac.uk/opend


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Courses

Jason Sowle Forensic Chemistry with a Year in Industry

The lecturers are brilliant. If you’re stuck then you can approach them and they are more than willing to sit with you for as long as needs be.

What attracted you to Kent? I loved the fact that Kent is a campus-based university – it feels like there’s more of a sense of togetherness. Being a sports fanatic (I now play football for the University), I was also attracted to the sports facilities here, which are still expanding with the opening of the new Sports Pavilion.

What about the facilities?

I’ve always been very good at science so I knew that would be the type of course I would choose. What really sold this course to me was the fact that it’s not a straight degree – Forensic Chemistry opens so many doors in terms of jobs and the forensics element keeps things varied and is extremely interesting.

How do you think your studies will affect your employment prospects?

How are you finding your course? I sometimes struggle with maths so I found parts of my course really hard, but it’s extremely well run and you are set deadlines and targets that are achievable with a bit of effort while still allowing you to enjoy student life. I loved all the modules I have done and I’ve learnt so much. I have to say the highlights have been collecting evidence from a crime scene scenario and finding out what it’s like to work in the real world during my year in industry.

The facilities here are brilliant: as well as the sports facilities, the library has everything that you need for your course, the labs are well-equipped and, obviously, the bars and nightclub on campus are an added bonus.

I hope that I can use the fact that I will have a degree to go as far as I want. I really think that my year in industry added to my degree greatly in that I now have experience working for a very large company, which is very hard to find normally. This will look very good on my CV and hopefully place me a cut above the rest when it comes applying for jobs.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking of taking this course? Do it, it’s a brilliant course. The lecturers are very nice and helpful and the mixture of things you are taught keep it interesting.

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A

Accounting & Finance at Canterbury Kent voices

“The course at Kent offered the crucial sandwich year I was looking for, and allowed me to develop a broad range of skills in the final year through modules such as Spreadsheet Modelling, Enterprise Start-up, e-Commerce and Social Responsibility Accounting.” Lewis Howard Accounting and Finance with a Year in Industry To read more of what Lewis has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Accountants are probably best known for checking the validity of company accounts – auditing – but they also devise and operate financial systems, conduct investment analysis, advise on business start-ups, company takeovers and company rescue schemes, and handle individuals’ and corporations’ tax affairs.

Degree programmes Single honours

At Kent Business School, we have designed the Accounting & Finance degrees to ensure that they respond to the needs and expectations of the modern accountancy profession. We offer the opportunity to spend a year on work placement, to study abroad, or to combine accounting with related subjects. Our supportive and flexible approach to teaching gives you the confidence and skills you need to follow the path that most interests you.

European programmes

• Accounting & Finance (N400) 3 years • Accounting & Finance with a Year in Industry (N404) 4 years • Accounting & Finance with Computing (N4G4) 3 years

• Accounting & Finance with French Business Studies (N4N1) 4 years • Accounting & Finance with German (N402) 4 years For other single honours programmes, including European options, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Joint honours Our graduates move into a whole range of careers including professional training in public practice (chartered accountancy) or in industry, commerce or the public sector, or financial services or general management. Achieving an average mark of 60% on the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Accounting & Finance and… • • • • • •

Business Administration (NN42) 3 years Computing (GN44) 3 years Economics (LN14) 3 years Law (NM41) 4 years Management Science (NN24) 3 years Mathematics (GN14) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules You take two 15-credit and two 30-credit core modules.

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Actuarial Science p26 Business Administration p50 Economics p82 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management p86 • Financial Mathematics p138 • Management Science p134

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• Computing for Business and Accounting • Financial Accounting 1 • Quantitative Methods for Business and Accounting • Either Economics Mode A or Economics Mode B Joint honours students take different core modules according to the degree programme.


A Accounting & Finance Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Options

A year out

• Business Law

Students on the European options spend a year studying at our partner universities in France or Germany between Stages 2 and 3. The Year in Industry is also between Stages 2 and 3 – we have a placement officer who can give advice and guidance.

or 30 credits from the following list: • • • • • •

Biological and General Psychology British Government and Politics Introduction to Social Psychology Modern languages Sociology Thinking about Politics.

Stage 2/3 Core modules Single/multidisciplinary honours • • • •

Financial Accounting 2 Management Accounting 1 Principles of Finance Strategic Management

Some programmes also specify other core modules, according to the subject, for example, degrees including a language involve compulsory language modules. Again, joint honours students take different core modules according to the degree programme.

Options Including, but not limited to: • • • • • • •

Auditing Business Finance Financial Statement Analysis Futures and Options Markets Management Accounting 2 Social Responsibility Accounting. Taxation (subject to approval).

And other modules according to the programme subject.

Teaching and assessment Usually you spend eight hours in lectures and four hours in seminars each week. Some modules have a number of workshops or sessions in computer laboratories. Most of your modules involve individual study using Library resources.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons) Programme type Full-time Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies).

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade B.

Most modules have an end-of-year examination that contributes either 70% or 80% to the final module mark: your coursework provides the remaining marks. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree class (together with your marks from your year abroad or year in industry, if applicable).

N4N1, N403: A level French grade B or GCSE French grade B/modern European language other than English at grade C. N402: A level German grade B.

Year out (see left) Professional recognition

Careers Our recent graduates went into accountancy training with firms such as KPMG, Ernst and Young and PricewaterhouseCoopers, other financial services with banks or private companies, or other types of management such as recruitment or marketing.

Full or partial exemption from the preliminary stage of professional accountancy examinations provided you choose the appropriate modules. Single honours degrees offer further exemptions from the examinations of some accountancy bodies.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Did you know?

Admissions enquiries

duating, Within six months of gra students 95% of Kent Accounting further or in yed plo em er eith re we study.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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A

Actuarial Science at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teaching has been excellent – the lecturers are passionate about what they are teaching and are always willing to help. The actuarial lecturers are all qualified actuaries, which I have found very useful, as they are always willing to answer any questions about working as an actuary.”

Actuaries evaluate and manage financial risks, particularly in the financial services industry. They form a small yet well respected, influential and relatively well-paid profession. If you are good at mathematics and you are curious about financial matters, you should enjoy studying actuarial science. Our degree gives you the opportunity to gain exemptions from eight of the professional examinations set by the UK actuarial profession, and is one of the few programmes to achieve full accreditation from the profession. Once you qualify, employment prospects are good, and students from this course have also gone on to successful careers in other areas such as accountancy, banking or operational research. The core actuarial modules are taught by professionally qualified actuaries with many years industry experience. The course offers an optional year in industry and we run the Invicta Actuarial Society which provides good links with industry.

Degree programme Single honours • Actuarial Science (N323) 3 years • Actuarial Science with a Year in Industry (N324) 4 years

Stage 1 You take six core modules of 15 credits and one of 30 credits (Financial Mathematics).

Core modules • • • • • • •

Algebra Calculus Discrete Mathematics and Computing Economics for Mathematicians Financial Mathematics Mathematical Methods Probability and Statistics

Stage 2 You take six core modules of 15 credits and one of 30 credits (Finance and Financial Reporting).

Core modules

To read more of what Alex has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

• • • • • • •

Not sure? How about...

Stage 3

Alex Dimond Actuarial Science

• • • • •

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Accounting & Finance p24 Business Mathematics p138 Financial Mathematics p138 Management Science p134 Mathematics p138

Our department is friendly and we make a point of getting to know our students on a one-to-one basis.

Analysis Contingencies 1 Finance and Financial Reporting Linear Algebra Probability and Inference Statistics for Insurance Time Series and Simulation

Again, you take six core modules of 15 credits and one of 30 credits (Financial Economics).

Core modules • • • • • • •

Contingencies 2 Financial Economics Financial Modelling Life Assurance Practice Pension Funds Stochastic Processes Survival Models


A Actuarial Science Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/ims

We are fully committed to continually developing and improving our programmes, and the course details above may change.

Year in industry We offer the opportunity for you to gain practical work experience with an insurance company, either during the summer vacation or for a oneyear placement between Stages 2 and 3.

Foundation year If, for whatever reason, your grades do not qualify you for direct entry, you may be able to take a four-year degree with a foundation year (with an initial year of Mathematics). For more information on foundation years, see p224.

Teaching and assessment Most of the teaching is by lectures and examples classes. At Stage 1, you can go to regular supervised classes where you can get help and advice on the way you approach problems. Modules which include programming or working with computer software packages usually involve practical sessions.

The course provides practical experience of working with PROPHET, which is used by commercial companies worldwide for profit testing, valuation and model office work. This market-leading actuarial system is provided by SunGard, a global leader in integrated software and processing solutions primarily for financial services. The final mark for almost all Stage 1, 2 and 3 modules is assessed by end-of-year examinations, with 10% or 20% awarded for coursework or a project.

Careers Our graduates have found work as trainee actuaries, in financial management in insurance companies and consultancy practices, the Government Actuary’s Department, the stockexchange and other areas of financial management, or have gone on to further study.

Each year, there are a number of special lectures by visiting actuaries from external organisations, to which all students are invited. These lectures help to bridge the gap between actuarial theory and its practical applications.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 360 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AA at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 6 in HL Mathematics or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher inc 6 in Mathematics.

Required subjects A level Mathematics grade A inc the core syllabus of Pure Mathematics.

Year in industry (see left) Professional recognition Our degree can give exemption from the core technical subjects (CT1 to CT8) of the professional examinations set by the UK actuarial profession, and gives a firm foundation for the later specialist technical subjects. Graduates may also get exemption from some of the examinations set by the Chartered Insurance Institute.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

in the UK for Kent was ranked 2nd graduate es enc Mathematical Sci in The employment prospects ide 2010. Guardian University Gu

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American Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“The modules available were exactly what I was looking for: a mix of literature, American history and sociology. The year abroad also caught my eye and I’m looking forward to spending a year in America and experiencing the culture first hand.” Natalie Bunch American Studies (History) To read more of what Natalie has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

English and American Literature p90 Hispanic Studies p112 History p114 Politics and International Relations p154

American Studies dates back to 1973 at the University of Kent. The programme is taught by an impressive range of internationallyrecognised scholars who specialise in American film, literature, history, and politics. Students are encouraged to visit the United States through our exchange system with 15 American universities. Kent offers three degree pathways. You can choose a four-year degree (with one year abroad) and specialise in American history or American literature. Or you can take our threeyear degree, with the option of spending one term at a US university in your third and final year. Each programme allows you to shape your degree into something unique and challenging. Kent provides a blend of established UK staples in American Studies such as the Civil War, slavery and contemporary politics, along with innovative modules on Native American literature, US environmental issues, and Latin American history and culture (including a Spanish language option). A wide range of modules are on offer in both three and four-year programmes. Recent staff publications include The American West: Competing Visions and Controversies in American Politics and Society. Please visit our website and feel free to contact us. We also arrange a number of social activities each year; recent events have included cinema trips, Thanksgiving meals and paintball days.

Degree programmes Single honours • American Studies (History) (T701) 4 years • American Studies (Literature) (T700) 4 years • American Studies (T702) 3 years

Stage 1 You take one to three core modules depending on the pathway.

Core modules • Introduction to American Studies History • The Emergence of America: From European Settlement to 1880 • The Rise of the United States since 1880 Literature • Romanticism and Critical Theory

Options A wide range of choices drawn from the Faculty of Humanities.

Stage 2 All students take a single discipline extended essay. The four-year programmes (Literature and History pathways) also have a number of compulsory subject-related modules. Students on the three-year programme take a range of American-related modules drawn from Drama, English, Film, History of Art, History, Politics and Hispanic Studies.

Core module Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• Single Discipline Extended Essay

Options History Two options drawn from a list, for example: • The Civil War • The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the Atlantic World, 1450-1870

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A American Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/amst

• How the West was Won (or Lost) • Inviting Doomsday: US Environmental Problems in the 20th Century. And a module from the Faculty of Humanities (US options include Contemporary Politics and Government in the USA). Literature • Early American Literature, 1630-1880 • Modern American Literature: From the Closing of the Frontier to the End of the Cold War

Time abroad Students on the four-year programmes spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 at one of our partner universities in the USA, taking specialist courses. American Studies students spending the year in the USA do not have to pay American universities’ (often high) tuition fees. Students on the three-year programme have the option of spending a term abroad in the final year.

Teaching and assessment And a module from the Faculty of Humanities (US options include Contemporary Politics and Government in the USA).

Stage 3 All students take The American Century and an extended essay. Students on the three-year programme can take options in Politics, History, Sociology, English and Hispanic Studies.

Stage 1 modules are usually taught by lectures and seminars. Stage 2/3 main modules are taught either by lectures and seminars, or by seminars alone. You usually have around ten hours of contact with staff each week.

Core modules • The American Century: The USA since 1970 • Interdisciplinary extended essay

Careers

History Options drawn from a list, for example:

Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 5/6/6 in HL English A1/A2/B for T700 and 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History for T701.

Required subjects History (T701): A level History grade B. Literature (T700): A level English Literature grade B.

Time abroad (see left). Depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50, 60:40 or 80:20.

Options

Location Canterbury.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Business, further professional training, management, broadcasting and media, teaching and a variety of other occupations in Britain, Europe and the USA.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

• California: The Golden State • The Supreme Court. Literature Options drawn from a list, for example: • Native American Cultures • Nineteenth-Century American Short Story.

Did you know? in the UK for Kent was ranked 10th Complete The in s American Studie University Guide 2009.

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Did you know?

Anthropology

was ranked Anthropology at Kent student 3rd in the UK for overall al Student tion Na the in n ctio isfa sat 9. 200 Survey

at Canterbury Kent voices

“I’m taking a BSc in Anthropology, which means I take a combination of biological anthropology and social anthropology modules. I’ve found it absolutely fascinating and I’ve enjoyed it so much, that often things I have learned come up in casual conversation, much to my friends’ chagrin!” Ruth Carlisle Anthropology To read more of what Ruth has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Biodiversity Conservation and Management p64 • Biological Anthropology p44 • Cultural Studies p70 • Medical Anthropology p140 • Social Anthropology p162

Anthropology addresses the big question – what makes us human? It is the study of human beings: how we evolved, why we live in different sorts of societies around the world, and how we interact with one another and the environment. An exciting and varied subject, anthropology covers a huge number of topics including human evolution, primatology, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, religion, kinship, politics, and development. At Kent, we offer a BSc degree in Anthropology that integrates the biological and social sides of the discipline; one of the very few departments in the UK to do so. Ours is a broad-ranging degree, both flexible and modular – you get to shape your own course through your choice of modules – but designed to ensure that whatever your choices, you receive a top quality education and the skills you need to succeed in the workplace. This is an ideal degree whether you have an arts, humanities, or science background. Anthropology draws on each of these, and by the end of your degree you will have a thorough understanding of your own species. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Anthropology (L601) 3 years • Anthropology with a Year In Europe (L603) 4 years • Anthropology with a Year in Japan (L604) 4 years

Joint honours • Archaeology and Anthropology (QL86) 3 years

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Stage 1 Core modules • • • •

Computing for Anthropologists Foundations of Human Culture Introduction to Social Anthropology Life’s Systems and Processes

Options • People and Plants • Economic and Environmental Systems • one other module of your choice

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Advanced Social Anthropology 1 • Advanced Social Anthropology 2 • Biological Anthropology: Comparative Perspectives • Biological Anthropology: The Human Animal • Methodology in Anthropological Science • Project in Anthropological Science

Options Your optional modules are drawn from both biological and social anthropology. You are required to take the indicated number of modules from each list, and are free to choose your remaining options from all the modules across both lists. Biological Anthropology options (three required): • Current Issues in Evolutionary Anthropology • The Evolution of Hominin Behaviour • Evolution of Human Diversity • History of Evolutionary Thought • Human Osteology • Paleopathology • Primate Behaviour and Ecology • Sex, Evolution, and Human Nature. Social/Medical Anthropology options (two required): • African Societies • The Anthropology of Amazonia • The Anthropology of Business


A Anthropology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/anthropology

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Anthropology of Central Asia The Anthropology of Eating The Anthropology of Gender The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Medicine The Anthropology of Law Anthropology and Development Anthropology and Language Culture and Cognition Ethnicity and Nationalism The Ethnography of Central Asia Human Ecology Medicinal Plants North Mediterranean Societies Pacific Societies Photographic Project in Visual Anthropology South-east Asian Societies Southern Mediterranean Societies Video Project in Visual Anthropology Visual Anthropology Theory.

We are associated with the nearby Quex Museum, which has one of the largest collections of primate skeletal remains in the world, as well as an extensive collection of cultural artefacts to which undergraduates have access. We have dedicated computing facilities within the School, in addition to the general University IT provision, a darkroom, and an ethnobiology lab for studying human-related plant material. Many of the core modules have an end-of-year examination which counts for 50% to 80% of your final mark for that module. The remaining percentage comes from practical or coursework marks. However, others, such as the ‘Project in Anthropological Science’ are assessed entirely on coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks from your year abroad, count towards your final degree result.

A year abroad

Careers

You spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 taking courses in anthropology at a university in France, Germany, Italy and Spain or the Netherlands, Japan, Finland or Denmark (where the courses are taught in English).

Advertising; education and teaching; social work; town and country planning; housing and personnel management; journalism, specialised film production, or research for radio and television programmes; consultancy in overseas development and relief agencies; science journalism; museum work; forensic science; business and the Civil Service.

Teaching and assessment On average, you have four hours of lectures and six hours of seminars and/or lab sessions each week. For the Project in Anthropological Science, you receive regular one-to-one supervision. The School of Anthropology and Conservation has a specialist teaching lab that provides equipment and specimens for teaching and research use. This lab has a completely integrated audiovisual system, providing cutting edge lectures, and is primarily used by BSc students. You have access to an excellent fossil cast collection with more than 50 casts of extant and extinct primates and hominins, including an entire Homo erectus skeleton.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels L601, L603: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematic Studies) and 4 in a science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points Higher inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematic Studies) and 4 in a science subject. L604: AAB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematic Studies) and 5 in HL science or 6 in SL science or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematic Studies) and 5 in HL science or 6 in SL science. QL86: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. Contact the Department of Classical and Archaeological Studies for further details.

Required subjects L601, L603, L604: GCSE Mathematics grade C, GCSE single or double science grade B. QL86: Grade B in A level in Classical Studies, Classical Civilisation, or Archaeology, where taken. We also consider students with alternative qualifications.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Admissions enquiries

Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

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Applied Professional Practice at Canterbury or Medway Kent voices

“With this degree I can go as far as I want in any direction and, providing it’s relevant to the workplace, I can pretty much do whatever I like. The possibilities are almost limitless.” Nicky Roissetter Applied Professional Practice To read more of what Nicky has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

This work-based learning degree provides a great opportunity for people already in work to study part-time for an undergraduate qualification through work-related learning. It offers you the chance to develop professionally within your area of practice, acquire valuable graduate skills to enhance career prospects, and provides support for you to realise your personal aspirations. By learning at work, through work and for work, you are able to gain new knowledge and skills while using your previous experience to develop personally and professionally. The Applied Professional Practice programme supports you to create an individual programme of study by choosing from a range of subjects across the University which relate to your workplace and reflect your needs and interests. For example, alongside the Applied Professional Practice modules, you could choose to study modules from Psychology, Sociology, Business, Health and Social Care amongst others – in effect, putting together a personalised degree programme.

Degree programmes Single honours • Applied Professional Practice Please apply directly to University of Kent, not through UCAS.

Stage 1 You take four 15-credit core modules and then choose 60 credits from across the University.

Core modules • Critical Appraisal of Publications and Literature • Recognition of Prior Learning • Introduction to Applied Professional Practice • Programme Planning

Options You take a choice of modules from a wide range available across the University which are relevant to your area of practice.

Stage 2 You take three 15-credit core modules and then choose 75 credits from across the University.

Core modules • Enquiring into Practice • Reflective Practice at Work (1) • Professional Relationships: People and Work

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

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Business Administration p50 Business Studies p52 Health and Social Care p108 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166

Options You take a choice of modules from a wide range available across the University which are relevant to your area of practice.


A Applied Professional Practice Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/cpp

Stage 3 You take three 15-credit modules, or two 15credit and one 30-credit module (depending on your independent study) and then choose 75 or 60 credits from across the University.

Core modules • Perspectives on Practice: Accountability at Work • Reflective Practice at Work (2) • Independent Study: Planning your Own Learning (15 or 30 credits)

Options You take a choice of modules from a wide range available across the University which are relevant to your area of practice.

Teaching and assessment We use a variety of teaching methods which may include work-based tasks to enable you to explore ‘real life’ issues and resolve them through reflection, personal development plans, case study analysis, seminars, learning contracts, presentations, and other reflective activities. The Applied Professional Practice modules are assessed solely by coursework and may include essays, written reports, and presentations. We promote self-assessment, which encourages you to reflect on the new knowledge you have gained, and how you can integrate it into your professional practice.

You will be required to attend taught sessions (typically 6 x 3 hour sessions for a 15-credit module), and individual tutorials. An amount of self-study will be required.

Location Canterbury or Medway. Award BA/BSc (Hons). Programme type

The teaching methods, assessments, and contact time for the modules you choose from across the University will vary according to the particular subject.

Careers This programme is applicable to a variety of careers and multidisciplinary job roles and will provide you with a host of generic skills including problem-solving, independent assessment, report writing and analysis, and project work. These skills, along with the achievement of a qualification, should enable you to improve your career prospects. The programme will help you to make better use of your existing skills and experience, and encourage you to take the new knowledge and skills you develop back into the workplace thus becoming a more effective and competent practitioner.

Part-time study within full-time employment.

Offer levels Entry to the programme is on an individual basis. You must be in an area of work that allows you to meet the module requirements. We welcome students without traditional qualifications, who can demonstrate the ability to study at this level. Individuals may, however, have to meet the entry requirements for their chosen academic subjects

Required subjects There are no prerequisites for Applied Professional Practice. However, the academic modules you choose may require specific prior qualifications. Mature students without these qualifications may be granted entry by interview, according to experience

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Architecture at Canterbury Kent voices

“I have found my studies in architecture has given me a wide variety of skills and knowledge, some specific to the profession, but others which are adaptable and useful for many other areas of employment, such as organisation and time management, report writing and analysis.” Joanne Macey Architecture To read more of what Joanne has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

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Creative Events: Design and Production p72 Experience Design p76 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Interiors p122 Multimedia Technology and Design p142

Architecture is the most public, the most expensive and the most pervasive of all the arts. It is shaped by politics and economics, and fashions and responds to the social life of cities and communities. Kent teaches Part 1 (BA honours, three years full-time) and Part 2 (Master of Architecture (MArch), a further two years full-time) of the requirements for qualification as a professional architect. Both programmes give you a thorough grounding in design, cultural context, environment and technology, management, practice and law (MPL), and communication. A distinctive feature of the programme is that Stage 1 is taught in common with the Interiors programme. The BA covers four main themes: renewal and regeneration, landscape and the space between buildings, the design of housing and communities, and urban planning and the quality of urban life. In the MArch programme, we encourage you to become more self-reliant and independent in designing a major project and satisfying the demands of a complex brief. We encourage you to specialise in a particular area and to develop skills and abilities complementary to your design work. A period of practical training or ‘year out’ is normally taken between Parts 1 and 2, when students find employment in an architectural practice. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of this degree programme.

Degree programme Single honours • Architecture (Standard route A) (K100) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • •

Caravanserai Enclose Enlighten Folio House and Housing Oasis Western Architecture

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • • •

Adapt and Extend Advanced Computer Modelling Climate Form and Structure Landscape 2 Post-Enlightenment Interior

Stage 3 Core modules • • • •

Management, Practice and Law Modernisms 2 Modular Urban 2

Options • Building Appraisal • Dissertation • Interdisciplinary


A Architecture Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/architecture

Master of Architecture (MArch)

Teaching and assessment

Kent’s programmes are designed to allow you to work towards full accreditation as a professional architect (see Facts box). The MArch degree in Architecture gives exemption from Part 2 of the examinations required by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA).

Teaching is usually by lectures, small groups, workshops, studio-based design projects, field visits for sketching and study visits to different locations.

Award BA (Hons) – ARB/RIBA Part 1. MArch – ARB/RIBA Part 2.

Stage 4

Assessment for the BA is by a variety of methods including sketchbook/notebook, self-illustrated research papers, project, coursework, written assignments and exams.

• • • • •

Assessment for the MArch is by a portfolio review of design projects, design and technical reports, the cultural context essay and seminar presentation, technical case study, and exams.

Cultural Context Minor Design Project Management Practice and Law Technology and Environment Urban Landscape Design Project

Location Canterbury.

Programme type Full-time. Offer levels BA (Hons): A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects

Stage 5

Careers

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

• • • • •

Successfully passing the MArch with Part 2 exemption is followed by a (further) period of practical work experience. Having completed 24 months (a minimum of 12 months post-Part 2), you are eligible to be considered for RIBA/ARB Part 3 of the Professional Practice examination, leading to full professional registration as an architect.

MArch: Applicants need an Architects Registration Board (ARB) prescribed first degree (ideally 2:2 or above) and six months logged office experience (a minimum of two periods of three months).

Independent Study Project Major Design Project: Design Report Major Design Project Pt 1 Major Design Project Pt 2 Major Design Project: Technical Report

Those without a UK Part 1 first degree must have gained the qualification by examination before they can be admitted onto the MArch course. You will need to apply direct to ARB to take the Part 1 as an external candidate.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in ployment em te dua Architecture gra lete University prospects in The Comp Guide 2010.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Art and Film at Canterbury Kent voices

“Art and Film is a really unique course. You get to see how artists have influenced filmmakers and vice versa. Lecturers are quick to respond to email queries and are always happy to meet you to discuss any issues you want. There is never any shortage of support on an academic or personal level.” Anna Balan Art and Film

Art and Film offers a unique opportunity to combine art history and film studies in a single honours degree. It cuts across the boundaries of different visual media, exploring perspective, colour and light, movement, montage and the portrayal of painting, photography, drawings, prints and sculpture in film and video. During the course, we examine all kinds of works of art, including films and performance art, to learn the theories, movements and ideas that have shaped them. We also look at the settings (for example, museums, galleries, cinemas) in which works of art and films are produced and viewed, examining how such settings affect our perceptions. Staff at Kent have expertise in the fields of film, photography and contemporary art, and the modules reflect these interests, such as the origins of cinema within the 19th century, and the uses of still and moving images by modernist and avant-garde artists and film-makers.

Degree programme Single honours • Art and Film (WV63)

Stage 1 You take four core modules that comprise 90 of your 120 credits for the first year, and a further 30 credits from a list of recommended options or modules available in the Faculty of Humanities.

Core modules • Introduction to Narrative Cinema 1 (American Cinema) • Introduction to Narrative Cinema 2 (World Cinema) • The Shock of the Now: Themes in Contemporary Art • Thinking About Photography and Histories

Options Recommended module: • Now That is Art! Aesthetics and the Visual Arts • Inner Worlds: Psychoanalytic Thinking and the Visual Arts.

To read more of what Anna has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

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Film Studies p96 Fine Art p98 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Visual and Performed Arts p178

Did you know? the UK for Art Kent was ranked 6th in Good es Tim The in and Design University Guide 2010.


A Art and Film Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/arts

Stage 2

Stage 3

You take two 30-credit core modules and a further 60 credits from the list of film and art history modules.

Again, you take two 30-credit core modules and a further 60 credits from the film and art history modules listed under Stage 2.

Core modules

Core modules

• History and Aesthetics of Photography 1: Realism in Theory and Practice • History and Aesthetics of Photography 2: Anti-realism from Pictorialism to Postmodernism

• Art and Film • Art and Film Dissertation

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time.

Options History & Philosophy of Art • Abstraction and Construction • Camera, Light and Darkroom • Classicism and Baroque • Contemporary Art: From Warhol to Whiteread • Patronage and Cultural Organisation • Picasso • Reading the Image • Russian Painting • The Sublime, the Disgusting and the Laughable Film Studies • Cinema in 1920s Berlin, Paris and Moscow • The Documentary Film • Pulp Film: The Avant-Garde and Popular Cinema • Sound and Cinema • Special Effects and Digital Cinema: A Critical History • Television • Topics in European Cinema 1: Realisms

Teaching and assessment The teaching staff emphasise a close working relationship with students. All modules involve weekly lectures and small group seminars, while some additionally involve film screenings, museum and gallery trips, or practice-based learning. Some practice-based modules include studio work in photography or film-making. Helping you to acquire independence of thought and the skills of independent study are at the heart of our teaching aims.

Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Visual Arts or 6 in SL Visual Arts where taken, or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Visual Arts or 6 in SL Visual Arts where taken.

Required subjects A level Film Studies grade B where taken.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Careers Graduates could go into careers in arts administration, galleries and museums, journalism, advertising, teaching, image libraries, film-making, film and television industries, local government and business.

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Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics at Canterbury Kent voices

“This course was exactly what I was looking for – no other university did anything similar. If you are interested in astrophysics, this is a great course at a good university.” Howard Philips Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics To read more of what Howard has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Computer Science p58 • Computer Systems Engineering p60 • Electronic and Communications Engineering p84 • Physics p152 • Physics with Astrophysics p152

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Kent runs a fantastic programme for students who are inspired by the wonders and vastness of the universe. In this course, there are opportunities to investigate the possibilities of life elsewhere in the universe. You get involved with real space missions from ESA and NASA and can work on Hubble Telescope data and images from giant telescopes.

Degree programmes Single honours

In the MPhys programme, core knowledge and skills are enhanced with the further in-depth training required for a science-based career, including the practical aspects of research.

* This foundation programme can lead to degree programmes F590, F591 and F592.

Our international exchange programme allows you to spend the third year of your degree studying in the USA at one of our partner universities, and our active student society organises trips and events such as virtual observing in Hawaii by remotely controlling a telescope on the other side of the world.

• • • • • •

• Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics BSc (F590) 3 years • Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics MPhys (F592) 4 years • Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics with a Year in the USA MPhys (F591) 4 years • Physics with a Foundation Year* (F305) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules Astrophysics, Space Science and Cosmology Computing Skills Disasters Mathematics Physics Skills for Physicists

Stage 2 Core modules • Atomic and Nuclear Physics • Mathematical Techniques and Differential Equations • Multimedia for Astronomy, Astrophysics and Planetary Science • The Multiwavelength Universe and Exoplanets • Optics and Electromagnetism • Physics Lab • Quantum Physics • Spacecraft Design and Operations

Stage 3 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Image Processing Physics Literature Review Physics Group Project Physics Project Laboratory Relativity, Optics and Maxwell’s Equations Stars, Galaxies and the Universe The Sun, the Earth and Mars Thermal and Statistical Physics


A Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/physical-sciences

Stage 4 (MPhys only) Core modules • • • •

Elementary Particles Physics Research Project Rocketry and Human Spaceflight Space Astronomy and Solar System Science

Plus, depending on your chosen degree programme: • Physical Science Research Planning • The Sun, the Earth and Mars.

A year abroad You spend a year in the USA between Stages 2 and 4, studying equivalent courses to those you take at Kent. Our partner universities include the Pennsylvania State University, several campuses of the University of California and the University of Indiana in Bloomington. If you take this course, you pay a reduced (50%) fee to Kent during your year abroad. You do not need to pay fees at the host university.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by lecture, laboratory sessions, and project and console classes. You have approximately nine lectures a week, plus one day of practical work. In addition, you have reading and coursework and practical reports to prepare. In the MPhys final year, you work with a member of staff on an experimental or computing project. Assessment is by written examination at the end of each year, plus continuous assessment of written coursework. Practical work is examined by continuous assessment. If you do the year in the USA, this counts towards your final degree assessment.

Award BSc (Hons), MPhys (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels F590, F591, F592,: A level 300 points, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Physics or 6 in SL Physics and 5 in HL Mathematics or 6 in SL Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Physics or 6 in SL Physics and 5 in HL Mathematics or 6 in SL Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies). F305: on an individual basis.

Careers Our students go into areas such as research and development, technical management, computing, software design, the media and teaching. Many also go on to postgraduate study.

Required subjects A level Mathematics and Physics at a combination of grades BC.

Year abroad (see left). Professional recognition

Foundation year The Physics foundation year is for students who lack the qualifications needed for direct entry into Stage 1 of the degree programmes. It comprises lectures and practical classes, is taught entirely on the Canterbury campus and successfully caters for students with a wide range of backgrounds and experience. You apply for the Physics with a Foundation Year course (F305), but successfully completing the foundation year guarantees you entry into any of the Physics or Astronomy degree courses.

Location Canterbury.

Degrees recognised by the Institute of Physics.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

y at Kent Physics and Astronom UK for overall was ranked 5th in the the 2009 student satisfaction in y. rve Su t den Stu al tion Na

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Audio Design and Production at Medway Kent voices

“The course is like no other in the country; it’s unique to Kent which helps to give us a better footing for employment in one of the most cut-throat industries in the world. I’ve found it inspiring and enlightening.” Mark Marler Audio Design and Production To read more of what Mark has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Creative Events: Design and Production p72 • Experience Design p76 • Music Technology p144

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This degree programme offers an exciting combination of subjects including practical audio production, sound theory and contextual studies. It will help you to develop the intellectual and craft skills required to produce sound design and audio content for a broad spectrum of creative industries. The unique blend of subjects offers a broad range of studies including the use of audio in film, radio, television, video games, sound design and art or exhibition installation. It also provides you with opportunities to develop an in-depth understanding of computer-based applications including synthesis and digital signal processing. The degree is based in our Music Technology and Audio Department, that is fully equipped with purpose-built studios and computer facilities. Visiting tutors contribute to module programmes providing valuable professional insights and perspectives. Option modules on this course benefit from a broad range of subjects from both Audio Design and Music Technology areas.

Degree programme Single honours • Audio Design and Production (J930:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • •

Acoustics and Psychoacoustics Applied Audio Technology I Audio Applications Development I Contextual Studies Fundamental of Sound and Audio Theory Introduction to Computer-based Production Sound Design I

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • • •

Applied Audio Technology II Audio Applications Development II Digital Audio Electronic Music and Synthesis Music and Sound for New Media Sound Design II

Stage 3 Core modules • • • •

Applied Audio Technology III Dissertation Individual Project Professional Practice


A Audio Design and Production Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/musictechnology

Stage 2/3 option modules Students take 30 credits of optional modules. These include: • • • • •

Advanced Acoustics and Psychoacoustics Introduction to Multimedia Applications Interactive Media Music and Society Popular Music Conventions and Production.

Core modules within the programme provide opportunities to explore specific theoretical, cultural and creative aspects, such as Electronic Music and Synthesis, Music and Sound for New Media, and 20th-century Music. You can also choose from various other option modules that provide the opportunity to design parts of the course to meet your own interests. These cover both music and sound design.

Most modules are continually assessed based on coursework, projects and seminar presentations. This can include creative projects in sound design, the design of software synthesisers, audio or multimedia content. Alongside practical projects, you have lectures and seminars on theory that will help you to develop research skills and essay writing. Some theoretical modules also include end-of-year examinations. There is a major written assignment (Dissertation) at Stage 3.

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level or equivalent, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Careers

Required subjects

Career opportunities would include audio production, audio software or hardware development, film or television audio specialists, audio for video games or web production, sound design for theatre, museum or exhibition, sonic arts, or further study at postgraduate level.

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment Most modules consist of a mix of lectures, small group seminars, individual or group project work, as well as research and private study. You also have access to current industrystandard resources that include facilities for recording and post-production.

Did you know? specially Music Technology has dios, designed recording stu t-production soundproof booths, pos ms, roo on tati rks wo and suites dware har st late the h wit equipped and software.

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Biochemistry at Canterbury Kent voices

Biochemistry deals with the way living organisms function at the molecular level. This covers a vast variety of life forms ranging from comparatively simple viruses and bacteria to mammals like ourselves, which need the complicated integration of metabolism in different tissues. The School of Biosciences provides a stimulating, supportive, research-active environment for teaching and learning, encouraging you to achieve your full academic and personal potential.

Degree programmes Single honours • Biochemistry (C700) 3 years • Biochemistry with a Sandwich Year (C702) 4 years • Biology with a Foundation Year (C101) 4 years

European programme • Biochemistry with a Year in Europe (C701) 4 years

Stage 1

“I really enjoyed the Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacology modules, as the subjects were very interesting for me and the teachers were both great. They really made the lectures very interesting – no one would miss one of their lectures!” Filipa Moniz Biochemistry To read more of what Filipa has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Biological Anthropology p44 Biology p46 Biomedical Science p48 Pharmacy p148

Biosciences has been rated one of the top departments in the country by its students. Our innovative approach to teaching has been recognised by the award of a National Teaching Fellowship to one of our staff for the development of our final-year science communications projects. The facilities within the School are excellent and include a £1 million refurbishment of the teaching laboratories in 2006. Our research is at the cutting edge of areas such as cancer, infectious diseases, protein science and cell biology, all of which feeds into our undergraduate teaching.

You take six core modules (90 credits) and two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules • Enzymes and Introduction to Metabolism • Fundamental Chemistry for Chemists and Bioscientists • Introduction to Biochemistry • The Microbial World • Molecular and Cellular Biology • Skills for Bioscientists 1

Options Two of the following:

Biochemistry offers both a Sandwich Year option and a new opportunity to study in Europe for a year. We also offer you the opportunity of a paid eight-week Research Studentship in the School during your summer vacation of the second year. These studentships are funded by the School and guaranteed for all biochemists who have an average grade of 60% or more.

• • • • •

Chemistry for Biologists Fundamental Human Biology General and Biological Psychology Human Physiology and Disease Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry.

Stage 2 You take six core modules (90 credits) and two optional modules (30 credits).

Core modules • • • • • •

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Catabolic and Biosynthetic Processes of Life Cell Biology Gene Expression and its Control How Enzymes Work Physiology Skills for Bioscientists 2


B Biochemistry Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/bio

Options

Teaching and assessment

Two from the following:

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, problem-solving sessions, and selflearning packages.

• • • • •

Developmental Biology Infection and Immunity Medicinal Chemistry Physiology of the Microbial Cell Pharmacology.

Stage 3 You take six compulsory modules (90 credits) and a research project (30 credits).

Core modules • • • • • • •

Advanced Immunology Biological Membranes Cell Communication Integrated Endocrinology and Metabolism Protein Structure and Function Research Project Skills for Biochemists

Foundation year If, for whatever reason, your grades do not qualify you for direct entry, you may be able to take a four-year degree with a foundation year in biological sciences. For more information on foundation years, see p294.

Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time

Modules are usually assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and end-of-year exams. Some of the Stage 1 modules are continuously assessed only. Exams take place at the end of the academic year and count for 50% or more of the mark of the modules that include them. The Sandwich Year is assessed by a presentation and written reports, and contributes 10% to the overall mark.

Offer levels BBB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Chemistry and 5 in Biology or 6 in SL Chemistry and 6 in Biology plus 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Chemistry and 5 in Biology or 6 in SL Chemistry and 6 in Biology plus 4 in Mathematics.

Careers

Required subjects

Recently, our graduates have gone into: research based in academic, government, industrial and medical labs; the environment and biotechnology; teaching; scientific publishing and marketing; or information technology. Many of our 2006 graduates went on to further study.

A level Chemistry and either Biology or Human Biology preferred. GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Sandwich year/year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Sandwich year/year abroad Biochemistry offers the possibility of doing a one-year placement away from the University between Stages 2 and 3. Sandwich placements provide an excellent opportunity to gain relevant work experience, usually in the pharmaceutical industry but also in the NHS, research institutes etc, either in the UK or abroad. The year abroad is an opportunity to study at a university abroad. We offer support and advice, and keep in touch with you during your year away from the University.

Location Canterbury.

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in ployment em te dua Biosciences gra Good prospects in The Times University Guide 2009.

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Biological Anthropology at Canterbury Kent voices

“I have always been interested in human biological sciences, but hadn’t considered anthropology until I was looking through Kent’s prospectus. The minute I read the page on Biological Anthropology, I knew it was a course for me. The thought of studying human evolution and adaptation is very exciting.” Justyna Miszkiewicz Biological Anthropology To read more of what Justyna has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Anthropology p30 • Biodiversity Conservation and Management p64 • Biology p46 • Biomedical Science p48 • Medical Anthropology p140 • Psychology p158 • Social Anthropology p162 • Wildlife Conservation p64

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Biological anthropology is the study of what makes us human. Biological anthropologists are interested in how humans evolved, and in understanding the evolutionary roots of human behaviour, as well as the social lives and ecology of monkeys and apes, and the biology of humans today.

Degree programmes Single honours

Typical questions that interest biological anthropologists could be: why do people have different skin colours or facial shapes? Does the environment affect fertility? What are the best ways to assess childhood malnutrition? When and how did humans evolve? What does chimpanzee aggression say about human violence? Why is sex fun? How much can you really tell about a person from their skeleton?

• • • •

Biological anthropology is not often studied at school, but if you have taken biology or psychology you may have already covered many of the basic principles that biological anthropologists use in their work. Biological anthropology is not offered as a stand-alone degree at many universities, and Kent offers a fantastic opportunity to study the subject in great detail!

• Biological Anthropology (L620) 3 years • Biological Anthropology with a Year in the USA (L622) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules Computing for Anthropologists Foundations of Human Culture Introduction to Social Anthropology Life’s Systems and Processes

Options • • • •

Economic and Environmental Systems Environmental Sciences Fundamental Human Biology Human Physiology and Disease

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Biological Anthropology: Comparative Perspectives • Biological Anthropology: The Human Animal • Current Issues in Evolutionary Anthropology • Methodology in Anthropological Science • Project in Anthropological Science

Options • The Anthropology of Eating: From the Raw to the Cooked • The Anthropology of Health Illness and Medicine • Archaeology of Death • Evolution of Hominin Behaviour • Evolution of Human Diversity • Evolutionary Genetics and Conservation • Forensic Archaeology • History of Evolutionary Thought • Human Ecology • Human Osteology • Paleopathology • Primate Behaviour and Ecology • Sex, Evolution and Human Nature


B Biological Anthropology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/anthropology/bioanth

Year abroad You spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 taking courses in biological anthropology at a university in the USA.

Teaching and assessment In each module, all students take part in lectures and seminars. Most modules also involve a great deal of individual study using the Library and, where relevant, the laboratories and computerbased learning packages. On average, you have four hours of lectures and six hours of seminars and/or lab sessions each week. For the Project in Anthropological Science, you receive regular one-to-one supervision. The School of Anthropology and Conservation has dedicated teaching and research laboratories. The teaching lab has a completely integrated audiovisual system, providing cuttingedge lectures and is primarily used by BSc students. You also have access to an excellent fossil cast collection with more than 50 casts of extant and extinct primates and hominins, including an entire Homo erectus skeleton. We are associated with the nearby Quex Museum, which has one of the largest collections of primate skeletal material in the world, to which our undergraduates have access; the biological anthropology research laboratory houses the Powell-Cotton collection of human skeletal remains, which provides you with material for hands-on learning and research. We have links with Howletts and Port Lympne wild animal parks, providing opportunities for students to conduct projects with non-human primates. We also have dedicated computing facilities within the School, in addition to the general University IT provision.

Many of the core modules have an end-of-year examination that accounts for 50% to 80% of your final mark for that module. The remaining percentage comes from practical or coursework marks. However, others, such as the Project in Anthropological Science and Human Osteology, are assessed entirely on coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks from your year abroad, count towards your final degree result.

Careers Professional biological anthropologists, NGOs, development agencies like the WHO, science journalists, museum curators, forensic scientists, rescue archaeologists, business and the Civil Service, primate conservation.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels L620: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics and 5 in HL Science or 6 in SL Science. L622: AAB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points with 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics and 5 in HL Science or 6 in SL Science.

Required subjects L620, L622: A level science (Biology preferred) or Psychology grade B. GCSE Mathematics grade C. We also consider students with alternative qualifications.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

the UK for Kent was ranked 6th in ardian Gu The in Anthropology University Guide 2009.

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Biology at Canterbury Kent voices

Biology influences our everyday life, and is at the forefront of social change, for example, in human cloning, stem-cell research, genetically-modified organisms, the human genome project, humanity’s effect on the environment, and the potential risks of some foods. It investigates, describes and analyses the structures and functions of living organisms and their interactions with the environment.

Degree programmes Single honours • Biology (C103) 3 years • Biology with a Sandwich Year (C105) 4 years • Biology with a Foundation Year (C101) 4 years

European programmes • Biology with a Year in Europe (C104) 4 years

Stage 1

“I was looking for a course that covered a broad spectrum of topics, and the Biology course offered at Kent is full of variety. The course also allowed me to take modules outside of biosciences, such as psychology and anthropology, to broaden my field of knowledge.” Hannah Shute Biology To read more of what Hannah has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Biosciences has been rated one of the top departments in the country by its students. Our innovative approach to teaching has been recognised by the award of a National Teaching Fellowship to one of our staff for the development of our final-year science communications projects. The facilities within the School of Biosciences are excellent and include a £1 million refurbishment of the teaching laboratories in 2006. Biology offers both a Sandwich Year option and the opportunity to study in Europe for a year.

You take seven core modules (105 credits) plus one optional module (15 credits).

Core modules • • • • • • •

Enzymes and Introduction to Metabolism Human Physiology and Disease Introduction to Biochemistry The Microbial World Molecular and Cellular Biology Plant and Animal Form and Function Skills for Bioscientists 1

Options One of the following: • Chemistry for Biologists • Fundamental Chemistry for Chemists and Bioscientists • Fundamental Human Biology • General and Biological Psychology • Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry.

Stage 2

Not sure? How about... • • • •

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Biochemistry p42 Biological Anthropology p44 Biomedical Science p48 Pharmacy p148

All students take the following eight core modules (120 credits).

Core modules • • • • • • • •

Catabolic and Biosynthetic Processes of Life Cell Biology Classification of Living Organisms Developmental Biology Gene Expression and its Control Infection and Immunity Physiology Skills for Biologists 2


B Biology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/bio

Stage 3 Core modules • Biological Anthropology: the Human Animal • Physiology of Microorganisms, Animals and Plants • Research Project • Skills for Biologists 3

Options Three from: • Advanced Immunology • Biological Anthropology: Comparative Perspectives • Biological Membranes • Integrated Endocrinology and Metabolism • New Enterprise Start-up • Pathogens and Pathogenicity.

Year abroad Biology offers the possibility of studying at a university in Europe or going on a year’s work placement (sometimes abroad) between Stages 2 and 3. We offer support and advice, and keep in touch with you during your year away from the University.

Teaching and assessment Teaching includes lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, problem-solving sessions and self-learning packages.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time.

Modules are usually assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and end-of-year exams. Some of the Stage 1 modules are continuously assessed only. Exams take place at the end of the academic year and count for 50% or more of the mark of the modules that include them. The Sandwich Year is assessed by presentations and written reports, and contributes 10% to the overall mark.

Offer levels BBB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects A level Biology or Human Biology preferred.

Careers Recently, our graduates have gone into government agencies, consultancies, NGOs, teaching, scientific publishing, marketing, information technology, research or further vocational training.

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Foundation year If, for whatever reason, your grades do not qualify you for direct entry, you may be able to take a four-year degree with a foundation year in biological sciences. For more information on foundation years, see p294.

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in ences for Biology and Related Sci in the ction overall student satisfa t Survey. 2009 National Studen

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Biomedical Science at Canterbury Kent voices

“As a Biomedical Science student at Kent you are always taught by cream-of-the-crop academics and professors. These people not only teach, but carry out research too so they really know their stuff. Their enthusiasm for the subjects they teach can be contagious!” Tim Dalessandri Biomedical Science

Are you interested in a career in the health services, in a pharmaceutical company or in medical research? Would you like to explore the biochemical processes that occur in the human body, and particularly diseases like cancer or the response to infection? Are you intrigued to learn how medicines are discovered and how they work? The School of Biosciences provides a stimulating, supportive research-active environment for teaching and learning, encouraging you to achieve your full academic and personal potential. We have excellent links with the local NHS trust, and with the pharmaceutical industry, and professionals from both of these important sectors teach on our programme. The Biomedical Science degree programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS). Alternatively, you can take a non-accredited route, which allows more flexibility in module choice. Both pathways include the opportunity to spend a year in industry or the NHS.

To read more of what Tim has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Degree programmes Single honours • Biomedical Sciences (B940) 3 years • Biomedical Sciences with a Sandwich Year (B942) 4 years • Biology with a Foundation Year (C101) 4 years

Stage 1 You take seven core modules (105 credits) and one optional module (15 credits).

Core modules • Enzymes and Introduction to Metabolism • Fundamental Chemistry for Chemists and Bioscientists • Human Physiology and Disease • Introduction to Biochemistry • The Microbial World • Molecular and Cellular Biology • Skills for Bioscientists

Options One of the following: • • • • •

Chemistry for Biologists Fundamental Human Biology General and Biological Psychology Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry Plant and Animal Form and Function.

Stage 2 You take six core modules (90 credits) plus two optional modules (30 credits).

Not sure? How about... • • • •

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Biochemistry p42 Biological Anthropology p44 Biology p46 Pharmacy p148

Did you know? in the UK for Kent was ranked 2nd ine for overall dic Me to Subjects Allied the 2009 and student satisfaction in t Surveys. 2008 National Studen

Core modules • • • • • •

Catabolic and Biosynthetic Processes of Life Infection and Immunity Pharmacology Physiology Physiology of the Microbial Cell Skills for Biomedical Scientists 2


B Biomedical Science Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/bio

Options

Foundation year

Two from the following:

If, for whatever reason, your grades do not qualify you for direct entry, you may be able to take a four-year degree with a foundation year in biological sciences. For more information on foundation years, see p294.

Location Canterbury.

Teaching and assessment

BBB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics.

• • • • • •

Cell Biology Gene Expression and its Control How Enzymes Work Introduction to Laboratory Medicine A* Introduction to Laboratory Medicine B* Medicinal Chemistry.

* Required for the accredited programme

Stage 3 You take six compulsory modules (90 credits) and a research project (30 credits).

Core modules • • • • •

Advanced Immunology Integrated Endocrinology and Metabolism Pathogens and Pathogenicity Research Project Skills for Biomedical Scientists 2

Options Two from the following: • • • • •

Cell Communication Haematology and Blood Transfusion* Topics in Medical Biosciences* Biological Membranes Protein Structure and Function

* Required for the accredited programme

Teaching includes lectures, laboratory classes, workshops, problem-solving sessions and self-learning packages. Modules are usually assessed by a combination of continuous assessment and end-of-year exams. Some Stage 1 modules are continuously assessed only. Exams take place at the end of the academic year and count for 50% or more of the mark of the modules that include them. The Sandwich Year is assessed by presentation and written reports, and contributes 10% to the overall mark.

Careers Our recent graduates have gone on to a variety of careers including: health care in the NHS; medical research based in academic, government, industrial and medical labs; biotechnology; teaching; industry and commerce; scientific publishing and marketing; information technology. Many are doing postgraduate study. The employment record of our students is excellent.

Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels

Required subjects A level Biology or Human Biology preferred. GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Sandwich year/year abroad (see left). Professional recognition The Biomedical Science degree programme is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS).

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Sandwich year/year abroad Biochemistry offers the possibility of doing a one year placement away from the University between Stages 2 and 3. Sandwich placements provide an excellent opportunity to gain relevant work experience, usually in the pharmaceutical industry but also in the NHS, research institutes etc, either in the UK or abroad. The year abroad is an opportunity to study at a university abroad. We offer support and advice, and keep in touch with you during your year away from the University. 49


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Did you know? Assessment In the 2008 Research iness and Exercise, 55% of Bus research Management Studies ationally at Kent was rated “intern g”. din lea rld “wo or nt” elle exc

Business Administration at Canterbury Kent voices

“I definitely picked the right course; it’s working towards where I’d like to be in life. I want to go into the advertising or marketing sector and this course will definitely give me the right skills to pursue that goal.” Nicholas West Business Administration To read more of what Nicholas has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Management and business are in the top ten subjects for degree course choices as they combine excellent academic training with good career prospects. The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree gives you the academic foundation you need for a career in business or management. The programme equips you with fundamental skills and knowledge essential for managing the key areas of organisations: accounting, human resource management, quantitative methods, marketing, strategy and operations management. In addition, it gives you the choice of following specialist options, such as computing, or spending a year working in industry or studying in Europe. Kent Business School students and staff come from a great variety of backgrounds and nationalities, which leads to a multicultural learning environment with a supportive and flexible approach to teaching. A good pass on the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Accounting & Finance p24 Business Information Technology p118 Business Studies p52 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management p86 • International Business p124 • Management Science p134

• Business Administration (N222) 3 years • Business Administration with a Year in Industry (N224) 4 years • Business Administration with Computing (N1G9) 3 years • Business Administration with Computing with a Year in Industry (N1GX) 4 years • Business Administration with Studies in Asia (N227) 4 years

European programme • Business Administration (European Management) (N223) 4 years

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Joint honours Business Administration and… • Accounting & Finance (NN42) 3 years • Computing (GNL2) 3 years • Computing with a Year in Industry (GNK2) 4 years • Economics (LN11 Business Economics) 3 years • French (NR21) 4 years • German (NR22) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (NR24) 4 years • Italian (NR23) 4 years • Law (MN12) 3 years • Management Science (N250 Business Analytics) 3 years • Management Science with a Year in Industry (N201 Business Analytics) 4 years • Philosophy (VN52) 3 years • Politics (LN22) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Business Skills Computing for Business and Accounting Financial Accounting, Reporting and Analysis The Global Business Environment Introduction to Statistics for Business Introduction to Management Introduction to Marketing Micro Economics for Business

Students on European programmes or those who wish to take a language at Stage 1 can substitute a language for Business Skills and Introduction to Statistics. Students on Computing programmes take alternative computing modules instead of Business Skills and Computing for Business and Accounting.


B Business Administration Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Stage 2 Core modules • Accounting for Management Control and Decision-Making • Managing Human Resources in Contemporary Organisations • Managing People • Marketing Strategy • Operations Management • Strategy Analysis and Tools

• Spreadsheet Modelling for Operational Research • Techniques and Methods in Management Science

• • • •

Contemporary Management Challenges Corporate and Business Strategy Service Management Strategic Human Resource Management

You can either spend a year working in industry, or, if you are taking the European Management programme, a year studying at a university in France, Germany, Italy or Spain. The year out is between Stages 2 and 3. Kent Business School has a placement officer who can offer advice and guidance.

Options You take 30 credits of options in Stage 2 and 60 credits of options in Stage 3. • Business/Management Project • Business to Business Marketing • Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Management • Decision Analysis • Diversity in Organisations • E-Commerce and Business • E-Marketing • Enterprise • The Environment: Policy, Politics and Law • European Business • Industrial Relations • International Business • International Employment Relations and Human Resource Management • International Marketing • Law of the Workplace • Marketing Communications • Marketing Research • New Enterprise Start-up • Psychology of the Workplace • The Rise of the Modern Corporation • Simulation Modelling

Award BBA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time.

You can take up to 30 credits drawn from modules offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences, or in applied computing or European languages.

A year abroad/in industry Stage 3 Core modules

Location Canterbury.

Teaching and assessment In a typical week, you spend six to eight hours in lectures, and four or five hours in classes, group discussion and seminars. Modules also involve individual study and sessions in the computer laboratories. In your final year, you take at least one project module, including the possibility of a 30-credit business/management project on a topic of your choice. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and exams.

Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BC at A level or BC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics. Joint honours: 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB/AB/AAB at A level.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C. Business Administration (European Management) – A level language grade C for German options, GCSE grade C in modern European language other than English for French, Italian or Spanish options.

Year abroad/in industry (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Careers Our BBA graduates work in a variety of careers in management, business analytics, marketing, website management, recruitment and business development for companies such as Hays Consulting, Juniper Networks, Hewlett-Packard, IBM or Microsoft.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Business Studies at Medway Kent voices

“One of the advantages of studying at Kent is the range of modules the course offers – from Financial and Management Accounting to Employment Relations. Not only are these interesting subjects but the modules also provide skills and knowledge that can be used in a variety of career paths.” Cilla Thompson Business Studies with a Year in Industry To read more of what Cilla has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Accounting & Finance p24 Business Administration p50 Business Information Technology p118 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management p86 • International Business p124 • Social Sciences p166

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Business studies is regularly one of the top ten most popular degree subjects, as it combines excellent academic training with good career prospects, and studying Business at the University of Kent at Medway gives you an understanding of the modern world of business that will greatly enhance your opportunities for employment. The programme includes a year in industry, and there is a parallel part-time programme. The course teaches you the theories, methodologies and applications of academic knowledge relevant to the business world. In addition, it provides you with a wide range of opportunities to develop your business skills, learning how to analyse a wide range of business problems and policies and provide solutions to them or make recommendations about them. Kent Business School has an international reputation and good links with local businesses.

Degree programme Single honours • Business Studies with a Year in Industry (N104:K) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Business Skills Financial Accounting 1(a) Management Accounting 1 The Global Business Environment Introduction to Management Introduction to Marketing Micro Economics for Business Quantitative Methods for Business and Accounting

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Business Management Project • Corporate and Business Strategy • Macro-Economics Managing HR in Contemporary Organisations • Managing People • Marketing Strategy • Strategy Analysis and Tools

Options There is a range of options available at Stages 2 and 3, enabling you to specialise in areas such as marketing, human resource management, and accounting and finance.

A year in industry The Business Studies programme has a compulsory year in industry, or a work placement, which reflects the applied nature of the course. You spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 working in full-time employment and earning a salary. The Business School offers advice on getting a placement and promotes you to the business community through our business engagement activities.


B Business Studies Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Placement opportunities are placed on the Business School website but you are encouraged to explore all routes to find a placement opportunity that suits you. Some opportunities are local, others require you to travel or even live abroad for a year. The placement allows you to experience first-hand many of the issues you will have addressed on your programme and to use the tools, techniques and applications in a real business setting. It will become a vital component of your CV. With increasing numbers of students attending university, competition for graduate employment continues to grow. Combining your university business-related degree with a period of full time employment provides you with an advantage over other graduates. Having completed your placement successfully, you will also benefit when you start job searching in your final year at university. Having completed applications and undertaken interviews for the placement year, you will already have experienced the job search process. You will now be more polished, confident and business ‘savvy’ when it comes to the real thing. You may already have been guaranteed a ‘fast track’ interview with the company you worked for, and in some cases you may even be made a firm job offer. Additionally, having been out in the corporate world, you will also be better prepared for your final year at Kent Business School, where you will be able to integrate many of your experiences into the programme. For many, the work placement means an improvement in their final grade, which can help them move on to postgraduate study in the future.

Teaching and assessment We use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations, and computer-based packages. You have approximately 12 hours of class time per week, and regular access to a personal tutor for advice on any matter concerning your studies or your performance on the course. Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and end-of-module examinations, with the examinations normally counting for up to 60% of the marks for each module.

Careers Our Business Studies graduates move on to hold junior management positions in a wide range of business functions in the private, public and charity sectors in the UK and overseas. Some of these companies include Enterprise Cars, Waitrose, Toys R Us, IBM, Hewlett Packard and many more.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280 points inc CC at A level (3.5 A level equivalents), IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects A level Business Studies grade C where taken. GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year in industry (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK Kent was ranked 9th in duate for Business Studies gra in The employment prospects ide 2010. Guardian University Gu

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Classical & Archaeological Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“I loved the Roman and Medieval Artefacts module. It was practical so you actually get to work with real artefacts. This was really exciting, especially once you thought about where the artefact had been and who used it. It really gets your imagination going!” Esmee van der Heijden Classical and Archaeological Studies To read more of what Esmee has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

The great strength of Classical & Archaeological Studies is the hugely interesting and varied range of subjects it includes – literature, mythology, drama, archaeology, art and architecture, history, languages and philosophy – and the way they all connect in the study of ancient civilisations. At Kent, you can do elements from all these areas inside one programme if you want to, or you can follow a more specialised pathway, in literature, history or archaeology. You also have the opportunity to learn Latin or Ancient Greek, which are taught at beginners, intermediate and advanced level. Much of European civilisation grew out of the classical world so it is not surprising that it is still highly relevant today. Canterbury, as a late Iron Age settlement, a Romano-British city, an AngloSaxon town, and a centre of early Christianity, is a good base for studying different cultures, with visits to local sites and museums as well as London museums and opportunities for archaeological fieldwork both locally and further afield. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of this degree programme.

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Comparative Literature p56 English and American Literature p90 History p114 Philosophy p150

Degree programmes Single honours • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QV84) 3 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Classical & Archaeological Studies and… • Comparative Literature (QQ28) 3 years • Drama (QW84) 3 years • English and American Literature (QQ38 3 years • Film Studies (QW86) 3 years • History & Philosophy of Art (VQ38) 3 years • Philosophy (QV85) 3 years In association with the School of History, we also offer a single honours programme in History and Archaeological Studies (VV14), and in collaboration with the School of Anthropology and Conservation, a single honours programme in Archaeology and Anthropology (QL86).

Stage 1 Core modules • Greek and Roman Civilization • Introduction to Archaeology

Options Did you know? the UK for Kent was rated 1st in 9 National Archaeology in the 200 of students Student Survey with 97% with the ed isfi sat re we y the saying . rse cou ir the quality of

• Atlantis: The History of a Legend and the Invention of Utopias • Beginners’ Greek • Beginners’ Latin • Classical Mythology • Introduction to Aegean Archaeology • Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology Plus some modules drawn from a wider range across the University.

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C Classical & Archaeological Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/classics

Stage 2/3 Core module • Dissertation (at stage 3)

• • • •

Options You must take 180 credits within the subject. The modules below are a sample of a wider range available.

• • •

Classical Literature and Culture • Comedy and Satire in Greece and Rome • Epic into Romance • Greek and Roman Medicine • Hellenistic Literature and Culture • Hieroglyphs Without Mystery • Literature and Identity: Being Greek, Syrian, Jewish, Egyptian Under Rome • Love, Sex and Society in Greece and Rome • Myth into Tragedy • Storytelling in Antiquity • Virgil’s Aeneid Ancient History • Archaic Greece and Persia • The Crisis of the Roman Republic • Early Greece and the Formation of the Classical World • Egypt and the Classical World • Graeco-Roman Egypt • Greece: City State to World Empire • The Hellenistic World: History and Material Culture • History of the Roman Empire from Augustus to Domitian • King and Court of Achaemenid Persia • The Reign of Darius I • The Rise and Fall of Athens • Roman Britain Archaeology • Archaeological Fieldwork Methods and Techniques • Archaeological Project • Archaeology of Belief, Cult and Ritual • The Archaeology of Death

• • • •

Archaeology of Romans in the West Barbarians in the West Foundations of Britain (1st Millennium BC) Gods, Heroes and Mystery Cults: Greek Religion Greek Art and Architecture Heads, Heroes and Horses: In Search of the Ancient Celts Late Antique Archaeology: Mediterranean Life from Constantine to Muhammad Minoan Art and Architecture The Origins of the Medieval City Roman and Medieval Artefacts Roman Art and Architecture

Year abroad You spend a year studying in Europe if you are taking joint honours with a modern language. There is also the opportunity to spend a year in Hong Kong, or a term in Ghent on an Erasmus exchange.

Teaching and assessment All modules have a weekly seminar, and most also have weekly lectures. Archaeology modules sometimes include museum and site visits. We encourage students to take part in excavations and surveys with staff and associated institutions, and student bursaries are available to support this.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC/BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher.

Required subjects None, although Classical Studies, Classical Civilisation or Archaeology A level grade B where taken.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Assessment at all stages varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework.

Careers Archaeology, heritage industry, museums, business, journalism, Civil Service, computing, media, librarianship, teaching, further academic study, general ‘arts degree’ employment requiring literacy and versatility.

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Comparative Literature at Canterbury Kent voices

“We have covered a wide variety of topics, from science in literature to learning about the roles of women. What I really like about this course is that each module you choose will help you with the other modules that you have chosen.” Annabel Drew Comparative Literature To read more of what Annabel has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Our modules in Comparative Literature cover literature from the classics to the modern age. We investigate literary movements such as Romanticism, Realism, Modernism and Postmodernism, and also how and why literary forms have evolved in different cultures and linguistic traditions. For example: what makes a tragedy by Sophocles so different from one written by Shakespeare? How has the genre of science fiction developed across Europe? What are the similarities and differences between a novel by Jane Austen and one by Goethe?

Degree programmes Single honours

You do not need to be able to read a foreign language to take a Comparative Literature degree as we study translations into English of a great range of major literature from other countries alongside literature originally written in English.

Comparative Literature and…

Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of this degree programme.

• Comparative Literature (Q200) 3 years • Comparative Literature with a Year Abroad (UCAS code tbc) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, including the chance to study abroad for a year, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

• Classical & Archaeological Studies (QQ28) 3 years • Drama (QW24) 3 years • English and American Literature (QQF3) 3 years • Film Studies (WQ62) 3 years • French (RQ12) 4 years • History (QV21) 3 years • Philosophy (VQ52) 3 years • Religious Studies (VQ62) 3 years

Stage 1 Core module • The Tale Plus 30 credits from the following:

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • • •

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Cultural Studies p70 Drama and Theatre Studies p80 English and American Literature p90 European Studies p94 Film Studies p96 French p104 German p106 Hispanic Studies p112 Italian p126 Philosophy p150

• Atlantis • Childhood and Adolescence in Modern Fiction • Classical Mythology • Freedom and Oppression in Modern Literature • Guilt and Redemption in Modern Literature • Introduction to Contemporary European and Hispanic Cinemas • Introduction to Literature and Science • Literature and Nationhood • Post-War European Cinemas • The Romantic Movement in Europe • Science Fiction


C Comparative Literature Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/complit

Stage 2 Core module • The Text

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The Book and the Film European Realism Fiction and Power From Dada to Kafka: The European AvantGarde and Modernism Jewish Writing from the Diaspora and Israel Literature and Fundamentalism Magical Realism Marriage, Adultery and Divorce in Eighteenth and Early Twentieth-Century Fiction The Novella Postmodernism Reason and Passion in Eighteenth-Century European Fiction Romance: Classical to Post-Modern Literature Science Fiction The Shoah in Literature, Film and Culture Spectacles of State: Literature, Politics and the Visual Imagination Tragedy Travel Writing Writing the Body: Women Writers and Gender

Stage 3 Core module

A year abroad The Year Abroad programmes offer you a unique opportunity to experience cultural diversity first hand, to develop intercultural competence and to benefit from exposure to different approaches to the study of comparative literature. Destinations are in various European countries and in North America. A foreign language is not required as the teaching language is English, but tuition in the language of the host country is provided and it is recommended that you take advantage of your stay abroad to learn and/or practise a foreign language.

Teaching and assessment For most modules, you have one two-hour seminar per week. The Final-Year Dissertation is based entirely on your private research but is supervised by a tutor. Assessment varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50 or 40:60.

Careers Recently, our graduates have gone into careers such as teaching, publishing, marketing, radio, journalism, television and film, the Civil Service, advertising, graphic design and copywriting.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher.

Required subjects A level English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

• Final-Year Dissertation

Options Drawn from the list above under Stage 2.

Did you know? at Kent was Comparative Literature the 2009 in UK ranked 3rd in the y. National Student Surve

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Did you know? Assessment In the 2008 Research uter Exercise, 65% of Comp was rated t Science research at Ken or “world nt” “internationally excelle leading”.

Computer Science at Canterbury Kent voices

Computer Science is an exciting and rapidly developing subject that offers excellent employment prospects and well-paid careers. At the University of Kent we teach you the fundamentals of computer science as well as giving you the opportunity to choose from a broad range of options in areas such as computer security and cryptography, mobile computing and parallel computing.

“The course is taught well at Kent. They do not just teach you how to use one programming language, but the theory behind what you’re doing so you can carry the knowledge to other programming languages.” Alex Alferovs Computer Science with a Year in Industry To read more of what Alex has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

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Business Information Technology p118 Computer Systems Engineering p60 Computing – Joint Honours p62 Information Technology p118 Multimedia Technology and Design p142 Web Computing p182

Our degree programme can be studied as the Computer Science general degree, where a subject focus is decided during the course of the study, or as a themed degree, such as, Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence), where a specific focus is decided at the time of enrolment and named in the degree title. Over half our students choose to do a Year in Industry. This gives you work experience, a salary and the possibility of a job with the same company after graduation. You can also work during your studies as a consultant at our Kent IT Clinic, earning credit towards your degree while providing computing support to local businesses. An internationally recognised Centre of Excellence for programming education, the School of Computing is a leader in computer science teaching and home to two National Teaching Fellows, authors of widely used textbooks and award-winning Java teaching systems such as BlueJ and Greenfoot. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Computer Science (G400) 3 years • Computer Science with a Year in Industry (G404) 4 years • Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) (G4G7) 3 years • Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) with a Year in Industry (G4GR) 4 years • Computer Science (Business) (GN42) 3 years • Computer Science (Business) with a Year in Industry (GN4F) 4 years • Computer Science (Consultancy) (G403) 3 years • Computer Science (Consultancy) with a Year in Industry (G406) 4 years • Computer Science (Networks) (G421) 3 years • Computer Science (Networks) with a Year in Industry (G420) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, please see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Computer Science and… • Management Science (NG2L) 3 years • Management Science with a Year in Industry (NG2K) 4 years • Mathematics (GG41) 3 years • Mathematics with a Year in Industry (GGC4) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules (for most themes) • • • • • • •

Computer Systems Foundations of Computing 1 Foundations of Computing 2 Introduction to Information Systems Object-Oriented Programming 1 Object-Oriented Programming 2 Web Applications


C Computer Science Honours degrees www.cs.kent.ac.uk/students

Plus other compulsory and optional modules depending upon your chosen programme, for instance computing, business, management or philosophy.

Options • • • • •

Financial Accounting, Reporting & Analysis Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Philosophy Managers and Organisations Spreadsheet Modelling for Operational Research • Techniques and Methods in Management Science

Stage 2 Core modules (for most themes) • Database Systems • Functional Programming • Software Engineering Practice Plus other compulsory and optional modules depending upon your chosen programme, for instance computing, business or management.

Options Including, but not limited to, and depending on your programme: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advanced Programming Techniques Algorithms, Data Structures and Complexity Cognitive Neural Networks Computing in the Classroom Concurrency Design and Practice Distributed Systems and Networks Dynamic Web Electronic Commerce Human Computer Interaction Introduction to Intelligent Systems IT Consultancy Methods IT Consultancy Practice Operating Systems and Architecture Programming Language Technology Software Engineering Design.

Stage 3 Core module (for most themes)

Location Canterbury.

• Computing Project or Consultancy (30 credits)

Award BSc (Hons).

Options

Programme type Full-time.

• Advanced Concurrency Design and Practice • Comparative Programming Languages • Computing Law and Professional Responsibility • Computer Graphics and Animation • Computer Networks and Communications • Computer Security and Cryptography • Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery • Information Systems Analysis • IT Consultancy Practice • Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing • Natural Computation • New Enterprise Start-up • Philosophy of Artifical Intelligence • Software Failure and Risk

Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents inc 3 A level passes), IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in Mathematics (6 in Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 5 in Mathematics (6 in Mathematics Studies). BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Distinction, Merit overall. Direct entry to Stage 2: typically, Distinction at HND level.

Required subjects

Plus some options which are also available at Stage 2.

GCSE Mathematics grade C – grade B for Computer Science with Management Science.

A year in industry

Year in industry (see left).

There are Year in Industry options on all our programmes. Our dedicated Placement Team can help you find a placement and support you during the year. Students go to a wide range of companies including IBM and Intel, or overseas to employers in locations including Amsterdam, Hong Kong and India.

Teaching and assessment Most modules run for a single 12-week term, and are usually a combination of lectures, seminars, private study and practical sessions. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-ofyear examination, apart from project modules, which are assessed wholly by coursework.

Careers Our recent graduates now work at Accenture, BT, Cisco, GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, Intel, Lilly, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Thomson Reuters, Siemens, Sun Microsystems and T-Mobile.

Professional recognition G400, G404: These programmes have full Chartered IT Professional (CITP) accreditation from the British Computer Society (BCS). NG2L, NG2K: These programmes have partial BCS CITP accreditation. GN42, GN4F: Partial accreditation has been applied for.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Computer Systems Engineering at Canterbury Kent voices

The range of uses for computers is increasing all the time – from smart phones and games consoles to aircraft flight control systems, super computers and global telecommunications systems. This programme develops the skills and expertise needed to design computer systems, including up-to-date detailed knowledge of computer hardware and software including electronics, communications systems and interface technologies.

“This programme looks forward all the time and no one is putting limits on my learning. I have found something that I really love. In my first year, my group won first place in the project prize and this year I want to do well again”

Teaching in both the School of Engineering and Digital Arts and the School of Computing has been rated as excellent. We base our courses on leading-edge research topics, which is vital in a field that advances at such a fast pace, so that you get to know about the latest technologies. We have a team of senior industrialists who meet regularly with staff to review our courses, while there is an option to spend a year working in industry.

Omer Kilic Computer Systems Engineering To read more of what Omer has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Degree programmes Single honours • Computer Systems Engineering 3 years • Computer Systems Engineering 4 years • Computer Systems Engineering Foundation Year (H614) 4 years • Computer Systems Engineering Industry BEng(H615) 4 years • Computer Systems Engineering Industry MEng (H617) 5 years

BEng (H618) MEng (H613) including a with a Year in with a Year in

Stage 1 You take eight modules worth 15 credits each – 120 credits overall.

Core modules • • • • • • • •

Computer Systems Digital Technologies Engineering Mathematics Further Object-Oriented Programming Engineering Analysis Introduction to Electronics Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Robotics Project

Stage 2 You take eight 15-credit modules.

Core modules

Not sure? How about... • Computer Science p58 • Electronic and Communications Engineering p84 • Multimedia Technology and Design p142 • Physics p152 • Web Computing p182

Did you know? the UK Kent was ranked 7th in ing graduate for Electronic Engineer in The employment prospects ide 2010. Gu y rsit ive Un lete Comp

• • • • • • • •

Computer Interfacing Project Digital Communications Digital Implementation Digital Signal Processing Image Analysis and Applications Instrumentation Microcomputer Engineering Operating Systems and Architecture

Stage 3 You take four 15-credit core modules, one 45credit core project module, and a choice of one 15-credit option.

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Core modules

Teaching and assessment

• • • • •

Teaching includes lectures, coursework and laboratory assignments, examples classes where you develop your problem-solving skills and regular staff ‘surgeries’. You have access to a wide range of modern high-performance laboratory equipment, computers and software packages for designing hardware and software.

Digital Control and Robotics Digital Systems Design Embedded Computer Systems Final-Year Project Product Development

Options One from: • Computer Networks and Communication • Computer Security and Cryptography

MEng only Stage 4 • • • • • •

Business Strategy Communication Networks (optional) Computer and Reconfigurable Architectures DSP and Digital TV (optional) Embedded Real-Time Operating Systems Fundamentals of Image Analysis and Biometrics (optional) • Systems Group Project

A year in industry Students on the Year in Industry degree spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We have an Industrial Placement Officer who can offer help and advice.

Foundation year (H614) This programme is for students who do not have the qualifications needed for direct entry to the honours degree programme. It covers electronics, computing, physics and mathematics.

Stage 1 modules are assessed by coursework and examination at the end of the year. Stage 2 and 3 modules, with the exception of the final year project, are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination. The project is assessed by a written report, an oral presentation, a viva examination, a poster presentation and the outcome of the project itself. The year in industry is assessed by a written report and an interview that together count as 10% of your overall degree result.

Careers Recently our graduates have gone into the design of electronic and computer systems, software engineering, real-time industrial control systems and computer communications networks, or further postgraduate study, for example the MSc in Information Systems and Biometrics or Embedded Systems and Instrumentation.

Location Canterbury. Award BEng (Hons), MEng. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels H615/H618: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc CC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in SL Mathematics and a science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in standard Mathematics and a science subject (not Mathematics Studies). Direct entry to Stage 2 available to suitably qualified students. H613/H617: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in SL Mathematics and a science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in standard Mathematics and a science subject (not Mathematics Studies). H614: 160 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc EE at A level, IB 24 points.

Required subjects H615/H618/H613/H617: At least an A level in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (such as Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C for BEng, grade B for MEng. Equivalent qualifications are acceptable. H614: GCSE Mathematics and Science grade C.

Year in industry (see left). If you successfully complete the foundation year, you can go on to take either the Computer Systems Engineering programmes mentioned above or Electronics and Communications Engineering (see p84).

Professional recognition Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Computing – Joint Honours at Canterbury Kent voices

“I feel the year in industry has given me a head start when looking for a job. The year profoundly affected the way I am tackling my final year and I believe that, when applying for a job, I will have a better understanding of what to look for and how best to approach employers.” Mansoor Shar Computer Science with a Year in Industry To read more of what Mansoor has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

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Business Information Technology p118 Computer Science p58 Computer Systems Engineering p60 Information Technology p118 Multimedia Technology and Design p142 Web Computing p182

Graduates who can offer employers a thorough understanding of the application of computing to business situations in addition to expertise in another specialism are in great demand. This degree lets you combine the subject of computing with another of your own choosing. Optional subjects include accountancy, business administration, film studies, languages and many others. These courses focus on the practical application of computers rather than the more theoretical aspects of computer science. You can choose to spend either a half or a quarter of your time studying computing – the remainder is spent studying the other subject. Many students choose to do a Year in Industry. You can also work during your studies as a consultant at the Kent IT Clinic earning credit towards your degree while providing computing support to local businesses. An internationally recognised Centre of Excellence for programming education, the School of Computing is a leader in computer science teaching and home to two National Teaching Fellows, authors of widely used textbooks and award-winning Java teaching systems such as BlueJ and Greenfoot. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, please see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Computing as a major subject You spend approximately half your time studying Computing on these courses: Computing and… • Accounting & Finance (GN44) 3 years • Business Administration (GNL2) 3 years • Business Administration with a Year in Industry (GNK2) 4 years • Classical & Archaelogical Studies (QG84) 3 years • English & American Literature (QG34) 3 years • Film Studies (WG64) 3 years • French (RG14) 4 years • German (RG24) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (GR44) 4 years • History (VG14) 3 years • Management Science (NG24) 3 years • Philosophy (VG54) 3 years. Computing as a subsidiary subject On these courses (titled ‘... with Computing’), you spend less than half of your time studying Computing: • Accounting & Finance (N4G4) 3 years • Business Administration (N1G9) 3 years • Business Administration with a Year in Industry (N1GX) 4 years • Economics (L1G4) 3 years • European Management Science (French/ German/Spanish/Italian) (N2GK) 4 years • Management Science (N2G4) 3 years • Management Science (with studies in the USA) (N2GL) 4 years • Social Policy (L4G4) 3 years.


C Computing – Joint Honours Honours degrees www.cs.kent.ac.uk/students

Stage 1

Year in industry

You take four of the following modules:

There are Year in Industry options on some of our joint honours programmes. With this option you spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. Our dedicated Placement Team can help you find a placement and support you during the year. Our students go to a wide range of companies including IBM, Intel and Thomson Reuters or overseas to employers in locations including Amsterdam, Hong Kong and India.

• • • • •

Computer Systems Introduction to Information Systems Object-Oriented Programming 1 Object-Oriented Programming 2 Web Applications

Plus other required modules for your joint honours subject.

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Computing Project • Object-Oriented Programming 2 (if not taken at Stage 1) • Software Engineering Practice

Teaching and assessment Most modules run for a single 12-week term, and usually include a combination of lectures, seminars, private study and practical sessions.

Options

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-of-year examination, apart from project work, which is assessed wholly by coursework.

At least four modules from the list below, plus other required modules for your joint subject.

Careers

• Cognitive Neural Networks • Computing in the Classroom • Computing Law and Professional Responsibility • Database Systems • Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery • Distributed Systems and Networks • Dynamic Web • Electronic Commerce • Human Computer Interaction • Information Systems Study • Introduction to Intelligent Systems • IT Consultancy Methods • IT Consultancy Practice • Logic Programming and Constraint Programming • Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing • Operating Systems and Architecture

Our recent graduates now work at Accenture, BT, GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, Intel, KCC, Lilly, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Thomson Reuters, Sun Microsystems and T-Mobile.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons), BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280/300/320 points inc BC/BB/AB at A level, depending on other subject, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14/15/16 points at Higher.

Required subjects None beyond those needed for your joint subject.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition Computing and Business Administration has partial British Computer Society Chartered IT Professional (BCS CITP) accreditation

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK Kent was ranked 6th in graduate for Computer Science in The employment prospects ide 2010. Gu y rsit ive Un ian Guard

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Did you know?

Conservation

in the UK for Kent was ranked 2nd employment Anthropology graduate Good es Tim The in cts spe pro 9. 200 ide Gu y Universit

at Canterbury Kent voices

“The course has been everything I wanted. It has not only shown the ecology aspects of conservation, but also looks at the human aspects as well, such as indigenous hunting and its role in conservation.” Chris Kinnear Wildlife Conservation To read more of what Chris has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

The world is currently facing a great conservation crisis. Animals and plants face extinction through habitat loss, overhunting, pollution, overpopulation and the threat of global climate change. And yet we now know that wildlife and biodiversity are vital for human survival.

Degree programmes Single honours

The programmes include an option to conduct a research project in the Peruvian Amazon and gain practical skills in a tropical forest which has the greatest mammalian diversity on earth – an amazing variety of fish, birds, amphibians and reptiles, and more tree species than anywhere on the planet.

• Biodiversity I • Life’s Systems and Processes

Wildlife and biodiversity conservation are also social, economic and political concepts, and our programmes study the social sciences, which helps you to understand the needs of human populations and teaches you how to get your message across. So, if you want to make a difference and help to save the world’s biodiversity and wildlife species, our degree programme can show you how.

Wildlife Conservation • Animals and People • Skills for Wildlife Conservation and Management

Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Biological Anthropology p44 Environmental Social Science p92 Medical Anthropology p140 Social Anthropology p162

• Biodiversity Conservation and Management (CD94) 3 years • Wildlife Conservation (CD14) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules

Biodiversity Conservation • Economic and Environmental Systems • Environmental Sciences • Survey and Monitoring for Biodiversity

Options Depending on your degree, options include some of the following: • • • • •

Animals and People Economic and Environmental Systems Environmental Sciences People and Plants Skills for Wildlife Conservation and Management • Survey and Monitoring for Biodiversity.

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • •

Conservation and Communities Design and Management of Protected Areas Further Topics in Conservation Biology Skills for Conservation Biologists

Biodiversity Conservation • Climate Change and Conservation • Global Biodiversity • Practical Research Project (30 credits) or Biodiversity Dissertation (30 credits)

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C Conservation Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/anthropology/dice/undergrad

• The Shaping of International Biodiversity Law • Tourism and Conservation Wildlife Conservation • Evolutionary Genetics and Conservation • Topics in Conservation Biology • Wildlife Management and Sustainable Use • Behavioural Ecology • Practical Research Project (30 credits)

Options • Skills for Biodiversity Management Plus a selection from the core modules listed for the other pathway.

Teaching and assessment In addition to lectures you have laboratory practicals and we incorporate many field trips. You also have an opportunity to conduct a field research-based thesis in the final year.

Most modules are assessed by 50% coursework and 50% unseen exam. Some modules are assessed only by coursework, which takes a variety of forms, including essays, short answer tests, laboratory reports, individual and team projects, field reports, commentaries, management plans and statistical analyses.

Careers The conservation and environmental sector is an expanding area for employment opportunities. DICE graduates can go into a number of different directions in terms of careers, including conservation jobs in city and county councils, conservation jobs with other organisations, postgraduate studies, private sector employment, international opportunities for employment in conservation and environment institutions, and environmental education.

During the summer vacation prior to Stage 3, you start a research project of your choosing. This gives you practical experience of developing a research proposal and research question, finding appropriate methods, conducting research, analysing results, interpreting results, writing up a full research project and giving an oral presentation. We offer the opportunity to conduct your research project in the Peruvian Amazon, one of the Earth’s most biodiverse regions. This is a rare opportunity to study in a tropical forest which has the greatest mammalian diversity on earth.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels CD94: A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Biology/HL Geography/HL Chemistry or 6 in SL Biology/SL Geography/SL Chemistry/SL Environmental Systems and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Biology/HL Geography/HL Chemistry or 6 in SL Biology/SL Geography/ SL Chemistry/ SL Environmental Systems and 4 in Mathematics. CD14: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Biology/HL Geography/HL Chemistry or 6 in SL Biology/SL Geography/SL Chemistry/SL Environmental Systems and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Biology/HL Geography/HL Chemistry or 6 in SL Biology/SL Geography/SL Chemistry/SL Environmental Systems and 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects A level natural science (eg, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geography) grade B. GCSE Mathematics grade C. In exceptional circumstances, we may consider promising candidates who do not have the formal entrance requirements but who have obtained several years of relevant experience or other qualifications in the subject area.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets 65


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Criminal Justice Studies at Medway Kent voices

“I highly recommend this course. I have learned so much about the way in which our criminal justice system works, the way it has developed and the direction to which it is headed now. You will learn so much more than just how courts are run or how our police force operates.” Arjun Malkotia Criminal Justice Studies To read more of what Arjun has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

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Criminology p68 Law p130, 132 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166 Social Work p168 Sociology p170

Criminal Justice Studies looks at the key elements of contemporary crime policy: policing, the courts, punishment and prevention. The programme modules address many contemporary issues in criminal justice, including: poverty, hate crime, illegal drug use, restorative justice, the care of victims, community safety, domestic violence, political responses to crime, anti-social behaviour, penal policy, social justice and human rights. The degree contains four elements at Stage 1: criminology and criminal justice, social policy, sociology, and law. The Stage 2 and 3 modules build on these to reflect a more vocational approach, focusing on criminal law, community safety, youth justice, policing and crime prevention, and systems of punishment and social control, supplemented by options in the social sciences and/or law. The course runs at the exciting new Medway campus and is part of the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research – one of the top departments in the country, staffed by highly rated and internationally recognised researchers.

Degree programme Single honours • Criminal Justice Studies (M900:K) 3 years

Stage 1 You take four 30-credit compulsory modules.

Core modules • Introduction to Criminology and Criminal Justice • Introduction to Law and Legal Process • Introduction to Sociology • Social Problems and Social Policy

Stage 2 You take one 15-credit and two 30-credit compulsory modules, and choose 45 credits from the list of options.

Core modules • Criminal Law (30 credits) • Issues in Criminal Justice (30 credits) • Research Methods in Sociology

Options include: • • • • • •

Forensic Psychology History of Police and Policing Principles and Practice of Social Policy Social Ethics Social Justice Practice Youth, Crime and Criminal Justice.


C Criminal Justice Studies Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 3

Teaching and assessment

You take two 30-credit compulsory modules, and choose 60 credits from the list of options.

We use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations and individual and group tutorials. Study groups are normally no more than 15-20 students and give you the opportunity to discuss a topic in detail.

Core modules • Crime, Punishment and Penal Policy • Dissertation

Options include: • • • • • •

Crime and Justice in Europe Drugs and the Criminal Justice System Politics of Criminal Justice Key Welfare Issues Restorative Justice Women, Crime and Criminal Justice.

Modules are usually assessed by a combination of coursework and written examinations. Some modules take the form of an extended dissertation or essay. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

Careers Potential career paths include crime prevention, the probation service, the prison service, courts, the police, community safety, social services departments, and drug and alcohol services.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level 240 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either CC at A level or CC in 12-unit GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 13 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma/Certificate with Merit, Merit, Merit. Successful completion of an Access course. University of Kent Certificate in Social Science. Mature students may be accepted on the basis of motivation and experience.

Required subjects None.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 9th in es Good Tim The in Social Policy University Guide 2010.

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Criminology at Canterbury Kent voices

“I can say that I’ve found my course to be exciting, engaging, and productive as well as enlightening. Though the course has been tough I am happy that I’ve persevered; no other course would do, but this one.” Shannon Bethel Law and Criminology To read more of what Shannon has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • •

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Criminal Justice Studies p66 Law p130, 132 Psychology p158 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166 Social Work p168 Sociology p170

Crime and criminal justice are major social and political issues. Why do people commit crime? How much crime is committed? What causes crime rates to rise or fall? How should we deal with offenders? How can crime be effectively prevented? The number and variety of career opportunities related to crime control have increased in recent years. As well as the traditional criminal justice agencies such as the police, probation service and the prison service, there is an increasing demand for suitably qualified people in the voluntary, public and private sector. This degree is taught by staff with internationally recognised expertise in criminological theory and criminal justice policy, and research interests in criminological theory, cultural criminology, policing and security, imprisonment, racist violence, night time economies, terrorism, drug use, youth crime and female offenders. We work regularly with criminal justice agencies, and people from these agencies occasionally lecture on the course. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Criminology can only be studied as a joint honours degree.

Joint honours Criminology and… • • • •

Cultural Studies (MV99) 3 years Law (MM19) 3 years Social Policy (LM49) 3 years Sociology (LM39) 3 years

Stage 1 You take two 30-credit core modules, plus other required modules for your joint honours subject.

Core modules • Introduction to Criminology • Social Problems and Social Policy: The Family and the State

Stage 2/3 You take two 30-credit core modules, plus other required modules for your joint honours subject.

Core modules • Criminal Justice in Modern Britain • Sociology of Crime and Deviance


C Criminology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Options

Teaching and assessment

You take four modules from the following list, plus other optional modules depending on your joint honours subject.

Most modules involve a weekly lecture and small group seminar, each lasting an hour. On average you have four lectures and four seminars a week if you are taking the degree full-time, or two of each if you are taking it part-time.

Location Canterbury.

Most modules are assessed by coursework (50%) and written examinations (50%). Some modules take the form of an extended dissertation. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

MM19: AAB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher.

• • • • • • • • • • •

Crime, Media and Culture Dissertation Drugs Society and Culture Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice History of Crime and Punishment Policing Punishment and the Penal System Psychology of Crime and Justice Sociological Approaches to Violence Terrorism and Modern Society Youth and Crime

Please note: The programme is under review and may differ in certain details from the one outlined here.

Careers Recently our graduates have gone into areas such as police forces, local authorities, criminal justice services, youth services, social services and the Crown Court, more general areas such as banks and financial services, or on to further study.

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels

MV99, LM49, LM39: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BC/BB at A level or BC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher.

Required subjects None. The School is committed to widening participation and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students. We welcome applications from students on accredited Access courses.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in employment Social Policy graduate ian University prospects in The Guard 9. 200 Guide

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Cultural Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“If you are interested in people and society, and in particular the expressive elements that are so often delivered through culture, then no other degree is more fascinating.” Alice Alden Cultural Studies To read more of what Alice has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • •

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Anthropology p30 Comparative Literature p56 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Philosophy p150 Religious Studies p160 Social Anthropology p162 Sociology p170

What do we mean by ‘culture’ and why are its many forms so hotly contested today? Why is it so important to our sense of identity and belonging? How are the ‘culture wars’ of today, surrounding such things as free speech, drugs, censorship and youth culture related to uses of new media and the rise of global capitalism? Do you think it matters how tradition and heritage are represented in the mass media or in museums? Have you ever thought popular culture is much more than a form of entertainment? Do you ever think that the culture and lifestyle which means a lot to you is not taken seriously or simply dismissed? It is often said that the world is changing more rapidly than at any other time in history, and the study of cultural transformation is key to achieving the ‘joined-up thinking’ society needs in the 21st century. Cultural Studies at Kent is a lively, innovative subject with distinctive perspectives on all forms of present day culture. We explore significant connections between popular culture, the arts, and everyday life by crossing traditional social sciences/humanities boundaries. There are several opportunities for combined honours degrees with related subjects, including European languages, giving the opportunity of a year abroad. The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research is ranked highly in national surveys. We recently received the highest rating in the Government evaluation of university research. You are taught by the leading academics in the field.

Degree programmes Single honours • Cultural Studies (V900) 3 years

Joint honours Cultural Studies can be studied combined with the following subjects: • • • • • • • •

Criminology (MV99) 3 years Comparative Literature (QV29) 3 years Film Studies (VW96) 3 years Hispanic Studies (R4V9) 4 years History and Philosophy of Art (VV93) 3 years Modern Languages 3 years Philosophy (VV59) 3 years Social Anthropology (LV69) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Sociology • Studying Modern Culture If you are taking joint honours, you do at least one required module from your joint honours subject.

Options Two further modules from a wide range of choices drawn from the list offered by the Faculties of Social Sciences and Humanities.


C Cultural Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • •

Cultures of Embodiment Drug Cultures Information Society and Digital Culture Popular Culture, Media and Society

Joint honours students take half of their modules from the joint honours subject.

Options There is a wide range of options to choose from, partly determined by the degree you register for. The list below represents just a few of them: • • • • • • • • • •

Arts and Cultural Policy The Body in Photography Cinema and Society: Britain at War 1939-45 Crime, Media and Culture Dissertation in Cultural Studies Drugs, Culture and Control Fiction and Power 1917-89 The Photograph Religion and Film Science Fiction.

Please note: The programme is under review and may differ in certain details from the one outlined here.

Teaching and assessment You normally have four hours of lectures and four hours of seminars per week; you can always consult the lecturers for individual advice. Coursework is continuously assessed at Stage 1, and this is combined with the results of exams, in most modules. At Stage 2/3, modules are assessed by a combination of essays (50%) and exams (50%). All single honours students and some joint honours students, also have the opportunity to do a final-year dissertation on a chosen subject, which counts as one module (and does not involve an exam).

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher. The Department is committed to widening participation and has a successful tradition of admitting mature students. We welcome applications from students on accredited Access courses.

Careers Cultural Studies, like most university subjects in the social sciences and humanities, is a useful background for a wide range of careers. It is especially good preparation for professional training in the media and cultural industries. Graduates take up careers in advertising and design, journalism, broadcasting, teaching, arts administration, publishing, public relations, research, information services, leisure industry management, tourism, personnel, local government, and the organisation of social and community projects.

Required subjects None. For joint honours required subjects, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

A year abroad If you are taking a European language, you spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 studying at a university in the country of your chosen language.

Location Canterbury.

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 9th in satisfaction t den stu Social Policy for dent Survey. in the 2009 National Stu

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Design: Creative Events: Design and Production at Medway Kent voices

“I particularly like the way the course is structured, with a heavy focus on teaching us the practical skills needed. We’ve been introduced to, and learn from, companies in the industry, which gives an extra dimension to the teaching.” Dave Moore Creative Events: Design and Production To read more of what Dave has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • •

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Architecture p34 Design for Performance p74 Drama p80 Experience Design p76 Film Studies p96 Fine Art p98 Interiors p122 Visual and Performed Arts p178

This unique degree introduces you to creative, practical, and managerial approaches to devising a range of exciting live events from street performances to product launches; from installations to community celebrations. The programme helps you to find ways of making extraordinary acts of imagination come to life. During your degree you might project images onto architecture; transform vacant buildings into realms of the strange; make processions with giant puppets; create a personalised rite of passage; launch a ship. You learn and deploy many vocational approaches and skills, and develop team-working methods, problem-solving strategies, and great communication skills. You will also come to understand what these spectacles and experiences contribute to our culture and our public life, you will investigate their contexts and effects. We have a dedicated design, production and presentation facility in a large converted Victorian Galvanising Shop on the Chatham Historic Dockyard. It includes an equipped AV theatre, a state-of-the-art lighting rig, design software on new Intel iMacs and a construction/making space. We involve many professionals in delivering the course, ensuring that it is as current and relevant as possible.

Degree programme Single honours • Creative Events: Design and Production (W900:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • •

Contexts and Case Studies Fundamentals of Design Realising the Creative Idea Regional and Industrial Research

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • •

The Business of Events Production Carnival and Celebratory Performance Dissertation Installations and Interventions in the Public Realm • Telling Stories

Options You can choose from a list that includes modules from other design degrees. Examples include: • • • • • •

Interpretive Environments Lighting, Sound and Projection Multimedia and Interactive Events Professional Development Portfolio Realised Project Scenography.


D Design: Creative Events: Design and Production Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Teaching and assessment Much of the teaching is based around creative projects, supervised by a member of staff or industry practitioner, sometimes in a real world context – that is, making an event for the public and a real client. During these projects, you learn creative and practical skills, as well as applying a more theoretical and academic analysis to your work. As the degree progresses, the projects offer the flexibility to allow you to develop specialisms in specific aspects of design, production or technology. Alongside the practical projects, you have seminars, lectures and research projects that cover aspects of the business, theory, marketing and funding of the work, as well as introducing the history, theory and context of a range of events. You are taught how to manage a project, how to assess the safety of the work, how to use computer modelling to develop and sell your design, how to use lighting and sound equipment and how to make a professional pitch to clients. You learn how to understand the brief and the context, to make decisions appropriate to the project requirements, to effectively manage the production, and then to evaluate the end result.

Assessment is through a wide range of methods: observation of your practical work, reports and essays, presentations, short ‘in-class’ tests, live events and projects. These are designed to ensure that you can find the best way to demonstrate your learning – making sure the assessment is right for the type of work, and ensuring that whatever your strengths and weaknesses, everyone has equal opportunity.

Careers Potential careers include: creative events design, celebratory arts worker (designing carnivals and similar events), party planner/wedding designer, designer of corporate events, performance production or stage manager, designer of educational or heritage events, conference organiser, arts administrator, and culture/arts/ tourism officer. Careers in advertising, design, tourism, performance, communications, and retail are also open to you.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Stage 1 entry: A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Merit, Merit. Stage 2 entry: successful completion of a Certificate, ie 120 units of Certificate level (Stage 1 level) learning, in a related area, subject to an interview.

Required subjects Entry is normally by interview and portfolio. We will normally look for qualifications at A level grade B or equivalent in one or two of the following: Design, Art, Graphics, Media, Performance. For other types of qualification, please contact us to discuss your situation.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets Visit the departmental website: www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Did you know?

Admissions enquiries

s selected to One of our students wa managers ge sta the work alongside Ceremony of the London Handover Paralympic and at the Beijing Olympic Games.

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Design: Design for Performance at Medway Kent voices

“This degree will allow you to explore a range of different approaches to design for a wide variety of forms, from theatre to contemporary dance, from site specific performance to musicals. You will use traditional approaches and the latest in digital modelling. By the end of the course, you will have a full portfolio and a thorough knowledge of performance forms.” Gavin Carver Director, School of Arts at Medway

Not sure? How about... • Creative Events: Design and Production p72 • Experience Design p76 • Interiors p122

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This degree is specifically focused on design for theatrical performance, either within theatres or in converted or found spaces. You are introduced to design for a range of work, from classical theatre to post modern site-specific performance, from dance to drama.

Degree programme Single honours

Your projects will generally be realised in model form, including 3D computer models, but you normally have an opportunity to see one of your designs realised on stage, either locally in Medway, on our Canterbury campus, or in another context suitable to your work.

Some of these are taken with students from our other design degrees:

You study modules in: theatre and performance history and contexts; general approaches to spatial and costume design; lighting, sound and media; specialist, project modules working on design for a range of briefs such as dance, site-specific performance, musical theatre, opera, design for play texts. You may also take modules from other degrees both inside and outside of the department.

• Design for Performance (WW24:K) 3 years (subject to approval)

Stage 1 Core modules

• • • • •

Contexts and Case Studies Fundamentals of Performance Design Production practice Realising the Creative Idea Visual Communications.

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • • • •

Dissertation Final Independent Project Lighting, Sound and Projection Places of Performance Scenography I Scenography II

Options You can choose from a list which includes modules from other design degrees. Examples include: • Digital and Interactive Design • Digital Studio • Installations and Interventions in the Public Realm • Interpretive Environments • Professional Development Portfolio.


D Design: Design for Performance Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Teaching and assessment

Careers

Most teaching and learning is delivered through project work; you will be given a brief, sometimes selected from a range of options, which you will work on while being supported by small lectures, workshops, demonstrations and one to one tutorials. You will regularly present your ideas and projects to your peers and tutors in sessions known as ‘crits’. The nature of the subject means that most projects will be undertaken individually, but there is scope for group work and collaboration. Many projects will result in models (real or digital) storyboards and other visual material, and at the end of your degree you will mount an exhibition of your work.

This degree prepares you for work as a designer in theatre and entertainment. Depending upon your options and interests, you may also seek employment in brand or heritage event and experience design, creative production for cultural and community performance and art, as a stylist, and many other roles in the creative industries. This degree also provides you with a range of transferable skills in communication, problem solving and creative thinking, which will prepare you well for a wide range of careers.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Stage 1 entry: A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Merit, Merit. Stage 2 entry: successful completion of a Certificate, ie 120 units of Certificate level (Stage 1 level) learning, in a related area, subject to an interview.

We expect you to dedicate about 40 hours a week to this course, typically you will be taught for eight to ten of those hours.

Required subjects Entry is normally by interview and portfolio. We will normally look for qualifications at A level grade B or equivalent in one or two of the following: Design, Art, Graphics, Performance/Theatre Studies, Media. For other types of qualification, please contact us to discuss your situation.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 6th in es Good Tim The in Art and Design University Guide 2010.

Visit the departmental website: www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Design: Experience Design at Medway Kent voices

“This programme provides you with an opportunity to develop and emphasise digital design skills such as 3D computer modelling and CAD, as well as a broad range of 2D and 3D ‘traditional’ design tools. With excellent links to creative agencies, including theme parks, museums and brand experience companies, there are opportunities to work on live project briefs, both on campus and through work placements.” Paul Gambrill Lecturer, Experience Design

Not sure? How about... • Creative Events: Design and Production p72 • Design for Performance p74 • Interiors p122

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This new degree course helps you to develop the creative, intellectual and craft skills required to design experiences and environments. Theme parks, heritage experiences, visitor attractions, living and interactive museums, brand events and experiences all deliver entertainment, interaction, immersion and often education; and all these experiences require careful and creative design founded on imagination, technical skills, research and development. These experiences are part of large and growing industry with a range of exciting career prospects. During the course you will learn through practice, producing designs (models, sketches, mood boards and computer animations) for a wide range of briefs, clients and contexts. You also learn and deploy many vocational approaches and develop skills in analysis and communication, team working, presentation, research and problem solving. This equips you for a whole range of jobs in the public and private sector following graduation. The degree is based in a dedicated design studio and you will also have access to the production and lighting workshops used by Creative Events students (see p72 for further information). The Chatham Dockyard is an extensive visitor attraction, and we often make use of the facilities both for case studies and project work.

Degree programme Single honours • Experience Design (W901:K) 3 years (subject to approval)

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • •

Contexts and Case Studies Fundamentals of Design Realising the Creative Idea The Transformation of Space Visual Communications

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • • •

Brand Experiences – Experiences that Sell Dissertation Exhibition and Environment Interpretive Environments Moving Experiences: Themes, Rides and Fantasies • Telling Stories

Options You can choose from a list that includes modules from other design degrees. Examples include: • Installation and Interventions in the Public Realm • Multimedia and Interactive Events • Professional Development Portfolio • Realised Project • Scenography.


D Design: Experience Design Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Teaching and assessment

Careers

Much of the teaching is based around creative projects, supervised by a member of staff or an industry expert. During these projects you learn creative and practical skills, as well as applying a more theoretical and academic approach to your work. As the degree progresses, the projects offer the flexibility for you to develop your interests and specialisms. Personal feedback during a project, and at your presentations at key points, form the basis of much of the teaching. Seminars and occasional lectures cover more theoretical and abstract material.

A wide range of experience design practitioners and companies were consulted while planning this degree programme and it has been designed to equip you for work in a range of positions. Potential careers include: designing visitor attractions, theme parks, heritage sites or interactive museums; creative director for brand campaigns and events; art director; stylist for brand and fashion marketing; set dresser. There are related opportunities in theatre, film and television design and production. You are also well placed to take a Master’s degree in areas such as: theatre design, management or technology; cultural policy; tourism and heritage; and marketing.

You are assessed through a wide range of methods including exhibitions, design presentations (or critiques), observation of your practical work, reports and essays, and oral presentations. This range of assessment methods is designed to ensure that you can find the best way to demonstrate your learning – making sure the assessment is right for the type of work, and ensuring that whatever your strengths and weaknesses, everyone has equal opportunity.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Stage 1 entry: A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Merit, Merit. Stage 2 entry: successful completion of a Certificate ie 120 units of Certificate level (Stage 1 level) learning, in a related area, subject to an interview. Entry by interview and portfolio

Required subjects A level grade B or equivalent in one or two of the following: Design, Art, Graphics, Media. For other types of qualification, please contact us to discuss your situation.

Further information Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 3rd in employment te dua gra n sig Art and De University lete mp Co prospects in The Guide 2009.

Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets Visit the departmental website: www.kent.ac.uk/creative

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Digital Arts at Canterbury Kent voices

Digital technology has had a tremendous impact on all forms of communication in the 21st century. Using the computer, the creative artist can manipulate all forms of artefact whether video, photographic image, sound clip or text to create exciting new experiences for users.

Degree programme Single honours • Digital Arts (UCAS code tbc) 3 years • Digital Arts with a Year in Industry (UCAS code tbc) 4 years

Stage 1 You take eight, 15-credit core modules:

Our course in the Digital Arts offers the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge in areas such as interactive design, web design, digital film-making, computer animation and special effects.

“If you are fascinated by the digital media and would like to experiment and create digital art, then our new BA in Digital Arts is just for you. Building on the strong foundations of our Multimedia Technology and Design course, this offers a much greater focus on creativity and design flair. We live in exciting times; join us on this exciting journey.” Ania Bobrowicz Lecturer, Multimedia Technology and Design

Not sure? How about... • Drama and Multimedia p80 • Multimedia Technology and Design p142 • Web Computing p182

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Teaching in the School has been rated as excellent. The course is taught by a team of experts in design, animation, film-making, photography and website design. We have a team of senior industrialists who meet regularly with staff to review our courses, and there is an option to spend a year working in industry.

• • • • • • • •

Digital Graphics Digital Photography Digital Visual Narrative Introduction to Filmmaking Introduction to Programming Professional Practice Visual Communication Website Design.

Stage 2 You take two, 15-credit and three, 30-credit core modules: • • • • •

Digital Filmmaking Digital Portfolio Interaction Design Sound Design Virtual Worlds and 3D Modelling.


D Digital Arts Honours degree www.ee.kent.ac.uk

Stage 3

Teaching and assessment

You take three, 15-credit core modules, a 60-credit project and one, 15-credit optional module:

Most modules consist of a mix of lectures, seminars, studio work, computer sessions and private study. The workstations in our computer suites are equipped with current industrystandard software.

Location Canterbury.

All modules contain design and project work, and are continuously assessed.

A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher.

• • • •

Design for Print Digital Culture Final Year Project Visual Effects and Compositing.

Options One from: • 3D Computer Animation Pipeline • Managers and Organisations.

A year in industry Students on the Year in Industry degree spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We have an industrial placement officer who can offer help and advice.

The specialist project at Stage 3 is assessed by a written report, a critique, an exhibition and, of course, the outcome of the project itself. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your degree result. The industrial placement year is assessed by a written report and an interview that together count as 10% of your overall degree result.

Careers Graduates will find careers in areas such as: computer-based training, web development, web mastering, multimedia authoring, television, film, electronic games and internet publishing. Some may wish to go onto postgraduate study, such as our MScs in Computer Animation or Digital Visual Effects.

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels

Required subjects None.

Year in industry (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in duate gra ing eer Electronic Engin in The employment prospects ide 2010. Complete University Gu

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Did you know? the UK Kent was ranked 7th in lete University for Drama in The Comp 9. 200 ide Gu

Drama and Theatre Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“So far, the course has been really wonderful. The lessons are interesting and all the lecturers and seminar leaders are very knowledgeable – they really are passionate about teaching their subject and I’ve learnt so much from them!” Muriel Van Cruchten Drama and Film Studies To read more of what Muriel has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

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Creative Events: Design and Production p72 English and American Literature p90 Experience Design p76 Film Studies p96 Visual and Performed Arts p178

Kent offers one of the most exciting and popular Drama and Theatre courses in the country, which was praised as ‘innovative and leading in the field’ by the external Periodic Review panel in 2008. For us, studying drama means helping you to develop creative competence for the theatre profession. We have our eyes firmly set on theatre as it happens every day, in its various forms, from traditional text-based theatre to innovative performance practice; from theatre management to community theatre. Our close links with the profession are reflected in regular guest lectures, workshops, and opportunities for placement learning, leading to an excellent employment record. For this reason, we offer a unique four-year single honours course leading to the exclusive award of MDrama, an undergraduate Master’s degree. The programme has a pre-professional year where you focus on one selected professional specialism such as directing, producing or designing or following a research pathway. Our degrees also include the opportunity to apply for a year’s study abroad in Europe or the US. The course is taught by a team of international experts in their fields. Modules covers topics such as Shakespeare, stand-up comedy, Greek theatre, acting, physical theatre, theatre management and performance art, so you can develop your in-depth knowledge of methodological approaches, creative ideas, and historical evidence. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Drama and Theatre Studies (W421) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Drama and… • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QW84) 3 years • Comparative Literature (QW24) 3 years • English and American Literature (QW34) 3 years • Film Studies (WW46) 3 years • French (RW14) 4 years • German (RW24) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (WR44) 4 years • History (VW14) 3 years • Italian (RW34) 4 years • Multimedia (GW44) 3 years • Philosophy (VW54) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • •

Modern Theatre Performance Skills Texts for Theatre (single honours only) Theatre Workshop

Options If you are a joint honours student, you take Modern Theatre and either Theatre Workshop or Performance Skills, and modules from your other subject.


D Drama and Theatre Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/arts/drama

Stage 2 Single Honours students take one compulsory module and a choice of options. Joint honours students choose two 30-credit modules.

Compulsory module • Explorations in Theatre Practice (single honours only)

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Acting American Drama Greek Theatre British Theatre 1860-1940 Commedia dell’arte Contemporary European Theatre English Theatre: Restoration to Victorian European Naturalist Theatre and its Legacy History of Performance Art Making Performance 20th and 21st Century Multimedia Theatre Physical Theatre 1 Playwriting for Beginners Popular Performance Shakespeare’s Theatre Site-specific Performance

Stage 3 Options Single and joint honours students have a choice of options. • • • • • • • • • • • •

British Theatre 1945 -2005 Cultural Policies Dance and Discourse Dissertation Option Drama and Society in the Age of Shakespeare Making Performance New Directions Performing Classical Texts Performing Lives Performance: the Seminar Physical Theatre 2 Places of Performance

• Scenography: Practice and Theory • The Shakespeare Effect • Stand-up Comedians

Location Canterbury.

Stage 4

Programme type Full-time.

You take one of the following options as a yearlong pre-professional specialism:

Offer levels

• • • • • • • •

Applied Performance Contemporary Performance Practice Creative Producing Design for Performance Directing European Theatre (Research Specialism) Stand-up Comedy Theatre Dramaturgy.

A year abroad Single honours students can apply to spend a year abroad studying at a university either in Europe or the USA in your third year and return into the fourth year on the MDrama with a Year Abroad programme. Joint honours students may be able to spend a year abroad with their other subject.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is through workshops, seminars, lectures, and practical projects. Drama and Theatre modules are continuously assessed, based on coursework, projects and presentations (practical or research), essays and dissertations.

Careers

Award MDrama (Hons), BA (Hons).

Single honours: A level 340 points (over 3 A level equivalents) inc AAB at A level, BTEC DDM overall, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher inc 6 in Theatre where taken. Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, BTEC DDM/DMM overall, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher inc 6 in Theatre where taken.

Required subjects Single honours: none, although A level Drama and Theatre Studies grade B if taken. Joint honours: see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332 for full details.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Past graduates have become theatre producers, literary managers, journalists, authors, directors, performers, scriptwriters for television, stand-up comedians, casting agents, event managers, arts administrators, community theatre officers for local councils, drama teachers, and many have gone on to further postgraduate study.

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Economics at Canterbury Kent voices

“I’m really enjoying my course. It’s all about picking the right course for you – one that is enjoyable and you have a passion for. The highlight for me has been macroeconomics, which looks at the economy and the policies that shape it – I really enjoyed that.” Daniella Ajala Financial Economics To read more of what Daniella has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Accounting & Finance p24 • Business Administration p50 • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Economics) p86 • Financial Mathematics p138 • Management Science p134 • Mathematics and Statistics p138 • Politics and International Relations p154

Economics examines some of the profound issues in our life and times: economic growth and sustainable development, inequality and poverty, emerging market economies, unemployment, inflation, financial and monetary crises, environmental and natural resource problems, the provision of food for all, international trade and aid to poor countries. All of which are impacted by problems of global economic, demographic and climatic change. When you study at Kent, you have the chance to learn about these issues from economists who are highly regarded within the profession for emphasising the practical application of economics in action. Student satisfaction with our programmes is very high and we consistently appear in the top 10 economics departments in the National Student Survey. The School has a strong international reputation for research in key areas of economics and was ranked 16th in the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise. Many staff members act as economic advisers to government bodies including the UK’s Department of Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), the Department for International Development (DFID), the Food Standards Agency (FSA), and the European Commission. Staff also provide advice to international organisations such as the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the European Central Bank (ECB), the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), and the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD). We offer a choice of degree programmes that have been carefully designed to cater for the strengths and interests of individual students, and with an opportunity to spend a year in industry or to study in Europe.

• Economics (L100) 3 years • Economics with a Language (Spanish) (L1R4) 3 years • Economics with a Year in Industry (L102) 4 years • Economics with Computing (L1G4) 3 years • Economics with Econometrics (L141) 3 years • Financial Economics (L111) 3 years • Financial Economics with Econometrics (L142) 3 years These are some of the more popular Economics options. For other combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

European programmes • • • •

European Economics (L171) 4 years European Economics (French) (L176) 4 years European Economics (German) (L174) 4 years European Economics (Spanish) (L177) 4 years

Joint honours Economics and… • Accounting & Finance (LN14) • Business (LN11) • Law (ML11) • Politics (LL12) • Sociology (LL13)

Stage 1 Core modules • Economics • Mathematics for Economics and Business • Statistics for Economics and Business Plus any other compulsory modules for your chosen programme, for example, students on a European programme take language modules.

Options Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

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Degree programmes Single honours

• The Contemporary European Economy • Strategy and Games


E Economics Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/economics

And other optional modules drawn from a list available in the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Macroeconomics • Microeconomics • Quantitative Economics Plus other compulsory modules depending on your chosen programme.

Options Including, but not limited to: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Applied Economics Project Development Economics Dissertation Econometrics 1: Foundations of Econometric Theory Econometrics 2: Topics in Time Series Economic Integration in the EU Economics of Finance 1: Financial Markets and Instruments Economics of Finance 2: Asset Pricing Education, Skills and Earnings Environmental Economics, Institutions and Policy Extended Essay Financial Analysis Games for Economics and Business Industrial Economics International Finance International Trade Monetary Economics Policy Analysis Public Economics 1: Public Finance Public Economics 2: Public Sector Economics The Public Sector.

Plus other options depending on your chosen programme.

A year abroad/in industry You can spend a year working in industry. Alternatively, our European Economics programmes provide an opportunity to study at a partner university in France, Germany, Greece or Spain. The year out is between Stages 2 and 3. The School has a placement officer who can offer advice and guidance.

Teaching and assessment All of our modules are taught by a combination of lectures and small group sessions, which include seminars, computing practicals, problem sets, debates and role-play games. On average, you have a total of 12-14 hours of teaching per week across all modules. The School of Economics is committed to making sure that you leave Kent with much more than just a degree in Economics. We put great emphasis on the development of transferable skills including numeracy, analytical problem solving, data analysis, and written and oral communication, as well as subject-specific skills for further study at postgraduate level. The modules are assessed by continuous assessment of coursework throughout the year and an end-of-year exam in the final term. A number of modules at each Stage are assessed solely through coursework.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons) – single honours programmes BA (Hons) – joint honours programmes

Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level or GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies).

Required subjects All programmes: Economics grade B at A level where taken. L100, L174, L176, L177: Minimum of GCSE Mathematics grade B. L141, L142: Mathematics grade B at A level. L174: German grade B at A level. L176: French grade B at A level where taken or GCSE grade B/C French. L177, L1R4: Spanish grade B at A level where taken or GCSE grade C modern European language other than English.

Year abroad/in industry (see left). Careers Kent graduates have a high success rate in the graduate employment market, with past students going on to careers in accountancy, banking, finance, journalism, management consultancy, and business. Employers who have recruited our graduates in recent years include the Government Economic Service, Bank of England, PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Financial Services Authority.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Electronic and Communications Engineering at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teaching is very good and if you don’t understand anything in the lectures, the lecturers hold surgery hours each week where you can go and ask any questions.” Danny Cranmer Electronic and Communications Engineering To read more of what Danny has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Electronics-based products play a vital role in our daily lives, from the sophisticated diagnostic equipment used in modern hospitals to state-ofthe-art fibre optic communications. Computer technology, telecommunications and consumer electronics are advancing at an ever-increasing pace. At Kent, we offer degree programmes teaching state-of-the-art technology, which means our graduates can work at the forefront of all the major areas of electronic engineering. Our teaching is research-led so you get to know about the latest cutting-edge technologies, and the courses combine theory with vitally important practical and project work – the chance to turn ideas into real systems. Our student work has been awarded international prizes. Our staff meet regularly with a team of senior industrialists to ensure that our courses keep up to date with industry, and you have the opportunity to spend a year working in industry, which improves your skills and career prospects.

Degree programmes Single honours • Electronic and Communications Engineering BEng (H619) 3 years • Electronic and Communications Engineering MEng (H607) 4 years • Electronic and Communications Engineering with a Year in Industry BEng (H604) 4 years • Electronic and Communications Engineering with a Year in Industry MEng (H608) 5 years • Electronic and Communications Engineering including a Foundation Year BEng (H605) 4 years • Electronic and Computer Systems BEng (H691)* 1 year * The Electronic and Computer Systems BEng is designed to allow suitably qualified students, such as successful Foundation Degree graduates, to obtain a full honours degree by taking a one-year Stage 3 course. This leads to the same level of qualification as for students taking a traditional three-year course.

Stage 1 You take eight 15-credit modules.

Core modules

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Computer Systems Engineering p60 Multimedia Technology and Design p142 Physics p152 Web Computing p182

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in duate gra ing eer Electronic Engin in The employment prospects ide 2010. Complete University Gu

• • • • • • • •

Computer Systems Digital Technologies Electronic Circuits Engineering Mathematics Engineering Analysis Introduction to Electronics Introduction to Programming Robotics Project

Stage 2 You take eight 15-credit modules.

Core modules • • • • 84

Communication Electronics Computer Interfacing Project Digital Implementation Digital Signal Processing


E Electronic and Communications Engineering Honours degrees www.ee.kent.ac.uk

• • • •

Electronic Circuit Design Instrumentation Microcomputer Engineering Operating Systems and Architectures

If you successfully complete the foundation year you can go on to take either the Electronic and Communications Engineering programmes mentioned above or Computer Systems Engineering (see p60).

Stage 3 You take three 15-credit core modules, one 45credit core project module, and then choose two 15-credit options.

Core modules • • • •

Communication Systems Digital Communications Final Year Project Product Development

Options Two from: • Digital Control and Robotics • Digital Systems Design • Embedded Computer Systems

Teaching and assessment Teaching includes practical work in conventional laboratory experiments or projects, lecture modules and examples classes, which develop your problem-solving skills, and staff hold regular ‘surgeries’ where you can discuss any questions you have. Assessment is by a combination of coursework for practical and examples classwork, and written examinations. The Stage 3 project is assessed by a written report, an oral presentation, a viva examination, a poster presentation and the outcome of the project itself.

Careers MEng only Stage 4 • • • • • •

Broadband Networks (optional) Business Strategy Communication Networks Signal and Communication Theory Systems Group Project Wireless/Mobile Communications (optional)

A year in industry

Our graduates go into careers such as: electronic engineering and computing; telecommunications industries including radio, television and satellite communications; medical electronics, instrumentation and industrial process control. They also frequently go on to postgraduate study, for example, MSc in Broadband and Mobile Communication Networks, Embedded Systems and Instrumentation or Information Security and Biometrics.

Location Canterbury. Award BEng (Hons), MEng. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels H604/H619: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc CC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points, inc 5 in SL Mathematics and a science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in standard Mathematics and a science subject (not Mathematics Studies). Direct entry to Stage 2 available to suitably qualified students. H607/H608: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in SL Mathematics and a science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in standard Mathematics and a science subject (not Mathematics Studies). H605: 160 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc EE at A level, IB 24 points.

Required subjects H604/H615/H618/H619: At least an A level in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/ technology subject (such as Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C for BEng, grade B for MEng. Equivalent qualifications are acceptable.

You have the option of spending a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3.

H614: GCSE Mathematics and Science grade C.

Foundation year (H605)

Year in industry (see left).

This programme is for students who do not have the qualifications needed for direct entry to the honours degree programme. It covers electronics, computing, physics and mathematics.

Professional recognition Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET).

Admissions enquiries

Further information

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets 85


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Employment Relations and Human Resource Management at Canterbury Kent voices

“My first-year core module gave me a good overview of management. It is a great module because it encourages you to look in different directions. It is a good basis for any business-related degree.” Candice Howe Employment Relations and Human Resource Management To read more of what Candice has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

This degree at Kent provides an up-to-date and analytical approach to human resource management. It also includes an important industrial relations element, which sets employment relations in a wider economic and social context, including the roles of government, trade unions and European institutions. The programme gives you a broad-based international business education, mainly non-quantitative, which equips you for jobs in employment relations, personnel, HRM, or any branch of management. The programme is multidisciplinary and gives you a chance to specialise in different pathways. It draws on both the varied professional experience of Business School staff and also on the resources of several other departments in the Social Science faculty. A good pass on the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (N620) 3 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Accounting) (NN46) 3 years • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Economics) (LN16) 3 years • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Law) (MN26) 3 years • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Social Policy) (NL64) 3 years • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Social Psychology) (CN86) 3 years • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Sociology) (LN36) 3 years

Stage 1 Core module • Business Skills • Introduction to Management Plus other required modules for your chosen pathway.

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

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Accounting & Finance p24 Business Administration p50 Business Studies p52 Economics p82 Management Science p134 Sociology p170

Options A wide range of choices drawn from a list in the Faculty of Social Sciences.


E Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Stage 2/3 Core modules You take the following compulsory modules. • Employment Relations • Employment Relations & Human Resource Management Project • International Employment Relations and Human Resource Management • Law of the Workplace • Managing Human Resources in Contemporary Organisations • Managing People • The Rise of the Modern Corporation or Psychology of the Workplace • Strategic Human Resource Management

Options Including, but not limited to, and depending on your chosen pathway: • • • • • • • • •

Teaching and assessment Modules are taught by lectures and seminars. Most of them include regular seminar papers, presentations, case studies, assignments and formal essays. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination, generally split 30% coursework and 70% examination. Both your Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

Careers Recent graduates have gone into careers such as: general management in industrial and commercial organisations, government services, trade unions; universities and other research bodies; human resource and personnel management, labour journalism, labour law, international agencies.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level or BC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (ER & HRM), ER & HRM (Law), ER & HRM (Social Policy), ER & HRM (Social Psychology), ER & HRM (Sociology): GCSE Mathematics grade C. ER & HRM (Accounting), ER & HRM (Economics): GCSE Mathematics grade B.

The Anthropology of Business Business Economics Corporate and Business Strategy Diversity in Organisations Education, Skills and Earnings Gender and Organisations Globalisation and Social Change Industrial Economics Strategy Analysis and Tools

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Plus other options generally drawn from a wide range in the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Did you know? Assessment In the 2008 Research ss and ine Bus of Exercise, 55% research Management Studies ernationally at Kent was rated as “int g”. din excellent” or “world lea

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English Language and Linguistics at Canterbury Kent voices

“My course is going really well. The first year is the theory year and the second year is when I get to study creative writing, language and the media – all the things I really want to do, so I’m looking forward to that.”

Studying English Language and Linguistics provides an opportunity to discover and explore a dynamic and often controversial field which is crucial to our understanding of spoken and written language in all their complexity. Combining theoretical and practical elements, the programme explores both the structure of language and its multifaceted relationship with society. It also covers related areas such as aesthetics, choice, function and organisation, globalisation, internationalisation, variety and change, the psychology of language, politeness and conversational structure, and concepts such as persuasion, power and barriers to communication. English Language and Linguistics is also available as a joint honours subject. Full details of our new joint honours degrees can be found online at www.kent.ac.uk/secl

Degree programmes Single honours • English Language and Linguistics (QQ13) 3 years

Joint honours English Language and… • Comparative Literature (QQ32) 3 years • Drama and Theatre Studies (WQ43) 3 years • English and American Literature (Q391) 3 years (subject to approval) • French (RQ13) 4 years • German (RQ23) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (RQ43) 4 years • History (VQ1H) 3 years • Italian (RQ33) 4 years • Philosophy (VQ5H) 3 years • Politics and International Relations (LQ23) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules

Elliott Farr English Language and Linguistics

• Language and Structure • Language, Self, and Society • Sounds of English

To read more of what Elliott has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Options

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Business Administration p50 Comparative Literature p56 Cultural Studies p70 English and American Literature p90 History p114 Foundation Programme for International Students p102 • Philosophy p150 • Politics and International Relations p154

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You can also choose from a range of optional modules, including: • • • • •

Discourse Analysis English Words: History & Morphology Language and Meaning Tackling Text World Englishes


E English Language Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl

Stage 2/3

Teaching and assessment

At Stages 2 and 3, building on the foundations laid in the first year, you may choose from the following options:

On average, you have eight one-hour classes each week, including lectures, seminars, discussion groups or workshops, depending on the material and the nature of the module. You may also have group or one-to-one tutorials for research projects and dissertations. You will additionally have access to additional information and support via Moodle, our interactive webbased learning platform.

Introduction to Stylistics • English Language Teaching • First Language Acquisition • Generative Grammar • Indo-European Philology • Language and The Media • Research Methods in Linguistics • Variation and Change in English Stylistics and Creative Writing • Atypical Language: Case Studies • Dissertation/Field Work Project • Topics in Language, Self & Society • Intercultural Communication • Theories of Discourse & Culture • Topics in Syntax: Interfaces These modules are subject to approval at the time of printing. Please check our website for their full status and module handbooks as well as for details of other new modules at www.kent.ac.uk/secl

At each stage, some modules are continuously assessed, while others combine coursework and examination. Stage 2 and 3 modules count towards your final degree result.

Careers Single and Joint Honours programmes in English Language and Linguistics prepare students for a range of careers where an in-depth understanding of how language functions is essential. These include advertising, journalism, public relations, publishing, teaching, company training, broadcasting, and the civil or diplomatic services. The single honours programme is particularly useful for students who are thinking of English teaching either in the UK or abroad.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents), inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. International students need national schoolleaving qualifications at the appropriate level. You need to be a proficient English speaker with a strong interest in language reflected in your qualifications, but all applications will be carefully considered. Joint Honours: See the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332 for details.

Required subjects GCSE English Language grade C. RQ13: A level in a modern European language other than English. RQ23: A level German grade B. WQ43: A level Drama grade B, if taken.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in dies in the Stu a Are and Languages t Sur vey. 2009 National Studen

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Did you know?

English Literature

the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in te employment English Studies gradua ian University prospects in The Guard 0. 201 Guide

at Canterbury Kent voices

“I’ve found myself busy throughout the year tackling accessible yet challenging work both in and outside of the course.” Matthew Carbery English and American Literature To read more of what Matthew has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

English at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. It covers not only traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) but newer fields such as American literature, creative writing, postcolonial literature and developments in literary theory. We also offer the opportunity for you to spend a year studying abroad in either America or Europe. Staff in the School of English are internationally recognised for academic research which links closely with undergraduate teaching, and the School regularly hosts visits by a variety of international writers and critics. There are several published authors and poets in the School, and our students annually publish a compilation of creative writing poetry and prose. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • English, American and Postcolonial Literatures (Q302) 3 years • English and American Literature (Q300) 3 years • English and American Literature and Creative Writing (Q324) 3 years

Year abroad programmes

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

American Studies (Literature) p28 Comparative Literature p56 Drama and Theatre Studies p80 English Language and Linguistics p88 Journalism p128

• English, American and Postcolonial Literature with an Approved Year Abroad (Q303) 4 years • English and American Literature with an Approved Year Abroad (Q301) 4 years • English and American Literature and Creative Writing with an Approved Year Abroad (Q325) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, including the chance to study abroad for a year, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. 90

English and American Literature and… • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QQ38) 3 years • Comparative Literature (QQF3) 3 years • Drama (QW34) 3 years • Film Studies (QW36) 3 years • French (QR31) 4 years • German (QR32) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (QR34) 4 years • History (QV31) 3 years • History & Philosophy of Art (VQ33) 3 years • Italian (QR33) 4 years • Law (MQ13) 4 years • Philosophy (QVH5) 3 years • Religious Studies (QV36) 3 years • Sociology (LQ33) 3 years English, American and Postcolonial Literature and... • Film (WQ63) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Critical Practice • Early Drama • Readings in the Twentieth Century (subject to approval) • Romanticism and Critical Theory (Single honours only) Creative Writing • Narrative Theory and Practice • Poetry Theory and Practice Joint honours students must take either Romanticism and Critical Theory or Early Drama.

Options Drawn from modules in the Faculty of Humanities.


E English Literature Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/english

Stages 2/3 Single honours students take four per year and joint honours students two per year of the following modules:

Core modules Literature • Early American Literature • Early Modern Literature • Eighteenth-Century Literature 1660-1750 • Eighteenth-Century Literature 1750-1830 • Elizabethan Drama • Jacobean Drama • Modern American Literature • Medieval and Tudor Literature • Modernism • Nineteenth-Century Literature Creative Writing • Reading and Writing the Self/Individual Writing Project

Options • American Crime Fiction • Bodies of Evidence: Reading the Body in Eighteenth-Century Literature • The Brontës in Context • Charles Dickens and Victorian England • Chaucer • Contemporary Irish Writing • Devils, Whores and Deceit: The Dramatic Repertoire of Prince Charles’ Men (c16101621) • Fantasy and Desire in Early Modern Literature • Heroes and Exiles: An Introduction to Old English Poetry • Image, Vision and Dream: Medieval Texts and Visual Culture • Innovation and Experiment in New York, 1945-1995 • John Milton • Language and Place in Colonial and Postcolonial Poetry • Literature and Food • The Literature of Terror

• • • • • • • •

Long Essay Native American Cultures: Texts and Contexts Nineteenth Century American Short Story Places and Journeys Postcolonial Writing Romance Romanticism and the Novel Sea Studies, Desert Studies: Literature and Other Media • Twentieth-Century American Short Story • The Unknown: Reading and Writing Creative Writing students choose from: • • • •

The Body Reading and Writing Poetry Reading and Writing Short Fiction Reading and Writing the Innovative Contemporary Novel

Location Canterbury Award BA (Hons) Programme type Full-time and part-time Offer levels A/AS level 320/340 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5/6/6 in HL English A/A2/B or IB Diploma with 16/17 points at Higher inc 5/6/6 in HL English A1/A2/B.

Required subjects A level English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B.

Year abroad (see left). Further information

A year abroad You have the opportunity to study abroad in either Europe or America for a year between Stages 2 and 3. We have exchange agreements with over 20 universities.

Teaching and assessment

Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Modules are taught by weekly lectures and seminars, plus individual supervision for the Long Essay. Assessment at Stage 1 is by 100% coursework in the first half of the year, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in the second half of the year. Stage 2/3 assessment varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50.

Careers Our graduates have gone into: journalism, broadcasting and media, publishing, writing and teaching; more general areas such as banking, marketing analysis and project management; or on to further study for postgraduate qualifications. 91


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Environmental Social Science at Canterbury Kent voices

This is a unique programme that brings together several social science subjects (anthropology, economics, law, politics, sociology, social policy) to explore the most important issues of our time – the impacts of human activity upon our environment, and the survival of species. The programme looks at the nature of environmental issues, why some are highlighted while others are neglected, how and why policymaking agendas change, and what measures are and might be employed to tackle serious environmental problems.

“So far, Environmental Policy and Practice has been my favourite module – we had a good seminar group with a lot of thoughtprovoking discussion. We’ve also had some really brilliant, enthusiastic lecturers.” Charlotte Neil Environmental Social Science

The departments that contribute to the programme are all highly rated for their internationally recognised research and the quality of their teaching. You will be taught by some of the internationally leading figures in their fields.

Not sure? How about...

Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of this degree programme.

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Anthropology p30 Conservation p64 Social Anthropology p162 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166 Sociology p170

• Environmental Social Science (F9L9) 3 years

Stage 1 You take one 30-credit core module and option modules of your choice totalling another 90 credits.

Core module • Environmental Issues: Social Science Approaches

Options As well as addressing vital issues close to home, such as climate change, waste management, the production and use of energy, consumption, food and agriculture, transport, health and environment, population and sustainable development, we examine the roles of environmental activists and transnational corporations, law, policy and environmental regulation, and the perspectives and practices of indigenous peoples.

To read more of what Charlotte has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

• • • • • •

Degree programme Single honours

Recommended options include the following: • • • • • • • • •

Animals and People Biodiversity Economics Environmental Sciences Introduction to Social Anthropology Life’s Systems and Processes Natural Sciences and the Environment People and Plants Social Problems and Social Policy: The Market, the Family and the State • Social Problems and Social Policy: Youth, the Family and the State • Sociology • Studying Politics and International Relations: Key Skills. Plus modules drawn from a wide range in the Faculty of Social Sciences.


E Environmental Social Science Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 2/3

Teaching and assessment

You take the 15-credit core module and other modules of your choice totalling 225 credits. We strongly recommend (although it is not required) that you take the 30-credit Dissertation option.

Most modules involve a weekly lecture and seminar, and you normally have four hours of lectures and four hours of seminars per week.

Core module • Environmental Policy and Practice

Options 165-180 credits from the following: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

The City Climate Change and Conservation Conservation and Communities Development Economics The Economics of the Environment Environmental Law Environmental Law Project Environmental Politics Environmental Social Science Dissertation Human Ecology The Information Society and Digital Culture International Environmental Politics Protest, Social Movements and Political Change Refugees and Forced Migration Research Project in Social Policy and Sociology Risk and Society The Shaping of International Biodiversity Regulation The Social Politics of Food Social Research Methods Sociological and Anthropological Approaches to Development Sociology of Disasters The Third Sector Tourism and Conservation Urban Sociology.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time.

Most modules have an end-of-year examination that counts for 50% of the mark, coursework contributing the other 50%. The Dissertation module is examined 100% by coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

Offer levels A/AS level 280/300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BC/BB at A level or CC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher.

Careers

Required subjects

Public, voluntary, and private sectors (both those in environmental subjects and those where an environmental awareness is necessary as part of a wider understanding); and more specialised study. Recent graduates have found employment in public relations, local government, research and teaching, among other professions.

None.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in employment Social Policy graduate ian University prospects in The Guard 9. 200 Guide

Plus credits from other modules in the Faculty of Social Sciences.

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European Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“I enjoy the interactive teaching methods: for example, we’ll research how the media has treated a story on a European directive and there will be lots of discussion, rather than just sitting being talked to.”

European Studies at Kent gives you the opportunity to study the politics, history and culture of Europe in the nearest UK city to continental Europe. We call ourselves the UK’s European university, not only because of our proximity to the continent but also because of our extensive network of connections and partnerships in Europe. We offer two sets of degree programmes in European Studies – one in Humanities and one in Social Sciences – both including the study of either French, German, Italian and Spanish, or a combination of two languages (Humanities only). All of our programmes include a year abroad in another European country either studying at one of our partner universities or working. For applicants taking the Kent Social Sciences Foundation Programme for International Students, passing with 60% average is a requirement for entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Christina Dziewanska-Stringer European Studies To read more of what Christina has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Degree programmes European programmes • European Studies (Humanities) – Combined Languages (R904) 4 years • European Studies (Humanities) – French (R190) 4 years • European Studies (Humanities) – German (R290) 4 years • European Studies (Humanities) – Spanish/Italian (R903) 4 years • European Studies (Social Sciences) – French (R191) 4 years • European Studies (Social Sciences) – German (R291) 4 years • European Studies (Social Sciences) – Spanish/Italian (R901) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules • European Integration • Introduction to Government • Studying Politics and International Relations: Skills and Methods • Language (French, German, Italian or Spanish) at an appropriate level for your chosen programme Other subject core modules depending on your chosen programme.

Options

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • •

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Comparative Literature p56 European Arts p96 French p104 German p106 Hispanic Studies p112 Italian p126 Politics and International Relations p154

Did you know? ean university Kent is the UK’s Europ nday Times Su the to and, according ‘can claim to University Guide 2008, tional be Britain’s only interna ’. university

Drawn from a wide range available in the Faculties of Social Sciences and Humanities, again varying with the programme you have chosen.


E European Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/politics www.kent.ac.uk/secl

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Language modules Depending on your chosen degree, compulsory modules could also include: • • • •

Europe and the World Federalism and Regionalism in Europe Politics in the Western European States Politics of the European Union.

Depending on your chosen subject, you must also take a number of the following, the choice of which depends on whether you are studying a Social Sciences or Humanities programme: • • • • •

European Legal Systems European Security Co-operation International Industrial Relations Theory, Ideology and Politics of Welfare Wars, Revolution and Dictatorship in Europe 1870-1945.

Plus core modules specified by your chosen subject area.

Options A choice of a range of modules from the Faculties of Social Sciences and Humanities, depending on your chosen programme.

A year abroad You spend a year abroad between Stages 2 and 3, studying at one of our partner universities in Paris, Grenoble, Lille, Lausanne, Namur (French), Berlin or Potsdam (German), Siena or Turin (Italian), and Madrid or Barcelona (Spanish), or working as an English language assistant (Humanities students only) or working in approved employment. Students on the Social Science with French programme are eligible to compete for an internship in Brussels. Credits from your year abroad count towards your final degree.

Teaching and assessment Most of the modules involve a combination of lectures, seminars, contact with a native speaker and individual study in our computer-assisted language learning laboratory.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Humanities: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc modern European language other than English. Social Sciences: A/AS level 320 points (3 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc modern European language other than English.

Modules taken at Stage 1 are assessed either by 100% coursework or a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination. At Stages 2 and 3, depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50.

Required subjects

Careers

Year abroad (see left).

Recent students went into areas such as politics both in the UK national and local government and Europe, the media, consultancy, teaching, marketing and financial services. Many also went on to postgraduate study.

Further information

French/Italian/Spanish post A level: A level grade B. French/Italian/Spanish beginners level: GCSE grade B/aptitude in modern European language. German: normally A level grade B.

Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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F

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 8th in ematics in The Drama, Dance and Cin y Guide 2009. Times Good Universit

Film Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“I chose Film Studies because I’m interested in film, film-making, drama and English – so it was sort of a collective of all my interests. In the spring term, I’ll be taking the module Exploring the Frame, which involves actually making a film, so that really appeals to me and will definitely stand out.” Luca Piercey Film Studies To read more of what Luca has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Art and Film p36 Creative Events: Design and Production p72 Drama and Theatre Studies p80 Fine Art p98 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Visual and Performed Arts p178

For over 30 years, the University of Kent has been at the forefront of developing film studies as an academic subject. We are one of the three major universities in the UK for film studies, and one of the most highly regarded departments in Europe.

Degree programmes Single honours

Film Studies at Kent engages with cinema’s rich scope and history, from silent classics and mainstream Hollywood to world cinema and the avant-garde. We have a thriving film culture, with 10-20 films screened on our courses each week, the Gulbenkian Cinema (the regional arts cinema) based on campus, and a lively student film society.

Joint honours

Our modules cover the study of film theory, history and analysis, from the basics of history and style from both Hollywood and World Cinemas at Stage 1 to exploring further aspects of film with topics including national cinemas, animation, cognition and emotion, fantasy and pulp film. The emphasis is on academic modules but these also combine with innovative and creative practical study, such as our module in Film Programming that includes a work placement. Single honours students can choose modules in practical film-making, including documentary film-making, screenwriting, and moving image production. You can explore languages and processes developed though both avant-garde and documentary traditions, alongside approaches to narrative fiction. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• Film Studies (W610) 3 years • Film Studies with a Year Abroad (W616) 4 years • European Arts (Film Studies) (W612) 4 years

These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Film Studies and… • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QW86) 3 years • Comparative Literature (WQ62) 3 years • Computing (WG64) 3 years • Drama (WW46) 3 years • English, American and Postcolonial Literature (WQ63) 3 years • English and American Literature (QW36) 3 years • French (RW16) 4 years • German (RW26) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (WR64) 4 years • History (VW16) 3 years • History & Philosophy of Art (VW36) 3 years • Italian (RW36) 4 years • Philosophy (VW56) 3 years

Stage 1 You take two core film modules and a choice of options.

Core modules • Introduction to Narrative Cinema 1 (American Cinema) • Introduction to Narrative Cinema 2 (World Cinema)

Options A wide range of options in the Faculty of Humanities, including Exploring the Frame (single honours Film Studies students only). 96


F Film Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/arts/film

Stage 2 At least one module from: • • • •

British Cinema since the 1950s History of British Cinema National and Transnational Cinema Topics in American Cinema.

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Animated Worlds Avant-garde and Experimental Cinema Cinema and Difference Cinema in 1920s Berlin, Paris, Moscow Cognition and Emotion in Film Digital Domains Documentary Film European Cinema: Realisms The Fantastic Film Film and Television Adaptation Film Criticism Film Programming Film Style: Analysis and Interpretation The Gothic in Film Introduction to Screenwriting (single honours students only) Pulp Film: The Avant-garde and Popular Cinema Representing Actuality Silent Cinema Sound and Cinema Storytelling and the Cinema Study of the Work of a Single Film Director Topics in American Cinema 1: Female Performers in Hollywood Cinema

Other options • • • •

The Photograph Reading the Image Science Fictions: Comparative Perspectives Science Fictions: Comparative Perspectives: Selected Topics

Stage 3 Options Drawn from the list available at Stage 2, with the exception of Introduction to Screenwriting and Representing Actuality. Single honours students can take Moving Image Production (provided they achieved at least 60% in Introduction to Screenwriting and Representing Actuality). Stage 3 single honours students can take the Long Essay module.

A year abroad You spend a year abroad between Stages 2 and 3, studying at one of our partner universities in Europe: Amsterdam, Berlin, Bologna, Lausanne and Paris; the USA: California and Indiana; and Asia: Hong Kong.

Teaching and assessment All modules involve lectures, small group seminars and film screenings (where relevant). On average, you have two lectures and three hours of seminars each week, plus film viewing. Depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, usually in the ratio 50:50.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 340 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Film Studies or 6 in SL Film Studies where taken or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Film Studies or 6 in SL Film Studies where taken. Joint honours: A/AS level 280/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Film Studies or 6 in SL Film Studies where taken or IB Diploma with 14/15/16 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Film Studies or 6 in SL Film Studies where taken.

Required subjects A level Film Studies grade B where taken.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Careers Film-making, film and television industries, arts organisations, university and school teaching, local government and business, postgraduate academic and practical film courses. In the last few years, students have gone on to take up positions such as film journalists, film/TV archivists and Promotions Director (BSkyB).

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Plus further options available from the Faculty of Humanities.

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Fine Art at Medway Kent voices

“Studying Fine Art at Kent is exciting and unique. For me, the best aspect of the course is the number of tutors we have available to us on a daily basis and how easy they are to approach. There is so much diversity within this course, every day can be completely different.” Elizabeth Hainsworth Fine Art To read more of what Elizabeth has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • •

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Architecture p34 Art and Film p36 Creative Events: Design and Production p72 Cultural Studies p70 Experience Design p76 Film Studies p96 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Interiors p122 Visual and Performed Arts p178

The Fine Art course at Kent brings together practical and intellectual skills, so that you are encouraged to explore and develop your own creative potential as an integral part of the academic study of fine art. Throughout the programme, you work on projects in the studio, at the same time, studying the key ideas and movements in the development of recent issues within fine art.

Degree programme Single honours

At each stage of the course, you are asked to make choices to create your own body of work in the studio, this can be in any discipline or in any medium. At Kent we have a contemporary ethos with no house style and we invest in the student’s own learning.

Stage 2 Core modules

The course is designed so that studio development is structured alongside practical teaching and contemporary theory. For example, in Stage 1, the diagnostic programme is designed to introduce you to a variety of new ideas and mediums. The contextual studies programme is designed to react to your needs within the practice of fine art. These elements let you respond in the studio through your practical work. In Stage 2, alongside studio development, you specialise in a module from your chosen area – 2D, 3D or 4D media. The Contemporary Theory module will support your practice by exploring a range of themes relevant to contemporary thinking. In Stage 3 you realise an independent practical project and while working towards your final exhibition, study the module Curation, Arts Writing and Display. This enables you to create work, put on a professional exhibition with a catalogue and have your first real experience of interfacing with an audience. Running alongside this will be your independent dissertation; an extended study within the area of contemporary art or critical thinking.

• Fine Art (W100:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Contextual Studies • Creative Investigation • Diagnostic Studies

• 2D, 3D and 4D Media • Contemporary Theory • Studio Development 1 and 2

Stage 3 Core modules • Curation, Arts Writing and Display • Independent Dissertation • Independent Realised Project

Option You will have the option to take modules from other courses within the School of Arts at Medway, these include Creative Events and Music Technology.


F Fine Art Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/arts/hpa

Teaching and assessment The Fine Art Department emphasises a close working relationship with students. All our staff are engaged with the practice of fine art and bring with them a broad range of experience, so that all areas of the fine art specialism are covered in the curriculum. You are given your own studio space so you have the freedom to develop as an artist, and you have access to fully equipped workshops, IT facilities and dark rooms. All our modules include lectures and seminars as well as group critiques and one-to-one tutorials. We emphasise viewing art in museums and galleries in London and international venues where you learn art criticism and other skills such as curation and display.

All modules provided by Fine Art are assessed solely by coursework such as critiques, presentations, seminar note, essays, image analysis and other module-related activities. This helps you develop in-depth knowledge of topics and gives you the practical skills to develop within modules that are most interesting and relevant to your study, and to acquire a wide range of generic and transferable skills.

Careers Potential careers could include artist, academic, arts administration, galleries and museums, journalism, advertising, teaching and image libraries.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Visual Arts or 6 in SL Visual Arts where taken or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Visual Arts or 6 in SL Visual Arts where taken.

Required subjects A level Fine Art, Art and Design or History of Art grade B if taken. You should bring a portfolio of your practical work to the interview.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Art Kent was ranked 6th in Good es and Design in The Tim University Guide 2010.

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Forensic Sciences at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teachers in the School are highly qualified and have very effective ways of teaching difficult chemistry topics to students in an interesting and easily understood way. The level of support is remarkable – the staff truly care about the students and work their hardest to support them through the degree programmes.”

Forensic science is a high-profile subject in the UK. It has received a lot of new investment for expansion since the well-publicised miscarriages of justice in the 1970s. As a result, scientific liaison officers have been appointed by the police service and the knowledge and communication gap between the scientists and the police at a crime scene has narrowed. Forensic skills are used in a wide range of professions and industries, for instance at disaster scenes, within archaeology and in the food and pharmaceutical industries. New legislation has stimulated demand for authentication of materials, and for experts and analytical companies to carry out the work. Forensic scientists are specialists, but their skills have to bridge several disciplines within a legal context. At Kent, the core scientific content is taught by staff from the School of Physical Sciences and the Department of Biosciences, and the legal background is taught by staff from Kent Law School. Additional content is delivered by expert practitioners from the field of forensic science.

To read more of what Rebecca has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... Biochemistry p42 Biology p46 Biomedical Science p48 Criminal Justice Studies p66 Criminology p68 Law p130, 132 Physics p152

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• Forensic Chemistry BSc (F1F4) 3 years • Forensic Chemistry MSci (F1FL) 4 years • Forensic Chemistry with a Year in Industry (F1FK) 4 years • Forensic Science BSc (F410) 3 years • Forensic Science MSci (F414) 4 years • Forensic Science with a Foundation Year (F412) 4 years • Forensic Science with a Year in Industry (F411) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Forensic Science Skills • Fundamental Chemistry for Physical Scientists and Bioscientists • Introduction to Biochemistry • Introduction to Forensic Science • Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry • Legal Process for Forensic Scientists • Molecules, Matter and Energy

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • •

Rebecca Tanney Forensic Chemistry

• • • • • • •

Degree programmes Single honours

Did you know? Kent was ranked Forensic Sciences at t satisfaction den stu for 1st in the UK dent Survey. Stu al in the 2009 Nation

Chemical Identification Techniques Criminal Law for Forensic Sciences Forensic Physical Methods Inorganic Chemistry Numeracy Skills for Forensic Science

Forensic Science • Forensic Archaeology • Forensic Ballistics and Collision Analysis or Pharmacology or Physiology • Facial Identification and Imaging Forensic Chemistry • Aspects of Synthetic Organic Chemistry • Inorganic and Polymeric Materials • Thermodynamics and Spectroscopy


F Forensic Sciences Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/physical-sciences

Stage 3 Core modules • • • • •

Analytical Chemistry Fires and Explosions Forensic Presentation and Media Skills Law of Evidence for Forensic Scientists Medicinal Chemistry

Forensic Science • Forensic DNA Analysis • Forensic Science Project Forensic Chemistry • Research Project • Topics in Functional Materials

Stage 3 MSci only Forensic Science • Advanced Laboratory Techniques and Projects • Forensic DNA Analysis Forensic Chemistry • Advanced Laboratory Techniques and Projects • Topics in Functional Materials

Stage 4 • • • • •

Advanced Topics in Forensic Science Forensic Analysis and Court Presentation Forensic Science Research Project Physical Science Research Planning Substances of Abuse

Foundation year This programme is for students who lack the qualifications needed for direct entry into Stage 1 of the BSc. It includes lectures in biology, chemistry and mathematics, together with practical classes, and is taught entirely on the Canterbury campus.

Teaching and assessment There are approximately eight one-hour lectures each week, laboratory classes, project work and problem-solving seminars. Assessment is by a combination of written examinations, continuous assessment and other assignments. You must pass the Stage 1 examinations in order to go on to Stage 2. The year in industry mark also counts towards your final degree result. Coursework assessments include incident analysis, evidence preservation, presentation skills, and expert witness testimony.

Careers Our graduates go into areas such as government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, local authorities, contract laboratories, research or further vocational training.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons), MSci. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Biology or 5 in HL Chemistry and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Biology or 5 in HL Chemistry and 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects F1F4, F410, F411, F414, F1FK, F1FL: A level grade C or equivalent in a science subject, preferably Chemistry, Biology or Human Biology. GCSE Mathematics grade C. F412: Foundation Course – individual consideration. MSci: A level grade C or equivalent in a science subject, preferably Biology, Chemistry or Human Biology.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition Degrees accredited by the Forensic Science Society.

Further information A year in industry You have the opportunity to spend a year in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We give advice and guidance on finding a placement.

Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Foundation Programme for International Students at Canterbury Kent voices

“The International Foundation Course is the best way to get ready for the next years at university and literally gives you the foundation to start university without any fears.” Theofano Michael International Foundation Year Social Sciences To read more of what Theofano has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

If you think that your education or experience so far may not yet have given you the qualifications, knowledge, study skills or ability in English language that you need to do the degree of your choice, why not apply for the international foundation programme?

Programmes

The international foundation programme is designed especially for international students. It includes additional English language support and provides entry into the wide range of subjects in our Faculties of Humanities, Social Sciences and Sciences.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

You are eligible for a foundation year if you achieved good grades but not in the subject areas needed for your chosen degree, you didn’t obtain grades high enough for your chosen degree, you are from a country where secondary education does not reach the level needed for direct entry to UK undergraduate degrees, for example, the USA, Japan or China, or you haven’t reached a high enough standard in English language to cope with the demands of a degree programme.

Architecture p34 Business Administration p50 Economics p82 English Literature p90 History p114 Law p130, 132 Philosophy p150 Politics and International Relations p154 Psychology p158 Sociology p170

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Passing this programme guarantees you entry onto the first year of the following degree programmes: American Studies Architecture Classical & Archaeological Studies Comparative Literary Studies Computing and the Humanities* Contemporary Arts Drama and Theatre Studies English and American Literature English, American and Postcolonial Literature European Arts European Studies (Humanities) Film Studies French German Hispanic Studies History History and Archaeological Studies History & Philosophy of Art Interior Architecture/Design Italian* Philosophy Religious Studies Visual and Performed Arts War Studies

* Joint degrees only

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • • •

International Foundation Year, Humanities (Q308) 1 year

Did you know? ght by specialist The programme is tau ry campus, rbu nte Ca lecturers at our to the full where you have access ces as well as range of learning resour ce. dan gui and t por student sup

International Foundation Year, Social Sciences (L590) 1 year Passing this programme guarantees you entry onto the first year of the following degree programmes: • • • • •

Accounting & Finance Anthropology Business Administration Computing and the Social Sciences* Conservation


F Foundation Programme for International Students Foundation Programme www.kent.ac.uk

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Criminology* Cultural Studies Economics Employment Relations and Human Resource Management Environmental Social Science European Studies (Social Sciences) Health and Social Care Law Management Science Politics and International Relations Psychology, Applied Psychology, and Social Psychology Social Anthropology Social Policy Social Policy and Public Sector Management Sociology

* Joint degrees only International Foundation Year, Sciences 1 year • Electronics • Computing • Computing and Artificial Intelligence

Core module • Academic Skills Development Some degrees require further core modules: students wanting to do Law must take a Law module, students doing Architecture must take a Design module, students in some subjects (for example, Business, Economics, Psychology) must take a module in Foundation in Mathematics/Quantitative Methods. Students taking Electronics must take a module in Electronics and students on the Computing pathway take programming modules.

Subject options Depending on how many core modules you are taking, you can choose two or three of the modules listed opposite. When you arrive at the University, you are given individual advice on the best options to take for your chosen course.

Humanities • • • •

European History for University Study Literature for University Study Philosophy for University Study Linguistics for University Study

Social Sciences • Business and Management for University Study • Economics for University Study • Politics for University Study • Sociology for University Study

Teaching and assessment Teaching includes small groups, tutorials, work in the IT laboratory, workshops, and independent study. Small groups give you the opportunity to express ideas and opinions through both formal presentations and informal discussion. We look for enthusiasm, commitment and active participation in all classes. For every hour in class, you should work a minimum of two hours in private study. Tutorials, guided study, and web-based learning resources supplement class work. You can also take part in the English Language Development Programme, which provides English language tuition free of charge for Kent students.

Location Canterbury. Award N/A. Offer levels Good school-leaving certificate. IELTS: minimum of 5.0 (5.0 reading and 5.0 writing). TOEFL: minimum 500 paper-based (3.5 in writing), 60 internet-based (15 in reading and 15 in writing). Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English D. Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English C. Contact the University to check whether other qualifications are acceptable.

Required subjects Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management, Management Science and Psychology degrees: a high enough standard in Mathematics. Architecture, Interior Architecture and Interior Design degrees: a portfolio of observational drawings and other visual work, for example, photography, sculpture, painting.

Assessment is by a combination of coursework and examination; the ratio varies according to which subject you are studying.

Foundation programme leaflet

Careers/progression routes

Admissions enquiries

Entry to chosen honours degree in Humanities, Social Sciences or Sciences. Most degree subjects have specific requirements for foundation students above the level of a minimum pass and candidates should check the current level of such requirements with the University prior to accepting offers of places on the foundation year.

Download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/foundation

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Did you know? d 7th French at Kent was rate Research nationally in the 2008 (RAE). Assessment Exercise

French at Canterbury Kent voices

“Kent is a great place to study French – the facilities are fantastic and the range of modules is inspiring. It is truly multicultural here so you can practice your language with native speakers.” Lauren Bramley French To read more of what Lauren has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Comparative Literature p56 European Studies p94 German p106 Hispanic Studies p112 Italian p126

Canterbury is the closest British university city to mainland Europe, and our proximity to the Channel ports and Ashford International station means you can be in France in just a couple of hours. There are many French-speaking students on campus, so you get a better chance to immerse yourself in the language than at any other university in the country. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) French at Kent came 7th in the UK, which means that during your studies at Kent you will be working with top-rated researchers. At Kent, we have a uniquely wide range of links with French, Canadian and Swiss universities. During your year abroad as part of an Erasmus programme, you could begin to study for a French qualification (Licence), or alternatively you can gain work experience by becoming a language assistant in a French school. Our link with the Chambre de Commerce et d’Industrie de Paris also gives any student at Kent the opportunity to sit for the internationally recognised diplomas offered by the CCIP. As a French student at Kent you will work closely with the various members of staff and the seven language assistants in lectures, seminars and one to one tutorials. Most of the modules are taught in French and we have instant access to French TV and radio thanks to up-to-date technology and satellite links. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • French (R101) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, including see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. • • • • • • • • • • • •

Business Administration (NR21) 4 years Comparative Literature (RQ12) 4 years Drama (RW14) 4 years English and American Literature (QR31) 4 years English Language and Linguistics (RQ13) 4 years Film Studies (RW16) 4 years German (RR12) 4 years Hispanic Studies (RR14) 4 years History (RV11) 4 years History & Philosophy of Art (VR31) 4 years Italian (RR13) 4 years Religious Studies (RV16) 4 years

Stage 1 You take three core modules, one from: • Learning French 1: Beginners • Learning French 2A and 2B: Post GCSE Level • Learning French 3: Post A Level And at least another two from: • • • • • •

France in Crisis French Drama: Love, Marriage and Politics French Narratives: Love, Marriage and Politics Questions of French Cinema Writer and Genre in France 1 Writer and Genre in France 2.

Options You choose the rest of your modules (depending on your degree programme) from a wide range of options drawn from a list available in the Faculty of Humanities. 104


F French Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/french

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Learning French 4: Intermediate • Learning French 5: Advanced

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Business French 1 Business French 2 Classical French Theatre Contemporary French Cinema Dissertation Eighteenth-Century Narratives Extended Essay History of French Language Introduction to Professional Interpreting Literary Trailblazers Memory and Childhood in 20th-Century French Fiction Modern French Theatre 1 Modern French Theatre 2 Mothers and Daughters The Painting as Phantom: Diderot to Proust Paris: Myth and Reality 1 Paris: Myth and Reality 2 The Reader and the Text Short Narrative Fiction Sociolinguistics of French

A year abroad You normally spend all or part of your third year abroad in a French-speaking country. Typically, this involves a year’s study abroad, an assistantship in a French/Swiss/FrenchCanadian school, or a work placement. We currently have exchange agreements with French universities in Avignon, Grenoble, Lille, Littoral, Lyon, Nice, Paris, Poitiers, Reims, with Canadian universities in Ottawa and Montréal and with Swiss universities in Geneva, Lausanne and Neuchâtel. We normally visit you during your year abroad.

Teaching and assessment Compulsory language modules involve three to four hours of classes per week, including one hour of small group work with a native speaker. We also make extensive use of computer-assisted language learning packages and audio and video materials. Culture and literature modules involve a weekly two-hour seminar plus essay supervision. The French Department employs seven French language assistants to help students improve their fluency. At Stage 1, assessment is by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in the first half of the year, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in the second half of the year. For Stages 2 and 3, depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 60:40 or 50:50. Credits from your year abroad count towards your final degree.

Careers Our students go into areas such as international banking, diplomacy, publishing, journalism, international product management, interpreting and translating, European media, law or accountancy, and language teaching. Some go on to postgraduate study in fields as varied as international journalism, visual studies and translation.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time or part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English. Joint honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English.

Required subjects Post A level: A level French grade B. Post GCSE level: GCSE French grade B. Beginner’s level: some aptitude for modern languages inc GCSE grade C in a modern European language other than English.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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German at Canterbury Kent voices

“My year abroad was fantastic. I taught in a comprehensive school, which was a bit scary at first, but the kids were very pleased to have a native speaker teaching them and so receptive that I really enjoyed myself.” Sophie Wetheridge German To read more of what Sophie has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

German is a culturally and commercially extremely important language. Within Europe, it is spoken by more people than English or French. Worldwide, it is the third most widely used language on the internet, after English and Japanese. It is frequently used as a second language in Eastern Europe, where it serves as a means of communication across international boundaries. Fluency in the German language, combined with knowledge of the political and cultural development of the German-speaking world, opens up career opportunities in many parts of the continent. We specialise in teaching the language, literature and culture of the German-speaking world of today, and exploring its literary and social history. Along with the other European language sections, German has state-of-the art computing and audio-visual facilities and many modules make extensive use of the internet. We benefit from having a full-time Lektorin supported by the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). All our courses offer the opportunity to spend a year either studying at a partner university, or teaching English, or working in a Germanspeaking country. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • German (R220) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For further joint honours combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. German and... • • • • • • • •

Business Administration (NR22) 4 years Computing (RG24) 4 years Drama (RW24) 4 years English and American Literature (QR32) 4 years French (RR12) 4 years Hispanic Studies (RR24) 4 years History (RV21) 4 years Italian (RR23) 4 years

Stage 1 You take 60 credits of compulsory modules and 60 credits of options.

Core modules • • • •

German post A Level Images of Germany 1945-2000 Speak Proper German! Varieties of German Writing

Options

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Comparative Literature p56 European Studies p94 French p104 Hispanic Studies p112 Italian p126

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A wide range of options drawn from the list in the Faculty of Humanities.


G German Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/german

Stage 2/3 Core modules

Teaching and assessment

Options

Teaching is by a combination of lectures and seminars. You also have regular teaching and conversation sessions with German native speakers.

• • • • • • • • • •

Assessment at Stage 1 is by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in the first half of the year, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in the second half of the year. At Stage 2/3, depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, in a ratio that will normally be 50:50, 60:40.

• German Advanced

Contemporary German Literature Desire and Identity in Modern Germany Gender and Identity in the Age of Goethe German Dissertation German Fiction and the Third Reich German Modernism The German Novelle and Short Story German Past, Present and Future Looking into German 1 and 2 The Lyric Imagination

Plus modules drawn from a wide range in the Faculty of Humanities.

A year abroad You spend a year in Germany or Austria studying at a university of your choice, including the exchange universities with which we have partnership agreements: Erlangen, Freiburg, Jena, Marburg and Heidelberg; or working as an English language assistant in a school; or possibly working in some other types of employment (excluding factories, hotels and work with families).

Careers Recent graduates have gone into careers such as teaching German, teaching EFL, translation, accountancy, law, customs, finance, publishing and journalism.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4/5/5 in HL German A1/A2/B or 5/6/6 in SL German A/A2/B or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher 4/5/5 in HL German A1/A2/B or 5/6/6 in SL German A/A2/B. Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC/BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4/5/5 in HL German A1/A2/B or 5/6/6 in SL German A/A2/B or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher 4/5/5 in HL German A1/A2/B or 5/6/6 in SL German A/A2/B.

Required subjects A level German grade B.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in a Studies Are and ges Other Langua dent Survey. in the 2009 National Stu

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Health and Social Care at Canterbury Kent voices

“I compared this course to others and thought it was better. It is really varied: I have studied anthropology, sociology and philosophy as well as social policy and social care.” Alison Small Health and Social Care To read more of what Alison has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Biomedical Science p48 • Health and Social Care Practice p110 • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities p120 • Pharmacy p148 • Psychology p158 • Social Policy p164 • Social Sciences p166 • Social Work p168

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Should ‘cloning’ or ‘assisted suicide’ be permitted? Should fertility treatment be available as a right on the NHS? Should older people pay for their own care? Are services delivered fairly to all sections of the community? The degree in Health and Social Care gives you a chance to explore all these topics and, equally importantly, equips you with the knowledge and skills for managerial and service-provision roles in the NHS and social care services, and within the growing voluntary and private social and health care sector. You can aim towards working directly with users of services – such as children and families, older people and those with disabilities – or a career in management, research, planning and evaluation. The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research is an international centre that has consistently received the highest government ranking for its research. You are taught by the leading academics in the field. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programme Single honours • Health and Social Care (LL45) 3 years

Stage 1 You take two compulsory 15-credit core modules, plus a further 90 credits from options.

Core modules • Social Problems and Social Policy: The Market, the Family and the State • Social Problems and Social Policy: Youth, the Family and the State

Options A choice of a wide range of modules offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • •

Health and Health Policy Issues in Social Care Social Research Methods Welfare in Modern Britain

Recommended modules include: • • • • • •

Care and Protection of Children Health, Illness and Medicine Key Issues in Social Policy Mental Health Reproductive Health Policy The Third Sector: Non-profit Associations, Charities, NGOs and Social Enterprise in Modern Society.


H Health and Social Care Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Options

Careers

These are drawn from a wide range offered by the School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research, and the Faculty of Social Sciences. It is possible to do a dissertation.

Careers open to our graduates could include: research and policy-oriented work in the voluntary sector; postgraduate training on social work and other professional courses; social care research and evaluation; social care work in the public, voluntary and private sectors; management and organisation posts in the health services; personnel and resource management posts in the private sector, local authorities and voluntary organisations.

Please note: The programme is under review and may differ in certain details from the one outlined here.

Teaching and assessment Usually you have four lectures and four seminars a week. Some modules involve workshops to develop key personal and study skills, or computing and project work, which you can do individually or in teams. In addition, you spend time in guided individual study, using the resources of the University library and computer-assisted learning packages.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 260 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either CC at A level or CC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 13 point at Higher. The School is committed to widening participation, and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students. We welcome applications from students on accredited Access courses. We always consider students with non-standard qualifications or with relevant work experience individually. In some cases, students with professional qualifications, HND or equivalent can enter directly into Stage 2. We welcome applicants with experience in the field.

Most modules in the School are assessed by 50% coursework and 50% end-of-year examination. A small number are assessed entirely by coursework. Marks from both Stages 2 and 3 count towards your final degree result. Stage 1 results do not count towards the final mark, but entry to Stage 2 depends on passing Stage 1 assessments.

Required subjects None.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

the UK for Kent was ranked 9th in es Good Tim The Social Policy in University Guide 2010.

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Health and Social Care Practice at Medway Kent voices

“I have enjoyed meeting the lecturers, particularly those from the Tizard Centre, and learning from their experiences in the field. They have been good at incorporating how theory is applied in practice through examples in each of the modules and this has made the lectures really interesting.” Jo Griffiths Health and Social Care Practice To read more of what Jo has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Criminal Justice Studies p66 • Health and Social Care p108 • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities p120 • Pharmacy p148 • Psychology p158 • Social Sciences p166 • Social Work p168

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Health and social care lies at the heart of community care for vulnerable adults in the UK. Recent changes in government policy on care provision call for improvements in the quality and type of services as well as an informed and well-trained workforce. Staff working in services need knowledge, theory and an understanding of past, current and future issues that underpin the ‘need for care’ and the provision of services. Health and Social Care Practice is an innovative programme that offers you an in-depth opportunity to learn about the range, nature and aims of services and care practice as well as the policy context, the history and construction of the welfare state, and the causes and management of social problems.

Degree programme • Health and Social Care Practice (L431:K) 3 years

Stage 1 You take six core modules, four of 15 credits and two of 30 credits.

Core modules • • • • • •

Academic Development Introduction to Health and Social Care Introduction to Sociology Service User Groups, Individuals and Needs Social Problems and Social Policy Values and Principles for Health and Social Care Practice

Stage 2 The course combines applied teaching with academic and theoretical knowledge. Our staff have extensive experience of working in and around care services and of relevant up-to-date research.

You take six core modules, four of 15 credits and two of 30 credits.

Core modules • Applied and Community Psychology • Health Policy in Britain • Managing and Delivering Community Care Services • Principles and Practice of Social Policy • Social Research Methods and Evaluation • Working Across Agencies and Sectors


H Health and Social Care Practice Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 3

Teaching and assessment

You take two 15-credit core modules, two 30 credit core modules plus one option worth 30 credits or two options worth 15 credits.

The modules are taught by a mixture of lectures, seminars, case studies, discussions and debates. The academic team puts particular emphasis on applying learning to the care sector.

Core modules • Developing Practice Competence and Knowledge • Key Welfare Issues • Service Intervention/Dissertation • User Group Specific Practice and Services

The applied modules are assessed by coursework assignments. The other modules are assessed by 50% coursework and 50% written examinations.

Careers Options You take one (or two) option(s) drawn from a list of relevant topics in Social Sciences. These could include: cognitive psychology, social ethics, or researching people with learning difficulties.

Possible careers could include: postgraduate training or courses; social care research and evaluation; care work and management in the public, voluntary and private sectors; management and administrative posts in the health services; personnel and resource management. This is a relatively new programme and the first cohort of graduates completed the programme in June 2006.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 200 points inc CD, or the equivalent, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 12 points at Higher. MMP National Diploma/Certificate in Health and Social Care. Advanced Diploma in Society, Health and Development Grade C.

Required subjects None.

Professional recognition Those students who work in services who need to take National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) in care-related subjects can opt to work with the course ‘accredited partner’ towards an NVQ 3 or 4, building on their assessed work.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

s ranked 9th Social Policy at Kent wa isfaction in sat t den in the UK for stu dent Survey. the 2009 National Stu

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Hispanic Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“We are not just learning a language but discovering a whole culture which is fascinating. The year abroad is a unique chance to study with people of your own age in another country.” Chris Paul Hispanic Studies and Italian To read more of what Chris has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Spanish is one of the most widely spoken languages in the world – outside Spain it is the official language of all countries in South and Central America except Brazil, and is widespread in many parts of North America. The programme at Kent gives you the opportunity to explore the languages and cultures of Spain and Spanish America while developing your language skills. You can study Hispanic Studies at Kent whether you have an A level or GCSE in Spanish, or whether you are a beginner. The programme offers some unusual features. You have the opportunity to spend your year abroad in Uruguay (as well as our exchange programmes with Spain), and our advanced language module in Stage 2 focuses on translation and interpreting – important skills when you look for a job. Catalan is compulsory for single honours and optional for joint honours students. Facilities include multimedia laboratories, which offer a variety of interactive language learning programs and dictionaries, and access to a wide range of TV satellite channels and audio, video and computerassisted language learning facilities. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Comparative Literature p56 Cultural Studies p70 European Studies p94 French p104 German p106 Italian p126

Degree programmes Single honours • Hispanic Studies (R400) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours programmes. For a full list of combinations you can take with Hispanic Studies or including Spanish, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Hispanic Studies and… • • • • • • • • •

Business Administration (NR24) 4 years Computing (GR44) 4 years Cultural Studies (R4V9) 4 years Drama (WR44) 4 years English and American Literature (QR34) 4 years Film Studies (WR64) 4 years French (RR14) 4 years German (RR24) 4 years Italian (RR43) 4 years

Stage 1 You take two core modules, including a language module appropriate for your level.

Core modules • Spanish: Beginners or • Spanish: Post A Level plus • Introduction to Hispanic Culture

Options Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in a Studies Are Other Languages and dent Survey. in the 2009 National Stu

You also choose one or two modules from the following (all taught in translation): • • • •

The Modern Spanish Novel The Modern Spanish-American Short Story Modern Spanish Theatre State Building in Latin America.

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H Hispanic Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/hispanicstudies

Stage 2 In Stages 2 and 3, language modules continue to develop your skills and you have regular sessions with native speakers of Spanish.

• Terrorism and State Terror in Latin America • Writing the Cuban Revolution Joint honours students also take the required modules for their other subject.

Core modules • Spanish: Advanced 1 • Spanish: Post A Level Plus (single honours only): • Catalan ab initio • Catalan for University Use.

Options • Catalan Culture • Contemporary Spanish Cinema • The Legacy of Inequality: Race and Ethnicity in Latin America • Spanish Literature: Censorship • Spanish Literature: Identity • Voices of a Continent – 20th-Century Latin American Poets • Women in Spanish American Narrative and Film Joint honours students also take the required modules for their other subject.

A year abroad You spend a year either wholly or partly in Spain, or possibly in Latin America, between Stages 2 and 3. Normally you study at a Spanish university or work as a language assistant in a school. We have exchange agreements with universities in Barcelona, Salamanca, Córdoba, Alicante, Madrid, Deusto (Bilbao) and Oviedo as well as with the University of Montevideo (Uruguay).

Teaching and assessment All Spanish language modules involve three hours teaching each week, with the exception of the beginners’ language modules at Stages 1 and 2 which involve four hours. They include small group seminars, conversation classes run by a native speaker, short lectures in Spanish, work in a language laboratory and work on computer-assisted language learning materials. The culture and literature modules normally involve a one-hour lecture and a one-hour seminar each week.

Stage 3 The final-year language class concentrates on translating and interpreting to help you perfect some of your language skills after your year abroad.

Core module • Spanish: Advanced 2

Stage 1 is assessed by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in some modules, and a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in others. Stage 2/3: depending on the modules you select, assessment varies from 100% coursework (extended essays), to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 60:40 or 80:20.

Options • • • • • •

The Carnivalesque in Modern Spanish Theatre Literature of Jorge Luis Borges Reading Monstrosity in Iberian Culture The Spanish Avant-Garde Spanish Extended Essay Spanish Literature: Sexuality

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English. Joint honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English.

Required subjects Beginner’s level: some aptitude for modern languages. Advanced level: A level Spanish grade B where taken.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Careers Recent graduates have gone into teaching, translating and interpreting, marketing, journalism, publishing, and other areas. Many language graduates begin their career abroad.

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Did you know? d 2nd Histor y at Kent was rate Research nationally in the 2008 (RAE). Assessment Exercise

History at Canterbury Kent voices

Canterbury is a unique place to study History, a city vividly connected to the past and rich with historical significance, with Europe only a stones-throw away.

Degree programmes Single honours • History (V100) 3 years

European programme

“You can really tailor this course to your own interests. Our lecturers and seminar leaders are excellent. I like the seminars as it is nice to have a space to discuss things.” Damian Wrigley History To read more of what Damian has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

American Studies (History) p28 Classical & Archaeological Studies p54 English Literature p90 War Studies p180

Within the School of History, you will be taught by passionate academics, active researchers and recognised experts. In the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise, the School of History was ranked second nationally for research quality in history, placing us amongst the leading departments in the country.

• European History (V221) 4 years

Our course offers great flexibility and scope alongside a unique university experience. You are able to tailor your degree to be as broad or focused as you wish, allowing you to choose the subjects which inspire you most from our wide range of modules. Study options are incredibly diverse, ranging from Anglo-Saxon England to the evolution of tank warfare; this encourages you to expand your perspective by exploring exciting areas of history you have not encountered before.

History and ... • Archaeological Studies (VV14) 3 years • Comparative Literature (QV21) 3 years • Drama (VW14) 3 years • English and American Literature (QV31) 3 years • Film Studies (VW16) 3 years • French (RV11) 4 years • German (RV21) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (RV41) 4 years • History & Philosophy of Art (VV31) 3 years • Law (VM1C) 3 years • Philosophy (VVC5) 3 years • Politics (LV21) 3 years • Religious Studies (VV61) 3 years

In the 2009 National Student Survey, 91% of graduating students said they were satisfied with their experience studying History at Kent. At Kent, you will join a large and thriving student body, benefiting from a strong tradition of student-led activities through our History Society. Alongside the extensive resources of the University library, you have the unrivalled privilege of access to the rare books and priceless manuscripts of Canterbury Cathedral. Opportunities are also available for work experience or a year studying in Europe.

These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other possible combinations, please see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Stage 1 You take one core module of 30 credits and at least 60 other History credits from a wide range of options.

Core module • Making History

Options Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

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Joint honours

• • • • • • •

Anglo-Saxon England Russia, 1750-1905 Britain and Europe 1500-1660 Britain in the Age of Industrialisation 1660-1815 Cinema and Society: War 1930-1960 Empire in Africa England in the Age of Chivalry


H History Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/history

• • • • • • • • • •

Home Front Hundred Years War Introduction to the History of Medicine Introduction to Military History 1 and 2 Medieval Europe: 450-1070 and 1066-1450 Monarchy and Aristocracy Poverty and its Problems Renaissance Courts US History: to 1880 and from 1880 Victorian Britain: Politics, Culture and Society

Stage 2/3 You must take at least 60 credits of History at Stage 2 and 90 at Stage 3. You must take a special subject at Stage 3.

• Churchill’s Army: The British Army in the Second World War • From Blitzkrieg to Baghdad: Armoured Warfare 1916-2005 • From Buffalo Bill to Bison Burgers: The American West in the 20th Century • The Global Burden of Disease, 1850-1960 • History of Modern Medicine and Medical Ethics, 1800-2000 • Late Stuart and Hanoverian Britain, 1688-1750 • Pre-Industrial England • Russia 1855-1945: Reform, Revolution and War • War, Revolution and Dictatorship in Europe, 1870-1945.

A year abroad Special subjects • Britain and the French Revolution, 1785-1804 • British Politics 1629-1642: A High Road to Civil War? • The Coming of the Friars: Urban Society, Learning and Lay Piety • Empire in Crisis: the Soviet Union and its Collapse • The Elizabethan Court and Realm • France in Civil War, 1559-1598 • The Great War: British Memory, History and Culture • Human Rights and Human Experimentation During the Cold War 1945-1989 • The Irish Revolution, 1910-1925 • The Legacy of the Second World War • Life in the Third Reich • The Monster in Medieval Culture • The Ocean Liner • Ritual, Ceremony and Magic • The Supreme Court and the Constitution in the 20th Century

Options Options are drawn from a list of 30 available modules across the School in all areas of our expertise, including topics such as: • The Art of Death: Representations, Rituals and Records in England, 1300-1450

Students on the European History programme have the opportunity to spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 studying at a university in France or Germany.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by a combination of lectures, providing a broad overview, and seminars, which focus on discussing particular issues and are led by student presentations. Lectures and seminars use a variety of materials including original documents, films and documentaries, illuminated manuscripts, slide and PowerPoint demonstrations. The School of History uses a mixture of assessment patterns. The standard formats are 100% coursework or 60% examination and 40% coursework.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels History: A level 300/340 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken or IB Diploma with 15/16/17 points at Higher inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken. European History: A level 300/340 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken or IB Diploma with 15/16/17 points at Higher inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken. Joint honours: A level 300/320/340 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken.

Required subjects A level History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or History to at least GCSE grade B if an appropriate subject is not taken at A level. European History: GCSE grade B in chosen language (French or German).

Year abroad (see left). Careers History graduates have transferable skills, valuable to a wide range of employers, and many find employment in fields such as journalism and the media, management and administration, local and national civil services, the museums and heritage sector, commerce and banking, teaching and research, and the law.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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History & Philosophy of Art at Canterbury Kent voices

“Studying the history of art at Kent was a great experience. All lecturers were extremely professional, enthusiastic and always supportive. The high quality of teaching at Kent had a lot to do with my choice to pursue a career in the arts.” Laura Pia History & Philosophy of Art To read more of what Laura has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Art and Film p36 Cultural Studies p70 Film Studies p96 Fine Art p98 Visual and Performed Arts p178

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For over 20 years, Kent has been at the cutting edge in providing innovative and interdisciplinary teaching in the visual arts. We have established research strengths in photographic studies, contemporary art, philosophy of art and art history, which are reflected in the rich variety of study choices we offer through this programme.

Degree programmes Single honours

Alongside traditional academic modules, we provide all of our students with the opportunity for practice-based learning about the visual arts, for example by taking photographs, writing criticism or curating an exhibition, and also to contribute to our growing Print Collection, where undergraduates collect art on behalf of the Department.

Joint honours

A degree in History & Philosophy of Art enables you to explore the history, meaning and nature of the visual arts, while also providing you with skills to equip you for a career in the arts industries or beyond. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• History & Philosophy of Art (V350) 3 years

European programmes • European Arts (History & Philosophy of Art) (V351) 4 years

These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other combinations, including the chance to study abroad for a year, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. History & Philosophy of Art and… • Classical & Archaeological Studies (VQ38) 3 years • Cultural Studies (VV93) 3 years • English and American Literature (VQ33) 3 years • Film Studies (VW36) 3 years • French (VR31) 4 years • History (VV31) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules 90 credits from the following (all available in 15 or 30 credit formats): • Inner Worlds: Psychoanalytic Thinking and the Visual Arts • Now That is Art! Aesthetics and the Visual Arts • Picasso • The Shock of the Now: Themes in Contemporary Art • Ways of Looking, Ways of Seeing: Thinking about Photography.


H History & Philosophy of Art Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/arts/hpa

Stage 2/3

Teaching and assessment

You take two 30-credit core modules, and 180 credits of optional modules, 60 of which can come from subjects across the Faculty of Humanities.

The History & Philosophy of Art section emphasises a close working relationship with students. All modules include weekly lectures and small group seminars, but a distinctive feature of History & Philosophy of Art at Kent is that many modules involve visits to London museums, and other out-of-classroom teaching venues. Helping students to acquire independence of thought and the skills of independent study are at the heart of our teaching aims.

Core modules • Independent Dissertation • Reading the Image Art History • Abstraction and Construction • Beauty in Theory, Culture and Contemporary Art • Camera, Light and Darkroom • Classicism and Baroque • Dialogues: Art in a Global Context • French Painting in the 19th Century • Historiography of Art • History and Aesthetics of Photography 1: Realism in Theory and Practice • History and Aesthetics of Photography 2: Idealism from Pictorialism to • Patronage and Cultural Organisation • Photography and Intuition • Picasso • Print Collecting and Curating • Reading the Image • Renaissance Art and Architecture • Russian Painting • The Sublime, the Disgusting and the Laughable • Visual Arts Writing • Warhol to Whiteread: Art since 1960

A year abroad Currently, our European programmes have exchanges with the University of Bologna in Italy and the University of Amsterdam in Holland, and we are exploring new exchange programmes with other universities. Courses at the University of Bologna are taught in Italian but at the University of Amsterdam the programme is taught in English.

All modules provided by the History & Philosophy of Art section are assessed solely by coursework such as essays, presentations, image or text analyses and other module-related activities. This helps you develop in-depth knowledge of topics within modules that are most interesting and relevant to your study, and to acquire a wide range of generic and transferable skills.

Careers Recent graduates have gone into careers such as arts administration, galleries and museums, journalism, advertising, teaching, image libraries, curating, and working in the art market.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher. Joint honours: A/AS level 280/300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC/BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14/15/16 points at Higher.

Required subjects None.

A year abroad (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? of Art at Kent History & Philosophy satisfaction t den stu received 96% al Student rating in the 2009 Nation Sur vey.

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Did you know?

Information Technology

the UK Kent was ranked 6th in graduate for Computer Science in The employment prospects ide 2010. Gu y rsit ive Un Guardian

at Medway Kent voices

“I am finding the course very interesting and have learnt a lot. I thoroughly enjoyed my first year and the time went so quickly. The second year is more challenging, with more coursework, shorter deadlines and increased group work. In the third year, there will be more flexibility, with a choice of options to take.” Michelle Boorman Information Technology To read more of what Michelle has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Business Studies p52 Computer Science p58 Computing – Joint Honours p62 Management Science p134 Web Computing p182

The Information Technology (IT) degrees give you the skills you need for the practical application of computing to areas typically found in industry. These include e-commerce, information systems, and computer consultancy. The Business Information Technology degree builds on the IT course, but also includes financial accounting, marketing and managing enterprises. Graduates who have both IT knowledge and business skills can expect excellent career prospects. Our IT course can be studied as the ‘Information Technology’ general degree, where a subject focus is decided during the course of the study, or as a themed degree, such as ‘Information Technology (Consultancy)’, where a specific focus is decided at the time of enrolment and named in the degree title. Over half our students choose to do a Year in Industry. This gives you work experience, a salary and the possibility of a job with the same company after graduation. You can also work during your studies as a consultant at the Kent IT Clinic, earning cash or credit towards your degree while providing computing support to local businesses. An internationally recognised centre of excellence for programming education, the School of Computing is a leader in computer science teaching and home to two National Teaching Fellows, authors of widely used textbooks and award-winning Java teaching systems, such as BlueJ and Greenfoot.

Degree programmes Single honours • Business Information Technology (NG14:K) 3 years • Business Information Technology with a Year in Industry (NG1F:K) 4 years • Information Technology (G503:K) 3 years • Information Technology with a Year in Industry (G505:K) 4 years • Information Technology (Consultancy) (G508:K) 3 years • Information Technology (Consultancy) with a Year in Industry (G509:K) 4 years • Information Technology (Software Engineering) (G5G6:K) 3 years • Information Technology (Software Engineering) with a Year in Industry (G5GP:K) 4 years • Information Technology (Web Applications) (G5G4:K) 3 years • Information Technology (Web Applications) with a Year in Industry (G5GK:K) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules You take the following shared core modules, and other core module(s), depending on your chosen subject. • • • • •

Computing Concepts and Practice Introduction to Information Systems Mathematics for Computing People and Computing Visual Programming

Business Information Technology • Economics Information Technology • Applications Project • Computer Systems

Stage 2 Core modules • Database Systems • Networking 118


I Information Technology Honours degrees www.cs.kent.ac.uk/students

Business Information Technology • Automation Tools or IT Consultancy Methods or Software Engineering Process • Financial and Management Accounting • Information Systems Analysis • Principles of Marketing

• • • • • •

Information Technology (depending on theme) • Dynamic Web • IT Consultancy Methods • Object-Oriented Programming 1 • Software Engineering Project Workshop

Year in industry

Plus other compulsory and optional modules depending on your chosen programme.

Options • • • • •

Human Computer Interaction Information Systems Analysis Object-Oriented Programming 2 Principles of Marketing Software Engineering Process

Stage 3 Core modules Business Information Technology • Strategic Management Practice • Either Group Project (30 credits) or Information Systems Study and Computing Law Information Technology (depending on theme) • Group Project or IT Consultancy Practice

Options Including, but not limited to, and depending on your programme: • • • • • • •

Advanced Programming Techniques Computing Law and Professional Responsibility Computer Security and Cryptography Data Mining Distributed Systems Electronic Commerce Enterprise

Industrial Relations IT Consultancy Practice Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Object-Oriented Programming 2 Semantic Web Software Failure and Risk.

There are Year in Industry options on some of our joint honours programmes. With this option, you spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. Our dedicated Placement Team can help you find a placement and support you during the year. Our students go to a wide range of companies, including IBM, Intel and Thomson Reuters, or overseas to employers in locations, including Amsterdam, Hong Kong and India.

Teaching and assessment Most modules run for a single 12-week term, and usually include a combination of lectures, seminars, private study and practical sessions. Teaching is based on lectures, with practical classes and seminars, but we are also introducing more innovative ways of teaching, such as virtual learning environments, videoconferencing and work-based tuition. Work includes group projects, case studies and computer simulations, with a large-scale project of your own choice in the final year. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-ofyear examination, apart from the project, which is assessed wholly by coursework.

Careers

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either 18 units at A level or GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in HL Mathematics or 5 in SL Mathematics or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher inc 4 in HL Mathematics or 5 in SL Mathematics. BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition NG14:K, NG1F:K: These programmes have partial British Computer Society Chartered IT Professional (BCS CITP) accreditation. G503:K, G505:K: These programmes have Initial Full BCS CITP accreditation.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Our recent graduates now work at Accenture, Barclays Capital, BT, GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, Intel, KCC, Kent Police, Lilly, Microsoft, Thomson Reuters, Sun Microsystems, T-Mobile and Thales.

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Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teaching has been extremely diverse, which is really great! The teachers encourage participation from all students. They make it clear that no question you ask will be regarded as silly, which enables us to question everything to ensure we’ve fully understood.” Jo Allcorn Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities To read more of what Jo has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Health and Social Care p108 Health and Social Care Practice p110 Psychology p158 Social Sciences p166 Social Work p168

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The Commission for Social Care requires managers of services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to hold a specialist qualification. This programme, taught at the Tizard Centre (a leading centre for teaching, research and service provision in intellectual/developmental disabilities and autistic spectrum disorders), offers such a qualification. It is designed specifically for students who provide community and school-based services, such as home leaders, peripatetic team leaders, instructors, community support staff, special educational needs teachers and teaching assistants. This comprehensive, competency-based programme allows you to integrate your learning with practical work carried out in daily experience working in your own organisation. The course covers a range of theoretical and applied topics essential to effective working in care environments. You complete assignments in the workplace, where you put your learning into practice, and have the opportunity to get feedback from a team of academic experts in the field. You tackle important practical problems against a background of shared experience with other students in similar circumstances. As practical work takes time to complete, the programme runs full-time over three years. The final year of the programme focuses on the scientific principles and practices of Applied Behaviour Analysis and is one of only two such undergraduate programmes in the UK.

Degree programme Single honours • Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (L512) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules You take four 15-credit modules and one work-based 60-credit module. • Academic Development • Person-Centred Values and Support • Promoting Choice, Well-Being and Communication • Supporting Participation and Independence • Work-Based Learning in Person-Centred Support

Stage 2 Core modules You take four 15-credit modules and one work-based 60-credit module. • Assessing and Understanding Challenging Behaviour • Designing Behaviour Support Plans • Implementing and Evaluating Behaviour Support Plans • Introduction to Positive Behaviour Support • Work-Based Learning in Positive Behaviour Support


I Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/tizard

Stage 3 Core modules Again, you take four 15-credit modules and one work-based 60-credit module. • • • • •

Concepts of Applied Behaviour Analysis Developing and Implementing Interventions Observation and Analysis of Behaviour Values, Ethics and Professional Practice Work-Based Learning in Applied Behaviour Analysis

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include mini-lectures, individual and group exercises, some with the use of video feedback. Exercises vary in length, in some cases being practice ‘simulations’ spread over several hours. There are exercises involving local services and people with intellectual disabilities. We also use analysis of published papers and reviews of the literature relevant to practice to explore the evidence base.

Careers Carers or practitioners in services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities, including health, social care and education. Special educational needs teachers and teaching assistants will also find this course invaluable, and anyone looking for a new career in those areas will not find a better course than this one.

Earn while you learn The BSc can now be combined with paid employment with the Avenues Trust. Subject to interview, successful applicants will be offered a place on the BSc and a position within the Avenues Trust. This will enable you to earn while you learn! You will also obtain vocational qualifications and train throughout your employment. Limited places are available.

Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 200 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc CD at A level or in GCE double A level. Mature students who do not hold appropriate qualifications can apply, but you need to demonstrate that you have the skills/ experience to study at degree level. All students must be in employment or otherwise have access to work with children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Required subjects None.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Work-based learning includes the production of assessed work, systematic reflection on practice, participation in supervision/mentoring arrangements and training/leadership of others. Assessment is mainly based on reports and videos of practical work undertaken with individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and autistic spectrum disorders. This allows us to integrate assessment with the development of practice.

Location Canterbury.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 9th in es Good Tim The in Social Policy University Guide 2010.

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Interiors at Canterbury Kent voices

“You are given the chance to explore many aspects of design, and to be creative, imaginative and original while working on a range of different projects. This has helped me be more openminded, not only as far as design is concerned, but also as a way of thinking and perceiving things.” Myrto Mitsiou Interior Design To read more of what Myrto has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Architecture p34 Creative Events: Design and Production p72 Experience Design p76 History & Philosophy of Art p116 Multimedia Technology and Design p142

As the economic structure of our working lives moves in step with change throughout our world, we must be able to provide environments that respond to our needs. The Interiors programme stems from the premise that the vast majority of spatial design projects – architecture, interiors and transportation – are concerned with alteration, reconfiguration, refurbishment, extension and addition to existing fabric and structure. The study, research and project work in Interiors recognises the multi and interdisciplinary nature of the subject. The course reflects contemporary perceptions and the convergence of parallel fields such as art, fashion, film, dance, exhibition design, architecture and interiors. You are encouraged to work in an exploratory and experimental manner employing installation, sculpture, stage and set design. You explore the materiality of interior space with an emphasis on ‘making’. You demonstrate a sense of scale; a concern for the ‘little things’ and the ‘big things’; the private and the public. The programme develops your design abilities through a series of increasingly complex projects, options and problems set in different contexts. You are encouraged to develop your own design ‘personality’ through an exploratory and experimental practical and philosophical approach to your design projects as well as research and study. You will challenge and be challenged. A distinctive feature of the programme is that Stage 1 is taught in common with the programme in Architecture. The School benefits from excellent facilities, including newly equipped studios, a computing suite, darkroom and model workshop. The Interiors programme includes a field trip to Barcelona at Stage 1. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

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Degree programmes Single honours • Interiors (KW12) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • •

Caravanserai Enlighten Folio House and Housing Oasis Western Architecture

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • • •

Process and Fragment Advanced Computer Modelling Paradox and Symbiosis Synthesis and Metamorphosis Contemporary Manifestos and Theories Post-Enlightenment Interior


I Interiors Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/architecture

Stage 3 Core modules • Event • Evolution • Major Work

Careers The broad spectrum of a compact yet rich Interiors programme aims to produce graduates who are versed in innovative spatial topographies and who have the power to change the way we perceive space and form.

Location Canterbury.

The embracing of a design and disciplinary commonality gives rise to the transfer and crossfertilisation of traditional and new technologies in interiors, interactions, furniture and product design.

A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Therefore, graduates find careers in new construction projects or within existing buildings, design consultancy, transportation design, production design for stage, film or television, exhibition/museum design, event design, styling of photo shoots, retail display and teaching.

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Options • Building Appraisal • Dissertation • Interdisciplinary

Teaching and assessment Teaching is usually by lectures, small groups, workshops, studio-based design projects, field visits for sketching and study visits to different locations. Assessment is by a variety of methods, including sketchbook/notebook, self-illustrated research papers, coursework and exams.

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels

Required subjects Applicants need to provide a portfolio of art/design work.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in employment te dua gra re ctu hite Arc lete University prospects in The Comp Guide 2010.

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International Business at Canterbury Kent voices

“Taking an international business degree at Kent will provide you with specialist knowledge in international business issues. You will gain insight into the strategies needed to approach management in a multinational and multicultural environment as well as gaining an understanding of the importance and role of emerging economies.”

This is a new programme that offers you the opportunity to pursue a thorough grounding in general business subjects while developing more detailed knowledge and skills within the specialism of international business.

Degree programmes Single honours

The modern business environment is increasingly international in scope. Consequently, this programme not only gives you a thorough grounding in the core topics that are key for all businesses’ success, but combines this with the study of contemporary issues within the international business environment. You also have the option of studying a modern European language, coupled with the opportunity to spend a year in Europe studying at one of our partner universities.

* This programme is available with a year in France, Germany, Italy, Spain or Hong Kong.

The programme equips you with the key skills and knowledge essential for managing a business, both domestically and within an international context. It will strongly appeal to students who are considering a future career in international management.

• International Business (N126) 3 years • International Business with a Year Abroad (N127) 4 years*

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Business Skills Computing for Business and Accounting The Global Business Environment Financial Accounting, Reporting and Analysis Introduction to Statistics for Business Introduction to Management Introduction to Marketing Microeconomics for Business

Options • Developing English Language for Business • European Language

Dr Patricia Lewis Senior Lecturer, Business

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • •

Accounting & Finance p24 Business Administration p50 Business Studies p52 English Language and Linguistics p88 European Studies p94 French p104 German p106 Hispanic Studies p112 Italian p126

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Did you know? ean university Kent is the UK’s Europ nday Times Su the to and, according ‘can claim to University Guide 2008, tional be Britain’s only interna ’. university


I International Business Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Stage 2/3 Core modules • • • •

Business in Emerging Markets European Business International Business International Business: A Strategic Perspective • Managing People • Marketing Strategy • Operations Management

Options • Accounting for Management Control and Decision Making • Business Management Project • E-Marketing • E-Commerce and Business • Enterprise • International Marketing • Introduction to Microeconomics • Management of Human Resources in Contemporary Organisations • New Enterprise Start-up • The Psychology of the Workplace Either • A European language or • Extending English Language for Business

Teaching and assessment In business, we use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations, and computer-based situations. You have approximately 12 hours of class time per week, and regular access to a personal tutor for advice on any matter concerning your studies or your performance on the course. For language study, teaching takes place in small groups, with regular assessed work throughout the year. The latest language learning technology is used extensively to support classroom-based learning. Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and end-of-module examinations, with the examinations normally counting for up to 70% of the marks for each module.

Careers Possible careers could include trainee management positions in the private or public sectors in the UK or overseas, or further study for an MA or MSc or professional examinations in, for example, marketing, personnel or accounting.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points inc BC at A level (3.5 A level equivalents), IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C. N127 only: GCSE modern European language (other than English) grade C.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Year abroad If you are on the Year Abroad programme, you spend a year studying abroad between Stages 2 and 3 at one of our partner universities. Currently, we have links with a large number of institutions in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and Hong Kong.

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Italian at Canterbury Kent voices

“We have a number of teachers who are incredibly funny, lively and interesting, and they just make learning the language a complete joy. They tell us anecdotes, make us laugh and bring everything to life.” Vicki Phippen Italian and Comparative Literature To read more of what Vicki has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Cultural Studies p70 European Studies p94 French p104 German p106 Hispanic Studies p112

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With Italy continually proving herself as a cornerstone in culture, art and history across Europe, you cannot help but be inspired to learn the language. By learning Italian, you give yourself a tool to explore this cultural richness and to open your eyes to its Roman heritage, the Renaissance, modern architecture, fashion and car design. It is a hugely popular language spoken not only in its home country, but also by over 15 million people in Switzerland, North America and Australia. Italian was one of the first language departments created at Kent and we are proud to offer a course of study which gives you the opportunity to learn Italian to a high standard and gain real insight into Italian culture, literature and society. The course covers topics such as organised crime, the history of Italian literature, 19th and 20th-century Italian fiction, Fascism, and neorealist and post-neorealist cinema. You can study Italian at Kent whether you have an A level or GCSE in Italian, or are a beginner. You can study either full-time or part-time. The majority of the Italian teaching staff are native speakers and there are usually a number of exchange students within the School, so you have the opportunity to immerse yourself in the language. This is supplemented by excellent technical facilities, including three satellite TV channels, videos, DVDs and computer-assisted language learning. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Joint honours Italian is only available as a joint honours degree. Italian and… • Business Administration (NR23) 4 years • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QR83) 4 years • Comparative Literature (QR23) 4 years • Cultural Studies (R3V9) 4 years • Drama (RW34) 4 years • English and American Literature (QR33) 4 years • European Management Science (N243) 4 years • European Studies (R903) 4 years • Film Studies (RW36) 4 years • French (RR13) 4 years • German (RR23) 4 years • Hispanic Studies (RR43) 4 years • History (RV31) 4 years • History & Philosophy of Art (RV35) 4 years • Journalism (at Medway) (P500:K) 4 years • Philosophy (RVH5) 4 years • Politics and International Relations (L273) 4 years • Social Anthropology with Italian (L673) 4 years • Sociology with Italian (L373) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules Either • Learning Italian 1 (Beginners) • History of Italian Cinema: The Legacy of Neo-realism or • Italian Texts in Context • Learning Italian 3 (Post ‘A’ Level) • Writing Italy Through the Centuries: An Introduction to Italian Literature


I Italian Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/italian

Options

Year abroad

• Italian Texts in Context • History of Italian Cinema: The Legacy of Neo-realism • Looking at Language

You normally spend the year abroad (if Italian is your only modern language subject) at one of our exchange universities in Italy – Bologna, Parma, Pavia or Salerno. Alternatively, you can opt to work as an English language assistant in an Italian school.

Plus required modules for your other joint honours subject.

Teaching and assessment Stage 2/3 Core modules • Learning Italian 2 (Intermediate) • Learning Italian 4 (Advanced 1) • Learning Italian 5 (Advanced 2)

Options You can choose among the following modules: • Art and Architecture of the Renaissance • Catching the Tide: Cultural Renewal in 20th-Century Italy • Cosa Nostra: Organised Crime and Italian Politics • Dogs, Devils and Demons: Images of Hell in Virgil and Dante • Italian Cinema and History • Italian Cinema and Literature • Italian Dissertation • Italian Extended Essay • The Italian First Republic • The Italian Resistance Movement • Italian Short Story • Midnight in the Century: Fascism in Film and Literature • Women Writers of the 20th Century • ‘Ye Without Sin’ – How Organised Crime Arose in Southern Italy. Plus required modules for your other joint honours subject.

Teaching is by lectures and seminars. We have extensive technical facilities, including three satellite TV channels, video and DVDs and computer-assisted language learning. Depending on the modules you select, assessment throughout all stages of the course varies from 100% coursework (extended essays or dissertation), to a combination of examination and coursework, in the ratio 50:50, 60:40 or 80:20.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Joint honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 at HL or 5 at SL in a modern European language other than English.

Required subjects Italian from beginner’s level: GCSE modern European language (other than English) grade B. Italian from advanced level: B grade A level Italian.

Year abroad (see left). Careers Recent graduates have gone into teaching, translating and interpreting, marketing, journalism and publishing, working abroad.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 7th in a Studies Are and ges Other Langua dent Survey. in the 2009 National Stu

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Journalism at Medway Kent voices

“I like the course because it is taught by experienced journalists. It doesn’t just focus on theory, it is hands on. We actually get to work ourselves.” Laura Hartmann Journalism To read more of what Laura has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

English Language and Linguistics p88 English Literature p90 History p144 Law p130, 132 Politics and International Relations p154 War Studies p180

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Journalism is fascinating, rewarding and influential. In a world hungry for information about issues ranging from global warming to fashion and from armed conflict to football, the ultra-competitive modern media market needs versatile, multimedia journalists with cuttingedge academic and vocational skills and a highly developed awareness of ethics. In this prestigious, professionally accredited programme, you study for an honours degree that includes history, politics and law while completing the National Council for the Training of Journalists’ Preliminary Certificates in Journalism and learning radio, television and online skills required by the Broadcast Journalism Training Council. Tutors include working reporters and columnists, former editors of national newspapers, radio and television programmes and magazines, network broadcasters and web publishers. Their professional expertise is reinforced by excellent academic teaching by leading historians, political scientists and lawyers. The course is based in a state-of-the-art newsroom complete with radio and television studios, editing and production facilities and its own dedicated website. Embracing multimedia skills from the beginning, you learn to write and report in text, on air and for the internet. Work placements with the KM Group are guaranteed and there are opportunities for placements in other news organisations.

Degree programme Single honours • Journalism and the News Industry (P500:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Mandatory topics include: • British Government and Politics • History of Journalism • Principles and Practice of Convergent Journalism (Radio, Television and Online) • Reporting and Writing (Print Journalism) • Shorthand.

Stage 2/3 Topics may include, but are not limited to: • • • • • • • •

Documentary Making Feature Writing Journalists in Fiction and Film Media Law and Ethics News Websites and Citizen Reporters Reporting Conflict Reporting the Environment Spin, Propaganda and Investigative Reporting.


J Journalism Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/journalism

Teaching and assessment Each day in the Centre for Journalism begins with editorial conference. Students and staff gather in the newsroom to discuss the top stories on the local, national and international news agendas and to consider how they have been reported in newspapers, by broadcasters and online. Teaching is by a variety of methods including masterclasses, lectures, seminars, films and small group discussions. Professional skills are taught in a live newsroom environment, which replicates the atmosphere of a working multimedia newsroom. You participate in regular Live News Days, during which you work to deadline to produce live radio and television bulletins and newspaper pages and to update websites. There are frequent guest lectures and masterclasses by working journalists and editors, including network broadcasters and editors of national and regional newspapers and magazines.

Assessment includes coursework (including academic essays, television, radio and online news reports and newspaper articles) and examinations. Students compile portfolios of reports. In your final year, you complete a dissertation, which may take the form of a television or radio documentary, an extended newspaper or magazine article or a web report.

Careers Possible careers could include newspaper, broadcast and online reporting and other editorial roles in the news industry or in communications roles for charities, NGOs and campaign groups or political parties.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Minimum of ABB at A Level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects Traditional academic subjects, for example, English Literature, History, Mathematics, Politics, Chemistry and foreign languages. Suitable candidates will be invited to attend a compulsory 30-minute interview and to sit a two-hour admissions test inc English, news writing and current affairs knowledge.

Professional recognition The degree is accredited by the National Council for the Training of Journalists and has accreditation pending status with the Broadcast Journalism Training Council.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

fessionally This is a prestigious, pro awardour at accredited course pus. winning Medway cam

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Did you know? ranked 6th Kent Law School was Research nationally in the 2008 (RAE). e rcis Exe nt me ess Ass

Law at Canterbury Kent voices

“Kent Law School has an excellent reputation and is ranked highly in the university league tables, so I knew I would be getting an education worth paying for. The wide range of modules available really appealed to me – I’ve found the course challenging at times, but never dull.” Gayle Hawke Law To read more of what Gayle has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Criminal Justice Studies p66 • Criminology p68 • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Law) p86 • Forensic Sciences p100 • Law (Medway) p132

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Consistently rated as one of the best law schools in the country, Kent Law School delivers high-quality legal teaching within an active and international environment. In encouraging you to place the law within a wider social and economic context, and through offering extensive opportunities for you to enhance your legal knowledge and skills outside of the classroom, our range of qualifying degrees equip you with the academic and professional tools required to succeed at university and be well prepared for the professional workplace.

Degree programmes Single honours

The award-winning Kent Law Clinic, based in the Law School, offers you the opportunity to practice law (with the support and supervision of qualified solicitors) as an undergraduate. You represent clients in real cases in a range of areas, enabling you to acquire vital legal and practical skills.

International programmes

The Kent electronic law library, Lawlinks, is one of the best in the UK. All modules have their own websites and many of the lectures are recorded when given live and made available as MP3 files. If you already have or will have a degree in another subject, you can apply for our ‘Senior Status’ programme. This allows you to complete the LLB in two years rather than the normal three. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students at the required level guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• Law (M100) 3 years

European programmes • • • •

English and French Law (M121) 4 years English and Spanish Law (M125) 4 years European Legal Studies (M120) 4 years Law with a Language (French or German) (M124) 3 years • Law with a Language (Spanish) (M1R4) 3 years

• Law with a Year in China (M103) 4 years • Law with a Year in Hong Kong (M104) 4 years • Law with French and a Year in Canada (M1R1) 4 years (subject to approval)

Joint honours Qualifying Law degree possible with all combinations. Law and… • Accounting & Finance (NM41) 4 years • Business Administration (MN12) 3 years • Criminology (MM19) 3 years • Economics (ML11)* • English and American Literature (MQ13) 4 years • History (VM1C) 3 years • Philosophy (MV15) 3 years • Politics (LM21) 3 years • Psychology (CM81) 4 years • Sociology (LM31) 3 years • Welfare (ML14) 3 years * Requires an additional module for qualifying status. We are constantly reviewing our programmes and adding to our range of international partners and international degree programmes. Please check our website for the latest information.


L Law Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/law

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • •

A Critical Introduction to Law Criminal Law Foundations of Property Introduction to Obligations Public Law I

Stage 2/3 Core modules You must complete the following modules to obtain a qualifying Law degree: • • • • •

Equity Land Law Obligations II Public Law II European Law.

European and language programmes also include language/European law modules.

Options You can choose your options from over 40 different modules including: • • • • • • • • •

Art Law Clinical Legal Studies Company Law Family Law Human Rights and English Law Intellectual Property Law International Law Law and Literature Law of Evidence.

Year abroad The European programmes include a year spent: in France at either Paris 1 (the Panthéon Sorbonne), Paris X (Nanterre), Bordeaux or Grenoble; in Spain at Toledo or Bilbao; and for European Legal Studies (where you are taught in English) in the Netherlands (Amsterdam or Maastricht), Denmark (Copenhagen), Sweden (Uppsala), Finland (Turku), Czech Republic (Prague), Austria (Vienna) and Norway (Bergen).

The third year of the Law with a Year in Hong Kong degree is spent at the University of Hong Kong, and the third year of the Law with a Year in China degree is spent at Southwest University of Political Science and Law in Chongqing. In both cases, the language of instruction for the year abroad is English.

Teaching and assessment The latest subject-based review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) of the Kent Law School concluded that the School provides ‘excellent learning opportunities for its students’.

Location Canterbury. Award LLB (Hons), BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS levels: AAB (over 3 A levels or equivalent), IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher. M104: A/AS levels: AAA (over 3 A levels or equivalent), IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher.

Required subjects Kent Law School emphasises research-led teaching which means that the modules taught are at the leading edge of new legal and policy developments. You are taught by as many of our leading researchers as possible. Small, weekly seminar-group teaching in all of our core modules actively encourages you to take part.

M121, M124, M125: A level grade B in relevant language.

Most modules are assessed by end-of-year examinations and continuous assessment, the ratio varying from module to module. Some Stage 2/3 modules include an optional research-based dissertation that counts for 45% or, in some cases, 100% of the final mark. In Clinical Legal Studies, the final mark is based on your client file and a dissertation.

Year abroad (see left).

Careers Law graduates can expect to go into a variety of careers, including: solicitors or barristers in private practice; lawyers in companies, local authorities, central government and its agencies, or in the institutions of the European Union; non-legal careers, such as banking, finance and management.

M1R4: good GCSE or A Sub in related modern language. CM81, MN12: GCSE Mathematics grade C. ML11, MN14: GCSE Mathematics grade B.

Professional recognition All programmes can lead to a qualifying law degree, which exempts you from the first stage of professional examinations required for qualification as a solicitor or as a barrister by the English Law Society and Bar Council. Joint honours degrees with Psychology or Accounting & Finance can lead to dual professional recognition.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Law at Medway Kent voices

Kent Law School also offers the single honours LLB in Law at the Medway campus of the University of Kent. Offering the same highquality legal teaching as at Canterbury, the smaller Medway campus has a supportive and active teaching staff who have extensive contact with their students. The structure and curriculum of the degree at Medway is identical to that at Canterbury, with an increasing number of options available there.

“Kent has many links with prospective employers, which makes life easier. Studying a law degree at Kent definitely better prepares you to face the real world and puts you in a better position when competing for vacancies.” Sunny Jassal Law To read more of what Sunny has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Criminal Justice Studies p66 • Criminology p68 • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Law) p86 • Forensic Sciences p100 • Law (Canterbury) p130

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The award-winning Kent Law Clinic also operates out of the Medway campus, and offers you the opportunity to practice law (under qualified supervision) by representing real legal clients from the local community. Part-time students at Medway can choose to study the entire LLB as a part-time evening course, with modules available as twilight sessions or evening sessions. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programme Single honours • Law (M102:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • •

A Critical Introduction to Law Criminal Law Foundations of Property Introduction to Obligations Public Law I

Stage 2/3 Core modules You must complete the following modules to obtain a qualifying Law degree: • • • • •

Equity European Law Land Law Obligations II Public Law II.

Options An increasing variety of options are available; recent options include: • • • • • • •

Company Law Family Law Human Rights and English Law Labour Law Media Law Law and Medical Ethics Sports Law.

We are constantly reviewing the modules and programmes we offer – please see our website for a full and up-to-date list of core and optional modules.


L Law Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/law

Teaching and assessment The latest subject-based review by the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) of the Kent Law School concluded that the School provides ‘excellent learning opportunities for its students’. Kent Law School emphasises research-led teaching which means that the modules taught are at the leading edge of new legal and policy developments. You are taught by as many of our leading researchers as possible. The majority of lectures are delivered in Canterbury and are available over the internet, but a small number of lectures are delivered at Medway throughout the year. Handouts and materials are available in both paper and electronic form.

Most modules are assessed by end-of-year examinations and continuous assessment, the ratio varying from module to module. Some Stage 2/3 modules include an optional researchbased dissertation that counts for 45% or, in some cases, 100% of the final mark.

Careers Law graduates can expect to go into a variety of careers, including: solicitors or barristers or legal executives in private practice; lawyers in companies, local authorities, central government and its agencies, or in the institutions of the European Union; non-legal careers, such as banking, finance and management.

Location Medway. Award LLB (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS levels: AAB (over 3 A level equivalents), IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher. Due to the smaller intake at Medway, we operate a degree of flexibility in our offer and may contact applicants to assess their suitability for the programme. We also encourage applications from students with non-traditional qualifications who can demonstrate similar potential.

Required subjects

All our core modules have small, weekly or bi-weekly seminar groups which actively encourage you to take part. Seminars held at Medway are longer than the usual one hour in Canterbury – two hours in the first year and one and a half hours after that.

None.

Professional recognition The LLB is a qualifying law degree, which exempts you from the first stage of professional examinations required for qualification as a solicitor or as a barrister by the English Law Society and Bar Council.

Further information Did you know? s awarded The Kent Law Clinic wa Prize in a Queen’s Anniversary won the November 2007, and Award tion uca Ed her Times Hig Contribution 2007 for Outstanding ty. to the Local Communi

Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Management Science at Canterbury Kent voices

“My year in industry taught me a lot, not just about the industry I’ve been working in, but also about working life and more about myself as a person. I’ve put the theory from my degree into practice, which has helped me to understand more about what I learnt in my first two years.” Victoria Baldwin Management Science To read more of what Victoria has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Accounting & Finance p24 Actuarial Science p26 Business Administration p50 Business and Information Technology p118 Business Studies p52 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management p86 • Financial Mathematics p138 • Mathematics p138

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Management Science, also known as Decision Science, Operational Research or Business Analytics, is the quantitative side of management. It is widely used for planning and decision making in business, industry, government, health services and everyday life by applying mathematical-based techniques to solving practical problems, often using computers. At Kent, we also aim to develop your skills in communications and the human side of management. There is a great demand for graduates with quantitative management skills. This wide-ranging and exciting subject has staff expertise in operations management, operational research, statistics, mathematics, simulation and computing. The programme also combines theory with practical applications, so you can practise techniques you have learnt and develop your consultancy skills. The programme is carefully structured with three out of four compulsory modules each term. The fourth module allows you to opt for a particular pathway if you wish. This includes finance, marketing, mathematics, business or languages. We offer a good variety of degree pathways, including the opportunity to study abroad in Europe or the USA or spend a year working in industry, both of which offer the chance to learn new skills and increase your employability. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Management Science (N200) 3 or 4 years • Management Science with Computing (N2G4) 3 or 4 years For other possible options, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

European/USA programmes You can study Management Science with a year abroad in Europe/USA. See the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide (p332) for further details.

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. • Accounting & Finance and Management Science (NN24) 3 years • Business Analytics (N250) 3 years • Business Analytics with a Year in Industry (N201) 4 years • Management Science and Computer Science with a Year in Industry (NG2K) 4 years • Mathematics for Management (GN12) 3 or 4 years For other joint honours combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Stage 1 Core modules • • • •

Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Managers and Organisations Mathematics for Management Science Spreadsheet Modelling in Operational Research • Statistics for Management Science • Techniques and Methods in Management Science


M Management Science Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Options

Year abroad

A choice of a wide range of modules from Kent Business School and other departments.

You spend a year studying in Europe or the USA, or working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We have placement co-ordinators who can offer help and advice, and staff visit you while you are on placement.

Location Canterbury.

Teaching and assessment

A level BBB/ABC or equivalent, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Mathematics or 6 in SL Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Mathematics or 6 in SL Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies).

Stage 2/3 Core modules • Advanced Optimisation • Applied Statistics Using Computer Packages • Heuristics for Combinatorial Optimisation Problems • Introduction to Applied Statistics and Numerical Optimisation • Mathematical Programming and its Applications • Operations and Services Management • Project in Management Science • Research Frontiers in Management Science • Selected Topics in Operational Research • Simulation Modelling

There are usually two lectures per week in each course and a small group seminar, practical computing class or workshop. One-to-one help from staff and other students in workshops supports all Management Science teaching. Assessment is by end-of-year examinations (normally 80% of the final mark), projects, presentations and continuous coursework assessment. The Stage 3 project is based 90% on written reports and 10% on an oral presentation.

Plus one optional module in each term.

Careers Options Including, but not limited to, and depending on your chosen pathway: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Analysis and Design of Information Systems E-Commerce and Business Financial and Management Accounting Forecasting Methods for Business and Management International Business The Management of Human Resources Managing Complexity: The Systems Approach Marketing Analysis Marketing Research Principles of Finance Strategic Management Techniques of Production and Operations Management.

Our graduates work in careers in management, consultancy, computing, banking and personnel management, government, in companies that require decision making, or go on to postgraduate study.

Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels

Required subjects A/AS level grade C in quantitative subject (Maths/Economics/Physics/Statistics), GCSE Mathematics Higher level grade A. French European option: A level French grade B. German European option: A level German grade C.

Year abroad (see left). Professional recognition NN24: exemption from accountancy professional examinations.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Did you know?

Admissions enquiries

Assessment In the 2008 Research ss and ine Bus of Exercise, 55% research Management Studies ationally at Kent was rated “intern g”. din excellent” or “world lea

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Marketing at Canterbury Kent voices

“In today’s increasingly competitive and global business environment, it is essential to have an in-depth understanding about who your consumers are and what is important to them. By studying a degree in marketing, you will learn how to create a product or service that your customers will value, how to communicate with them and how to ensure they remain loyal to a particular brand.” Dr Dan Petrovici Lecturer, Marketing

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Business Administration p50 Business and Information Technology p118 Business Studies p52 International Business p124

Which mobile phone did you choose to buy? How do you decide where to go on holiday? What is important to you when choosing a university? These are questions that marketing professionals try to understand. How to create a product or service you will value and how to ensure you remain loyal to their brands. Marketing is an integrated business function that seeks to understand customer needs and cultural diversity, with the aim of generating value and developing long-lasting relationships. Marketing represents a vibrant, exciting and challenging activity, geared towards creating customer value, satisfaction and loyalty towards the brand. The BA (Hons) Marketing degree at Kent equips you with the knowledge of principles, models and techniques of marketing, and provides you with a framework and toolkit, enabling you to practise in any organisation. The programme gives you the fundamental skills and knowledge essential for managing the key areas of organisations: accounting; human resource management; quantitative methods; marketing and operations management. In addition, it gives you the choice of following specialist options in marketing, or spending a year working in industry. Marketing and business are in the top ten subjects for degree course choices as they combine excellent academic training with good career prospects. This degree gives you the academic foundation you need for a varied career in business or marketing. Kent Business School is a multicultural learning environment with a supportive and flexible approach to teaching. A good pass on a Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

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Degree programme Single honours • Marketing (N500) 3 years (subject to approval)

Stage 1 Stage 1 of the programme gives a basic foundation in business, including an introduction to marketing. You are required to take eight 15-credit core modules: • • • • • • • •

Business Skills Computing for Business and Accounting Microeconomics for Business Financial Accounting, Reporting and Analysis The Global Business Environment Introduction to Management* Introduction to Marketing* Introduction to Statistics for Business.

Stage 2/3 In Stages 2 and 3, you take a range of specialist marketing modules covering areas including marketing research, consumer behaviour, marketing strategy and all students complete a marketing project. These specialist marketing modules can include: • Accounting for Management Control and Decision Making • Business-to-Business (B2B) Marketing • Consumer Behaviour • E-Marketing • Enterprise • International Marketing • Managing People • Marketing Communications • Marketing Management Project • Marketing Research Techniques • Marketing Strategy • New Products Marketing • Retail Marketing • Service Management • Strategy Analysis and Tools


M Marketing Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/kbs

Students may choose up to 15 credits of ‘wild’ modules (modules from another programmes) in the second term by agreement with the Director of Studies for Marketing.

Year in industry With the BA (Hons) Marketing, you can choose to spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. Kent Business School has a student placement service providing you with information and skills to find a work placement. Companies who have participated in the placement scheme in recent years include: British Energy, BP, IBP, Hewlett Packard, KPMG, Lloyds TSB, Unilever and Burson-Marsteller (UK) as well as corporations in New York, Kyoto, Dubai and Barcelona. For many of these companies, this is an ideal opportunity to discover new talent or to staff one-year projects by tapping into a pool of dynamic students who have, by this time, gained a consolidated knowledge and understanding of marketing issues. For our students, it represents the opportunity to put theory into practice as well as make a valuable contribution to a real organisation.

Teaching and assessment In a typical week, you spend six to eight hours in lectures, and four or five hours in classes, group discussion and seminars. Modules also involve individual study and sessions in the computer laboratories. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and exams.

Careers Following graduation, you will be equipped to pursue an area of specialism in marketing, such as strategic marketing planning, brand/new product management, marketing research, e-commerce, media planning, public relations or retail promotions. Our graduates have moved on to pursue a variety of careers in management, sales, website management, marketing, recruitment and administration, for example, trainee management positions in the private or public sectors in the UK or overseas. Others have chosen to pursue further study for an MA or MSc in Value Chain Management at Kent, or to take professional examinations in, for example, marketing or management.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels 300 UCAS points (3.5 A level equivalents) (21 units), IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects GCSE English grade C, GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition This programme has been approved and accredited by The Chartered Institute of Marketing to provide direct entry onto the CIM’s Professional Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing. This is an internationally recognised diploma, highly sought after by employees worldwide.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? consistently Kent Business School Management for ten top the in ks ran Student al tion Na the in UK in the Surveys.

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Mathematics and Statistics at Canterbury Kent voices

“I’m really enjoying my course – it’s exciting and interesting. The teaching has been really enthusiastic. All the lecturers are passionate about their respective subjects and are approachable to discuss them.” Josofene Dixon Mathematics

Mathematics is important to the modern world. All quantitative science, including both physical and social sciences, is based on it. It provides the theoretical framework for physical science, statistics and data analysis as well as computer science. Our programmes reflect this diversity and the excitement generated by new discoveries within mathematics that affect not only the technicalities of science but also our general understanding of the world in which we live. The programmes share a common core of Mathematics at Stage 1, and then move on to cover abstract, analytical and computational techniques that give you the opportunity to specialise in areas such as non-linear differential equations, computational algebra and geometry, financial mathematics, forecasting, design and analysis of experiments, inference and stochastic processes. All our programmes offer the opportunity to spend a year on work placement in industry.

To read more of what Josofene has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Actuarial Science p26 Computer Science p58 Economics p82 Management Science p134 Physics p152

• • • •

Business Mathematics (G1N1) 3 or 4 years Financial Mathematics (GN13) 3 or 4 years Mathematics (G100) 3 or 4 years Mathematics and Statistics (GG13) 3 or 4 years • Mathematics including a Foundation Year (G108) 4 years All the above programmes are available with a sandwich year. The UCAS code is the same as for the corresponding non-sandwich programme.

Joint honours Mathematics and… • Accounting & Finance (GN14) 3 years • Computer Science (GG41) 3 years • Computer Science with a Year in Industry (GGC4) 4 years • Management (GN12) 3 or 4 years • Secondary Education (G1X1) (QTS, joint programme with Canterbury Christ Church University) 3 years When you are applying for Mathematics and Secondary Education (G1X1), please apply to Canterbury Christ Church University, UCAS institution code C10, and do not use the Kent institution code (K24).

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Degree programmes Single honours

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 8th in ics in the tist Sta in lity research qua ment Exercise. 2008 Research Assess

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • •

Algebra Calculus Discrete Mathematics and Probability Mathematical Methods Statistics

Plus other required modules for your chosen programme.

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M Mathematics and Statistics Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/ims

Stage 2 Core modules • Analysis • Linear Algebra Plus other required modules for your chosen programme.

Year in industry All single honours Mathematics degrees offer the option of spending a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We can offer help and advice in finding a placement.

Foundation year

All single honours students do a 30-credit project or dissertation. Other required modules depend on your chosen programme.

If your qualifications are not sufficient, for whatever reason, for direct entry onto a degree programme, you can apply for Mathematics with a Foundation Year (G108). For more information on foundation years, see p220.

Core module

Teaching and assessment

• Dissertation

Most of the teaching amounts to about 16 hours of lectures and classes per week. Modules that involve programming or working with computer software packages usually include practical sessions.

Stage 3

Options • Analysis of Variance • Applied Stochastic Modelling and Data Analysis • Business Finance • Calculus of Variations • Complex Analysis • Computational Algebra • Discrete Mathematics • Futures and Options • Heuristics and Structured Problems in OR • Non-linear Systems and Mathematical Biology • Numerical Solutions of Differential Equations • Selected Topics in Operational Research • Optimisation • Polynomials in Several Variables • Practical Multivariate Analysis • Probability and Inference • Stochastic Processes • Spreadsheet Modelling for Operational Research • Time Series Modelling and Simulation • Topics in Applied Mathematics.

The majority of Stage 1 modules are assessed by end-of-year examinations. Many Stage 2 and 3 modules include coursework which normally counts for 20% of the final assessment. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree result.

Careers Recent graduates have gone into careers in medical statistics, pharmaceutical industry, the aerospace industry, software development, teaching, actuarial work, Civil Service statistics, chartered accountancy, the oil industry and postgraduate research.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Mathematics, except for Mathematics inc a Foundation Year (G108) (individual consideration).

Required subjects A level Mathematics grade B, inc the core syllabus of Pure Mathematics.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition Mathematics and Computer Science – exemption from Part I of the British Computer Society examinations. Mathematics and Accounting – various exemptions from the Institute of Chartered Accountants examinations. Mathematics and Statistics – exemption from the examinations of the Royal Statistical Society. Mathematics with Secondary Education – qualified teacher status.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Medical Anthropology at Canterbury Kent voices

“My favourite module has been human osteology because it gave me the chance to learn in-depth information about bones in a really practical way. The teaching has been excellent, with lecturers being more than willing to answer random questions that you may have as well as giving advice on essays.” Elise Vivers Medical Anthropology To read more of what Elise has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Biological Anthropology p44 Biomedical Science p48 Conservation p64 Psychology p158 Social Anthropology p162

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Why do people get sick? Are humans the only species that use medicine? How do medical systems evolve? What happens when folk medicine and professional biomedicine are used at the same time? What are the health effects of mass-produced food? What makes plants effective medicines?

Degree programme Single honours

Medical anthropology studies the causes and consequences of illness and disease. Medical anthropologists are interested in how the environment affects health, the diversity of human medical practices, the history of medicine, economics and current health care policy, emerging infectious diseases and access to primary health care facilities.

Core modules

Kent is one of only two UK universities that offer a stand-alone Medical Anthropology degree to undergraduates. The School of Anthropology and Conservation is very highly rated in both teaching and research and there is a friendly atmosphere and strong relations between staff and students. The programme provides a unique opportunity to study a range of subjects that could lead to a variety of careers.

• Medical Anthropology (L621) 3 years

Stage 1 In the first year, you take three core modules and a choice of options.

• Computing for Anthropologists • Foundations of Human Culture • Introduction to Social Anthropology

Options • Introduction to the History of Medicine • Life Systems and Processes • People and Plants

Stage 2 At Stage 2, you take four core modules and a choice of options.

Core modules • Biological Anthropology: The Human Animal • Health, Illness and Medicine • Medicinal Plants: Home Remedies, Pharmaceuticals and Illicit Substances • Methods in Anthropological Science

Options • • • •

Advanced Social Anthropology II Human Ecology Human Osteology Sex, Evolution and Human Nature


M Medical Anthropology Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/anthropology/medanth

Stage 3 At Stage 3, you take two core modules and a choice of options.

Core modules • The Anthropology of Eating: From the Raw to the Cooked • Project in Anthropological Science

Module assessment ranges from 80:20 exam/coursework to 50:50. At Stage 2/3, most modules have an end-of-year examination that counts for 80% of the mark. The Project in Anthropological Science is assessed entirely on coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your final degree class.

Careers Options • • • • •

Anthropology and Development The Anthropology of Gender Current Issues in Evolutionary Anthropology Palaeopathology Visual Anthropology Theory

Teaching and assessment In each module, you have lectures and take part in interactive seminars, and you also have the opportunity to conduct research on health and medicine in the local community. Most modules include study time using the Library and, where relevant, our laboratories and computer-based learning packages.

Medical Anthropology is a new degree at Kent, so potential careers could include: researchers in universities and for governmental and non-governmental agencies, such as the World Health Organisation; health care providers in clinical settings; teaching cultural competence in medical schools; pharmaceutical, health insurance and medical service industries.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies) and 4 in a Science subject or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics (5 in Mathematics Studies) and 4 in a Science subject.

Required subjects A level, at grade B or better, in a science (Biology preferred) or Psychology. GCSE Mathematics grade C. We will also consider students with alternative qualifications.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? was ranked Anthropology at Kent student 3rd in the UK for overall al Student satisfaction in the Nation 9. 200 y Surve

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Multimedia Technology and Design at Canterbury Kent voices

In current technology communications, computing and entertainment have converged to create completely new media possibilities and experiences. These creative industries need people who can combine digital technology skills with creative ability to meet design challenges.

Degree programmes Single honours • Multimedia Technology and Design (G4W2) 3 years • Multimedia Technology and Design with a Year in Industry (G4WF) 4 years

Joint honours Our multidisciplinary course in Multimedia Technology and Design offers the opportunity to develop in-depth knowledge in areas such as web design, digital film-making, 3D modelling, special effects and compositing.

“I have studied a variety of techniques and discovered what I enjoy doing. One of the great things about this course is that it bridges the gap between programming and the more creative side of computing.” Tristan Slaughter Multimedia Technology and Design To read more of what Tristan has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • •

Computer Systems Engineering p60 Digital Arts p78 Drama p80 Electronic and Communications Engineering p84 • Information Technology p118 • Music Technology p144 • Web Computing p182

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• Drama and Multimedia (GW44) 3 years

Stage 1 You take eight compulsory modules.

Core modules Teaching in the School has been rated as excellent. The course is taught by a team of experts in design, animation, film-making, photography, web technology and programming. We have a team of senior industrialists who meet regularly with staff to review our courses, and there is an option to spend a year working in industry.

• • • • • • • •

Computer Systems Digital Photography Digital Visual Narrative Interaction Design Internet Programming with Java Introduction to Programming Visual Communication Website Design

Stage 2 You take two 15-credit and three 30-credit compulsory modules.

Core modules • • • • •

Audio and Video Technology Digital Portfolio Digital Film-making Software Development Virtual Worlds and 3D Modelling


M Multimedia Technology and Design Honours degrees www.eda.kent.ac.uk/multimedia

Stage 3 You take three compulsory modules and one option.

Core modules • E-Commerce Technology • Multimedia Final Year Project • Visual Effects and Compositing

The specialist project at Stage 3 is assessed by a written report, a critique, an exhibition and, of course, the outcome of the project itself. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks count towards your degree result. The industrial placement year is assessed by a written report and an interview that count as 10% of your overall degree result.

Options One optional module drawn from a list, including: • 3D Computer Animation Pipeline • Digital Culture • Managers and Organisations.

Year in industry Students on the year in industry degree spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. We have an Industrial Placement Officer who can offer help and advice.

Careers Our recent graduates have gone into computer-based training, web development, web mastering, multimedia authoring, television, film, electronic games, mobile communications, electronic commerce, internet publishing, multimedia marketing, computer programming and network management. Some have gone on to postgraduate study, such as our MScs in Computer Animation or Digital Visual Effects.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year in industry (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Teaching and assessment Most modules consist of a mix of lectures, seminars, studio work, computer sessions and private study. The computer workstations in our multimedia laboratories are equipped with current industry-standard software. The majority of the modules contain design and project work, and are continuously assessed; some modules also have an end-of-year examination.

Did you know? ing and The School of Engineer voted top of Digital Arts has been Survey twice the National Students ut the quality abo ing talk ts den by stu . rse of their cou

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Music Technology at Medway Kent voices

“You should choose this course if you want to be in the industry and not just a performer or a composer. Music theory is part of the course and you need to know it to do some stuff, but you need to know about recording and mixing techniques more.” Marie-Claire Newman Music Technology To read more of what Marie-Claire has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Audio Design and Production p40 • Creative Events: Design and Production p72 • Experience Design p76

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The convergence of music and computing technologies has increased the creative possibilities and potential for innovative and diverse new music and media. Multimedia communications are rapidly evolving and the ability to communicate effectively through music, coupled with an understanding of digital technologies is a powerful combination. Advances in music production, web design, video games, cable television and interactive entertainment require professionals with an understanding of media requirements who can also provide creative input.

Degree programme Single honours

The course provides the opportunity for you to combine musical ability, theory and sound manipulation skills in order to produce music and sound content for a wide range of new media.

Stage 2 Core modules

We provide specialist facilities for composition, recording and post-production editing for you to produce music and sound content to industry standards. Throughout the course, a wide variety of both technical and creative projects reflect current working practices and give you the opportunity to develop research and problem-solving skills.

• Music Technology (W351:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • •

• • • • • •

Acoustics and Psychoacoustics Applied Audio Technology 1 Fundamentals of Sound and Audio Theory Introduction to Computer-Based Production Music Theory and Analysis 1 Practical Composition 1 20th-Century Music

Applied Audio Technology 2 Digital Audio Electronic Music and Synthesis Music and Sound for New Media Music Theory and Analysis 2 Practical Composition 2

Stage 3 Core modules • • • •

Applied Audio Technology 3 Dissertation Major Individual Project Professional Practice


M Music Technology Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/musictechnology

Stage 2/3 options

Teaching and assessment

Students choose 30 credits of optional modules. These include:

Most modules consist of a mix of lectures, small group seminars, individual or group project work, as well as research and private study. You also have access to current industrystandard resources that include facilities for composition, recording and post-production.

• • • • • • • • • •

Advanced and Alternative Notation Electronic Music Performance Introduction to Multimedia Applications Music Arrangement Audio Applications Development Popular Music Conventions and Production Advanced Acoustics and Psychoacoustics Composing Music to Picture Music and Society Interactive Media.

Core modules within the programme provide opportunities to explore specific theoretical, cultural and creative aspects, such as Electronic Music and Synthesis, Music and Sound for New Media, and 20th-century Music. You can also choose from various other optional modules that provide the opportunity to design parts of the course to meet your own interests. These cover both music and sound design.

Most modules are continually assessed based on coursework, projects and seminar presentations. This can include creative projects in composition, the design of software synthesisers, sound design or multimedia content. Alongside practical projects, you have lectures and seminars on theory that will help you to develop research skills and essay writing. Some theoretical modules also include end-of-year examinations. There is a major written assignment (Dissertation) at Stage 3.

Careers Possible careers could include music production, sound design, video game development, radio, film and television, advertising, web content development, media production, teaching, electro-acoustic composition and studio management.

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level or equivalent, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects Some practical musical ability plus the ability to read music notation to a level equivalent to grade 3 music theory must be demonstrated (candidates with A level music at grade C should be at or above this level). A level grade C music (not Music Technology) will be considered instead of grade 3 music theory GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? specially Music Technology has dios, designed recording stu t-production soundproof booths, pos ms, roo on tati rks wo and suites dware har st late the h wit equipped and software.

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Pharmaceutical Chemistry at Canterbury Kent voices

“This exciting new programme is a collaboration by the Schools of Physical Sciences, Biosciences and Pharmacy. It focuses on the pharmaceutical, medicinal, material and biological applications of chemistry, giving you knowledge and skills to participate in the design, delivery and application of pharmaceuticals.” Dr Simon Holder Senior Lecturer, Organic Chemistry

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Biochemistry p42 Biology p46 Biomedical Science p48 Forensic Chemistry p100 Forensic Science p100 Pharmacy p148

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The pharmaceutical industry is one of Britain’s leading manufacturing sectors and it currently employs 32,000 people in Research & Development in the UK. A recent report from the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry has highlighted the need for graduates with skills that support the research and development of new medicines. A degree in Pharmaceutical Chemistry from Kent will provide intellectual training in addition to providing a set of scientific skills from a multidisciplinary background. Pharmaceutical Chemistry is a multidisciplinary BSc programme with chemistry at its core and involves teaching in aspects of chemistry, biology, pharmacy, biochemistry and physiology. It is principally based in the School of Physical Sciences, with significant teaching components from the School of Biosciences and the Medway School of Pharmacy (all three Schools have been voted number one for student teaching satisfaction in their respective degree courses). Further teaching and training will be provided by industrial representatives.

Degree programme Single honours • Pharmaceutical Chemistry (F153) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Enzymes and Introduction to Metabolism • Fundamental Chemistry for Physical Scientists and Bioscientists • Fundamental Human Biology or optional module • Human Physiology and Disease • Introduction to Biochemistry • Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry • Molecules, Matter and Energy • Pharmaceutical Chemistry • Skills for Pharmaceutical Chemists

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Chemical Identification Techniques How Enzymes Work Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry Pharmaceutical Chemistry Pharmacology Physiology Thermodynamics and Spectroscopy


P Pharmaceutical Chemistry Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/physical-sciences

Stage 3 Core modules • • • • • •

Analytical Chemistry Inorganic and Polymeric Materials Medicinal Chemistry Research Project (double module) Synthetic Chemistry Topics in Pharmaceutical Chemistry

Options • Protein Structure and Function • Topics in Functional Materials

Careers Our graduates find employment in areas such as industrial research and manufacturing, government agencies, consultancies, emergency services, local authorities, contract laboratories, or further postgraduate study (PhD or MSc). Past chemistry graduates from Kent now work in a number of well-known chemical companies, including Pfizers and GSK. Kent is one of the top five universities for graduate recruitment in the UK.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC in two A levels, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Chemistry and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in HL Chemistry and 4 in Mathematics.

Teaching and assessment

Required subjects

There are approximately eight one-hour lectures each week, laboratory classes, project work and problem-solving seminars.

A level Chemistry grade C required and A level Biology grade C recommended.

Assessment is by a combination of written examinations, continuous assessment and other assignments. You must pass the Stage 1 examinations in order to progress to Stage 2.

Further information

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? t was ranked Physical Sciences at Ken dent stu rall ove for UK 5th in the al Student satisfaction in the Nation Survey 2009.

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Pharmacy at Medway Kent voices

Medway School of Pharmacy is a unique partnership between the University of Kent and University of Greenwich. The School has achieved full accreditation by the RPSGB (Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain) and is recognised as an established School of Pharmacy. The School’s mission is to produce, through innovative teaching and research delivered in a supportive and caring environment, highquality professional graduates committed to lifelong learning.

“The teaching is absolutely excellent. The way in which the course is structured really benefits you as a student. Although pharmacy involves much theory, the course is very dynamic in the way it is taught. Lectures lead to group workshops and labs, where you put the theory to practice.” Patrick Moynagh MPharm Pharmacy To read more of what Patrick has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Biochemistry p42 Biology p46 Biomedical Science p48 Forensic Sciences p100 Medical Anthropology p140

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The MPharm degree is a four-year programme based on three interlinked themes: practitioner and patient; medicinal products; and the patient, disease and drug action. Extensive use is made of tutorials, workshops and practical laboratory classes. Throughout the programme, external placements are arranged at hospitals, community pharmacies and industry. Graduates are required to undertake a pre-registration year in practice and pass a pre-registration exam before they can register as a pharmacist in Great Britain.

Degree programme Single honours • Master of Pharmacy (B230) 4 years When you are applying for the MPharm degree, please apply to the Medway School of Pharmacy, UCAS institution code M62, and do not use the Kent institution code (K24).

Stage 1 Core modules • Medicinal Products 1 • The Patient, Disease and Drug Action 1 (Body Systems 1) • The Patient, Disease and Drug Action 2 • Practitioner and Patient 1

Stage 2 Core modules • Medicinal Products 2 • The Patient, Disease and Drug Action 3 (Body Systems 2) • The Patient, Disease and Drug Action 4 (Body Systems 3) • Practitioner and Patient 2


P Pharmacy Honours degree www.msp.ac.uk

Stage 3 Core modules • • • •

Medicinal Products 3 The Patient, Disease and Drug Action 5 Practitioner and Patient 3 Research Methods

Stage 4 Core modules • • • •

Advanced Science Electives Advanced Therapeutics Practitioner and Patient 4 Research Project

At Stage 4, modules are worth 20 or 30 credits, apart from the Research Project, which is worth 60 credits. All students studying the MPharm or FdPP programmes will be subject to the code of conduct for pharmacy students and associated fitness to practice procedures as required by the professional regulatory body. Visit www.msp.ac.uk for further details.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by seminars, workshops and practical laboratory classes, which take up approximately two thirds of the programme. Placements form a key part of the teaching programme.

Location Medway.

A variety of assessment methods are used including practical dispensing examinations, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), presentations (individual and group), written reports, interim assessments and end-of-year written examinations.

A/AS level 300 points, inc BBB, IB 32 points with 15 at Higher to include at least 5 in both Chemistry and one other science-based subject.

Careers There are opportunities in all branches of the profession, including hospital, community, primary care, industry and academia. Flexible working is widely available.

Award MPharm. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels

Required subjects A level Chemistry, and one from Biology, Physics or Mathematics (or equivalents), plus GCSE Mathematics and English grade C or above. Mature students and students without the necessary qualifications may gain access to the programme on completion of an Access to Science course with 54 credits at Level 3 and an overall grade of Distinction. Overseas applicants are assessed on an individual basis based on the NARIC equivalent. Students who complete a Medway Foundation Degree in Pharmacy Practice with grades of 40% or above may gain direct entry to Stage 2 (see p193).

Professional recognition Did you know? Pharmacy The Medway School of overall of l leve t had the highes %) of any student satisfaction (97 tion in the higher education institu t Sur vey. 2009 National Studen

The programme has full accreditation from the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Philosophy at Canterbury Kent voices

“Philosophy is a really interesting subject – you never run out of things to learn, discuss or think about. It’s also a good degree to have as it shows that you are a clear thinker who can understand and evaluate problems effectively.” Emma Postgate Philosophy To read more of what Emma has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

What is philosophy? Why is it important? Is it relevant? As a student of Philosophy at Kent, you do not so much learn about philosophy as learn to do it yourself. This includes not only studying major philosophies and philosophers, but also contributing your own ideas to an ongoing dialogue. You develop the ability to connect the most abstract ideas to the most concrete things in our experience. Philosophy at Kent is a top-rated teaching department that was awarded the maximum score in its most recent teaching assessment. We have a thriving research culture with internationally recognised experts, and interests range from philosophers such as Hegel, Kant and Wittgenstein to topics such as philosophy of mind, ethics, logic, moral psychology, reasoning and artificial intelligence. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Philosophy (V500) 3 years

European programme • Philosophy with an Approved Year Abroad (V501) 4 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For other possible combinations, please see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Philosophy and… • Business Administration (VN52) 3 years • Classical & Archaeological Studies (QV85) 3 years • Comparative Literature (VQ52) 3 years • Computing (VG54) 3 years • Cultural Studies (VV59) 3 years • Drama (VW54) 3 years • English and American Literature (QVH5) 3 years • Film Studies (VW56) 3 years • History (VVC5) 3 years • Law (MV15) 3 years • Politics (LV25) 3 years • Religious Studies (VV56) 3 years • Social Anthropology (LVP5) 3 years • Sociology (LVH5) 3 years

Not sure? How about...

Stage 1

• • • • •

Core modules

Classical & Archaeological Studies p54 Comparative Literature p56 English Literature p90 History p114 Religious Studies p160

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You take four core 15-credit modules.

• Introduction to Philosophy: Ethics • Introduction to Philosophy: Knowledge and Metaphysics • Philosophical Reading and Writing • Philosophical Thinking


P Philosophy Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/philosophy

Plus 30 credits from: • Existentialism • Ideas in the Arts: Aesthetics, Truth and Meaning • Self and Society.

Options You have a choice of modules drawn from the wide range offered by the Faculty of Humanities.

Stage 2/3 You take a range of the following modules. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advanced Topics in Mind and Language Aesthetics Alternative Theories of Knowledge Contemporary Theory of Knowledge Greek Philosophy: Plato and Aristotle Hegel and Marx Karl Popper Knowledge and Metaphysics Logic Meta-ethics Metaphysics, Truth and Relativism Normative Ethics Paradoxes Philosophical Hermeneutics Philosophies of Art Philosophy Dissertation Philosophy Extended Essay Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence Philosophy of Language Philosophy of Logic Philosophy of Medicine Philosophy of Mind Philosophy of Religion Philosophy of Science Political Philosophy: Analysing Political Culture Political Philosophy: Liberals and Communitarians • The Self and Authenticity • Social Philosophy • Wittgenstein

Plus other modules drawn from a wide range in the Faculty of Humanities.

Year abroad

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons).

You have the option to spend a year studying Philosophy abroad between Stages 2 and 3.

Programme type Full-time and part-time.

Teaching and assessment

Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher.

Teaching is by lectures, seminars, class discussions, and individual and group research, which is discussed in class. Stage 1 is assessed by 100% coursework (essays, class participation) in the first half of the year, plus a 50:50 combination of coursework and examination in the second half of the year. At Stage 2/3, the large majority of modules are 100% coursework, and no module has more than 50% of its assessment based on examination.

Careers Recently, our graduates have gone into areas such as teaching, publishing, journalism, media, marketing, the civil service and the legal profession.

Offer levels

Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5/3 A level equivalents) inc BC/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher.

Required subjects None, although A level Philosophy grade B where taken.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? top ten for Kent was ranked in the ording to The acc n ctio student satisfa y Guide 2009. Times Good Universit

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Physics at Canterbury Kent voices

“At Kent I am taught by leading experts in the field and I enjoy working alongside like-minded people. The lecturers are very good and the staff have lots of time for students.” Michael Banda Physics To read more of what Michael has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics p38 • Computer Science p58 • Electronic and Communications Engineering p84 • Forensic Sciences p100 • Mathematics p138

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Physics reaches from the quark out to the largest of galaxies, and encompasses all the matter and timescales within these extremes. At the heart of a professional physicist is a fascination with the ‘how and why’ of the material world around us. We aim to equip you with the skills to understand these phenomena and to qualify you for a range of career pathways. At Stage 3, the combination of specialist modules and an attachment to one of our research teams opens avenues for even deeper exploration: for instance, in space probe instrumentation, fibre optics, or the atomic-scale structure of a new engineering material, or neutron scattering work. Our international exchange programme also offers the opportunity for you to spend the third year of your degree studying in the USA at one of our partner universities.

Degree programmes Single honours BSc • Physics (F300) 3 years • Physics with a Foundation Year (F305) 4 years • Physics with Astrophysics (F3F5) 3 years MPhys • Physics (F303) 4 years • Physics with Astrophysics (F3FN) 4 years • Physics with Astrophysics with a Year in the USA (F3FM) 4 years • Physics with a Year in the USA (F304) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • •

Astrophysics, Space Science and Cosmology Computing Skills Disasters Mathematics Physics Skills for Physicists

Stage 2 Core modules • Atomic and Nuclear Physics • Mathematical Techniques and Differential Equations • Medical Physics • Optics and Electromagnetism • Physics Lab • Quantum Physics Plus, depending on your chosen degree, one of: • The Multiwavelength Universe and Exoplanets • Spacecraft Design and Operations.

Stage 3 Core modules • • • • •

Physics Problem Solving Physics Group Project Physics Project Lab Image Processing Relativity, Optics and Maxwell’s Equations


P Physics Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/physical-sciences

• Solid State Physics • Thermal and Statistical Physics Plus, depending on your chosen degree programme, one or more of: • Numerical and Computational Methods • Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

Stage 4 – MPhys only Core modules • • • •

Elementary Particles Physics Research Project Quantum Mechanics Space Astronomy and Solar System Science

Plus, depending on your chosen degree programme, one of: • Physical Science Research Planning • Topics in Functional Materials • Stars, Galaxies and the Universe.

Year abroad You spend a year in the USA between Stages 2 and 3, studying equivalent courses to those you take at Kent. Our partner universities include the Pennsylvania State University, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the University of Indiana in Bloomington. If you take this course, you pay a reduced (50%) fee to Kent during your year abroad. You do not need to pay fees at the host university.

Foundation year This course is for students who lack the qualifications needed for direct entry into Stage 1 of the degree programmes. The foundation year is taught entirely on the Canterbury campus and caters for students with a wide range of backgrounds and experience. Successful completion of the foundation year guarantees entry into any of the School’s Physics or Astronomy degree courses.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by lectures, practical classes, tutorials and workshops. You have an average of nine one-hour lectures, one or two days of practical or project work and a number of workshops each week. The practical modules include specific study skills in Physics and general communication skills. In the MPhys final year, you work with a member of staff on an experimental or computing project. Assessment is by written examinations at the end of each year and by continuous assessment of practical classes and other written assignments. Your final degree result is made up of a combined mark from the Stage 2/3/4 assessments with maximum weight applied to the final Stage.

Careers Recent graduates have gone into research and development, technical management, the City and financial institutions, computing, software design, the media and teaching. Some have also gone on to postgraduate study.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons), MPhys (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A level 300 points, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL Physics and Mathematics or 6 in SL Physics and Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc HL Physics and 5 in Mathematics or SL Physics and 6 in Mathematics (not Mathematics Studies). F305: on an individual basis.

Required subjects A level Mathematics and Physics at a combination of grades BC.

Year abroad (see left). Professional recognition Degrees fully accredited by the Institute of Physics.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? y at Kent Physics and Astronom UK for overall was ranked 5th in the the 2009 student satisfaction in y. rve Su t den Stu al tion Na

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Politics and International Relations at Canterbury Kent voices

“The Kent course has a really good mix of international relations, British politics and political philosophy. This mixture of subjects proved to be really valuable because it allowed me to get a really comprehensive picture of the vast field of politics.” Chris Henry Politics and International Relations To read more of what Chris has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Politics and international relations is an exciting, fast-changing, broad-based discipline. At Kent, we offer an extensive range of four-year programmes, which include the opportunity to study for a year in places such as Argentina, France, Germany, Italy and Spain, where you study in the local language, as well as Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, Hong Kong, Japan and Poland, where the teaching is in English. We also offer the rare opportunity to gain dual British and French qualifications with our Politics and International Relations (Bi-diplôme) programme, offered in partnership with the Institut d’Etudes Politiques of Lille. Our programmes are extremely flexible and offer extensive module choice, reflecting the research interests of our staff, including conflict resolution, federalism, European integration, ethnic conflict, terrorism, the theory of international relations, political theory, and the politics of countries such as China, Germany, Japan, Lebanon, Russia, Switzerland and the USA. We have an excellent and cosmopolitan community, with close to half our students coming from outside the UK. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Economics p82 European Studies p94 History p114 Journalism p128 Law p130, 132 Philosophy p150 Social Policy p164 War Studies p180

• Conflict, Peace and Security (L252) 3 years • Politics (L242) 3 years • Politics and International Relations (L258) 3 years • Politics and International Relations (Bidiplôme) (L291) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with a Year in China/Hong Kong (L254) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with a Year in Continental Europe (L255) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with a Year in Japan (L257) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with French (L243) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with German (L271) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with Italian (L273) 4 years • Politics and International Relations with Spanish (L2R4) 4 years

Joint honours Politics and… • Business Administration (LN22) 3 years • Economics (LL12) 3 years • History (LV21) 3 years • Law (LM21) 3 years • Philosophy (LV25) 3 years • Sociology (LL32) 3 years For other possible joint honours combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • •

Degree programmes Single honours

Did you know? duating, Within six months of gra ts den 95% of Kent Politics stu or in further were either employed dy. stu

Stage 1 Students on L258 take four core modules and choose from a range of options. Other programmes could include compulsory language modules.

Core modules • Introduction to Government • Introduction to International Politics 154


P Politics and International Relations Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/politics

• Introduction to Political Thought • Studying Politics and International Relations

Options Depending on your degree, they could include: • Key Issues in British Politics Today • European Integration • International History and International Relations • Politics and Popular Culture in Modern Japan • The Rise of China.

• • • • • • • • •

Political Behaviour in Britain Policies and Policymaking in the EU Politics of Trust (in the USA) Politics of the Middle East Postcommunist Russia Research Methods of Peace and Conflict Studies Rights, Freedoms and Individualism: Contemporary Liberalism in Question Specialist Dissertation State Failure: Causes, Consequences and Prospects Terrorism and Political Violence Theories of Conflict, Cohesion and Consent Understanding Federalism Understanding US Foreign Policy: War, Transformation and Terror US and Latin America.

Students on L258 take three core modules and a choice of options. Students taking different subjects have slightly different choices.

• • • •

Core modules

• Contemporary International Relations Theory • Modern Classics of Comparative Politics • Political Research and Analysis

Year abroad

Stage 2/3

Options Including, but not limited to: • Conflict and Security in Africa • Conflict Resolution in the Balkans • Contemporary Politics and Government in the USA • East Asian Political Systems: An Introduction • East European Politics • Engendering Politics: Feminist Contributions to Political Theory • Ethics in International Relations • Europe and the World • European Security Co-operation since 1945 • Foreign Policy Analysis and Management • Governance and Politics of Contemporary China • International Conflict Analysis and Resolution • International Environmental Politics • International Organisation: The UN System • Introduction to Strategic Studies • Japan in the World • Modern Political Thought

You spend a year studying in one of our partner institutions in Barcelona, Berlin, Buenos Aires*, Grenoble, Lausanne, Lille, Madrid, Namur, Paris, Potsdam, Siena and Turin, where you study in the local language; or Brussels, Prague, Kyoto, Nagoya, Tampere, Tokyo, Warsaw, Hong Kong or Beijing, where courses are taught in English. *Limited spaces

Teaching and assessment Our main teaching methods are lectures, seminars, working groups, PC laboratory sessions and individual discussions with your personal tutor or module teachers. Assessment is through continuous feedback, written examinations, assessed essays and oral presentations.

Careers Recent graduates have gone into areas such as teaching, publishing, practical politics, local and central government, the diplomatic service, EU administration, non-governmental organisations, journalism, international business or international organisations. Many have also gone on to postgraduate study.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time (120 credits per academic year). Part-time (60 credits per academic year). Part-time programme options: L252, L242, L258.

Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3 A level equivalents) inc either AB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. Joint honours: 320 points inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher. L291: A/AS level 320 points (over 3 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher, plus a two-part written exam and an interview in English and French.

Required subjects L291: A level French grade A L271: A level German grade B. L243, L273, L2R4: Good GCSE or A level in modern foreign language.

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Primary Dental Care at Medway Kent voices

“I feel that completing the first year of the BSc has not only contributed to the raising of patient care standards and improved my academic, ethical and clinical knowledge, but also that I feel a more integrated member of the dental team.” Nicky Gough Primary Dental Care

Not sure? How about... • Applied Professional Practice p32

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Future dental provision requires the best and most appropriate use of targeted professional skills, as well as effective regulation, all delivered through the concept of fully integrated and devolved team working. As part of the Centre for Professional Practice, the Division of Dentistry is dedicated to the provision of lifelong learning for the entire dental team to encourage skill-mix and to enhance clinical and non-clinical competencies. The BSc degree in Primary Dental Care embraces and promotes the principles supporting whole team dentistry, including leadership and inter-professional and collaborative working, to enhance the quality of patient care. This programme equips the qualified, registered Dental Care Professional (DCP) with the necessary skills for a sustainable and enduring career within the dental profession, and facilitates credibility through professional and academic development.

Degree Programme Single honours • Primary Dental Care (A900:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Core modules • Critical Appraisal of Dental Health-Related Publications • Development of Core Skills and Audit • Introduction to Primary Dental Care in a Social Context • Lifelong Learning and the Academic DCP In addition, Stage 1 includes integrated generic study skills, which introduce you to standards of study within an academic environment.


P Primary Dental Care Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/cpp/dentistry

Stage 2 Core modules

Stage 3 Core modules

• Communication within Primary Dental Care • DCP Mentorship • Introduction to Research in Primary Dental Care • Oral Health Education in a Social Context

• The DCP Function within an International Context • Dissertation Project • Professional Development Portfolio • Teamwork and Leadership within Primary Dental Care

Options You take one or two, depending on the number of credits, from the following: • • • • •

Diet and Nutrition Law, Ethics and Governance Oral Health Education Practice Appraisal and Change Management Specialist Care (subject to approval).

Teaching and assessment Taught classroom time is roughly 10% of the total study time, the remainder of which is self-study and work-based learning. Depending on the module, assessment is through a blend of assignments, presentations, evidence-based portfolios or examination. The work-based learning element involves study based on your function within the dental care setting. You evaluate the nature of your role within the workplace using personal journals and professional peer group discussions. You are required to demonstrate the application of skills and knowledge necessary to enhance your professional contribution and your ability to raise the standards of patient oral health through improved professional practice.

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Flexible. Offer levels Applicants must be qualified Registered Dental Care Professionals (dental nurse, dental therapist, dental technician, orthodontic therapist, clinical dental technician or dental hygienist, with at least an NQF Level 4 qualification or equivalent), registered with the General Dental Council, and in a working environment that enables the study and completion of the minimum number of modules. You should be computer literate and able to use the internet, Microsoft Word and PowerPoint packages. In addition, you should have an email address and access to a computer and broadband.

Required subjects GCSE English grade C.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries

Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

in the UK for Kent was ranked 2nd ine for overall dic Me to Subjects Allied the 2008 and student satisfaction in t Surveys. 2009 National Studen

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Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 8th in ardian Psychology in The Gu University Guide 2009.

Psychology at Canterbury Kent voices

“Psychology is great! It’s inspiring the way it is taught here – it’s a really practical course and very interactive. The lecturers range from the hilarious to the fascinating – they make you feel really included in the subject and that makes you feel good about what you are doing.” Benjamin Weeks Psychology To read more of what Benjamin has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Biomedical Science p48 Criminology p68 Health and Social Care Practice p110 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities p120 Social Anthropology p162 Social Sciences p166 Social Work p168 Sociology p170

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Psychology is the study of people: how they think, act, react and interact. Psychologists scientifically study all kinds of behaviour and the thoughts, feelings and motivations underlying behaviour. Psychology examines questions like: how do people act on a first date? How can we ease the effects of parental divorce on children? How can we make teams work efficiently? How can we help people to overcome depression or phobias? By collecting information about what people do, think, perceive and feel, psychologists answer questions about human behaviour, cognition and development.

Degree programmes Single honours

The Psychology programmes at Kent give you a broad background in practical applications, experimental methodology, information technology and theory construction, and also allow you to follow specialist interests at Stage 3. Applied Psychology programmes give you the opportunity for a year’s work placement, and Psychology with Studies in Europe allows you to spend a year studying abroad.

Joint honours

All these programmes are accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) as conferring eligibility for Graduate Membership of the Society with Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist.

Stage 1

For applicants taking the Kent Social Sciences Foundation Programme for International Students, passing with 60% average including 45% in the Maths and Quantitative Methods module (unless the student has already achieved Grade B or above in GCSE Maths) is a requirement for entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• Applied Psychology (C850) 4 years • Applied Psychology with Clinical Psychology (C823) 4 years • Psychology (C800) 3 years • Psychology with Clinical Psychology (C822) 3 years • Social Psychology (C882) 3 years

European programme • Psychology with Studies in Europe (C881) 4 years

Psychology and… • Law (CM81) 4 years • Social Anthropology (CL86) 3 years • Sociology (CL83) 3 years For full details of all Psychology options and joint honours programmes, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

You take three 30-credit core modules in Psychology, plus a further 30 credits. Students on the Psychology with Studies in Europe programme take a language module or, in the case of the Polish, Finnish and Turkish variants, two modules with a European perspective from other schools instead of the optional modules.

Core modules • Introduction to Biological and General Psychology • Introduction to Social Psychology • Psychology Statistics and Practical

Options Drawn from a wide list in the Faculty of Social Sciences, depending on your chosen subject. The School of Psychology offers an Introduction to Forensic Psychology option.


P Psychology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/psychology

Stage 2 You take one 30-credit compulsory module and six 15-credit compulsory modules to ensure BPS accreditation. If you are on the Psychology with Studies in Europe programme, you delay taking two 15-credit modules until Stage 3. This allows you to take modules in the relevant language, or European Studies modules.

• • • • • •

Motivation The Neuroscience of Cognitive Disorders Psychoanalysis – Freud Psychoanalysis – Post Freud Researching People with Learning Disabilities Understanding People with Learning Disabilities.

Year out Core modules • • • • • • •

Biological Psychology Child Development Cognitive Psychology Personality Psychology Statistics and Practical The Social Psychology of Groups The Social Psychology of the Individual

Stage 3 You take two compulsory modules, plus any core Stage 2 modules not already taken. If you are following a ‘with Clinical’ programme, you take Clinical Psychology. You make up the remaining credits through a wide choice of options. If you are following the Social Psychology programme, these include two social psychology options.

Students on the Psychology with Studies in Europe programme spend a year at one of our partner universities in Germany, Italy, France, Spain, Poland, Finland or Turkey. Students on Applied programmes spend a year on placement within an organisation that delivers a form of psychological service, such as the Health Service, Home Office, Education Department or social services (subject to achieving an average mark of 60% at Stages 1 and 2).

Teaching and assessment Modules are taught by weekly lectures, workshops, small group seminars and project supervision. The Psychology Statistics and Practical modules include laboratory practical sessions, statistics classes, computing classes and lectures in statistics and methodology.

Core modules • Applying Psychology • Project

Options Drawn from a range of modules in topic areas that reflect the research interests of the School. The optional modules are subject to change from year to year. Those currently offered are: • • • •

Advanced Developmental Psychology Attitudes and Social Cognition Cognition in Action Forensic Psychology: Theoretical and Applied Perspectives • Groups in Action • Language and Communication • Mind-World Interactions

Most modules are assessed by examination and coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks for your year abroad or placement count towards your final degree result.

Careers Our students develop a broad range of transferable skills. Our graduates have gone into areas such as local government administration, communal services, the Home Office, the probation service, teaching, special needs work, the NHS and health charities, or on to postgraduate professional training courses, for example, in educational, occupational or clinical psychology.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time (120 credits per academic year). Part-time (60 credits per academic year). Part-time programme options: C800, C822, C882.

Offer levels A/AS level AAB at A level (AAA for Applied programmes), IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects GCSE Maths grade B (and GCSE English grade B, tbc). Psychology with Studies in Europe: French – A level French grade C. German – A level German grade C. Italian/Spanish/Finnish/Polish/Turkish – GCSE grade B or AS level in any modern European language other than English.

Year out (see left). Professional recognition Eligibility for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society and Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership, provided the minimum standard of qualification of second class honours is achieved and a pass mark achieved in the final year project.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Religious Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“Religious Studies has equipped me with a lot of skills that will be useful in a work environment. I have learnt to time manage, which is helpful, and I also feel I have a broader knowledge of the world.” Alexandra Harvey Religious Studies To read more of what Alexandra has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Religion is a vital element in human culture, and today religious issues are everywhere – from current affairs and international events, to the history of ideas, art and literature, and our own immediate experience and environment. Religious Studies at Kent involves investigating and discussing these ideas, experiences, practices and institutions, through texts, films, historical data and directly observing the world today. Kent offers a range of modules reflecting the central place of religion in human life and thought. Some modules provide introductions to major world religions; others investigate philosophical themes within religious studies; and others explore connections between religion and topics such as psychology, science, ethics, films, literature and the arts. Staff research interests also cover areas such as mysticism and the cultural study of cosmology and divination. Canterbury is a well-known centre in world religion, and the University has strong links with the Cathedral library and archives. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • •

Classical & Archaeological Studies p54 Comparative Literature p56 Cultural Studies p70 English Literature p90 History p114 Philosophy p150 Politics and International Relations p154

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Degree programmes Single honours • Religious Studies (V616) 3 years

Joint honours Religious Studies and… • Comparative Literature (VQ62) 3 years • English and American Literature (QV36) 3 years • French (RV16) 4 years • History (VV61) 3 years • Philosophy (VV56) 3 years For other possible joint honours combinations, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Stage 1 Core modules You choose at least four modules (60 credits) from the list below: • • • • •

Gods of the Desert: Judaism and Islam An Introduction to Hinduism and Buddhism Myths, Symbols and Mysteries Religion and Sex What is Religion?

Options You choose your remaining credits from a range available in the Faculty of Humanities.


R Religious Studies Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/secl/thrs

Stage 2/3

Teaching and assessment

If you are taking a single honours degree, you complete a Religious Studies Dissertation and up to seven of the modules listed below. (Other options are available from a wide range in the Faculty of Humanities.) If you are taking joint honours, you should choose four from the list below, together with the required modules in your other subject.

You are usually taught in small groups, with most modules involving either two or three hours per week in class, plus individual consultations with teachers as well as sessions on computing and library skills.

Location Canterbury.

Stage 1 modules are normally assessed by 100% coursework. At Stages 2 and 3, some modules are assessed by 100% coursework (such as essays), others by a combination of formal examination and coursework.

Single honours: A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher.

Core modules • Dissertation (Single honours students at Stage 3 only)

Careers Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Anthropology of Religion Buddhism: Its Essence and Development Christianity and Ethics Death of God? Christianity and the Modern World Gurus and Disciples Hindu Religious Thought History and Literature in Early Christianity: Luke – Acts Issues in Religious Studies Philosophy of Religion Philosophy, Religion and Political Economy Psychology and Religion Religion and Film Religion and Globalisation Religion and Story Science and Religion Sociology of Religion William James: Philosopher, Psychologist and Scholar of Religion

Recent graduates have gone into areas such as teaching, publishing, travel, advertising, personnel, diplomacy, social work, journalism, media, marketing and the legal profession, or further academic or vocational qualifications.

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels

Joint honours: A/AS level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15/16 points at Higher.

Required subjects A level Religious Studies or Theology grade B where taken.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? top ten for Kent was ranked in the ording to The acc n ctio student satisfa y Guide 2009. Times Good Universit

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Social Anthropology at Canterbury Kent voices

“Anthropology is a diverse subject. Its ethnographic fieldwork methods are by far the most exciting in any discipline. The course has opened doors to a broader understanding of other cultures around the world.” James Richardson Social Anthropology To read more of what James has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Biological Anthropology p44 Cultural Studies p70 Medical Anthropology p140 Psychology p158 Social Sciences p166 Sociology p170

Social anthropology is the study of human societies, cultures and communities around the world. Social anthropologists are interested in the whole range of people’s ideas, practices and activities, from their social and political organisation to their forms of religious worship, from how they work and what they eat to what they wear and how they create relationships. By looking at small-scale societies in the Amazon and New Guinea through to the industrialised nations of the West, we try to understand the range of social diversity that humans have created. The programme at Kent reflects staff research interests and includes topics such as: magic and ritual; gifts and economic exchange; romantic love and marriage; political struggle and resistance; religious identity; environmental politics, law, business and development. We explore communities and the systems and processes that link them together, such as globalisation, migration, the media and world politics. Anthropology is a friendly and cosmopolitan School where you are taught by leading authorities in their fields. Our Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing was one of the first in the country, and our degrees offer the chance to study in Europe or Japan. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Social Anthropology (L600) 3 years • Social Anthropology with a Year in Japan (L612) 4 years

European programmes • Social Anthropology with a Year in Denmark 4 years (subject to approval) • Social Anthropology with a Year in Finland (L677) 4 years • Social Anthropology with a Year in the Netherlands (L610) 4 years • Social Anthropology with French (L675) 4 years • Social Anthropology with German (L676) 4 years • Social Anthropology with Italian (L673) 4 years • Social Anthropology with Spanish (L674) 4 years

Joint honours Social Anthropology and… • • • • • • •

Cultural Studies (LV69) 3 years Economics (LL16) 3 years History (LVP1) 3 years Philosophy (LVP5) 3 years Politics (LL62) 3 years Psychology (CL86) 3 years Sociology (LL36) 3 years

These are some of the more popular joint honours and European degrees. For other possible combinations, please see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Stage 1 You take three core modules and a choice of recommended or ‘wild’ modules or any language requirements.

Core modules • Computing for Anthropologists • Foundations of Human Culture • Introduction to Social Anthropology 162


S Social Anthropology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/anthropology

Recommended modules

Year abroad

• Animals and People • People and Plants

You spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 taking courses in Social Anthropology at a university in France, Germany, Italy and Spain or the Netherlands, Japan or Finland (where the courses are taught in English).

Location Canterbury.

Teaching and assessment

A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher.

Stage 2/3 You take core modules in each year and, if relevant, a language module or required modules for your other subject if you are taking joint honours. You then take options drawn from the list below or others offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Students on the Year in Japan programme may take a Japanese language class at Stage 2.

On average, you have both four hours of lectures and four hours of seminars each week. Most modules involve individual study using library resources and, where relevant, laboratories and computer-based learning packages. If you are taking modules involving computing or learning a language, you have additional workshop time.

Core modules • • • • •

Advanced Social Anthropology I Advanced Social Anthropology II Ethnography 1 Ethnography 2 Main Currents in Anthropological Thought

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

African Societies Anthropology and Development Anthropology and Language The Anthropology of Amazonia The Anthropology of Business The Anthropology of Eating The Anthropology of Gender The Anthropology of Health, Illness and Medicine Culture and Cognition Ethnicity and Nationalism The Ethnography of Central Asia Human Ecology North Mediterranean Societies Pacific Societies Photographic Project in Visual Anthropology Southern Mediterranean Societies South-east Asian Societies Special Project in Social Anthropology Video Project in Visual Anthropology Visual Anthropology Theory

Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels

L612: AAB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 17 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics.

Required subjects Assessment ranges from 80:20 exam/coursework to 100% coursework. At Stages 2 and 3, most core modules are split 50% end-of-year examination and 50% coursework. Both Stage 2 and 3 marks and, where appropriate, the marks for your year abroad count towards your final degree result.

Careers Our recent graduates have gone into areas such as overseas development and aid work, further research in social anthropology, social sciences research, media research or production (TV, radio), journalism, advertising, social work, education, international consultancy and work with community groups.

L600, L610, L611, L677: None. L612: GCSE Mathematics grade C. L675: A level French grade C. L676: A level German grade C (exceptionally good GCSE in German plus experience or AS level). L673, L674: GCSE grade B/C in modern European language (other than English).

Year abroad (see left). Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know?

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

the UK for Kent was ranked 6th in ardian Anthropology in The Gu 9. 200 ide Gu y rsit Unive

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Social Policy at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teaching is excellent. I’ve had help whenever I’ve needed guidance and the staff are always available for a chat if you need to talk something over. And when you are introduced to a subject you’ve never thought about before, the way some lecturers draw you in is inspiring.” Karen Steffan Social Policy To read more of what Karen has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

How should scarce health resources be allocated? What sorts of jobs will we be doing, in what sorts of workplaces, in the future? How can we provide frail people and people with disabilities with the care they need? Are some groups still disadvantaged, such as women, young people, or members of ethnic minorities? Social policy looks at the ways in which society handles the welfare of individuals and families. On this course, you study some of today’s central issues, such as violence, poverty, ill-health, crime, homelessness and child protection, and learn more about the ways in which health and social services, education and housing agencies respond to these issues. The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research is an international centre for the study of social policy that has consistently received the highest ranking in the national evaluation of university research. You are taught by some of the leading academics in the field. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Social Policy (L430) 3 years

Joint honours These are some of the more popular joint honours degrees. For a full list, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332. Social Policy and… • Criminology (LM49) 3 years • Law (titled Law and Welfare) (ML14) 3 years • Politics (LL42) 3 years • Sociology (LL34) 3 years

Stage 1 You take two compulsory 15-credit core modules, plus a further 90 credits from options.

Core modules • Social Problems and Social Policy: The Market, the Family and the State • Social Problems and Social Policy: Youth, the Family and the State

Options A choice of a wide range of modules offered by the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Stage 2/3 You take 90 credits of core modules and 150 credits of options.

Not sure? How about... • Criminology p68 • Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Social Policy) p86 • Environmental Social Science p92 • Politics and International Relations p154 • Social Sciences p166 • Social Work p168 • Sociology p170

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Core modules • • • •

Dissertation Key Issues in Welfare Systems Social Research Methods The Welfare System in Britain


S Social Policy Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Options

Teaching and assessment

You draw your options from a list that currently includes:

Usually you have both four lectures and four seminars a week. Some modules involve workshops to develop key personal and study skills, or computing and project work, which you can do individually or in teams. In addition, you spend time in individual study, using the resources of the University Library and computer-assisted learning packages. The Dissertation module gives you the opportunity to do more individual research work.

• The Care and Protection of Children and Families • Childhood, Society and Children’s Rights • Criminal Justice in Modern Britain • Education, Training and Social Policy • Environmental Policy and Practice • Gender, Work and the Family: Exploring the Work-Life Balance • Health and Health Policy • Housing and Social Policy • Issues in Social Care • Mental Health • Poverty, Inequality and Social Security • Reproductive Health Policy in Britain • The Social Politics of Food • The Third Sector: Non-profit Associations, Charities, NGOs and Social Enterprise in Modern Society • Youth and Crime. Plus other modules drawn from the Faculty of Social Sciences. Please note: The programme is under review and may differ in certain details from the one outlined here.

Most modules in the School are assessed by 50% coursework and 50% end-of-year examination. A small number are assessed entirely by coursework. Marks from both Stages 2 and 3 count towards your final degree result. Stage 1 results do not count towards the final mark, but entry to Stage 2 depends on passing Stage 1 assessments.

Careers Recently, our graduates have gone into areas such as: social work and health care; policy analysis in the public and voluntary sector; human resource management and advice services; education and research; and management in the Civil Service, local authorities or other public agencies, voluntary sector or business.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels Single honours: A/AS level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB at A level or BC in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher. Joint honours: A/AS level 280/300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC/BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14/15/16 points at Higher. The School is committed to widening participation and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students. We welcome applications from students on accredited Access courses.

Required subjects None.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 1st in employment Social Policy graduate ian University prospects in The Guard 9. Guide 200

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Social Sciences at Medway Kent voices

“The Social Sciences course involves so many different skills that employers regard in high esteem, such as the use of statistical software, evaluating and analysing both qualitative and quantitative data, and the assessing of presentation skills. Competency in these areas has real benefits for later, working life.” Andrew Harris Social Sciences To read more of what Andrew has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • • •

Criminal Justice Studies p66 Criminology p68 Economics p82 Environmental Social Science p92 Health and Social Care Practice p110 History p114 Politics and International Relations p154 Psychology p158 Social Policy p164 Sociology p170

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Social Sciences offers an interdisciplinary approach to investigating society and people, by providing an opportunity to study different subjects (social policy, psychology, history, politics and sociology). Contemporary issues (such as health care, forensic psychology, social justice, cultural identity and political resistance) are never simple to understand, but the degree programme provides a multi-perspective analysis of such issues. In addition, new and returning students value the ability to select topics and modules to match their interests and needs in a flexible and coherent manner. You can choose from an expanding list of new modules taught by a dedicated research-active staff. Graduates’ job opportunities include teaching, research, local government, Civil Service, management in the public, private or voluntary sectors, marketing, care and counselling, psychology and the police.

Degree programme Single honours • Social Sciences (L340:K) 3 years

Stage 1 You take a 30-credit core module, and then choose 90 credits from a list of options.

Core module • Methods of Social Research

Options • • • • •

Introduction to Contemporary Britain Introduction to Criminology Introduction to Psychology Introduction to Sociology Social Problems and Social Policy

Stage 2 You take two 15-credit research modules, and then further modules from the options listed below to make a total of 120 credits.

Core modules • Psychology Research Methods and Data Analysis • Theory and Method in Historical Research • Sociological Research Methods

Options Sociology and Social Policy • Care and Protection of Families • Doing Visual Sociology • Drugs and Crime • Drugs and Culture • Gender, Work and Employment in the 21st Century • Health Policy in Britain • Key Welfare Issues • The Politics of Criminal Justice • Politics and Society • Principles and Practice of Social Policy • Social Ethics • Social Justice Practice • Youth, Crime and Social Justice


S Social Sciences Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Social History and Politics • Britain on Film: 1930-1990 • British Government and Politics • Crime, Punishment and Penal Policy in England and Wales • History of the Police and Policing • Politics and Society • Women and Work in Britain 1850-1975 • Women, Politics and Society in Britain from 1750 • Youth, Crime and Criminal Justice Psychology • Applied Cognitive Psychology • Applied Social Psychology • Developmental Psychology • Human Cognition • Individual Differences • Psychology of Emotion and Motivation • Psychology of Group Behaviour • Psychology of Social Behaviour • Psychology of Social Cognition • Psychopathology • Forensic Psychology • Social Psychology of Health

Teaching and assessment We use a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, case-study analysis, group projects and presentations, and individual and group tutorials. Study groups are normally no more than 15 to 20 students at any one time, and give you the opportunity to discuss a topic in detail. Assessment is by a mixture of coursework and examinations, except for the methods modules and the dissertation, which are assessed entirely by coursework.

Careers Our graduates mostly go into caring and counselling professions, local government and the Civil Service, voluntary organisations, management and marketing, politics, teaching, lecturing and research.

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level 240 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either CC at A level or CC in 12-unit VCE A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 13 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma/Certificate with Merit, Merit, Merit. Successful completion of an Access course. University of Kent Certificate in Social Science. Mature students may be accepted on the basis of motivation and experience. The School is committed to widening participation and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students.

Required subjects None.

Stage 3

Further information

You take one compulsory 30-credit module, and take your remaining credits from the options listed under Stage 2.

Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Core module

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

• Dissertation

Did you know? s ranked 9th Social Policy at Kent wa isfaction sat t den in the UK for stu dent Survey. in the 2009 National Stu

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Social Work at Medway Kent voices

“I am thoroughly enjoying my course. I will admit that the work can be quite intensive, but the satisfaction I get from it gets me through and compensates for that challenge. On the whole, there’s an amazing effect on my adrenalin!” Grace Kelly Social Work

The degree in Social Work offers successful graduates eligibility for professional registration with the General Social Care Council (GSCC). It provides the national required standard in knowledge and skills needed by professional social workers. The programme also provides extensive work in practice learning settings that meet Government requirements. Social Work runs at the University of Kent’s Medway campus, and benefits from the excellent new facilities on site. The degree is taught by lecturers with extensive social work practice experience, and the student body is a cosmopolitan mix of mature and younger students, from different ethnic backgrounds and nationalities. Home and EU students are normally eligible for a non-means-tested Department of Health bursary of approximately £3,500 per year, which includes a basic grant, an amount for practice placement expenses and a contribution towards tuition fees. More information is available at www.nhsbsa.nhs.uk/students.aspx

Degree programme Single honours • Social Work (L508:K) 3 years

Stage 1 You take eight compulsory 15-credit modules. • • • • • • •

Communication Skills Human Growth and Development Introduction to Law for Social Work Social Policy Social Theory for Social Workers Social Work Services and Service Users Social Work Theories, Methods and Practice 1 • Values, Ethics and Equality In January there is a ten-day observation placement in a social work organisation where you have the opportunity to shadow an experienced social worker and to develop a greater understanding of the experience of service users.

Stage 2

To read more of what Grace has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

From September to March, you do a 100-day assessed practice placement in a social work organisation involving direct provision of services to service users.

Not sure? How about...

Practice placements are allocated by the University in statutory (for example. local authority services), voluntary and private organisations, depending on availability, taking into account your interests, learning needs and geographical considerations.

• • • • • • • • •

Criminal Justice Studies p66 Criminology p68 Health and Social Care p108 Health and Social Care Practice p110 Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities p120 Psychology p158 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166 Sociology p170

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You then take two 30-credit compulsory modules: • Adults Services and Community Care • Social Work with Children and Families.


S Social Work Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 3 In the first term, you take four 15-credit modules. • People Who Use Services and Carers • Research for Social Work Practice • Social Work Practice in a Multi-agency Context • Social Work Theories, Methods and Practice 2 The programme finishes with another 100-day period of assessed practice, from January to June, in a social work organisation.

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include formal lectures, large and small group discussion and experiential work, and a programme of seminars. Social workers are required to be computer literate, so you have the opportunity to take modules towards the European Computer Driving Licence (ECDL) or equivalent.

In addition to the assessed placements, you are assessed through a mixture of written module assignments, in class tests, presentations and video work. Successfully completing Stage 1 also includes satisfying the Board of Examiners that you are safe to do the practical component of Stages 2 and 3.

Careers The programme has a good record of graduates obtaining employment. Nationally, there is a shortage of social workers. Jobs are available in: local authority and health settings (for example, working with children and families, disabled people, people with mental health problems, older people); voluntary organisations (for example, Barnardos, NSPCC); and private agencies (for example, private fostering agencies). Some graduates choose to do agency supply work.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level or in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points with 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher inc 4 in Mathematics. Mature candidates who do not hold appropriate qualifications may apply but need to satisfy the University they have the ability to study at degree level. All applicants must demonstrate in their UCAS personal statement that they have gained sufficient experience to evidence their interest and suitability to study Social Work. Offers are subject to a GSCC health check and a CRB clearance (enhanced).

During placement periods, you are assessed by a practice educator on whether you meet the National Occupational Standards for Social Work.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Professional recognition Social workers must register with the GSCC and the degree is a prerequisite for professional registration as a qualified social worker.

Did you know? s ranked 1st Social Work at Kent wa isfaction in sat t den in the UK for stu tional Student the 2008 and 2009 Na Surveys.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Sociology at Canterbury Kent voices

Sociology provides ways of making sense of a world undergoing unprecedented social change and uncertainty. It aims to explain the origins, formation and development of modern societies. Sociological research is devoted to understanding the conditions that govern our experience of everyday life as well as the structures that determine the overall character of a society.

Degree programmes Single honours • Sociology (L300) 3 years

European programmes • Sociology with a Year in Finland (L301) 4 years • Sociology with a Year in Spain (L303) 4 years • Sociology with Italian (L373) 4 years

Joint honours

“I was attracted to this course mainly due to my fascination with society and its social actors, and how they relate to each other. It’s interesting and enjoyable, and has helped me gain a better understanding of how society functions. I have found the teaching outstanding; the lecturers are easily approachable and very helpful.” Mwai Mauluka-Jones Criminology and Sociology To read more of what Mwai has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • • • • • • • • • •

Anthropology p30 Criminal Justice Studies p66 Criminology p68 Cultural Studies p70 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management (Sociology) p86 Environmental Social Science p92 Psychology p158 Social Anthropology p162 Social Policy p164 Social Sciences p166

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The programme at Kent is designed to provide students with an understanding of core traditions and contemporary developments in sociological thinking and research. It also features a range of specialist areas such as race and ethnic identity, risk and society, sociological approaches to violence, terrorism and society, new media technologies, the sociology of health, sex, gender and socialisation, the sociology of work and the sociology of embodiment. We also offer the opportunity to study Sociology with a year in Europe. Sociology teaching at Kent was described by national assessors during their most recent visit as ‘very impressive’. The School of Social Policy, Sociology and Social Research has the highest national research rating available. You are taught by some of the leading academics in the field.

Sociology and… • Criminology (LM39) 3 years • Economics (LL13) 3 years • English and American Literature (LQ33) 3 years • Law (LM31) 3 years • Philosophy (LVH5) 3 years • Politics (LL32) 3 years • Psychology (CL83) 3 years • Social Anthropology (LL36) 3 years • Social Policy (LL34) 3 years For a full list of Sociology programmes, see the Honours Degree Quick Reference Guide on p332.

Stage 1 You take one core module, plus a language if relevant, and a choice of options.

Core modules Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

• Introduction to Sociology • Language module (for Italian programmes)

Options A wide range of modules drawn from the Faculty of Social Sciences.


S Sociology Honours degrees www.kent.ac.uk/sspssr

Stage 2/3

Teaching and assessment

You take three core modules, a language, if relevant, and a choice of options.

On average, you have four hours of lectures and up to four hours of seminars each week. Most modules also involve individual study using library resources and, where relevant, computerassisted learning packages. If you are taking modules involving computing or learning a language, you have additional workshop time.

Core modules • Concepts and Theories in Sociology • Social Research Methods • Sociology Dissertation

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Childhood, Society and Children’s Rights Criminal Justice in Modern Britain Cultures of Embodiment Gender, Crime and Criminal Justice Globalisation and Social Change Health, Illness and Medicine The Information Society and Digital Culture Mental Health Politics and Sociology of the Environment Popular Culture, Media and Society Protest, Social Movements and Political Change ‘Race’ and Ethnic Identity Risk and Society Sex Gender Socialisation Sociological Perspectives on Violence The Sociology of Belonging Sociology of Deviance Sociology of Disasters ‘Terrorism’ in Modern Society Urban Sociology Youth and Crime

Please note: The programme is under review and may differ in certain details from the one outlined here.

Year in Europe On European programmes, you spend a year between Stages 2 and 3 studying at one of our partner universities in Italy or Finland.

Most Sociology modules are assessed by a variety of methods, including examination and coursework, which counts for 50% of the final mark. The dissertation, usually done at Stage 3, is assessed without examination. Marks from Stages 2 and 3 and, where appropriate, the marks for your year abroad all count towards your final degree result. Stage 1 results do not count towards the final mark, but entry to Stage 2 depends on passing Stage 1 assessments.

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280/300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC/BB at A level or BC/BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher. The School is committed to widening participation and has a long and successful tradition of admitting mature students. We welcome applications from students on accredited Access courses.

Required subjects L373: GCSE or AS level in a related modern language.

Year abroad (see left). Careers Our graduates go into a variety of areas such as marketing, recruitment consultancy, the Prison Service, teaching, banking and financial services, and further study.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 9th in es Good Tim The in Social Policy University Guide 2010.

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Sport and Exercise Management at Medway Kent voices

“The Centre for Sports Studies will benefit from new sports teaching and research facilities at Medway Park. This £11 million development project, to which Kent contributed £3 million, also has a new athletics track, gymnastics hall, 12-court facility and training gym.” Professor Louis Passfield Director, Centre for Sports Studies

Not sure? How about... • Sports Science p174 • Sports Therapy p176

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Studying Sport and Exercise Management in the Centre for Sports Studies gives you the opportunity to gain a strong background in this field. You develop an excellent understanding of aspects of management that are needed to be effective in the sport and exercise industry. The management modules within the programme cover topics including sports event management, principles of sports marketing, people and organisations, and human resource development, while the applied sport and exercise modules cover principles of training, exercise for special populations, and sport and exercise promotion. In the third year, you have the opportunity to complete a placement module within the sports industry and focus on personal training, corrective exercise, and strength and conditioning. The Centre for Sports Studies provides a firstrate experience for students in a friendly, innovative and fast-growing department. The Centre encourages a range of teaching methods for student learning, including traditional lectures and more student-centred approaches, such as problem-based learning scenarios. The Centre for Sports Studies benefits from excellent purpose-built facilities, housing state-ofthe-art equipment; these include sports science laboratories, teaching and student clinics, and a rehabilitation gymnasium. The Centre is also part of the exciting Medway Park development. Over £500,000 of new items of equipment has also been purchased, including items used by NASA and premiere league football clubs. This will provide students with the opportunity to study sports management in real-life situations in a busy centre of excellence. Lecturers in the Centre are also involved in some of the latest sports research developments and work with prominent sports teams and bodies, such as the RFU, British Cycling, EIS and UK Sport.

Degree programme Single honours • Sport and Exercise Management (C601:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Typical modules • • • • •

Introduction to Human Physiology People and Organisations Principles of Training for Sport and Exercise Sport and Exercise Nutrition Sport and Exercise Psychology

Stage 2 Typical modules • • • • •

Exercise for Special Populations Human Resource Development Principles of Sports Marketing Sport and Exercise Leadership Sport and Exercise Promotion

Stage 3 The final year consists of compulsory modules and an optional module.

Typical compulsory modules • Exercise Prescription, Referral and Rehabilitation • Individual Research Study

Example optional modules • Contemporary Issues in Sport and Exercise Nutrition • Personal Training and Corrective Exercise • Sports Event Management • Sports Industry Placement • Strength and Conditioning


S Sport and Exercise Management Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sports-studies

Teaching and assessment

Careers

The programme involves taking part in, designing and leading practical sports sessions, lectures, small group seminars and private study. You will have several lectures or practical sessions, and a series of seminars each week. You are also required to spend additional time developing your skills and knowledge in real-life situations.

A graduate in Sport and Exercise Management has a number of career opportunities. The degree can lead to: employment in sports development with local authorities, national or regional sports governing bodies; employment within public or private leisure centres, health and fitness clubs; and posts in community leisure centres, or self-employment as a personal trainer. Additionally, you can choose further study to pursue a career in teaching (PGCE), or research (MPhil/PhD) or other Master’s programmes.

The first half of Stage 1 is largely assessed by coursework and observed assessments. In the second half of Stage 1, most modules have written examinations in addition to coursework and practical assessments. During Stages 2 and 3, the form of assessment varies from 100% coursework to a combination of examination and coursework.

Location Medway. Award BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 260 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 13 points at Higher. BTEC National Diploma 18 units at Distinction, Merit, Merit in an appropriate subject. National Certificate 12 units at Distinction, Merit.

Required subjects A level grade B in a relevant subject inc Human Biology or PE/Sports Studies, National Certificate or Diploma in Applied Science (Sports Studies), Sports Performance, Sports Development or Exercise Science or AVCE Leisure and Recreation. Applicants with applied/ theoretical knowledge of anatomy and physiology are considered individually. GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Did you know? Studies has new The Centre for Sports k as par t of an Par ay dw facilities in Me ate a regional cre to t jec ÂŁ11 million pro nce. elle exc sporting centre of

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Sports Science at Medway Kent voices

“All lecturers are approachable so if you have a problem, they are always willing to help especially if you don’t understand something. The teaching has been very good, although it takes time getting used to thinking on your own and working to time constraints for assignment deadlines – all part of the learning experience.” Helen Pullen Sports Science To read more of what Helen has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Not sure? How about... • Sport and Exercise Management p172 • Sports Therapy p176

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This stimulating degree programme enables you to study the application of science to issues in sport and exercise science. The programme also allows you to gain the key skills needed to become an excellent practitioner within the sports, exercise and fitness industries. Topics studied include anatomy, physiology, the principles of training, exercise prescription, sports nutrition and sports psychology. In the third year, you have the opportunity to specialise by choosing advanced modules on contemporary topics in the sport and exercise sciences. You are taught by members of staff who have extensive experience and expertise in sports science support. Members of staff within the Centre have worked with a range of people, from Beijing Olympic athletes to the elderly and frail. The Centre for Sports Studies provides a first-rate experience in a friendly and rapidly developing department. The Centre encourages a range of teaching methods, including traditional lectures and more innovative approaches, such as problem-based learning scenarios. The Centre for Sports Studies benefits from excellent purpose-built facilities, including new sports science laboratories, an environmental chamber, teaching and student clinics, and a rehabilitation gymnasium. The laboratories are equipped to the highest standards to provide sports science support for Olympic athletes and to enable cutting-edge research. Lecturers in the Centre are involved in some of the latest sports research developments and work. We have worked with prominent sports teams and bodies such as RFU, English Institute of Sport, British Cycling and UK Sport as well as supporting many local teams and athletes.

Degree programme Single honours • Sports Science (C602:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Stage 1 represents the first year of your degree programme. All single honours students take the following core modules: • • • • •

Functional Anatomy and Biomechanics Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology Introduction to Sport and Exercise Nutrition Introduction to Sport and Exercise Psychology Principles of Training for Sport and Exercise.

Stages 2 and 3 Stage 2 and 3 represent the second and final year of your degree programme. The structure of Stage 2 provides a general grounding, covering all the key aspects of Sport Science. You then have the opportunity to focus on other, more specialised areas within the third year of the degree programme.

Typical modules • • • • • •

Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology Applied Sport and Exercise Nutrition Exercise for Special Populations Research Methods Sport and Exercise Promotion Sport and Exercise Psychology


S Sports Science Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sports-studies

In Stage 3, students must take the Research Study in Sport Sciences module and then choose from a range of option modules including: • Applied Sport and Exercise Psychology • Contemporary Issues in Sport and Exercise Nutrition • Exercise Prescription, Referral and Rehabilitation • High Performance Physiology • Strength and Conditioning.

Careers Graduates from this course may find employment as a sports scientist with the National Institutes of Sport working with elite athletes, or self-employment as a personal trainer. The degree can also lead to employment within the NHS, for example, working in physical activity, exercise referral or health promotion; in health and fitness clubs, sports development within local authorities or with national governing bodies; and in community leisure centres.

Teaching and assessment

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc CC, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in SL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 13 points at Higher inc 5 in SL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics. BTEC National Diploma 18 units at Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Teaching involves practical laboratory and sports-based sessions, lectures, small group seminars and private study. You will have a number of lectures and practical sessions and a series of seminars each week – depending on the optional modules you select. You may also be required to spend time developing your practical skills and experience in placement or event situations.

National Certificate 12 units at Distinction, Merit.

Required subjects A level grade B in a relevant subject inc Human Biology or PE/Sports Studies Certificate; or a National Diploma in Applied Science (Sports Studies), Sport Performance or Exercise Science. Applicants with applied/theoretical knowledge of anatomy and physiology are considered individually.

The first term of Stage 1 is typically assessed by 100% coursework and observed assessments. In the second term of Stage 1, most modules have examinations as well as coursework and practical assessments. During Stages 2 and 3, module assessment varies in its combination of written and practical examination and coursework.

GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Professional recognition Graduates of this programme may be eligible to apply for Register of Exercise Professionals accreditation.

Did you know? top ten for Kent was ranked in the ording to The acc n ctio student satisfa y Guide 2009. Times Good Universit

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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Sports Therapy at Medway Kent voices

“The Tissue Repair and Rehabilitation Research Group, part of the Centre for Sports Studies, conducts an interesting range of sports therapy research, including hamstring injuries in rugby, rehabilitation after cartilage repair, and fascia and connective tissue research. A range of state-of-the-art equipment is used, including ultrasound, the Alter-G anti-gravity treadmill and the GameReady cryotherapy.” Kyra De Coninck Lecturer, Sports Studies

Not sure? How about... • Sports and Exercise Management p172 • Sports Science p174

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Our BSc (Hons) degree programme in Sports Therapy is for those students with a strong interest in this fast-growing profession. The Centre for Sports Studies recently opened new sports injury clinics and laboratories in an £11 million development at Medway Park. This houses some of the latest therapy equipment, providing you with the opportunity to learn the latest techniques and interventions. It also provides students with the opportunity to work in a sports injury clinic set within a regional centre of sporting excellence and busy local sports centre.

Degree programme Single honours

We have also recently revised our degree programme to ensure its position as the leading course in the UK. Graduates from the degree programme may soon be able to achieve state registration with the Health Professions Council. You will learn to diagnose, treat and prevent sporting injuries as well as compile exercise and training programmes for different population groups, ranging from elite athletes to ageing adults with chronic disease. The degree programme also covers topics such as massage, rehabilitation techniques, client examination and assessment, therapeutic mobilisations, sports psychology and nutrition.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Sports therapy is one of the fastest-growing careers in the sport and exercise sector. The Medway campus has facilities specifically designed for Sports Therapy teaching, such as a new rehabilitation gym, teaching clinic and sports science laboratories. The Centre for Sports Studies provides a first-rate experience in a friendly and rapidly growing department. The Centre encourages a range of teaching methods, including traditional lectures and more innovative approaches, such as problem-based learning scenarios. We also run sports injury clinics to allow you to gain first-hand experience of working as a sports therapist with clients.

• Sports Therapy (C600:K) 3 years

Stage 1 Typical modules • • • • •

Anatomy and Biomechanics Human Physiology Massage Principles of Training and Fitness Sports Nutrition

Stage 2/3 Example modules Clinical Practice Examination and Assessment Exercise for Special Populations Individual Research Study Rehabilitation Research Methods Soft Tissue Techniques Sport and Exercise Nutrition Sport and Exercise Promotion Sport and Exercise Psychology Sports Injuries Strength and Conditioning Therapeutic Mobilisations


S Sports Therapy Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/sports-studies

Teaching and assessment

Careers

The programme involves taking part in practical therapy sessions, clinical practice, designing training, small group seminars and private study. You will be taught by a combination of lectures, practical sessions and seminars each week. You will also spend additional time developing your clinical skills and experience through placements and in the student clinic.

Graduates can immediately embark on a career as an accredited Graduate Sports Therapist. Sports Therapists can be employed or selfemployed in, for example, a sports injury clinic, a sports club, National Institute of Sport, or with a professional team; other relevant job opportunities may be found in the NHS in physical activity or health promotion, health and fitness clubs, sports development within local authorities, with national governing bodies of sport; or teaching/lecturing in a sport/ exercise-related field.

The methods of assessment vary and can include coursework, observed assessment, practical tests, clinical assessments and written examinations.

Location Medway. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level 300 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc either BB at A level or BB in GCE double A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in SL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics or IB Diploma with 15 points at Higher inc 5 in SL Biology or 6 in SL Biology and 4 in Mathematics. BTEC National Diploma 18 units at Distinction, Merit, Merit.

Required subjects A level grade B in an appropriate subject inc Biology or PE/Sports Studies, National Diploma Applied Science (Sports Studies) or Exercise Science, or Advanced Diploma in Sports Therapy. Applicants with applied/ theoretical knowledge of anatomy and physiology are considered individually. GCSE Mathematics grade C or equivalent.

Did you know?

Professional recognition

dents gain Our Sports Therapy stu many top at nce erie hands-on exp as the London sporting events, such don Triathlon. Marathon and the Lon

Graduates of the programme are eligible to apply for accreditation and full membership of the Society of Sports Therapists. Note: the Society is working towards state registration with the Health Professions Council (HPC) to make Sports Therapist a protected title and a recognised graduate occupation.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk 177


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Visual and Performed Arts at Canterbury Kent voices

“The course is brilliant! It’s really enjoyable and I’m getting along with the work because I’m interested in it. One of my favourite modules is Introduction to Narrative Cinema: World Cinema, which looks at different types of cinema, from Asian to Spanish.” Santino Zelaschi Visual and Performed Arts To read more of what Santino has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

Visual and Performed Arts (VPA) is a multidisciplinary programme which is unique to Kent. It is run by departments with an international reputation for academic excellence and subject innovation. VPA enables you to combine the study of fine art, drama and film, and has been designed as a degree for students with a broad interest in the arts. It draws on module options from the degrees in History & Philosophy of Art, Film Studies and Drama and Theatre Studies. During Stages 2 and 3, you have the opportunity to specialise in any of these subjects. VPA is principally a historical and theoretical programme, but Film and Drama also offer more practice-based programmes. Kent has among the highest graduate employment rates within UK universities, with many VPA students going on to secure employment across the public and private sectors, including positions in arts administration, broadcasting, curatorial careers, journalism, teaching and postgraduate research. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programme Single honours • Visual and Performed Arts (W000) 3 years

Stage 1 • The Shock of the Now: Themes in Contemporary Art or • Thinking about Photography and its Histories Plus 30 credits from: • High Art and Low Life: Approaching Art History • Inner Worlds: Psychoanalytic Thinking and the Visual Arts • Now that is Art! Aesthetics and the Visual Arts • Thinking about Photography and its Histories. Plus the following modules, depending on which pathway you choose to follow at Stage 2. Film Studies • Introduction to Narrative Cinema: American Cinema • Introduction to Narrative Cinema: World Cinema Drama and Theatre Studies • Modern Theatre: A Theoretical Landscape

Not sure? How about... • • • • • •

Art and Film p36 Cultural Studies p70 Drama and Theatre Studies p80 Film Studies p96 Fine Art p98 History & Philosophy of Art p116

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Did you know? the UK for Kent was ranked 8th in atics in The em Cin and Drama, Dance y Guide 2009. Times Good Universit


V Visual and Performed Arts Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/arts/hpa

Stage 2 Core module

Stage 3 Core module

Location Canterbury.

• Reading the Image

• Patronage and Cultural Organisations

Award BA (Hons).

Film Studies Either two History & Philosophy of Art options (see list below) and one Film Studies core module, or one History & Philosophy of Art option and two Film Studies core modules.

Film Studies Either two History & Philosophy of Art options (see list under Stage 2) and one Film Studies module, or one History & Philosophy of Art option and two Film Studies modules.

Programme type Full-time and part-time.

Drama Two History & Philosophy of Art options (see list below) and one Drama module.

Drama Either two History & Philosophy of Art options (see list under Stage 2) and one 30-credit Drama module, or one History & Philosophy of Art option and one 60-credit Drama module.

Options • Art and Architecture of the Renaissance • Art and Film • Beauty in Theory, Culture and Contemporary Art • Classicism and Baroque • Contemporary Art: From Warhol to Whiteread: Postmodernity and Visual Art Practice • French Painting in the 19th Century: The Origins of Modernism • Historiography of Art: Selected Texts from Winckelmann to Greenberg • History and Aesthetics of Photography 1 and 2 • Independent Study in History & Philosophy of Art • Making Photographs: Camera, Light and Darkroom • Photography and Intuition • Print Collecting and Curating • Russian Painting from the Academy to the Avant-Garde • The Sublime, the Disgusting and the Laughable • Visual Arts Internship (available to Stage 3 students only)

For a list of Drama and Theatre Studies modules, see p80 and for Film Studies modules, see p96.

Teaching and assessment Most modules are taught by lectures and small group seminars. Film modules involve screenings and seminars, where films are studied on an editing table. Drama modules may involve rehearsals and workshops.

Offer levels A/AS level 280 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BC at A level, IB Diploma 33 points or IB Diploma with 14 points at Higher.

Required subjects None.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

All modules are assessed by 100% coursework (essays, class participation).

Careers Recent graduate destinations have included arts administration, advertising, teaching, journalism, curatorial postings and gallery administration, and further study.

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War Studies at Canterbury Kent voices

“The teaching is really good. The pace of lectures and seminars is never too fast but, at the same time, remains stimulating and interesting. If you ever need help or feedback, the lecturers are very helpful.” Greg Marriott War Studies To read more of what Greg has to say, visit www.kent.ac.uk/undergrad/profiles

What makes countries, ethnic groups or individuals go to war? How has warfare changed with the introduction of new technology? How has propaganda been used? Can we learn anything from history? The University of Kent is in a unique geographic position to study war and its effects. Canterbury and Kent have been ‘Front-Line Britain’ in British military history, and contain significant military sites, ranging from Roman forts to Cold War nuclear bunkers. We have easy access to the continent, particularly the battlefields of the First and Second World Wars. Our modules reflect the range of our research interests, from war and culture to the evolution of tank warfare. At Kent, we believe military history should form the main thrust of our programme, an area often sidelined by similar courses. In addition to War Studies modules, the diverse pool of History modules remain accessible to our students. In the recent National Student Survey, our graduates rated the enthusiasm of our teaching most highly, and with such passion and focus, War Studies at Kent has rapidly gained a strong reputation.

Degree programme Single honours • War Studies (V391) 3 years

Stage 1 You take three core modules (60 credits) and choose the other 60 credits from the list of options.

Core modules • Introduction to Military History • Making History

Options • Autocracy, Reform and Culture in Russia, 1682-1905 • Britain and the Home Front in the Second World War • Cinema and Society: Europe and the USA in Depression, War and Affluence, 1930-1960 • England in the Age of Chivalry • The Hundred Years’ War • International History and International Relations • The Emergence of America from European Settlement to 1880 • The Rise of the United States since 1880

Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Not sure? How about... • • • •

European Studies p94 History p114 Law p130, 132 Politics and International Relations p154

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Did you know? d 2nd Histor y at Kent was rate Research nationally in the 2008 (RAE). Assessment Exercise


W War Studies Honours degree www.kent.ac.uk/history

Stage 2

Stage 3

War Studies students are able to select modules from the History programme, as well as from the War Studies programme. War Studies modules include:

You do a 60-credit dissertation, and a 30-credit core module, choosing the rest of your options from those listed under Stage 2.

• Britain and the Falklands War • Churchill’s Army: The British Army in the Second World War • The Cold War, 1941-1991 • The Cultural History of the Great War: Britain, France and Germany • From Blitzkrieg to Baghdad: Armoured Warfare in Theory, Practice and Imagery, 1916-2003 • Redcoats: The British Army and Society: British Army, 1688-1920 • Toy Soldiers to ‘Dad’s Army’: Military Masculinities in Britain, 1890-2000 • War, Revolution and Dictatorship in Europe.

Core modules

History options

Lectures usually last one hour and seminars are one or two hours, depending on the module.

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Britain and the American Revolution Cinema and Society: Britain at War, 1939-1945 Conflict and Stability in 17th-Century Britain The Crusades Divided Land, Divided History: Ireland 18852005 Ethics in International Relations European Security and Co-operation since 1945 Introduction to Strategic Studies The Irish Revolution, 1910-1925 Methods for Peace and Conflict Research The Nature of Command New World Orders and International Relations Politics, War and the State in Early Modern Europe

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Programme type

• Dissertation • The Nature of Command

Teaching and assessment Teaching is through a combination of lectures and seminars. Lectures are often used to provide the broad overview, while seminars focus on discussing particular issues and are led by student presentations. Lectures and seminars use a variety of materials, including original documents, films and documentaries, illuminated manuscripts, slide and PowerPoint demonstrations.

The School of History uses a mixture of assessment patterns. The standard formats are 100% coursework or 60% examination and 40% coursework.

Careers

Full-time and part-time.

Offer levels A level 300/320 points (3.5 A level equivalents) inc BB/AB at A level, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 5 in HL History or 6 in SL History where taken.

Required subjects A level History, Classical Studies or Archaeology, grade B if taken. History to at least GCSE grade B if an appropriate subject is not taken at A level.

Further information Order a subject leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Our War Studies graduates have transferable skills, valuable to a wide range of employers, and many find employment in the armed services, journalism and the media, management and administration, local and national civil services, the museums and heritage sector, defence analysis, commerce and banking, teaching and research, and the law.

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Web Computing at Canterbury Kent voices

The incredible growth of the web over the last decade has had a major impact on business and commerce. There is a high demand for graduates who have technical skills in web and internet technologies, and this programme gives you an excellent understanding of web software development, e-commerce and internet security, and a more general background in software engineering and other aspects of computer science.

“The web is the key way in which people interact with computer systems. This course gives you the opportunity to learn about web technology at all levels: from designing pages, learning about the creative multimedia technologies that are an important part of today’s web, to getting a thorough understanding of the systems on which the web runs.” Dr Colin Johnson Senior Lecturer, Computer Science

Not sure? How about... • • • • •

Computer Science p58 Computer Systems Engineering p60 Computing – Joint Honours p62 Information Technology p118 Multimedia Technology and Design p142

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Over half our students do a Year in Industry, which gives you work experience, a salary and the possibility of a job with the same company after graduation. You can also work during your studies as a consultant at the Kent IT Clinic, earning credit towards your degree while providing computing support to local businesses. An internationally recognised centre of excellence for programming education, the School of Computing is a leader in computer science teaching and home to two National Teaching Fellows, authors of widely used textbooks and award-winning Java teaching systems, such as BlueJ and Greenfoot. Passing the Kent Foundation Programme for International Students guarantees you entry onto the first year of these degree programmes.

Degree programmes Single honours • Web Computing (G450) 3 years • Web Computing with a Year in Industry (G451) 4 years

Stage 1 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Computer Systems Foundations of Computing Interaction Design Introduction to Information Systems Managers and Organisations Object-Oriented Programming 1 Object-Oriented Programming 2 Website Design

Stage 2 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Algorithms, Data Structures and Complexity Audio and Video Technology Database Systems Distributed Systems and Networks E-Commerce Technology Multimedia Technology Operating Systems and Architecture Software Engineering Practice


W Web Computing Honours degrees www.cs.kent.ac.uk/students

Stage 3

Year in industry

You have a choice of a computing or electronics project and take five or six optional modules depending on the project you choose.

There is an option to spend a year working in industry between Stages 2 and 3. Our dedicated Placement Team can help you find a placement and support you during the year. Our students go to a wide range of companies, including IBM, Intel and Thomson Reuters or overseas to employers in locations including Amsterdam, Hong Kong and India.

Core module • Project

Options Including, but not limited to: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Computer Networks and Communication Computer Security and Cryptography Computing Graphics and Animation Computing in the Classroom Computing Law and Professional Responsibility Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery Digital Photography Electronic Commerce Embedded Computer Systems Intelligent Media and Security IT Consultancy Methods IT Consultancy Practice Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing Multimedia Communications Software Failure and Risk.

Teaching and assessment Most modules run for a single 12-week term, and usually include a combination of lectures, seminars, private study and practical sessions. Assessment is by a combination of coursework and end-of-year examination, apart from the project, which is assessed wholly by coursework. The teaching on this programme is provided by both the School of Computing and the School of Engineering and Digital Arts.

Careers Our recent graduates now work at Accenture, BT, GlaxoSmithKline, IBM, Intel, KCC, Lilly, Microsoft, Morgan Stanley, Thomson Reuters, Sun Microsystems and T-Mobile.

Location Canterbury. Award BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels A/AS level 320 points (3.5 A level equivalents), inc 3 A levels, IB Diploma 33 points inc 5 in Mathematics (6 in Mathematics Studies) or IB Diploma with 16 points at Higher inc 5 in Mathematics (6 in Mathematics Studies). BTEC National Diploma Distinction, Distinction, Merit overall.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics grade C.

Year in industry (see left). Professional recognition This is a new programme, and full British Computer Society Chartered IT Professional (BCS CITP) and partial Chartered Engineer (BCS CEng) accreditation has been applied for.

Further information Order a leaflet or download a pdf from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/leaflets

Admissions enquiries Did you know? experience by You can get real work or by being ry ust ind taking a year in t IT Clinic. a consultant with the Ken

T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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In this section 186 Additional courses introduction 187 Additional courses in alphabetical order

Additional courses

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Courses Additional courses www.kent.ac.uk

Additional courses The University of Kent works closely with its Associate and Partner Further Education Colleges to offer a range of vocationally related higher education qualifications. These programmes are designed to give students an understanding of the world of work and help them to develop a broad range of job-related skills. Courses are taught in the colleges by college staff but lead to a University of Kent qualification. Higher National Certificate A Higher National Certificate (HNC) is made up of ten modules and is worth 150 credits at first- and second-year undergraduate level. It is taught on a part-time basis over two years. Students are required to successfully complete all ten units in order to achieve the award. Students may take additional units to top-up to a Higher National Diploma. HNC courses are vocational in nature as they prepare students for careers in specific areas of industry.

Higher National Diploma Higher National Diplomas (HNDs) are made up of 16 modules and are worth 240 credits at firstand second-year undergraduate level. This is a full-time qualification and is taught over two years. Students are required to successfully complete all 16 units in order to achieve the award. Students who successfully complete an HND may be eligible for entry onto a BA top-up programme, where they can top-up their HND to a full degree. Successful students receive a final award of pass, merit or distinction. HNDs are also vocational in nature.

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Entry requirements for HNCs and HNDs vary, but students should normally hold at least one GCE A level in a related subject or a vocational A level/Advanced GNVQ or a BTEC National Diploma, Certificate or Award or a related Level 3 qualification (for example, a National Vocational Qualification) or an Access to Higher Education Certificate.

Foundation degrees Foundation degrees (FdA, FdSc, FdEng) are designed and delivered in partnership with employers to equip students with the relevant knowledge and skills for business. They are offered by universities in partnership with higher and further education colleges and can be fullor part-time. The study methods can be very flexible, which means that they are available to people already in work, those wishing to embark on a career change and to those who have recently completed level 3 qualifications (for example, A levels, Advanced Apprenticeships or NVQ3). Foundation degrees are rated at 240 credits at first- and second-year undergraduate level, and the final award is given a class mark, like three-year degree programmes. A full-time course usually takes two years. Part-time courses may take longer, although this is not always the case. Entry requirements are similar to those for the HNC/D but formal qualifications are not always necessary, as appropriate commercial and industrial experience can be more relevant. Students should normally be working within a related industry, as much of the assessment is workbased and requires students to have access to a relevant workplace.

BA/BSc top-up These programmes usually last for one year (although some may take 15 months). They allow students who have successfully completed a HND or foundation degree to complete their full degree. Most are taught on a full-time basis and are rated at 120 credits at third-year undergraduate level. Students wishing to apply for a BA top-up should normally have a merit profile or better for their HND, or a 2:2 (lower second) grade in a foundation degree.

How to apply Students who wish to apply for a part-time course (either HNC or FdA) should apply direct to the college offering the programme. Students applying for HND programmes, full-time foundation degrees or top-up degrees should apply through UCAS.

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A Animal Science Additional courses www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Animal Science at Canterbury College This is a vocational programme that covers a broad range of principles key to animal science. It includes the study of conservation, animal husbandry and wildlife issues. There is a significant amount of practical work, both in the laboratory and in the field, to develop skills and understanding. In 2010, HND and BSc students attended, at their expense, an optional Academic African Safari Field Trip and it is our intention to offer a similar trip to students in each academic year.

Options (Year 2) • Principles of Land-based Business • Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation

Programme type HND: full-time

Core modules

BSc (Hons): full-time and part-time.

• • • • •

Animal Adaptions Clinical Animal Behaviour Clinical Animal Science Pathology and Immunology Research Project

• Animal Reproduction • Anthrozoology • Conservation and Wildlife Heritage

Teaching and assessment All tutors have a wealth of experience and qualifications relating to animal science.

Award HND, BSc (Hons).

Top-up

Options Canterbury College offers both HND and top up honours degree. You can graduate with the HND in two years with the option to continue onto the BSc (Hons) Animal Science over one year.

Location Canterbury College.

Teaching is by lectures, tutorials and practical work. You will also undertake private study and research activities.

Offer levels HND: GCSE Mathematics, English at C and at least one science subject, preferably Biology at C. One A level or equivalent, preferably in a science-related subject. National Diploma or equivalent at Merit grade. Mature applicants, who may not fit the above profile but have relevant experience, are welcomed. Applicants will normally be interviewed. BSc (Hons): Applicants must have at least a Merit profile in the Higher National Diploma in Applied Animal Science or other appropriate qualification.

You will study a total of 16 modules for the HND and then an additional seven modules for the BSc (Hons).

Assessment is mainly by coursework, projects, examinations, essays and presentations.

Programmes

Careers/progression routes

Mature applicants are welcomed.

• HND Applied Animal Science (093D:C) • BSc (Hons) Animal Science (top-up) (D930:C)

The Higher National Diploma gives you the skills and knowledge to enter a career relating to the animal science sector, or to continue your studies by completing the BSc (Hons). Successful completion of the BSc will enable you to apply for relevant management-level employment in fields relating to animal science or to progress to postgraduate study at an appropriate university or with a professional training provider.

Applicants may be subject to interview.

HND

Core modules include • • • • • • • • • • •

Anatomy and Histology Animal Husbandry Animal Nursing Animal Welfare Applied Animal Psychology Ethology Genetics and Animal Breeding Introduction to Conservation Principles of Microbiology Research Project Vertebrate Physiology

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries Canterbury College T: 01227 811188 www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

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A Applied Chemistry Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Applied Chemistry at MidKent College This programme is designed to help you develop the key scientific skills needed for a career in a chemical sciences environment or related industrial area. The programme includes the principals of inorganic, organic and physical chemistry, the applications of chemistry to relevant industrial processes, the applications of chemical principles in an environmental context, the aspects of chemistry relevant to medicinal and clinical chemistry and the use of numerical and statistical techniques to solve scientific problems. The HND is made up of 16 modules and students on the HNC study ten modules.

Programmes • HNC Applied Chemistry • HND Applied Chemistry (011F:M)

Year 1 • • • • • • • •

Analysis of Scientific Information and Data Analytical Chemistry Biology for Chemists Chemical Laboratory Techniques. Environmental Chemistry I Inorganic Chemistry I Organic Chemistry I Physical Chemistry I

Year 2 • • • • • • • •

Biochemistry II Environmental Chemistry II Inorganic Chemistry II Organic Chemistry II Laboratory Management and Organisation Medicinal Chemistry Physical Chemistry II Project

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Teaching and assessment The course is delivered through a variety of practical laboratory sessions, research projects, lectures, problem solving, external visits and speakers, tutor and student-led discussions. Assessment is carried out by means of experimental reports, presentations, project reports, supervision questions, essays and written examinations.

Careers/progression routes Students who complete the programme can go onto industrial placements or transfer to a full degree programme. This programme encourages the development of intellectual, transferable skills, such as problem solving and working with others, that are widely sought after by employers

Location MidKent College. Award HNC, HND. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in Applied Science or similar discipline. GCE Advanced level profile which demonstrates strong performance in a relevant subject supported by an adequate performance in another GCE. Other related Level 3 qualifications Access to Higher Education Certificate awarded by an approved further education institution. Mature applicants without the above qualifications but with relevant industrial work experience may be considered.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk


B Business Additional courses www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Business at Canterbury College These are vocational programmes designed to provide a strong grounding in key concepts and principles relating to the business sector, each with a pathway providing a particular emphasis on a key aspect of business understanding. Each pathway involves a total of 16 modules.

Programmes • HND Business (Finance) (3N1N:C) • HND Business (Human Resource Management) (6N1N:C) • HND Business (Law) (1M1N:C) • HND Business (Marketing) (5N1N:C)

Core modules • • • • • • • •

Business Decision-Making Business Environment Business Strategy Common Law I Managing Financial Resources and Decisions Marketing Organisations and Behaviour Research Project

Options Law programme • Business Law • Common Law II • English Legal System • European Law

Human Resource Management programme • Employee Relations • Human Resources Management • Human Resources Development • Managing Human Resources Marketing programme • Advertising and Promotion • Marketing Intelligence • Marketing Planning • Sales Planning and Operations

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by lectures, tutorials and practical work. You will also undertake private study and research activities.

Location Canterbury College. Award HND. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C or above or equivalent with at least one A Level or Advanced GCE at grade C National Diploma or equivalent at Merit grade. Mature Students and people with relevant experience may also return to study to enhance their qualifications. Applicants will normally be interviewed. Applicants must be 18 years or over.

Assessment is mainly by coursework, projects and presentations.

Required subjects None.

Careers/progression routes Successful students will have the skills and knowledge to enter a career across a range of business sector options. Students may also progress to a related degree or other study at a number of institutions.

Admissions enquiries Canterbury College T: 01227 811188 www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Finance programme • Financial Reporting • Financial Systems and Auditing • Management Accounting – Costing and Budgeting • Taxation

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B Business Additional courses www.kent.ac.uk

Business at Canterbury The top-up programme taught at the Canterbury campus of the University of Kent offers you the chance to attain an honours degree after one full academic year of University study, once you have gained an HND or foundation degree with a compatible syllabus in Business or other business-related discipline. The programme begins with a two-week Study Skills module, then gives you a wide choice of specialist options open to students taking the Business Administration (BBA) degree. This allows you to increase your in-depth knowledge of subjects you have already studied, or to widen your knowledge base to reflect your interests and career aims. Kent Business School students and staff come from a great variety of backgrounds and nationalities, which leads to a multicultural learning environment with a supportive and flexible approach to teaching.

Degree programme • BA (Hons) Business (top-up) (N107) You must take a preparatory Study Skills module in the middle two weeks of September, in order to prepare you for the change from HND to degree-level work. You must attend and complete the requirements of this preparatory module in order to progress to the core degree modules.

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Core modules • Business/Management Project • Strategic Management • Study Skills

Location Canterbury. Award BA (Hons). Offer levels

Options • • • • • • • • • •

E-commerce and Business E-marketing Enterprise European Business International Business Management of Human Resources Marketing Analysis New Enterprise Start-up Operations and Service Management Techniques and Methods in Management Science

Teaching and assessment In a typical week, you spend six to eight hours in lectures, and four or five hours in classes, group discussion and seminars. Modules also involve individual study and sessions in the computer laboratories. Modules are assessed by a combination of coursework and exams.

Careers/progression routes Our graduates go on to work in a variety of careers in: accounts, management, sales, personnel, programme analysis, website management, marketing, recruitment, and administration. Employers include: the London Stock Exchange, the Royal Bank of Scotland, Barclays International, and the Bank of New York.

Merit profile in HND in Business, Foundation Degree in Business or other business-related discipline at a UK higher/further education establishment (or equivalent). You must also attend and complete the requirements of the Study Skills module prior to starting the main course.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk


B Business and Management Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Business and Management at MidKent College These programmes provide a foundation for a range of careers in business, commerce and the public sector. They give you a broad introduction to many of the issues which arise in business and management, as well as providing specialised studies directly relevant to specific vocations and professions in which you could already be working or intend to seek employment.

Options • Management and Development of Personal Skills • Managing Communications and Information Systems • Managing Customers and Quality • Managing E-Business • Managing the Human Resource Function

College).

Award FdA, HND. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level at grade C plus five GCSE passes.

Teaching and assessment These programmes in Business and Management take two years full-time. This amounts to the equivalent of two days support in college, one day in the workplace and flexible study time as required each week. We intend to offer a part-time route over three years for students currently employed in a business management environment, where you spend one day or its equivalent in college and your employer provides facilities for the work-based component to be completed.

Location Medway campus (run by MidKent

Teaching is by lectures, tutor-led tutorials, student- and tutor-led seminars, self-directed learning using study guides and web-based material, problem-solving/work-related scenarios, role-playing exercises and work-based exercises. Assessment is by written examinations, coursework reports and presentations, case-study analysis and work-based projects/presentations.

National Diploma or other equivalent Level 3 qualification at Merit grade. Successful completion of a recognised Access course. Students over 21 can apply on the basis of relevant experience only.

Required subjects GCSE English Language and Mathematics grade C or equivalent. Business or business-related background.

Careers/progression routes Programmes • FdA Business and Management (N205:M) • HND Business and Management (102N:M)

Core modules include • • • • • • • • • •

Business Project Employment Skills Introduction to Financial Management Introduction to Managing Operations Introduction to Managing People in Organisations Introduction to Marketing Introduction to Strategic Management Introduction to the Business Environment Professional Development Quantitative Analysis in Business

Career opportunities include a wide range of opportunities in business, commerce and the public sector.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Students may also progress on to a business degree at the University of Kent at Canterbury or Medway.

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C Civil Engineering Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Civil Engineering at MidKent College The Foundation Degree in Civil Engineering is designed for students who want or are already in a professional career in the civil engineering sector. Pathways include Structural Engineering, Civil Engineering, Management, Quantity Surveying, Highways, Water and Environmental Engineering. The degree aims to provide you with an effective employment position through its work placement. The Industrial Applications and Personal Skills modules are key ‘development’ components of the programme, which focus on preparing you for an appropriate professional role by developing your individual personal qualities, skills and attitudes for your future career.

Options • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Advanced Structural Analysis and Design Building Services Civil Engineering Construction Civil Engineering Management Contracts and Procurement Economics and Financial Studies Engineering Mathematics Fluids and Hydraulics IT Applications Measurement QS Practice Site Surveying Procedures Tendering and Estimating Transportation

Teaching and assessment The Higher National Certificate (HNC) in Civil Engineering is studied part-time by day release and is designed for students who are already employed in the civil engineering sector. The pathways are as above. It aims to provide you with the technical knowledge to progress within your career.

Programmes • FdEng Civil Engineering (H200:M) • HNC Civil Engineering

Teaching includes lectures, research-based activities, individual and group projects, practical applications and seminar presentations. Assessment is mainly by ongoing coursework, which requires different methods of researching and presenting results, and some examinations. The Industrial Applications modules are assessed, where appropriate, in conjunction with work-based projects.

Careers/progression routes Core modules (HNC) • • • • •

Analytical Methods Industrial Applications 1 Introduction to Civil Engineering Safety in Construction Science and Materials

Core modules (additional for FdEng) • • • •

Geology and Soil Mechanics Industrial Applications 2 Industrial Applications 3 Personal Skills 1 – Communication and Research • Personal Skills 2 – Personal Development • Structural Analysis and Design

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You can top up the HNC to the Foundation Degree in Civil Engineering and the Foundation Degree to a BSc (Hons) in Construction at MidKent College. Career opportunities include: technician, civil engineering management, structural design, highways and maintenance, local authorities, and utilities industries.

Location MidKent College. Award FdEng, HNC. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level 80 points, preferably in an analytical subject. BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in a relevant discipline at Merit grade. Mature entry subject to interview with programme director.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics, English and a Science grade C.

Professional recognition The programme acts as a basis for progression to further study or entry to professional institutions, such as the Institution of Civil Engineers and the Institution of Structural Engineers.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk


C Community Pharmacy Practice Additional courses www.kent.ac.uk/pharmacy

Community Pharmacy Practice at Medway This course enables students who did not meet the MPharm entry criteria to gain a solid grounding in science that meets the requirements for direct entry into Stage 2 of the MPharm programme. The course lasts two years and covers the same four modules as the first year of the MPharm plus, during the first year, two other modules to enhance your basic science knowledge. There are also extensive practice placements throughout both years.

Teaching and assessment Teaching includes lectures plus individual projects, seminars, laboratory work, small group work and practice-based activities.

Programme type Full-time. Offer levels

Careers/progression routes

A/AS level 240 points including CCC at A level.

• FdSc Community Pharmacy Practice (B231 – Institution M62) When you are applying for this degree, please apply to the Medway School of Pharmacy, UCAS institution code M62, and do not use the Kent institution code (K24).

In order to register as a pharmacist in Great Britain, you must pass the MPharm, complete a year in practice and pass a pre-registration examination.

Core modules

Alternatively, you can transfer into the third year of an appropriate honours degree within the University of Kent or another institution.

• • • • • • • •

Cell Biology and Biochemistry Chemistry and Drug Delivery Essential Biological Science for Pharmacy Essential Chemistry for Pharmacy Introduction to Physiology and Pharmacology Learning through Reflection on Practice Pharmacy Placement Pharmacy Practice

Award FdSc.

Assessment is through coursework, examinations and work-based assignments.

The Foundation Degree in Pharmacy Practice is accredited by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain as meeting the requirements for direct entry to the Medway School of Pharmacy MPharm Stage 2. All students successfully completing this foundation degree are eligible to transfer to the MPharm programme.

Degree programme

Location Medway School of Pharmacy.

IB 28 points, including a score of 4 in Chemistry and one other science. BTEC National Certificate with Distinction/Distinction overall. Mature students and those without the necessary qualifications may gain access on completion of certain approved access/foundation courses. All students must have GCSE English Language and Mathematics (grades A-C) or equivalent. Applicants whose first language is not English are required to achieve an IELTS of 6.5 or above.

Required subjects A level Chemistry and either Biology, Physics or Mathematics at C. GCSE Mathematics grade C. GCSE English grade C.

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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C Construction Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Construction at MidKent College This Foundation Degree and BSc (Hons) programme is designed for students who want to pursue a career in the construction sector. Pathways include Architectural Technology, Construction Management, Quantity Surveying and Building Surveying.

• Management Applications • Personal Skills 1 – Communication and Research • Personal Skills 2 – Personal Development • Safety in Construction • Science and Materials

The programme provides you with an effective employment position through its unique work placement. The Industrial Applications and Personal Skills modules are key ‘development’ components of the programme, which focus on preparing you for an appropriate professional role by developing your individual personal qualities, skills and attitudes. You can complete just an FdSc and then top-up to BSc (Hons) with a further year of full-time study.

Options

The Higher National Certificate (HNC) in Construction is studied part-time by day release and is designed for students who are already employed in the construction sector. There are also HNCs available in Building Services Engineering and Housing. These programmes aim to provide you with the technical knowledge and skills to progress within your career.

Programmes • • • • •

FdSC Construction (K220:M) HNC Building Services Engineering HNC Construction HNC Housing BSc (Hons) Construction (top-up) (K222:M)

Core modules • • • • • • • • • •

Analytical Methods Building Technology Construction Dissertation Contracts and Procurement Economics and Financial Studies Industrial Applications 1 Industrial Applications 2 Industrial Applications 3 Introduction to Construction Law and Contracts

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• • • • • • • • • •

Building Construction Construction Management Design Technology IT Applications Measurement QS Practice Refurbishment, Maintenance and Adaption Site-Surveying Procedures Tendering and Estimating The Urban Environment

Location MidKent College. Award FdSc, HNC, BSc (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels FdSc: GCSE Mathematics and English Language at grade C. A level 80 points. National Certificate or Diploma in relevant discipline at Merit grade. Mature entry subject to interview with programme director. BSc: Students with HND or FdSc (Merit profile or 2:2) in appropriate subjects may enter at the ‘top-up’ stage for the BSc (Hons).

Teaching and assessment

Required subjects

Teaching includes lectures, research-based activities, individual and group projects, practical applications and seminar presentations.

Preferably technology, science, mathematics or construction-related subjects.

Assessment is mainly by coursework, which requires different methods of researching and presenting results, and some examinations. The Industrial Applications modules are assessed, where appropriate, in conjunction with workbased projects.

Careers/progression routes Careers may include: technician, construction management, quantity surveying, building surveying, building control, architectural technology, building services engineering, housing, urban regeneration, planning. Further study includes a Master’s degree in architecture, construction management or quantity surveying.

Professional recognition The course could act as a basis for entry to professional organisations, such as the Chartered Institute of Building, the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors, the Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists, the Association of Building Engineers, Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers and the Chartered Institute of Housing.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk


C Construction Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Construction at South Kent College These courses are for students presently working in or who want to go into construction, urban development or related fields. They aim to equip you with the necessary skills for entry into or career progression within a range of technical, professional and managerial roles.

• • • • •

Refurbishment, Maintenance and Adaption Site-Surveying Procedures Structural Behaviour and Detailing Tendering and Estimating The Urban Environment

Teaching and assessment The courses include industrial applications modules and personal skills modules (FdSc only). The industrial applications modules offer specialised studies of construction projects in a particular working environment. The personal skills modules focus on developing the key skills and techniques you will need in your future career.

Programmes • FdSc Construction (K221:S) • HNC Construction

Teaching includes lectures plus research-based activities, individual and group projects, practical applications and seminar presentations to complement the lectures. Assessment is mainly by ongoing coursework, which requires different methods of researching and presenting results, and some exams. The industrial applications modules are assessed, where appropriate, in conjunction with workbased projects.

Careers/progression routes Core modules • • • • • •

Analytical Methods Industrial Applications 1 Industrial Applications 2 (FdSc only) Industrial Applications 3 (FdSc only) Introduction to Construction Personal Skills 1 – Communication & Research (FdSc only) • Personal Skills 2 – Personal Development (FdSc only) • Safety in Construction • Science & Materials

Career opportunities include: technician, middle management and professional roles in construction management, quantity surveying, building surveying, building control, architectural technology, building services engineering, housing, urban regeneration and planning. Further study opportunities include degrees in architecture, urban regeneration and quantity surveying.

Location South Kent College, Ashford. Award FdSc, HNC. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C or equivalent. A level 80 points. National Certificate or Diploma in relevant discipline at Merit grade. Mature entry subject to interview with programme director.

Required subjects The course could act as a basis for entry into professional organisations such as the Chartered Institute of Building, the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors, the Chartered Institute of Architectural Technologists and the Association of Building Engineers.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk

Options • • • • • • • • • • •

Building Construction Building Services Construction Management Contracts and Procurement Design Technology Economics and Financial Services IT Applications Law and Contract Management Applications Measurement QS Practice 195


E Engineering Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Engineering at MidKent College Pathways for these programmes include Electronic, Electrical, Mechanical, Manufacturing, and Plant and Processing. The Foundation Degrees focus on preparing you for and introducing you into your chosen profession. You are offered work placements as part of the programme. The Industrial Applications modules count as credits towards the degree and the Personal Skills modules focus on the development of your personal qualities, skills and attitudes towards future careers and education goals. The purpose of the Foundation Degree is to integrate academic and work-based learning with collaboration between employers and programme providers. The Higher National Certificate (HNC) in Engineering is studied part-time by day release and is mainly designed for students who are already employed in the engineering sector.

Programmes • • • • • • • • • •

FdEng Engineering (Electrical) (H624:M) FdEng Engineering (Electronic) (H610:M) FdEng Engineering (Manufacturing) (H700:M) FdEng Engineering (Mechanical) (H300:M) FdEng Engineering (Plant and Processing) (H790:M) HNC Engineering (Electrical) HNC Engineering (Electronic) HNC Engineering (Manufacturing) HNC Engineering (Mechanical) HNC Engineering (Plant and Processing)

Year 1 Core modules • • • • • •

Analytical Methods Design Management Techniques Industrial Applications 1 and 2 Personal Skills 1 and 2 Science

Year 2 Core modules

Award FdEng, HNC. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C or equivalent. A level 80 points.

• Industrial Applications 3

National Certificate or Diploma in relevant discipline at Merit grade.

Plus modules specific to your chosen pathway.

Required subjects

Teaching and assessment

A levels in Mathematics, Physics and one other, or a suitable bridging course.

Each module is continuously assessed by a mixture of assignments and examinations. A wide range of learning and assessment experiences are provided throughout the course. Typical lessons will involve research-based activities, individual and group projects, practical applications and seminar presentations to complement the lecture. The school operates a small-group teaching structure rather than adopting large lecture theatre situations, offering a more personal team approach to teaching.

Careers/progression routes Successful completion of the FdEng could lead to employment with local or national companies as a technician, assistant engineer, designer, project engineer or manager. You may also gain part exemption towards an honours degree and qualify for membership of appropriate professional institutions.

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Location MidKent College.

GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C.

Professional recognition The course could act as a basis for entry into professional organisations such as the Institution of Engineering and Technology or the Institute of Mechanical Engineers at IEng level.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk


E Engineering Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Engineering at South Kent College This is a multidisciplinary course for those intending to pursue a professional, technical or management career in engineering and related fields. This part-time programme emphasises strong links with students’ employers, training officers and line managers. The Year 2 Project enables you to select a work-based problem and apply to it the intellectual, subject-specific and transferable skills you have acquired. The Department operates a small-group teaching structure rather than adopting large lecture theatre situations. Classes involve individual and group projects, practical applications, laboratory work and research.

• • • • • •

Managing the Work of Teams and Individuals Materials Engineering Programmable Logic Controllers Project Management Quality Assurance and Management Utilisation of Electrical Energy

Year 2 • Project

HNC HNC HND HND

Electrical/Electronic Engineering Mechanical Engineering Electrical/Electronic Engineering Mechanical Engineering

Year 1 Core modules • • • • • •

Analytical Methods Business Management Techniques Electrical Principles (Electrical/Electronic) Engineering Design Engineering Science Mechanical Principles (Mechanical)

Options HNC students take four modules and HND students take ten modules from options that could include: • • • • • • •

Award HNC, HND. Programme type Part-time. Offer levels GCSE Mathematics and English at grade C or equivalent. A level 80 points.

Teaching and assessment Each module consists of 60 guided learning hours, including 45 hours of direct teaching, instruction and assessment, together with structured learning time of supported individual study and assignment work. Teaching includes lectures, practical and research-based activities, individual and group projects and presentations.

Programmes • • • •

Location South Kent College, Ashford.

Assessment is by assignment work, and this includes presentations and practical lab-based assessments as well as a time-constrained assignment in each module and a work-based project in Year 2.

BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in Engineering with Merit/Merit grades. Mature entry subject to interview with the Programme Team.

Required subjects Preferably Mathematics or Further Mathematics at A/S level, and a science/technology-based subject. The candidate should preferably have employment in an engineering based company.

Professional recognition Careers/progression routes Careers include technician, middle management and professional roles in engineering management, and design and development in a range of industrial sectors. Study opportunities include progression to Year 2 or 3 of an engineering degree at another institution.

The course could act as a basis for entry to professional organisations such as the Institution of Engineering and Technology, and registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk

Digital and Analogue Devices and Circuits Dynamics of Machines Electronic and Digital Principles Engineering Mathematics Fluid Mechanics Further Analytical Methods Health and Safety and Risk Assessment

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F Fashion and Textiles Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Fashion and Textiles at South Kent College The Foundation Degree gives you the opportunity to study fashion and printed textiles, with the option to specialise in either one in the second year. It also involves work-based placement within the industry. The top-up programme allows you to develop your chosen specialist discipline to achieve a BA (Hons) degree. Seminars and workshops with professional practitioners enable you to develop and maintain strong links with the industry. Throughout the courses there are trips to exhibitions and textile trade fairs both in the UK and abroad. You will also have the chance to showcase your work in London and Kent.

Top-up

Core modules

Location South Kent College, Ashford.

• • • • • • • •

Award FdA, BA (Hons).

Business Organisation Creative Technology Concept Realisation Dissertation Fashion Print Development Final Major Project Product Range Development Promotion and Portfolio Development

Teaching and assessment There are 12 hours per week contact time, and a suggested 23 hours per week private study. Assessment is conducted on a continuous basis throughout the course, for all practical, theoretical and exhibition units. There is no final examination.

Programmes • FdA Fashion and Textiles (W230:S) • BA (Hons) Fashion and Textiles (top-up) (W232:S) FdA

Year 1 Core modules • CAD/CAM for Fashion and Textiles • Design and Production Techniques in Printed Textiles • Drawing for Design • Fashion Design and Production Techniques • Fibres and Fabrics • Research and Study Skills

Year 2 Core modules • • • • • •

Critical Thinking Designing a Fashion/Textiles Collection Exhibiting Work and Portfolio Development Producing a Fashion/Textiles Collection Visual Communication Work-Based Placement and Professional Practice

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Careers/progression routes Career opportunities could include: fashion or textiles designer, pattern cutter/grader, garment constructor, colourist, predictor, stylist, illustrator, buying, retail, merchandising, and marketing. Further study opportunities include specialist degree courses at either BA or MA level, depending on programme taken.

Programme type Full-time. Offer levels FdA: two A level passes. National Diploma or Foundation Studies in Art, Textiles or a fashion subject. Mature students are welcome to apply and need to show a good portfolio together with evidence of enthusiasm and commitment to the subject. A good portfolio of creative work. BA (Hons): Higher National Diploma or Foundation Degree in an allied subject with a profile of at least six units at Merit or Distinction grade.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk


F Fine Art Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Fine Art at South Kent College The HND gives you the opportunity to explore a fine art discipline of your choice to gain a rounded understanding of professional practice and cultural context. This contemporary course aims to break down existing barriers between the formal disciplines. The top-up programme allows you to develop your chosen specialist discipline and achieve a BA (Hons) degree. You have the opportunity to study the critical and contextual dimensions of fine art and to engage with the artist’s required relationship with audiences, clients, markets, and consumers. You will develop and refine your own practice through workshops in fine art processes, group critiques and research activities.

Programmes • HND Fine Art (001W:S) • BA (Hons) Fine Art (top-up) (W101:S) HND

Year 1 Core modules • • • • • • • •

Developing Fine Art Language Drawing in Fine Art Fine Art Identity Historical and Contextual Referencing Lens-based Recording Techniques Materials and Processes in Fine Art Presenting and Exhibiting Artwork Professional Practice

Year 2 Core modules

Options Commissioned Artwork Curating and Participating in Exhibitions Digital Imaging Fine Art: Printmaking/Ceramics/Sculpture/ Photography • Installation and Performance • Painting • Specialist Studio Practice

Location South Kent College, Ashford.

Top-up

Mature students without formal qualifications are encouraged to apply.

• • • •

Core modules • • • •

Dissertation Fine Art Professional Practice Fine Art: Identity, Synthesis and Exhibition Visual Research and Working Methodologies

Teaching and assessment There are 12 hours per week contact time, and a suggested 23 hours per week private study. Assessment is conducted on a continuous basis throughout the course, for all practical, theoretical and exhibition units. There is no final examination.

Careers/progression routes This course is intended for students considering a career in fine art, but may also be useful in a variety of creative fields such as: curating, museum and gallery work, creative consultation, community arts work, arts management and administration, or other areas of the creative industries, including: advertising, film and video production, software design, or as a self-employed artist or designer-maker.

Award HND, BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels HND: level 3 qualification, such as A level, Foundation Diploma in Art and Design, National Diploma in a Creative Art.

Applicants are interviewed and their portfolio is assessed. BA (Hons): Higher National Diploma or Foundation Degree in an allied subject with a profile of at least six units at Merit or Distinction.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk

• Critical Study • Drawing Personal Development • Site-Specific Art

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G Graphic Design Additional courses www.wkc.ac.uk

Graphic Design at West Kent College This course provides a vocational background for those aiming to become professional graphic designers. You will learn how to generate and develop ideas as well as how to interpret design briefs, work with computer applications and build a portfolio. There is an emphasis on reflective practice and the relationship of visual communication theory to design practice and development. Location work and field trips are a major component of the course.

Teaching and assessment Typically the course is divided into a range of short and longer graphic design projects that mimic real-life scenarios. These might include magazine layout, website design, information graphics and branding, among others. There will be both individual and group-work briefs with presentations of work. The final assessment of the two years is based around a design brief set by the student in negotiation with tutors.

Programmes

Careers/progression routes

• HNC Graphic Design • HND Graphic Design (W210:W) • BA (Hons) Graphic Design (top-up) (012W:W)

Career options are varied, but upon successful completion of the course typical careers might include those within advertising, publishing (book/magazine design), freelance illustration and creative direction. Students are actively encouraged to join professional bodies such as the Chartered Society of Designers and the Association of Illustrators. Tutors work closely with students to discuss their intended career paths and the possibility of postgraduate study.

HNC/D

Year 1 Core modules include: • • • •

Design for Digital Media Graphic Design and Typography Visual Communication Web Design

Location West Kent College, Tonbridge. Award HNC, HND, BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels HND/C: Merit/C level National Diploma or A levels, preferably in art/design/media-related topics. Admission is by interview with portfolio. Those with alternative qualifications are also encouraged to apply. BA (Hons): Applicants should have 240 credit points, 120 of which must be at Merit or Distinction level, achieved on either an HND or a foundation degree (not a foundation course) in Graphic Design or a relevant discipline. All applicants will be subject to an inspection of a portfolio of creative work.

Required subjects Graphic Design or a related subject.

Year 2 • Final Major Project • Graphic Design Computer Applications • Methodology

Options include • Pathways include Typography, Photography, Illustration or Animation. The course is structured to allow various options in respect of the balance between written and practical work. Top-up

Core modules include • Advanced Professional Practice • Dissertation • Major Project

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Admissions enquiries West Kent College T: 01732 358101 www.wkc.ac.uk


H Health and Social Care Additional courses www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Health and Social Care at Canterbury College The HND in Health and Social Care aims to develop vocational skills and academic understanding in order to prepare students for a career in a relevant sector. This is a full-time course and students will need to arrange 200 hours of work placement experience (paid or unpaid) in Year 1 in order to complete the HND. The BA (Hons) in Health and Social Care Management is a 15-month full-time programme providing a third-year top-up to either the HND or the FdA, allowing students to progress to a full degree.

Programmes • HND Health and Social Care (034L:C) • BA Health and Social Care Management (L436:C) HND Students study 16 modules, including: • • • •

Communicating in Health and Social Care Ensuring Health and Safety Principles of Practice Psychology for Health and Social Care

Teaching and assessment All awards are taught by a range of methods, including lectures, small groups, student mentoring, presentations and work-based project work. Assessment is through a combination of written individual assignments, projects, personal log and presentations.

Careers/progression routes The Higher National Diploma will give you the skills and knowledge to enter a career relating to health and social care. Upon completing the BA (Hons), you will be able to apply for relevant management-level employment in health and social care. Achievement of the BA (Hons) will enable you to progress to postgraduate study at an appropriate university.

Location Canterbury College. Award HND, BA. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels HND: one A level/Advanced GCE, BTEC National Diploma, Vocational A level/Access award or equivalent qualifications in a relevant subject. BA: applicants must have successfully completed the HND or FdA in a relevant subject with a Merit profile. All applicants are interviewed.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries Canterbury College T: 01227 811188 www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Top-up Students study eight modules, including: • • • • •

Law and Ethics in Health and Social Care Managers and Organisations Operations and Services Management Research Project Social Care and Social Policy.

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I Information Technology Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Information Technology at MidKent College The IT courses at MidKent College include the Foundation Degree, HND and HNC in Information Technology. The Foundation Degree and HND are full-time courses; the HNC is a part-time (day-release) course. The Foundation Degree requires a work-placement component, whereas the HND does not. The HNC is aimed primarily at people already working in an IT capacity. The content of these courses includes systems analysis, computer-based problem solving, computer architecture and information systems. The course develops the use of programming and scripting languages, system installation and maintenance, website multimedia design and database management.

Teaching and assessment The course is delivered through a variety of seminars, tutorials and hands-on practical sessions or workshops. These combine with student-led, research-based exercises, together with individual and group work.

Location MidKent College.

Assessment methods vary according to the individual modules and include combinations of written reports, examinations (where appropriate) and presentations.

A level 80 points, GNVQ Advanced or AVCE in IT or related subject, BTEC National Certificate or Diploma in relevant discipline.

Core modules • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Database Design and Development Information Systems and Tools Intranet Implementation Intranet Project Introduction to Computer Architecture Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming IT Management Multimedia on the Web Networks Operating Systems Organisations and their IS Requirements Programming in a Modern Environment Systems Analysis and Design Web Programming

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Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels

Mature entry is subject to interview with the programme director.

Careers/progression routes Career opportunities include: website designers and developers, web programmers, intranet designers and developers, database analysts and programmers, systems analysts, IT management, and technical support roles.

Programmes • FdSc Information Technology (G405:M) • HNC Information Technology • HND Information Technology (105G:M)

Award FdSc, HNC, HND.

Further study opportunities include progression onto University of Kent honours degrees in Information Technology or Business Information Technology.

Required subjects GCSE Mathematics at grade C or equivalent, such as Key Skills, Level 2 Pass preferred.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk


I Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Additional courses www.kent.ac.uk/tizard/

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities at Canterbury This programme, taught by the University of Kent, enables you to work in constructive, nonaversive and ethically sound ways with people who are often marginalised and vulnerable, and to develop the practical skills essential for effective working in this area. The programme increases your understanding of the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across statutory, private and voluntary agencies in the care sector. The Foundation Degree puts the emphasis on practice. We expect students to be practitioners already working with people who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. You bring your own knowledge and experience to the programme, which in turn influences the teaching methods used. We encourage applications from people from a wide variety of backgrounds who may not have traditionally recognised qualifications.

Year 2 Core modules • Assessing and Understanding Challenging Behaviour • Designing Behaviour Support Plans • Implementing and Evaluating Behaviour Support Plans • Introduction to Positive Behaviour Support • Work-Based Learning in Positive Behaviour Support

Teaching and assessment Teaching methods include mini-lectures, individual and group exercises, some with the use of video feedback. Exercises vary in length, in some cases being guided practice ‘simulations’ spread over several hours. We analyse published papers and review literature relevant to practice. You also do work-based learning in your place of employment.

Location Canterbury. Award FdSc. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels A level 200 points (3.5 A level equivalents) including CD at A level or double award VCE A level. Mature students who do not hold appropriate qualifications can apply but need to demonstrate they have the skills/experience to study at degree level.

Required subjects GCSE English Language grade C (or an acceptable equivalent).

Admissions enquiries T: 01227 827272 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Assessment is by written reports on the application of knowledge in practice. You complete a personal portfolio documenting your learning and reflecting on the learning process.

Degree programme • FdSc Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities (L513)

Year 1 Core modules • Academic Development • Person-Centred Values and Support • Promoting Choice, Well-Being and Communication • Supporting Participation and Independence • Work-Based Learning in Person-Centred Support

Careers/progression routes Possible careers include carers or practitioners in services for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities including health, social care and education. Students who successfully complete the programme may also progress onto the third year of the Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities BSc (see p120).

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I Interactive Media Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Interactive Media at South Kent College You will learn about interactive media and design techniques and be introduced to a range of materials, technologies and tools used. Experimental projects encourage you to experiment and explore interactive media technology and creative design. You are given the opportunity to work with a professional design studio or on a real-life project, which will provide you with work-place experience of the practical needs and expectations in relation to the interactive media and design industries. Project-based enquiry is supplemented with lectures and seminars which explore the issues of content and form faced by those within the interactive media and design-related industries. These include methods of generating ideas, fulfilling the client’s needs, implementing and developing concepts (personal and contextual), and critical theory debate.

Programme • HND Interactive Media (054G:S)

Year 1 Core modules • • • • • • •

Animation Techniques Computer Applications in Art & Design Computer Fundamentals Image Manipulation Applications Interactive Media Design and Authoring Interactive Media Web Authoring Marketing Development using Interactive Media • Sound Production and Editing using Interactive Media

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Year 2 Core modules • • • • • • •

3D Computer Modelling and Animation Audio Visual Techniques in Interactive Media Cultural Interpretations Historical and Contextual Referencing Interactive Media Professional Practice Interactive Media Professional Team Brief New Technologies in Interactive Media

Teaching and assessment There are 12 hours per week contact time, and a suggested 23 hours per work private study. Assessment is conducted on a continuous basis throughout the course, for all practical, theoretical and exhibition units. There is no final examination.

Careers/progression routes The course leads to a wide variety of careers in the creative industries, including: graphic designer, digital animator, web designer, illustrator, photographer, sound artist, advertising creative, video director/editor, and new media designer. You can also continue your studies to obtain a BA in Visual Design and Communication or any other design/media-related degree.

Location South Kent College, Ashford. Award HND. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Level 3 qualification, such as A level, Access to HE, National Certificate or Diploma, or another relevant qualification. Mature students with no formal qualifications may be accepted subject to portfolio and interview.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk


L Life Science Laboratory Technology Additional courses www.midkent.ac.uk

Life Science Laboratory Technology at MidKent College This Foundation Degree combines a range of practical techniques used in a diverse range of laboratories, such as health care and the NHS, food production, manufacturing and quality control, diagnostics, molecular biology, and chemical analysis. This is underpinned by academic knowledge of the underlying biology and chemistry of these techniques, their development and application. The course is based on the work environment and includes a high proportion of practical work and work simulation. The course has been developed following consultation with the bioscience industry and should offer good employment prospects. The course is taught at a purpose-built laboratory facility at the Kent Science Resource Centre in Sittingbourne. Nearby businesses at the Kent Science Park will enable you to gain work experience as part of the second year of the course. The lecturing staff come from industry, MidKent College, and also our partners the University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University.

Degree programme • FdSc Life Science Laboratory Technology (C190:H)

Year 2 Core modules • • • • •

Advanced Laboratory Practice Applied Microbiology Company Organisation and Entrepreneurship Immunity and Infection Manufacturing Processes and Advanced Instrumentation • Metabolism and Enzymes • Work Placement (12 weeks)

Location Kent Science Park, Sittingbourne. Award FdSc. Programme type Full-time and part-time. Offer levels DD at A level or VCE A level including one of Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics or Applied Science.

Year 3

National Certificate or Diploma (Merit level) in Science.

Leading to BSc Life Science Laboratory Technology (subject to validation).

Access courses in Science.

You can top up the Foundation degree to BSc by further study in the workplace and in the Kent Science Resource Centre.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by a mixture of lectures, seminars, workshops and practical work. Assessment is by both written examination and practical and coursework assessment, extended essay/report writing and research project. You are expected to increase your practical expertise during the course and to develop the knowledge to underpin your skills.

Mature applicants with experience of working in a science-based industry may also be eligible, subject to interview and assessment of work-based experience. Students with extensive laboratory experience could gain accreditation for prior experiential learning in the workplace.

Required subjects A level Biology or Chemistry or Mathematics, GCSE English and Mathematics grade C.

Admissions enquiries MidKent College T: 01634 402020 www.midkent.ac.uk

Careers/progression routes Year 1 Core modules • • • • •

Basic Laboratory Practice Biochemistry Cell Biology Human Physiology and Disease Introduction to Organic and Medicinal Chemistry • Intermediate Laboratory Practice • Microbiology • Project Management and Work-Related Learning

This is a new course which prepares you for further study, or for a career as a laboratory scientist in the bioscience industry.

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P Photography Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Photography at South Kent College This course encourages a creative and individual approach to photography, and will help you to expand your digital and non-digital practices. The programme covers the historical, technical and professional aspects of photography through project work and lectures. You have the opportunity to learn about photographic industries and experience the professional environment first hand through work-based placement, enabling you to start building a portfolio that is appropriate to your career aspirations. This programme is based on South Kent College’s Henwood campus (Ashford School of Art and Design) in Ashford. Facilities on the site include a well-equipped darkroom, digital darkroom with Apple Mac computers, and professional-standard studio facilities.

Programme • FdA Photography (W641:S)

Year 1 Core modules • • • •

Contextual and Professional Studies Environment and the Photographic Image Photographic Genres Portraiture, Identity and Culture

Year 2 • • • •

Critical and Reflective Photographic Practice Independent Final Project Photography and Visual Communication Work-based Placement

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Teaching and assessment There are 12 hours per week contact time, and a suggested 23 hours per work private study.

Location South Kent College, Ashford.

Assessment is conducted on a continuous basis throughout the course, for all practical, theoretical and exhibition units. There is no final examination.

Programme type Full-time.

Careers/progression routes

Mature students with no formal qualifications may be accepted subject to portfolio and interview.

The course leads to a wide variety of careers in the creative industries, including: graphic designer, jobs in digital manipulation, illustrator, professional photographer, advertising creative. You can also continue your study to obtain a BA in Visual Design and Communication, a BA Fine Art or another design/media-related degree.

Award FdA.

Offer levels Level 3 qualification, eg, A level, Access to HE or another relevant qualification.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk


P Photography Additional courses www.wkc.ac.uk

Photography at West Kent College This is a well-established programme which extends the interaction of the theoretical, technical and creative aspects of photography and prepares students for employment or further study within the field. Students are enabled to follow their own choice of specialism within the medium. College attendance is in the afternoon and evening so you can keep up part-time employment and have time for day-time practical photography.

Programmes • HNC Photography • HND Photography (046W:W) • BA Photography (top-up) (W640:W) HNC/HND

Year 1 Core modules • • • • •

Concepts in Photography Design for Digital Media Photographic Techniques and Materials Professional Practice 1 Visual Design

Year 2 Core modules • • • •

Critical Studies Digital Imaging Extended Specialist Project Professional Practice 2

Students are supported in their individual choice of specialism where possible.

Top-up

Core modules

Location West Kent College, Tonbridge.

• Advanced Professional Practice • Final Major Project and Dissertation

Award HNC, HND, BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time and part-time.

The course is structured to allow you to choose your own balance between written work and practice-based work. There is also support for an individual choice of professional specialisms. Students are given the option to take part in the organisation and subsequent exhibition of their final work at a selected appropriate venue.

Teaching and assessment The course is full-time and is run as a series of lectures, seminars, visits, group and individual tutorials and workshops. You are encouraged to undertake research and self-directed study. Work is assessed by assignment on a continuous basis throughout the programme. Assignment work is presented at group critique; written work and workbook development is assessed separately.

Careers/progression routes The HND/HNC in aims to develop a foundation of skills, knowledge and creative approaches required both for employment and for progression to further study in photography and other related disciplines. The BA top-up in Photography aims to develop a firm foundation of skills, knowledge and creative approaches required both for employment and for progression to postgraduate study in photography and other related disciplines.

Offer levels HNC/HND: BTEC National Diploma, AVCE, or Advanced GNVQ in Photography or a related subject (Merit or Distinction profile), or a similar Level 3 qualification such as an Access to HE or one A level pass, two AS level passes in relevant subjects. This should be supported with five GCSE passes at grade C or above, ideally including Mathematics and English. Mature applicants without the formal requirements are welcomed and will be considered individually. BA: 240 credit points, 120 credits at Merit or Distinction level achieved on a foundation degree or HND programme in photography or related/relevant discipline. All applicants will be asked to submit a portfolio of practical work.

Required subjects Photography or a related subject.

Admissions enquiries West Kent College T: 01732 358101 www.wkc.ac.uk

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P Popular Music Additional courses www.wkc.ac.uk

Popular Music Performance at West Kent College This course is based at West Kent College, Tonbridge, where a £90m rebuilding project will comprise a £1m 500-seat theatre and state-of-the-art music facilities, including specialist keyboard lab, eight rehearsal studios and an industry-standard Mac suite. Modules are primarily focused on live performance, but there is also an option to train as a specialist instrumental/vocal teacher. The Music staff are all successful practising musicians, who enable maximum progress through individual attention and focused learning, in a friendly and supportive environment.

Programmes • FdA Popular Music Performance (W310:W) • BA Popular Music Performance (top-up) (W311:W)

Core modules • • • • •

Contextual Studies Instrumental Skills Music Technology in Performance Musicianship Skills Stylistic Awareness

Options • • • •

Instrumental Teaching Session Musician Singer Songwriter Theme Band

Teaching and assessment Attendance is required three to four days per week throughout the course, with some evening performances. All students study two instruments (we offer specialist training for vocals, guitar, keyboards, bass, drums and horn section) and will be expected to practice for a minimum of 15 hours per week. Assessment is primarily through practical tasks and examinations, with an element of written work/verbal presentation.

Careers/progression routes The course includes work-based options in which you will develop material suitable for commercial use, and/or instrumental/vocal teaching experience. This will enable you to combine writing, performance and teaching in your musical career. Students completing the top-up degree would be ideally placed to progress to a full PCE/PGCE (DTLLS) qualification or an appropriate Master’s degree in performance or composition.

Location West Kent College, Tonbridge. Award FdA, BA (Hons). Programme type Full-time. Offer levels FdA: BTEC National Diploma in Music Practice/Popular Music Merit or Distinction profile. Access to Music Level 3 Merit or Distinction profile. A level Music grade B or above. First instrument grade 8/second instrument grade 5. Music Theory grade 5. Audition and interview, which may include practical/written assessments. English and Mathematics GCSE level 2 or above. Mature entry subject to interview/audition with programme director. BA: Foundation degree or HND in relevant subject. First instrument grade 8/second instrument grade 6. Music Theory grade 6.

Required subjects Music.

Admissions enquiries West Kent College T: 01732 358101 www.wkc.ac.uk

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P Public Services Additional courses www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Public Services at Canterbury College The HND and BA will prepare you for a career in a range of public services at managerial or officer level. The HND is a full-time vocational programme that covers a broad range of contemporary issues and principles. It is relevant to those who have no experience of public services or those who already work in the sector and wish to increase their skills and knowledge. The BA is designed as a full-time third-year top-up to the HND, allowing you to achieve a full degree qualification. This is a 15-month programme.

Programmes • HND Public Services (064L:C) • BA (Hons) Public Services Management (L433:C) HND

Core modules Students study 16 modules, including: • • • • • •

Equality and Diversity Foreign European Language People Management in the Public Services Police and Armed Forces Law Psychology Youth and Crime.

Top-up

Core modules

Location Canterbury College.

Students study eight modules, including:

Award HND, BA.

• • • • •

Contemporary Social Policy Globalisation and Social Change Law of the Workplace Managers and Organisations Research Project.

Programme type Full-time. Offer levels HND: one A Level or Advanced GCE. National Diploma or equivalent.

Teaching and assessment Teaching is by lectures, tutorials and practical work. You also undertake private study and research activities. Assessment is mainly by coursework, projects and presentations.

Careers/progression routes Successful students will have the skills and knowledge to enter a career in areas including the Police, Armed Forces, Immigration Service, Social Services, Fire Service. HND students can also progress to the BA degree at Canterbury College. Upon completing the BA (Hons), you will be able to apply for relevant managementlevel employment in the public services. Achievement of the BA (Hons) will enable you to progress to postgraduate study at an appropriate university.

BA: HND in relevant subject with a Merit profile. Applicants will normally be interviewed.

Required subjects HND: Psychology, Sociology or Law at A or AS level prefered.

Admissions enquiries Canterbury College T: 01227 811188 www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Options • • • •

Public Services and Physical Fitness (Year 1) Social Policy and the Public Services (Year 1) Exploring Global Socio-political Issues (Year 2) Public Sector Funding (Year 2)

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R Retail Management Additional courses www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

Retail Management at Canterbury College Retail is one of the largest sectors in the UK for employment, accounting for around 11 percent of the total UK workforce and 24 percent of its Gross Domestic Product. Retailers are having to cope with increased competition using new forms of technology, customers are increasingly looking for better value and improved service levels. It has never been more important to have a relevant qualification if you are working in, or considering moving to, retail. The HND Retail Management aims to develop vocational and academic understanding of retail and its needs for those who intend to enter a career in the sector. It is an exciting two-year full-time programme, offered at Canterbury College, run over two days per week. Studies include field trips and retail practice analysis. Workplace experience will be considered upon application, and may be used in conjunction with interview to fulfil the prerequisites of entry as opposed to academic qualification. Students will ideally to be employed in the retail sector.

Programme • HND Retail Management (042N:C)

Core modules You study a total of 16 modules including: • • • • • • • • • • • •

Brand Management Customer Care E-Retailing Food Retailing International Retailing Legal Environment for Retailing Managing People in Retail Retail Communications The Retail Environment Retail Management Strategic Management of Retailing Visual Merchandising

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Teaching and assessment You are taught by a range of methods, including lectures, small groups, problem-based scenarios, individual and group presentations, and individual and group project work.

Location Canterbury College. Award HND. Programme type Full-time (usually two days contact per week).

Assessment is mainly by coursework, projects and presentations

Careers/progression routes Possible careers include: store management, logistics, buying, marketing, fashion retail, financial services provision, human resources and e-retail. Completion of the HND will enable you to progress to a full degree programme at a number of Colleges and Universities.

Offer levels One A level/Advanced GCE, BTEC National Diploma, vocational A level or equivalent qualifications. Applicants who may not fit the above profile but have relevant experience are welcomed.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries Canterbury College T: 01227 811188 www.canterburycollege.ac.uk


T Textiles and Fashion Additional courses www.wkc.ac.uk

Textiles and Fashion at West Kent College This course provides the opportunity to develop knowledge of and technical skills in textiles and fashion. You will be taught by industry-trained lecturers and we also have links with industry professionals. You can access specialist textile and fashion equipment and resources, and from March 2010 the programme will be taught in brand new purpose-built studios.

Programmes • FdA Textiles and Fashion (W233:W) (subject to approval)

Year 1 Core modules • Computer Applications for Textiles and Fashion • Drawing and Surface Pattern • Fashion Materials, Techniques and Concepts • Research and Study Skills • Textile Materials, Techniques and Concepts

Year 2 Core modules

Teaching and assessment Teaching includes demonstrations and practical workshops, seminars, lectures and individual tutorials. Modules are taught through a series of tutor-set or self-directed, negotiated project briefs. Approximately two days contact time and two days independent study per week. Assessment is ongoing through coursework which may take the form of sketchbooks, portfolio work, essays and reports. You will be asked to discuss, evaluate and present your work to tutors and peers as part of the assessment process.

Careers/progression routes Career opportunities include: textile designer, fashion designer, textile craft maker, textile artist, fashion or textile educator, fashion or textile buyer, fashion or textile retailer, pattern cutter, dressmaker, and freelance designer. Successful students can top-up to BA (Hons) in Textiles or Fashion at West Kent College from September 2011 (subject to validation).

Location West Kent College, Tonbridge. Award FdA. Programme type Full-time. Offer levels Level 3 qualification such as BTEC National Diploma or A levels in related or art-based subject. Mature students are welcome subject to interview. All applicants must submit a portfolio of creative work at interview.

Required subjects Arts-based subject.

Admissions enquiries West Kent College T: 01732 358101 www.wkc.ac.uk

• Critical Thinking • Exhibiting Work and Portfolio Development • Professional Practice and Work-Based Placement • Textile and Fashion Design • Textile and Fashion Realisation

Options In Year 2, you choose to specialise in developing a range or collection of: • Contemporary Applied Art Textiles (textiles and art/craft products or pieces) • Fashion Textiles (textile samples or garments using own textile work).

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V Visual Design and Communication Additional courses www.southkent.ac.uk

Visual Design and Communication at South Kent College This is a one-year top-up degree programme in which you develop your chosen specialist discipline and achieve a BA (Hons) degree. The course aims to help you underpin your practice with a critical understanding of history and theory and to facilitate the building of a substantial art/design portfolio in preparation for employment in your chosen field.

Teaching and assessment

The course aims to avoid a narrow focus on practices within the media industries and instead encourage a broad awareness of visual culture. Visual design is considered in the broadest sense with the course supporting a wide range of creative practices. With a strong emphasis on personal development, the course aims to support individual needs by combining the strengths of a teaching team whose specialisms cover a range of creative disciplines.

Careers/progression routes

Typically, a high percentage of students will choose to specialise in areas such as graphic design, illustration, web design or photography. During the year it is not uncommon for students to already be picking up design commissions, usually from local businesses, and for many the end of year show serves as a launch pad for working as a freelance designer.

Degree programme • BA (Hons) Visual Design and Communication (top-up) (W213:S)

Core modules • • • •

Confirmation of Design Identity Dissertation Media and Meaning Visual Design Professional Practice

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There are 12 hours per week contact time, and a suggested 23 hours per work private study.

Location South Kent College, Ashford.

Assessment is conducted on a continuous basis throughout the course, for all practical, theoretical and exhibition units. There is no final examination.

Programme type Full-time.

As well as freelancing as designers, students may also find work with a design agency or working as an in-house designer within either a private or public sector organisation. For students whose specialism is photography, there is an opportunity to find employment within fields such as advertising or photojournalism. All students have the opportunity to continue their studies through progression to a Master’s programme. Established progression routes include the University of Kent and University for the Creative Arts, but students are equipped to progress onto any MA programme to continue study of their specialism. Each year, a number of graduates choose to pursue a career in teaching. Their graduate status enables them to join a teaching course with the intention of becoming art and design teachers with established multimedia skills.

Award BA (Hons).

Offer levels Higher National Diploma in an allied subject with a profile of at least six units at Merit or Distinction.

Required subjects None.

Admissions enquiries South Kent College T: 0845 207 8220 www.southkent.ac.uk


Open Days in 2010 Canterbury Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

days

www.kent.ac.uk/open

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Course structure Foundation programmes General entry requirements Choosing a course and applying

Studying at Kent

Fetin Abu-Sardaneh Drama and Theatre Studies What attracted you to Kent? I remember looking at the prospectus for the University and it just looked amazing from the photos. I read about Drama and Theatre Studies and the course sounded really exciting. It was described in a way that no other institution was and that really attracted me to it. Since I was young, I’ve wanted to become a film director and I believe this course is going to help me a lot with that career.

How is your course going? It’s going really well. All our lecturers are really amazing and they’re funny as well. They really try to make the course as exciting as possible for you and encourage you to put all your effort into it.

How would you describe the social scene? The social life is great. The bars here are fantastic – it’s sometimes hard to choose where to go. The food is excellent in the bars and cafés as well. The Gulbenkian is a really good place to go. You get a lot of famous people coming here. And the scenery is lovely, too! Welcome Week was fun. There were lots of activities to get involved in. I lived in Keynes and it was great being so close to everything. We had the bar right next to us as well as all the classrooms. The bedrooms were nice and the kitchen was a really good place for getting together – it was very sociable.

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Studying at Kent Course structure

Course structure Kent offers a variety of degree programmes • Single honours where you study one main subject, usually with the option of taking up to 25% of your degree in another subject. • Joint honours where you study two subjects on a 50:50 basis. • Occasionally you can do a major/minor honours degree where the majority of your study is in one subject and the minority in another, for example, Accounting & Finance with Computing. • Part-time study where you can take a full-time degree programme on a half-time basis, or do an honours degree by working your way through interim awards – see p300 for further details. • Honours degrees with a foundation year If, for whatever reason, you do not have appropriate qualifications for direct entry, some science honours degrees offer a foundation year, and there are two general foundation years especially for international students whose academic qualifications or English language is not at the required level for direct entry to a degree (see p220 for further details). • Foundation degrees are interim higher education awards, which start at a point before honours degree entry and end at a level significantly below an honours degree. There are usually good progression routes on to a related honours degree or a specific top-up honours degree. See p186 for further details. • Higher National Diplomas are interim higher education awards, which should be for honours degree entry and end at a level significantly below an honours degree. • Top-up honours degrees are one year programmes designed to allow progression from foundation degrees or HNDs to bachelor honours degree level.

Degree pathways Many of the subject areas listed in this prospectus give you the opportunity to broaden your degree and acquire new skills by studying on different pathways. These include: taking a language, which normally involves a year studying or working abroad; taking a sandwich year and working in industry; learning extra computing skills; or taking the new Kent Enterprise programme.

Degrees that include study abroad or a work placement in industry usually involve an extra year on a full-time basis. A few degrees in the sciences and engineering include an extra fourth year – these are also usually on a full-time basis. Drama includes an extra full-time fourth year and the MArch degree in Architecture requires five years’ full-time study.

These degrees are normally listed on the subject pages or in the Quick Reference Guide on p230.

Normally marks from both Stages 2 and 3 count towards your final degree result. You have to pass Stage 1 to be allowed to go on to Stages 2 and 3.

Modes of study

Academic credit

Kent offers both full and part-time study. Some programmes offer both modes, and some either one or the other. The Facts box for each subject should indicate which mode of study is available for that programme.

Honours programmes at Kent offer academic credits on a nationally agreed scale. You normally take 120 credits at increasingly higher levels at each of Stages 1, 2 and 3, making a total of 360 for a full honours degree. Degrees involving a full-time fourth year total 480 credits. Foundation degrees carry 240 credits, generally 120 credits per year for two full-time years.

Stages of study Kent degrees divide into stages, as follows: Stage 1

Full-time First year

Part-time Generally two years (but can be up to a total of four years)

Stage 2

Second year

Two further years

Stage 3

Third year

Two further years

Kent has adopted the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). This system was developed by the Commission of the European Communities in order to guarantee academic recognition of studies throughout universities and colleges across Europe. Each module at Kent carries an ECTS weighting, which is usually half of the credits allocated by the University, so that a Kent 30-credit module has 15 ECTS credits, and a 15-credit module carries 7.5 ECTS credits.

“I love the flexibility of the course structure at Kent, as there are not many universities that would allow me to study a joint honours degree as well as wild modules.” Stephanie Ham Religious Studies and Philosophy

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Studying at Kent Course structure

If you have been studying higher education programmes elsewhere and have academic credits that are recent, relevant and at the right level, you can apply to transfer the credit you have accumulated to a relevant programme at Kent, subject to the formal agreement of the University. Equally, credit you gain at Kent can transfer to appropriate programmes elsewhere.

Progression routes There are a number of ways you can qualify to study a degree – see our general entry requirements on p222, and details of Access, certificate and diploma courses on p300 and foundation programmes on p220. Many foundation degrees, also have linked or relevant honours degrees which you can move on to once you gain your foundation degree award.

Modules Courses at Kent divide into a number of modules (up to a maximum of eight) at each stage. Each module carries a credit rating (according to its ‘weight’) of 15, 30 or occasionally 45 credits. Some degrees have set modules that you are required to take, particularly if you are studying a subject that leads towards professional recognition, for example, law or accounting. Other subjects allow more choice, particularly at Stage 1, which gives you the opportunity to diversify and broaden your experience by studying topics outside your main subject area.

Graduating needn’t be the end of your university career – Kent offers a large number of postgraduate courses, and many of our students have gone on to take further academic qualifications. Some courses qualify you for careers that need further study in order to gain a professional qualification, for example, Law, Actuarial Science, and Architecture.

Class hours Class hours vary tremendously, depending on which subject you take. For example, sciencebased degrees can include full-day practical laboratory sessions, while other degrees may only have one lecture and seminar per module each week and require you to spend more time in private study and reading.

“It is great to know that the people teaching you are leaders in their field and have produced research, journal articles and books that can all form part of your studies.” Jo Griffiths Health and Social Care Practice 218

Did you know? to professional Kent degrees can lead s in tion mp exe qualifications or ial Science, Accounting, Law, Actuar ence, r Sci Architecture, Compute , Psychology, Electronic Engineering Science al dic Pharmacy, Biome and Social Work.


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Studying at Kent Foundation programmes

Foundation programmes Kent offers three main types of foundation programmes, which help you get qualifications for degree-level entry. During your foundation programme you qualify as a full undergraduate student, so you have access to all the University’s support, welfare, leisure and study facilities.

Honours degrees with a foundation year These are subject-specific programmes which offer one year full-time prior to Stage 1 and are open to all students. If you don’t have qualifications in the appropriate subjects for your chosen degree, if your grades aren’t high enough, if you are applying from a country where secondary education does not reach the level required for direct entry to UK degrees or if you don’t have a high enough standard of English to cope with the demands of a full degree, you should apply for this programme. Currently the subjects which can include these programmes are Actuarial Science, Biosciences, Computer Systems Engineering, Electronic and Communications Engineering, Forensic Science, Mathematics, Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Physics. All of these courses are taught on the Canterbury campus.

If you register for these foundation courses and your first language is not English, we will assess your language competency. You need to have an English language standard of IELTS 5.5 or the equivalent. We encourage you to use our comprehensive English language support service, and we may ask you to take an additional English course. You can find further details under the individual subject entries, or from our website at www.kent.ac.uk/studying/foundation

Foundation Programme for International Students The general foundation years, designed for international students, provide entry into the wide range of subjects in our Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences for international students whose school leaving qualifications are insufficient for direct entry. It gives you a year’s preparation in academic subjects, English language and study skills up to the level required for entry to a degree programme. Progression to the degree programme may depend on achieving specific grades during the foundation year.

Foundation degrees Foundation degrees are interim higher education awards with a strong vocational focus and involve work placements or are work-related qualifications for people already in a post. They involve 240 academic credits, starting at a level before Stage 1, and take two years of full-time study to complete. The degrees finish at a point before the end of Stage 2, and allow you to progress, after further study, to a related honours degree. For more information, see the foundation degrees section on p186.

Further information Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

For further details, see p102.

“They are the most helpful teachers I have ever met.” Theofano Michael Foundation Programme for international students 220


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Studying at Kent General entry requirements

General entry requirements Kent accepts a wide range of qualifications, and we always try to judge applications on the basis of academic potential. We consider your experience, alternative qualifications, and other information you enter on your application form. We try to ensure that students are not treated differently on grounds of race, colour, religion, disability, gender, sexuality or any other distinction. You can find full details of our admissions policy online at www.kent.ac.uk/aps The following are our minimum entry requirements for degree level study.

Age There is no upper age limit to studying at the University. We recommend that you are at least 17 years old by 20 September in the year you begin your course, but if you are below this age we may still consider you for admission, provided we are satisfied you have reached an appropriate level of academic and personal development. In order to comply with both health and safety and child protection legislation, the University may impose restrictions on the use of some facilities by students who are under 18. International students who are under 18 at the start of their course are required to provide details of a guardian/parent/carer who is resident in the UK.

GCE/GCSE We have based our minimum entry requirements on the assumption that most schools and colleges will offer students at least four AS levels in Year 12 with three continued to A2 in Year 13. The minimum requirements are: • Five passes at GCSE grade C or above, including English Language or Use of English (IGCSE English as a Second Language, grade B), and at least two subjects at A level. or three passes at GCE A level and a pass at grade C or above in GCSE English Language or Use of English. Offers are normally based on the best 3.5 A level equivalents of achievement at Level 3 (A level equivalent), although some University subject areas may specify differently. You must have a minimum of two A level equivalents at Level 3 in two subjects (ie two A2 levels or one vocational double award). We do not accept four AS levels as meeting our matriculation requirement and the University only counts subjects at one level. We do not make unconditional offers on the basis of AS level grades alone. We base offers on a combination of GCSE/AS/VCE A level/A level/other qualifications or predicted grades, your personal statement and reference.

Subjects accepted for the General Entry Requirement • Generally, Kent accepts any A or AS level syllabus approved by the AQA, OCR and EDEXCEL awarding bodies, though we regard some subjects as more suitable than others. • We do not accept the more vocational subjects if offered as one of only two A level passes. • We count subjects with a significant overlap as one subject.

• We may accept two mathematical subjects at the same level provided that the course syllabuses were substantially different, for example, a combination of Pure and Applied Mathematics or of Mathematics and Further Mathematics. We will accept papers in Mathematics and Further Mathematics set on the SMP syllabus. • We may take into consideration passes at Level 3 key skills in Communication and IT where you cannot meet the matriculation requirements for English and Maths at GCSE level.

GCE A level double award • A level double award (two A level equivalents) and a pass in an approved English language qualification.

BTEC/OCR • BTEC National Diploma (18 units) or Certificate (12 units) or OCR National Diploma (12 units) or Extended National Diploma (18 units) and a pass in an approved English language qualification. • Higher National Diploma or Certificate and a pass in an approved English language qualification.

Access/foundation courses • A satisfactory pass in an approved foundation course. An overall pass in an Access course. Some degree programmes may require specific grades in some units/modules in Access courses started from 2009 onwards. Please check with the University before you apply that we will accept the Access/foundation syllabus you took.

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Studying at Kent General entry requirements

New 14-19 Diploma qualifications

Other qualifications

International students

The University welcomes the introduction of the new 14-19 Diploma qualifications. We will consider Diploma applicants for admission on a case-by-case basis where appropriate subjects have been taken. You can find further information about Diploma qualifications on the web at www.direct.gov.uk/diplomas More detailed information on our specific entry requirements for Diploma applicants will be made available on our website and in our UCAS entry profiles as it becomes available.

We are happy to consider other qualifications on a case-by-case basis, including the following qualifications, provided they reach a satisfactory standard and include a pass in English at the equivalent of GCSE:

In addition to the above requirements, international students can also qualify with the following:

International Baccalaureate Diploma The University welcomes applications from prospective students offering the full IBO Diploma. We make offers solely on the basis of the IBO marking scheme and not the UCAS tariff. For 2011 entry we have introduced a standard IB Diploma offer of 33 points across all programmes of study. As an alternative to achieving 33 points, the University will also make IB students the offer of passing the IB Diploma with specific achievement in higher/standard level subjects. Both offers will be communicated to UCAS. Students offering a combination of IB certificates and other qualifications, such as A Levels or Advanced Placement Tests, will also be considered on their individual merits and should contact the Recruitment and Admissions Office for additional guidance.

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• Scottish (SQA) higher/advanced higher qualifications • Irish Leaving Certificate • European Baccalaureate Diploma • Certificate in Education • University degree • Advanced International Certificate of Education • Advanced Placement (AP) – a minimum of two full APs is required • Overseas certificates (including some other European Union countries) • Higher School Certificate of Matriculation of approved overseas and EU authorities • American High School Diplomas if accompanied by two full AP passes.

• School Certificates and Higher School Certificates awarded by a body approved by the University • Subsidiary level credit or pass = pass at GCSE • Higher School Certificate pass = pass at A level • matriculation from an approved university, with a pass in English Language at GCSE/O level or an equivalent level in an approved English language test • passing one of Kent’s foundation programmes, provided that you meet the subject requirements for the degree course you intend to study • an examination pass accepted as equivalent to any of the above. If you haven’t yet reached those standards Kent runs foundation programmes for international students which give you a year’s academic and language training before you begin on your degree (see p290 for further details).


Studying at Kent General entry requirements

English language qualifications

Foundation degrees

Changes to offer levels

In order to enter directly onto a degree course. you also need to prove your proficiency in English, and we ask for one of the following:

Entry requirements are set by the course provider and vary from course to course. Work experience may be more relevant, so you should contact the institution concerned if you have any queries.

Due to advance publication deadlines, the A level entry grades listed in this prospectus are provided as a guide to minimum entry levels expected for admission in the coming application round. The University reserves its right to make higher offer levels than those published in this prospectus.

• average 6.5 in IELTS test, minimum 6.0 in reading and writing • a TOEFL score of at least 580 including 4.0 reading and writing (paper-based test), 237 including 4.0 reading and writing (computerbased test) or 85 including 19 reading and writing (internet-based test) • WELT, BBC/BCC • a TEEP score of 6.5 including 6.0 reading and writing • grade C in Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English • grade B in Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English • international GCSE English as a first language grade C; as a second language grade B.

Returning to study We advise students who want to return to study after a long break from education to talk to our Information and Guidance Unit for further advice on the best route into degree level studies (see p299 for more details). If you are applying for full-time study, we normally expect you to have done some recent study as preparation to show you can complete a degree course successfully.

Qualification checks Admission to a programme of study is made on the basis that you have accurately and truthfully presented all the relevant facts in your application. The University retains the right to withdraw an offer of a place or terminate your registration if it subsequently comes to light that the information you provide in support of your application was inaccurate or incomplete or a misrepresentation of your academic and other achievements. The University requires all students to provide proof of identity and qualifications at point of registration.

Further information Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Changes to Visa rules for non-EEA students The UK Government is in the process of introducing a new system of immigration control for non-EEA students. All visa national students are now required to obtain a Confirmation of Acceptance for Studies (CAS) from the University before applying for a visa. For up-to-date information on the Tier 4 Scheme, please see the UK Border Agency website: www.bia.homeoffice.gov.uk/studyingintheuk Please note that some partner/associate colleges may not be agreed sponsors and students requiring an educational visa will be unable to take courses at those colleges.

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Studying at Kent Choosing a course and applying

Choosing a course and applying Choosing the right course

Programme type

Kent offers approximately 400 different undergraduate honours degrees. With this amount of choice, you need to consider all your options and make sure that you are applying for the right programme.

Kent programmes are available on a full-time only, full-time and part-time, and part-time only basis. Check the Facts box on the subject page to see which formats are available.

Professional qualifications All subject areas are listed in the following section, and all degrees, together with their qualifications, are listed in the Quick Reference Guide on p330.

Location The majority of honours degree courses run at the Canterbury campus, but a growing number run at Medway. Law is the only subject that runs at both locations. Foundation degrees are taught on the Canterbury campus, at the Medway School of Pharmacy, or by our Associate or Partner Colleges: MidKent College, South Kent College, Canterbury College and West Kent College.

Subject area We offer a large number of subject areas, so if the subject you like doesn’t offer quite what you want, there is probably an alternative that does. Each subject page carries a list of closely related subjects and suggestions in case you want to look further. Some subjects also offer a year in industry or study abroad, or joint honours combinations. For a full explanation, see p216.

Qualifications In addition to the general entry requirements (see p222), each degree has its own entry requirement. Some specify particular subjects at A level. If you don’t meet the entry requirements for your chosen subject, the University offers other routes to achieving the appropriate standard, such as foundation years (see p220), foundation degrees (p186, 220), part-time certificates (p303) and Access courses (p300).

Some degrees offer routes into qualifying for a profession and give exemption from entrance exams, for instance Law, Architecture, Accounting & Finance. Occasionally, these subjects offer joint honours options that may not include all the subjects you need to study in order to qualify – check with the University if you are in any doubt.

The institution code number of the University of Kent is K24, and the code name is KENT. If you are applying for courses based at Medway, you should add the campus code K in Section 3(d). If you are applying for the Pharmacy degree, you should apply to the Medway School of Pharmacy, institution code name MEDSP, institution code M62. If you are applying for the degree in Mathematics and Secondary Education, you should apply to Canterbury Christ Church University, UCAS institution code C10. Courses with the UCAS campus codes given below are taught by associate/partner colleges, not by the University of Kent:

Year out options Many programmes offer options to go on a year’s work placement in industry, or to spend time studying or working abroad. Mostly these options are listed separately, but some subjects, such as mathematics, include the industry option under the same UCAS code, and you need to specify your preferred route on your UCAS form.

Applications

Campus Campus Campus Campus

code code code code

C – Canterbury College M – MidKent College S – South Kent College W – West Kent College.

What you need in order to apply You can find detailed instructions on how to apply at www.ucas.com, or in the UCAS directory, which you can get from schools, colleges or public libraries.

Full-time degrees For autumn 2011 entry to full-time honours degree courses, all students should apply through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), the UK’s central admissions service.

You should apply online if possible, either via www.ucas.com if you are applying directly or via your college or school if it has a UCAS online application system. UCAS, PO Box 28, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire GL52 3ZA United Kingdom

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Studying at Kent Choosing a course and applying

UCAS applications timeline

*Late applications

Access courses

Please note some UCAS dates may vary for technical reasons.

UCAS accepts late applications from Home/EU students throughout the remainder of the application year, which universities or colleges then consider at their discretion. We do not guarantee to give late applications the same level of consideration as applications received by the normal closing date.

To apply for the University’s Access course (for details see p300), you should contact:

End June Late Sept

15 Oct

15 Jan

Nov – Mar

Apr and May

May and June

30 June Aug

Aug or Sept Sept or Oct

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UCAS applications open UCAS applications can be submitted to UCAS and will be passed on to institutions Oxbridge and medical, dentistry and veterinary deadline UCAS main scheme deadline for equal academic consideration* Applicant invited for visit or interview Decisions made (conditional, unconditional, unsuccessful). Applicants can apply to universities through the UCAS Extra Scheme Applicant chooses firm and insurance choices (first and second choices) Local authority financial assessment, accommodation applications Application deadline for ‘late’ applications* Examination results and Clearing for unsuccessful applicants Places confirmed and registration packs sent out Start university!

Access to Higher Education Office, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: 01227 823507 E: accesstohe@kent.ac.uk

Foundation courses For autumn 2011 entry to courses, including a foundation year, the general foundation programme for international students and fulltime foundation degree courses, you should apply through UCAS in the same way as for honours degrees (described above). For entry to part-time foundation degrees, apply directly to the University as described below. For entry to the International Foundation Programme or JYA, see p220 and p290.

Part-time degrees For autumn 2011 entry to part-time undergraduate degree courses, apply directly to the Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office at the address below. You can also apply via the part-time online application form at www.kent.ac.uk/studying/part-time/apply

Undergraduate certificates and diplomas To take one of the University’s certificates or diplomas (see p299), apply directly to the Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office. Again, you can apply via the part-time online application form at www.kent.ac.uk/studying/ part-time/apply

Sponsored students If you are working in industry and hope your employer will sponsor you to study on a course listed in the UCAS Directory, you must apply through UCAS in the normal way.

Deferred entry We will consider applications for deferred entry in 2012 on the same basis as those for entry in 2011; you should apply in the usual way during 2010/2011. It will help us if you could give some indication on the application form of how you will spend the intervening year, ie travelling, voluntary work or paid work. You have to meet the conditions of an offer by the summer of 2011.

Decisions on applications We will give you a decision on your application as soon as possible. UCAS will confirm the decision if you are applying through them. You can enquire about an application in progress by contacting the Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, and it would help us if you can give us your UCAS personal ID number (if appropriate) and course code. You can also check the status of your application via the UCAS website at www.ucas.com


Studying at Kent Choosing a course and applying

Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications (ELQ) The Government has announced that it will no longer provide funding for students who wish to study a higher education qualification that is equivalent to, or at a lower level than one they have already achieved. The University will therefore charge a different (higher) rate of tuition fees to students who already have such qualifications. Please visit www.kent.ac.uk/studying/funding/elq.html The University continues to welcome applicants who wish to return to university for a further university level qualification, either to enhance their skills or improve their employment prospects, as we believe that re-skilling is important both to individuals, as part of their personal and professional development, and to the economic growth of the country. However, in response to the Government’s decision to change the funding model for higher education, the University is required to charge a higher-rate fee to all undergraduate students who hold an equivalent or higher level qualification and, therefore, are not eligible for Government funding. The ‘ELQ’ fee will be the same as that currently charged to students from the Channel Islands (pro-rata for part-time students). Applicants are required to disclose details of all qualifications they hold at the point of application in order that a proper assessment of fee status can be made. The University will take action to reclaim fees retrospectively from registered students who are undercharged, if such undercharging was the result of the applicant failing to provide complete or accurate qualifications data on which their fee status was based, or as a result of a failure of the applicant to disclose their ELQ status when asked to do so.

Appeals and Complaints Appeals will only be considered where the applicant believes there has been a failure in the admissions procedure or if the applicant believes that they have been discriminated against unlawfully. Complaints concerning the process should be made in writing to the Head of the Information, Recruitment & Admissions Office, unless the complaint is regarding the Head of the Office, in which case the written complaint should be directed to the Head of Admissions & Partnership Services or the Academic Registrar. A complaint made by email will be accorded the same level of thorough consideration and will be addressed within the same timescale as any other written complaint, normally within 28 days of receipt. Due to the requirements of the Data Protection Act and the University’s policy on disclosure, the University will only correspond on any issue regarding an application with the applicant themselves, unless the applicant has provided written permission for the University to discuss it with another person.

Term dates 2011/12 Welcome Week

19 Sept 2011 – 25 Sept 2011

Autumn Term

26 Sept 2011 – 16 Dec 2011

Spring Term

16 Jan 2012 – 6 April 2012

Summer Term

7 May 2012 – 15 June 2012

Further information Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

“There are many great things at Kent, but if I had to highlight one it would be the support of the staff. The support has been very consistent through the whole process, from the point of enquiry to getting my actual place on the course. I am so glad I chose Kent!” Chris Paul Hispanic Studies and Italian

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In this section

Where can I study? Canterbury Rich Fox English Language What attracted you to Kent? I received unconditional offers from Kent and another university but, after visiting both universities, I thought Kent was much more appealing. I found the staff who discussed my course with me to be very helpful and I really liked the campus right away. I was also attracted to the English Language course by the sheer scale of topics to do with English, as well as the literature elements.

232 234 236 238 240 242 244 246 248 250 252 254

The campus from the air The Canterbury campus Canterbury and the region Accommodation Sport, physical activity and recreation Arts Music Kent Union Student Learning Advisory Service IT services Templeman Library Personal support services

My seminar leaders and lecturers are always approachable and interesting. I really enjoy the interactivity of the seminar format. The tutors have been very reassuring whenever I’ve had concerns about my course and are always there to discuss matters with me – I’ve found this very positive.

What about the facilities? Campus is a good place to be and I happily spend a lot of time in the Library. I’ve found it to be very good for all kinds of resources. My house in Park Wood was amazing and never felt crowded with the six of us who lived there. It was a great beginning to my university living arrangements.

How are you finding your course? So far, it’s been varied and interesting, and often highly challenging! The idea that studying English changes the way you look at language is very much true. I loved the module Tackling Text the most and I am also enjoying Language in Literature. The combination of English language and literature is completely fascinating.

What’s been the highlight? I’d say the course – just coming to do a degree has felt like a great thing to do. I’ve also enjoyed the societies I’ve joined and Canterbury as a city is a great place to live!

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Where can I study? Canterbury The campus from the air

The campus from the air The Canterbury campus is built on 300 acres of parkland and is less than 30 minutes walk from Canterbury city centre. Residential, teaching and administrative buildings are surrounded by green open spaces, fields and woods. The campus is self-contained and includes student accommodation, a library, sports centre, theatre, nightclub, cinema, places to eat and bars, shops, a bookshop, medical centre, day nursery, public access computer rooms, a chapel, launderettes and bus stops.

The Canterbury campus has excellent transport links. The Medway campus is 30 miles away en route to London (55 miles to the north-west). Dover is half an hour away to the south-east, and the nearest coastal town is Whitstable, six miles to the north. The Eurostar terminals at Ashford and Ebbsfleet are close by, meaning you can be in Paris, Brussels or Lille within two hours.

“When I first saw the campus, I fell in love with it – there is lots of green around. I love the fact that you can see the Cathedral from the campus and that the University is so close to Canterbury.” Omer Kilic Computer Systems Engineering

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Where can I study? Canterbury The Canterbury campus

The Canterbury campus Surrounded by lush green countryside and with easy access to miles of beautiful coastline, the Canterbury campus is located in a thriving area of the country, with fast transport links to London and mainland Europe. Founded in 1965, it is Kent’s original site and is built on 300 acres of parkland overlooking the city centre. Modern buildings are surrounded by open green spaces, courtyards, gardens, ponds and woodland, with stunning views of Canterbury and the Stour Valley. Kent’s Canterbury campus is self-contained, which means you are within walking distance of all the excellent facilities on offer: the Sports Centre, the Gulbenkian Theatre and Cinema, the Templeman Library, the Medical Centre, the Computing Service, the Campus Shop and bookshop, a pharmacy, an off-licence, banks and cashpoints, bistros, bars, the Students’ Union, The Venue nightclub, public access terminals, bus stops and launderettes. If you want to explore the city centre, it is less than 30 minutes from campus and is on a direct bus route.

There are approximately 16,000 students at the Canterbury campus, including undergraduates and postgraduates, as well as lecturers, research staff, members of the local community and overseas students on a year abroad. With 139 nationalities represented, the campus has a very cosmopolitan feel.

All students and academic staff belong to a college, so you have plenty of opportunities to meet people studying different subjects. The colleges give you access to a ready-made community from the moment you arrive. Each college has a Master, who is responsible for student welfare within their college.

Campus life centres round five colleges, the Templeman Library, the Students’ Centre, purpose-built science laboratories and teaching buildings, including the brand new, state-of-theart Jarman building, which opened in January 2010, and houses the University's School of Arts. There are also plenty of places to eat on campus, including a traditional dining hall, bistros, cafés and sandwich bars, which serve all types of food at reasonable prices. You can also buy snacks and hot drinks from shops and vending machines across the campus.

Many social activities are also organised on a collegiate basis, and each college has a Student Committee that covers almost every aspect of student life. The Student Committee makes an active contribution to the way colleges are run by representing student interests and organising events and entertainment.

The colleges The five colleges at Kent are each named after distinguished British figures – Darwin, Eliot, Keynes, Rutherford and Woolf (the postgraduate college). They are more than just halls of residence because, in addition to living, social and catering facilities, they also house lecture theatres, seminar rooms, computer terminal rooms and academic schools.

Did you know? y Guide 2010 The Complete Universit ts in its top jec sub ranks many of our erican Studies, 20. These include Am sign, Drama, Architecture, Art & De rk. Wo l cia So Histor y and

“The atmosphere on campus is great. It’s like a little village and you’ll always run into someone you know.” Ollie Shackleton English and American Literature 235


Where can I study? Canterbury Canterbury and the region

Canterbury and the region Canterbury is a vibrant city with a warm and friendly atmosphere, within easy reach of London, France and Belgium. Canterbury Canterbury has been permanently inhabited since pre-Roman times. Augustine established his first cathedral and abbey around AD600, and in medieval times the city became a centre for pilgrimage to the shrine of St Thomas Becket, famously depicted in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. The playwright Christopher Marlowe was born here and the Treaty of Canterbury, which paved the way for the building of the Channel Tunnel, was signed in Canterbury Cathedral by Her Majesty the Queen and François Mitterand, then President of France. The city’s medieval history is easy to see in its streets and buildings and in the world-famous cathedral, which is the venue for the University’s degree ceremonies. The Cathedral, St Augustine’s Abbey and St Martin’s church make up a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Abbey marked the rebirth of Christianity in southern England and the church, the oldest parish church in England, is still used for worship. Canterbury has a thriving cosmopolitan atmosphere as befits Britain’s closest city to continental Europe. There has been significant investment in recent years; the new multimillionpound Whitefriars development has transformed a substantial part of the city centre and is a fantastic shopping location where you can find all the major high street names. The city has a unique charm, with past and present sitting comfortably together and there are plenty of specialist shops, as well as many restaurants, pubs and bars.

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Canterbury is a cultural city with a strong focus on the arts. There are a number of galleries and the annual Canterbury Festival attracts thousands of visitors from across the UK and Europe. The city is also home to the Marlowe Theatre, which hosts national touring productions of West End shows and attracts top artists from the worlds of dance, music, comedy, drama, ballet and opera. The theatre is undergoing a massive redevelopment to create the ‘New Marlowe’, which will firmly position Canterbury as the place to enjoy a superb theatrical experience. Canterbury has lots to offer in terms of great nightlife. There is a new venue, Chill, which boasts a five-star club, with booths available for hire, celebrity guests/DJs and a unique mix of events including a weekly student night. The Works, near Canterbury East station is a popular student haunt and features the very best in oldschool classics and party, commercial R&B/Hip Hop and dance. The Works hosts two student nights a week and offers plenty of promotional deals. Studio 41 is another favourite, with its ‘Girls and Boys’ night on Saturdays, unmissable theme nights and regular guest appearances. There are also plenty of traditional pubs and bars, including The Farmhouse, which has live music nights and DJ sets. Canterbury also hosts its own summer festival, Lounge on the Farm, which is rapidly becoming one of the ‘must do’ events of the year and has featured major artists such as the Super Furry Animals, The Coral, Roots Manuva, Black Kids, New York Dolls plus DJ sets by Kevin Rowland and Terry Hall.

Transport links You can easily do a day trip to either London or Paris from Canterbury. It is only 56 miles from London on the M2/A2. Regular trains run to and from London Victoria, Charing Cross, Waterloo East and London Bridge – journey time is approximately 90 minutes. A high-speed rail link from Canterbury to St Pancras station in London has recently opened, reducing the journey time into London to just over an hour. You can also take the Eurostar from Ashford or Ebbsfleet to arrive in Paris or Brussels in less than two hours. The Channel ports are less than 20 miles away, and it is only 30 minutes’ drive to the Channel Tunnel at Folkestone.

The region Canterbury is situated in Kent, known as the ‘Garden of England’, and offers you the opportunity to live and study in one of the most picturesque areas of the country. East Kent has 120 miles of coastline, and a number of its beaches have been awarded the prestigious Blue Flag for their environmental management, safety, and water quality. The nearest coastal town to Canterbury is Whitstable, where you can get involved in many water sports including windsurfing, yachting and water-skiing, as well as sampling its famous array of seafood. Kent is also renowned for its historical past and Canterbury is just a short distance from a number of castles and forts. During their second and third years, many students choose to live in the local towns of Whitstable, Herne Bay and Faversham, which are on bus routes to Canterbury and have direct rail links to London.


“Canterbury is a lovely place. You get a good mix of the really old cobbled streets, the old buildings and the Cathedral which is amazing, and really good shopping, lots of bars and a couple of nightclubs that are fun to go to.� Alison Small Health and Social Care

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Where can I study? Canterbury Accommodation

Accommodation We offer accommodation to all new full-time undergraduates for the first year on either a bed and breakfast or self-catered basis. The Canterbury campus houses over 4,300 students in rooms, flats and houses. Much of the accommodation is en-suite and all bedrooms have free internet links.

Off-campus accommodation

Shops and launderettes

Most students live off campus in Canterbury or local towns during their second and third years. We provide a regularly updated list of accredited accommodation on our website. All off-campus accommodation is regularly checked and has to meet quality and safety standards, as specified by Canterbury City Council’s student housing accreditation scheme.

There are two shops on campus, selling grocery and household items, together with a bookshop and a pharmacy. There are launderettes located in residential areas across campus.

Accommodation for students with disabilities or other special needs

Bed and breakfast accommodation

We have a number of specially adapted rooms available across campus. The Disability and Dyslexia Support Service offers help and advice to students with special needs (see p254 for details).

For current guidance and information regarding parking on campus, please check the Estates Department website at www.kent.ac.uk/estates/transport/parking

This type of accommodation is offered in Eliot, Keynes and Rutherford Colleges. Rent includes a meal allowance, which covers breakfast or which you can use towards an evening meal. Rooms are arranged in corridors and each corridor includes a kitchenette with a microwave oven, a small fridge and kettle, so that you can prepare snacks and drinks. Accommodation is occupied for 31 weeks (excluding winter and spring vacations).

Self-catering accommodation Most of our self-catering accommodation is in Park Wood, a purpose-built student village in a parkland setting just a few minutes walk from central campus. The accommodation is primarily in five or six-bedroom houses, together with four blocks of flats offering en-suite bedrooms. On central campus, self-catering accommodation is also available in Darwin College and adjacent houses, together with three blocks of flats in Tyler Court offering en-suite bedrooms. All self-catered flats and houses have communal kitchens. Self-catering accommodation is available for 39 weeks (including winter and spring vacations).

Food and drink There are around a dozen outlets across campus, offering a range of food. This includes: • breakfast, brunch, lunch and evening meals, with vegetarian dishes and an extensive salad bar • cooked-to-order Mediterranean-style cuisine • burgers and Tex-Mex options • takeaway food for those in a hurry, including freshly made sandwiches and baguettes • pizzas and paninis. Snacks and other essentials are also available from vending machines across campus. The Canterbury campus has been awarded Fairtrade status and all our outlets sell Fairtrade tea, coffee and other items.

KentOne card When you arrive at Kent, you are given a multifunctional photo ID card, known as the KentOne card. You can also use it as a debit card to buy food, drink and other items in campus outlets.

Parking and transport We regret that there is no parking available for students living on or close to campus.

The Unibus runs frequently between the campus and the city centre and there is a subsidised season ticket scheme for students. For further details, see www.kent.ac.uk/estates/transport/bus

Online application If Kent is your first or second UCAS choice, you should apply for accommodation online as soon as you receive your unconditional or conditional offer from UCAS and by the deadline of 31st July. When all the accommodation has been allocated in mid to late August, we notify you of your allocation, which you can then view and accept online at www.kent.ac.uk/hospitality

Accommodation guide prices You can find undergraduate accommodation costs for 2009/2010 on our website at www.kent.ac.uk/accommodation

Further information The Accommodation Office, Kent Hospitality, Tanglewood, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7LR T: +44 (0)1227 766660 E: hospitality-enquiry@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/hospitality

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Where can I study? Canterbury Sport, physical activity and recreation

Sport, physical activity and recreation The University’s Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation Service is based at the campus Sports Centre and offers all students the opportunity to get involved in a wide range of activities. If you enjoy trying new things, would like to lead a healthier lifestyle whilst meeting and socialising with new people, or if you are an experienced sportsperson looking to improve, Kent has the facilities you need. Sport and recreation is a big part of student life at the University and the Canterbury campus offers a wide range of facilities for you to use and activities for you to do. More than 4,000 student Sports Centre members enjoy facilities that include a fitness suite, two multi-purpose sports halls, squash courts and dance studio. You can also enjoy use of the outdoor playing fields complex, which has two artificial pitches, grass pitches and tennis/ netball courts. The outdoor facilities also include The Pavilion, which offers fantastic amenities to its users. It has underground heating in the changing rooms, a superb café/bar with Sky TV and viewing balconies overlooking both grass and artificial pitches.

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A comprehensive programme of sports courses, workshops and intramural competitions run throughout the year. There are also fitness programmes, nutrition consultations and nearly 40 aerobic/dance classes every week to enjoy. For more information visit our website: www.kent.ac.uk/sports

Sports Federation The Sports Federation is part of the Students’ Union and runs over 30 student sports clubs, ranging from American football to kick-boxing, cricket, skiing, fencing and snowboarding. To find out more about the clubs and societies run by the Sports Federation visit: www.kentunion.co.uk

• Up to £2,000 hockey scholarship in partnership with Canterbury Men’s Hockey Club • Up to £2,000 hockey scholarship in partnership with Holcombe Hockey Club • Up to £2,000 hockey scholarship in partnership with Old Bordenian Hockey Club. See p321 or our website for further details of eligibility and how to apply.

Further information The Department of Sport, Physical Activity and Recreation, Sports Centre, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NL T: +44 (0)1227 827430/823623 E: sportsenquiries@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/sports

Sports scholarships The University of Kent offers a number of sports scholarships that are open to all students who excel in their particular sport: • University sports scholarships – numerous awards between £250 and £5,000 • The J&K Huntley £2,500 Scholarship in conjunction with Kent County Cricket Club • £2,000 rugby scholarship in partnership with Canterbury Rugby Club • Up to £2,000 hockey scholarship in partnership with Canterbury Ladies’ Hockey Club

“My decision to come to Kent was partly based on the sports facilities available on campus and the range of sports clubs available for students. Sports Centre membership is really reasonable and, included in the price, you can use the gym, the sports hall, the squash courts and plenty of outdoor facilities whenever you like. I play a number of different sports and I’m yet to come across a sport that I’d like to play that Kent does not offer.” Ed Whatmore Business Administration 241


Where can I study? Canterbury Arts

Arts The Canterbury campus has a thriving arts scene, with the Gulbenkian Theatre and Cinema, art exhibitions and other events running throughout the year. The Gulbenkian acts as the front door to the Canterbury campus. With its welcoming foyer and licensed café, it is a meeting place for students, staff and the general public.

Gulbenkian Cinema

Fine arts

The cinema is open both to students and the general public. It is Canterbury’s independent film theatre, showing new mainstream and non-mainstream releases as well as archive and foreign-language films not otherwise available in the region. It has a thriving cinema club, ‘GulbCineClub’, which entitles members to benefits including cheaper tickets and free club screenings. The Gulbenkian Cinema works closely with the Film Studies Department and other University departments. Students from all subjects can work as ushers.

The Canterbury campus has a number of exhibition spaces for artwork. The Rutherford Panoptican exhibitions are usually curated by students, and the Keynes Atrium and Gallery display work by nationally known figures, local artists and alumni.

Gulbenkian Theatre

Gulbenkian Café Bar

The theatre seats 340 and welcomes audiences from both the student population and the wider community. Student, professional and amateur shows are presented throughout the year. It is possible to see a full range of productions in each season, varying from stand-up comedy, with performers such as Mark Thomas, Lee Mack and Sean Lock, to dance, drama, world music, jazz, folk and classical music.

The lively licensed café bar is a favourite haunt for all members of the University community as well as the general public. The café bar hosts the Funny Side Comedy Club and regular music nights, and is available for use by student clubs and societies.

Events Kent runs an annual summer ArtsFest day that includes a mix of music and drama venues around the campus and ends up with a spectacular fireworks display overlooking the Cathedral. Other events include regular Open Lectures, given by a mixture of public figures and newly appointed professors. We have also recently created ‘WorldFest’, a celebration of world cultures.

Further information Gulbenkian Theatre, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NB T: (Booking Office) 01227 769075 www.gulbenkiantheatre.co.uk

The theatre management welcomes student involvement backstage, in wardrobe or front of house as ushers. The student society, T:24, presents at least one show a term in the theatre, and the University’s Drama and Theatre Studies Department has a three-week residency each June.

“The Gulbenkian Theatre and Cinema is right on campus and has some amazing films and performances on throughout the year, which is something every student must go to at some point.” Roshni Patel Law 242

Opposite: Wen-Tung Chan performing with EDge, the postgraduate performance company of London Contemporary Dance School (photo: Chris Nash)


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Where can I study? Canterbury Music

Music Thanks to a multimillion-pound donation, the University is currently building a state-of-theart centre for music performance on its Canterbury campus. Opening in early 2012, this will become the venue for the wide range of extra-curricular musicmaking available to all students studying for any degree.

Concerts on campus

Music scholarships

There are many other concerts at the University, featuring all kinds of music, ranging from classical and jazz to world and folk. The University presents a regular series of popular lunchtime concerts at the Gulbenkian Theatre that feature both professional and University performers.

(Patron: Dame Anne Evans)

The annual ArtsFest on the Canterbury campus provides an exciting finale to the year and showcases a whole range of student musicians on the outdoor stages.

Kent offers two different kinds of music scholarship to talented instrumentalists and singers applying for any degree: University Music Scholarships worth up to £5,000 per year, and Music Lesson Scholarships which enable students to continue with their instrumental and vocal tuition. For further information and an application form, see www.kent.ac.uk/music See p322 for more information on scholarships.

If you sing or play an instrument, you can join: • The Chorus – an unauditioned choir of around 200 singers • The Symphony Orchestra • The Concert Band and Big Band – open to all wind, brass and percussion players • The Chamber Choir – an auditioned choir of around 20 singers. All these rehearse weekly for public concerts throughout the academic year. As well as performing on campus, there are many opportunities to sing and play in the spectacular surroundings of Canterbury Cathedral, other venues in Kent and across the Channel. Visiting musicians give workshops, and University Music has an exciting partnership with the worldfamous Brodsky Quartet. Students also form their own ensembles and bands each year. Each of the colleges on the Canterbury campus has a practice room with a piano, which is available to all students.

Musical Theatre

Cathedral choral scholarship

Students can take part in productions in the University’s own Gulbenkian Theatre, working with professional staff. There are opportunities to star in roles, sing in the chorus, play in the orchestra or work backstage.

A choral scholarship is offered to male students at the University as and when a vacancy exists. For further information, contact David Flood, Cathedral Organist, email DavidF@canterburycathedral.org

Further information Susan Wanless, Director of Music, Eliot College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NS T: 01227 823305 E: s.j.wanless@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/music

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Where can I study? Canterbury Kent Union

Kent Union Kent Union, the Students’ Union at Kent, is run ‘by the students, for the students’. It provides a wide variety of facilities, represents students’ interests at the University and in the wider community, and offers help, support and advice when needed. Facilities and entertainment The Venue is one of the best student clubs in the country. It has won a number of awards for its efforts in maintaining a safe environment and looking after the welfare of its customers, including the 2009 ‘Best Bar None’ award. It has a 1,400 capacity, and is open four nights a week from 9pm to 2am. The Venue regularly hosts live acts, which have recently included Zane Lowe, Pendulum, Chase and Status and Ministry of Sound. It plays everything from salsa to garage, house, drum and bass, and trance. The Venue also has its own fast food outlet where you can buy lunch, dinner and late night snacks; it also provides deliveries across campus. Kent Union also runs Woody’s, a traditional pub serving tasty homemade food in the heart of Park Wood, Rutherford Bar, a stylish bar that serves premium drinks and a tapas-style menu, and a number of cafes around campus serving coffee and snacks. Newly opened in 2009, The Sports Pavilion Bar is a great place to grab lunch and a drink whilst watching Kent teams on the sports fields. Shops on campus run by Kent Union include Essentials, one of the biggest students’ union shops in the UK, and Park Wood Essentials, where you can find everything from food to stationery. It also runs Extras, an offlicence that also rents out DVDs. This year, Kent Union opened UNIque, selling University of Kent clothing and memorabilia.

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Getting involved As a student at Kent, you can get involved in all sorts of activities. All academic courses have student representatives who contribute to the way their subjects are run, and most locations (such as the colleges) have student committees that represent students’ views and organise social activities. Other ways of getting involved include becoming a member of Union Council (Kent Union’s governing body) and standing for part-time officer positions within the Students’ Union itself.

You can also help out with the student newspaper inQuire or at Canterbury Student Radio, the UK’s first student FM radio station.

Volunteering Kent Union offers you the opportunity to get involved with volunteering. This can be anything from tutoring, working with the elderly, conservation activities or stewarding at concerts. Kent Union can arrange local placements that fit in with your studies (see p317).

Support Clubs and societies A good way of following a current interest or taking up a new one is to join one of the many clubs and societies run by Kent Union. Societies at Canterbury reflect the wide spectrum of student interests; music, dance, current affairs, photography, film, chess, paintball and science are just a few examples of what is on offer. Different faiths and nationalities are also well represented along with subject-related societies. The list is ever-changing – see our website at www.kentunion.co.uk. If you have an interest that is not represented, you can also start your own society with help from Kent Union.

“I love how there is something for everyone. Kent Union really looks after students and makes sure that everyone enjoys themselves here.” Jasmin Raisanen American Studies

Kent Union has qualified staff who provide advice and support on issues that could affect you while you are a student, such as finance, housing issues, course problems and health matters. Kent Union also run Jobshop@kent, which can help you find part-time or temporary work whilst studying at the University. To view the range of jobs you can apply for, please visit www.kentunionjobshop.co.uk. (See p317.)

Further information Kent Union, Mandela Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NW T: 01227 824200 E: kentunion@kent.ac.uk www.kentunion.co.uk


Did you know? Bar None Kent has won the Best ning. run rs yea two for Award

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Where can I study? Canterbury Student Learning Advisory Service

Student Learning Advisory Service The Student Learning Advisory Service (SLAS) is a free, friendly advice service providing guidance and information on all aspects of effective learning and study skills to all students from the minute they arrive at the University until they finish their studies. SLAS is part of the Unit for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching and is a popular resource for undergraduates, postgraduates, full-time, part-time, mature, European and international students. We also work with academic schools through the Advantage Initiative to help them to embed study skills within their core modules.

What we offer Individual and confidential advice and study guidance Any student or small group of students who wish to improve their learning can make an appointment with a learning adviser who will offer guidance and support. If a student is unable to get to a University campus, they can arrange a telephone appointment or email the Student Learning Advisory Service at learning@kent.ac.uk

Mathematics and statistics support In partnership with the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, we provide mathematics and statistics clinics. Students can get in touch by emailing learning@kent.ac.uk

Programmes SLAS offers a range of programmes aimed at helping students to achieve their potential while at university. These include: Workshops: Each term, in partnership with the Library and Information Services, SLAS offers a series of generic workshops on study skills for all students from all levels and schools. Additional exam support/VALUE programme: This is a programme for Stage 1 students who are concerned about transferring to Stage 2 of their studies and who might be at risk of failure or underachievement. VALUE MaP: This is a programme for mature and/or part-time students which takes place on the Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge campuses. It is run as a series of workshops on effective study, and takes place on Saturdays and at varying times of the week to allow for flexible attendance.

Learning resources We have a range of free leaflets on study skills and techniques for students to take, as well as books that students can take out on loan. In addition we have various online study skills resources that also provide links to other web resources. If you have any problems affecting your studies, and don’t know who to talk to or where to get help, we’ll do our best to point you in the right direction.

Further information Student Leaning Advisory Service, Unit for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NQ T: 01227 824016 F: 01227 827169 E: learning@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning/

“I find it really helpful to talk to the Student Learning Advisory Service about planning, organising and structuring my work. The advice and the useful materials given by the staff members support me a lot when I need to write an essay. This all happens in a really friendly atmosphere which often reminds me that work can be fun as well.” Inga Valhaus Psychology 249


Where can I study? Canterbury IT services

IT services Whether you want to conduct research, produce essays and dissertations, improve your IT skills or collaborate online, Kent IT services are here to support you. Services and facilities • PCs: there are over a thousand computers across the Canterbury campus for student use, in the library, colleges, academic schools and other locations. You can also borrow a laptop for use within the Templeman Library. • Software: all student PCs run Microsoft Windows and offer Microsoft Office, as well as specialist and course-specific software. • Printing: self-service printing (in colour or black and white) is widely available. • Email: you will be given your own web-based Kent email address. • Wireless on campus: laptops and compatible mobile devices can connect to the Kent network to access the internet*. • Using your own PC in student accommodation: access to the network and internet* is available from student bedrooms on campus. For most rooms this includes access to digital TV channels online (TV licence required), and access to telephone services for making cheap or free calls over the internet.

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• Off-campus working: you can connect your own computer to the network from home to access files and resources. • Help and support: help and advice for accessing Kent IT facilities is available at help points on campus, or by phone, email or via an online chat service. Additionally, self-help user guides are available in print and online.

Further information Information Services, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NU T: 01227 824567 www.kent.ac.uk/itservices * Internet access has some security restrictions.

Training IT training is available covering subjects such as: • using Microsoft packages such as Word or PowerPoint • using the web for research purposes. Online learning materials provide the opportunity for you to learn at your own pace at a time to suit you. Visit www.kent.ac.uk/student/skills/ to see what workshops and online courses are available.

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Where can I study? Canterbury Templeman Library

Templeman Library The Templeman Library, located in the centre of the Canterbury campus, offers inspiring views of the city and surrounding countryside. The Library houses over a million items including books, journals, DVDs, slides and microforms, and provides access to a vast range of electronic resources online.

• Wireless service: high-speed network and internet* access throughout the building for laptops and compatible mobile devices. • A café with lounge area offering quick access PCs, wireless internet* and printing facilities. • Training: specialist subject advice and training in library and information skills. • Help and support: Help and Enquiry desks offer library and IT support in person, by telephone or via email.

Services and facilities

• The British Cartoon Archive: an unrivalled source for the study of cartoons as a reflection of British history and society, from 1904 to the present. • Special Collections: documents, manuscripts, photographs and rare books relating to the theatre, Kent local history, literature, politics, the history of science and more. • Collections of official and government publications.

• Library online catalogue: enabling you to find, reserve and renew items. • Easy borrowing via self-service machines. • Prompt access to items in high demand: an open-access Core Text Collection provides timely access to course reading material. • Online resources: an extensive range of online resources has been purchased by the Library for the exclusive use of Kent students. These include full text journals, e-books, newspaper archives, databases and reference works. • Study areas to suit your needs: there are group study and silent study areas, many equipped with student PCs. • Fully equipped presentation practice rooms to help you fine tune your presentation skills. • DVD and video collection with individual and group viewing facilities. • Over 300 student PCs offering high-speed internet* access, self-service printing and a range of office and academic software. Wireless-enabled laptops can also be borrowed for use within the Library.

Collections of rare, historic and valuable items

Term-time opening hours Monday-Friday 8.45am – 12midnight Saturday-Sunday 9.30am – 7pm Opening hours are extended to 3am during the exam period (late March to early June).

Further information Information Services, The Templeman Library, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NU T: 01227 824567 www.kent.ac.uk/library * Internet access has some security restrictions.

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“The Templeman Library is equipped with all core modular textbooks, online resources, computing facilities, and both silent and group study areas. It is user friendly, and includes a social area with a cafe.” Hannah Shute Biology 253


Where can I study? Canterbury Personal support services

Personal support services There is a network of student support and back-up services on the Canterbury campus, where you can go to get help and good advice. University Medical Centre The Medical Centre is a specialist GP practice on the Canterbury campus, providing care tailored to meet all the health needs of students at the University – see our website for full details. All services are completely confidential. The University Nursing Service (in Keynes College) provides nursing care for in-patients, a minor casualty service, and counselling and advice to students seven days a week during term time. There is also a pharmacy next door to the Medical Centre. We strongly advise you to register with a doctor’s surgery close to your term-time accommodation. By registering under the NHS system, you qualify for treatment here and in many reciprocating countries abroad. You should also register with a local NHS dentist.

Further information Medical Centre, Giles Lane, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7PB T: 01227 823583 www.kent.ac.uk/medical

Disability and Dyslexia Support Service

The Oaks Day Nursery

Our core services include:

The Oaks Day Nursery on the Canterbury campus has been established for over 30 years. The Nursery has been run by Kent Union since November 2007 and provides a warm, caring and stimulating environment where children can develop and grow to their full potential. Children are cared for in four rooms that cater for different ages and abilities; there is also a large outdoor play area.

• support for students with specific learning difficulties including dyslexia and dyspraxia • support for students with physical or sensory impairments, medical conditions and mental health difficulties • help with applications for the Disabled Students’ Allowance. We have a team of tutors who can provide individual specialist tuition and support assistants who can help with note-taking and other learning support requirements. We recommend that if you have a specific learning difficulty and/or disability, you apply for the Disabled Students’ Allowance as soon as you make your UCAS choices. You can get further information from the following website: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

The Oaks Day Nursery is committed to providing equality of opportunity for all children and families, and discrimination on the grounds of sex, race, age, religion, colour, marital status, ethnicity or political belief, is not tolerated in this setting.

Admissions

We encourage all students who have a disability or specific learning difficulty to contact us before starting at the University, to discuss their support needs.

We are registered for 65 children a day, aged from three months to four plus. Our client base is made up of University staff, students and families from the wider community. For information about our pricing structure please telephone or email Chris or Lisa. oaksnursery@kent.ac.uk

Further information

Further information

Disability and Dyslexia Support Service, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: 01227 823158 E: accessibility@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/ddss

The Oaks Day Nursery, Giles Lane, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7LX T: 01227 827676 Ofsted registration No: EY 361367 www.oaksdaynursery.co.uk

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Where can I study? Canterbury Personal support services

The Chaplaincy The Chaplaincy team is both ecumenical and multi-faith. We have two full-time chaplains (Anglican and Catholic) and several part-time members who serve all the main Christian denominations as well as the Buddhist, Islamic and Jewish faith communities at Kent. We lead worship on the Canterbury campus on Sundays and run a number of weekday services, and students have plenty of opportunities to learn more about their own faith-traditions. There is an attractive small chapel in Eliot College on the Canterbury campus that is regularly used for worship and is open to everybody for quiet prayer and meditation. Another room has been specially designated for use by the Muslim community.

The University Counselling Service, based on the Canterbury campus, offers a completely confidential service, and is open all year round. In addition to individual counselling sessions, we run groups, workshops and courses on mindfulness, assertiveness, bereavement, relaxation, confidence building, increasing motivation, and other issues according to demand. We are also helping to develop workshops and open walks using the University indoor and outdoor labyrinths on topics such as: well-being, after graduation, and stress reduction.

Further information Counselling Service, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NY T: 01227 823206 E: counselling@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/counselling

Further information Chaplains Office, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NY T: 01227 827491 E: chaplaincy@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/chaplaincy

Counselling Service Going away to university is a time of transition and personal development, and there may be a time of difficulty when you begin to feel that you would benefit from some professional counselling. The goal of counselling is to empower, encourage and support you and to help you to help yourself. Evidence suggests that the vast majority of students who have been for counselling find it a valuable experience.

Equality and Diversity The University is committed to creating and supporting a balanced, inclusive and diverse community that is open and accessible to all students. We do not tolerate discrimination, harassment or bullying of any groups or individuals, and we provide comprehensive student guidelines that outline ways of ensuring fair and consistent behaviour. We also have equal opportunity representatives or harassment contacts you can get in touch with if you have any problems.

Further information Equality and Diversity Office, Human Resources, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827825 or 824781 E: equalityanddiversity@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/hr-equalityanddiversity

Security Kent is one of the safest places in which to study but we do recognise that some students may feel vulnerable, particularly at night. Our trained, inhouse security officers are on duty 24 hours per day and regularly patrol the campus and CCTV cameras are also monitored in Campus Watch. We offer a service to accompany anyone who feels vulnerable across campus and we also offer free personal attack alarms. Some accommodation areas have their own night security officer; where this is the case, the security officers are also the building fire officers. Some accommodation areas have a night security officer, where this is the case the security officer is also the fire officer for the building.

Further information Emergencies: 3333 Campus Watch: 3300 Security Supervisors’ Office: 3060 Security Manager: 3829 www.kent.ac.uk/estates/security

Did you know? est incidence Canterbury has the low population the of 00 1,0 per e of crim UK. the in city sity of any univer

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In this section 260 262 264 266 270 272 274

The Medway campus The Medway region Accommodation Student life Student Learning Advisory Service Library and IT services Student advice and support

Where can I study? Medway Sunny Jassal Law (LLB)

They are also very friendly and approachable, always willing to assist in any way possible. I felt very comfortable and appreciated when I came here.

What attracted you to Kent? Kent is a well-respected university, with affiliations to many institutions in Europe and beyond. It also happens to have the only critical law school in the country. Black letter law never interested me; at Kent, you are taught to question the law, not to regurgitate it, no matter how concrete it may be. The campus at Medway is close to London as well as the famous Bluewater shopping centre. It’s also situated on an old naval barracks, so there’s a lot of naval heritage around the Dockyard. As it’s a new campus, students are able to create real change in the University dynamic, whether it’s by establishing new societies or by suggesting opinions on the courses.

How is your course going? The degree itself is fantastic and much more! The option of listening to lectures online is a valuable one. This makes learning a lot easier. I’m currently learning EU and international law, which are fascinating as they give me an insight into the legal systems of other countries. The teaching is of the highest level; the lectures and seminar tutors are very enthusiastic in what they teach and are always on hand to assist. They inspire the students to do better!

There are many societies and groups that allow practical experience, such as the award-winning Kent Law Clinic, which allows students to represent real clients and to have an opportunity to have the cases heard in courts and tribunals – where the advocacy, under supervision, will be conducted by the student.

How would you describe the social scene? I’ve enjoyed getting involved in the many new societies and sporting clubs – participating in the first Universities at Medway Boat Race was a particular joy. The Medway campus has seen regeneration and a major expansion of building works due to the influx of students enrolling every year, resulting in the creation of many bars and restaurants. As a result, the scene is very lively at the moment. Kent has also invested in the local sports centre, Medway Park, in order to build an athletics track, in conjunction with the upcoming Olympic Games.

What are you planning to do next? I plan to continue my studies by undertaking a Master’s in Law, the subject of which I’m yet to decide. Then I hope to further my career by studying on the Bar Professional Training Course and finally achieving my goal of qualifying as a barrister.

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Where can I study? Medway The Medway campus

The Medway campus The University of Kent’s expansion at Medway is one of the most exciting developments in higher education in the United Kingdom. The University offers a vibrant and modern campus, with innovative buildings and facilities. You can expect outstanding teaching, learning and leisure opportunities, and an exceptional level of personal support. The University has invested millions of pounds in purpose-built facilities. The flagship Medway Building has won several awards for design excellence and houses lecture theatres and seminar rooms equipped with the latest technology; specialist studios and rehearsal rooms for the Music Technology programme; and facilities for the Centre for Sports Studies, such as exercise suites and a private treatment clinic. The Gillingham Building houses fullyequipped teaching rooms and academic departments. It is also home to an industrystandard multimedia newsroom for the Journalism programme and a new one-stopshop student services area. The Drill Hall Library on campus is truly exceptional, offering spacious study facilities of the highest quality (see p272).

The University of Kent also has some prominent buildings at Chatham Historic Dockyard, close to the main Medway campus. These include Bridge Wardens College and the Galvanising Shop. The latter is a fully-renovated, split-level design studio and workshop, used by students on our Creative Events: Design and Production course. The Galvanising Shop is equipped with sophisticated lighting and sound facilities and also houses teaching rooms and a lecture theatre.

Universities at Medway The University of Kent is part of a unique partnership that includes the University of Greenwich, Canterbury Christ Church University and MidKent College, known collectively as Universities at Medway. The four institutions share the specially developed Medway campus, adjacent to the Historic Dockyard at Chatham Maritime. The site was built originally as a naval base, HMS Pembroke, at the start of the 20th century. The University of Kent moved onto the Medway campus in 2005, and most of our buildings are new or have been completely renovated.

Student facilities The Pilkington Building, which received an award-winning, multi-million-pound renovation, includes a 180-seat lecture theatre, an exhibition room, teaching facilities, the Venue café and a social meeting area. Nearby is Essentials, the Medway campus shop, run by the Students’ Association, which stocks food and household goods, and is also a mini off-licence. The Rochester Building, adjacent to the Medway and Gillingham Buildings, includes the popular Gulbenkian Café, as well as large rooms for seminars and executive meetings. The University’s new accommodation at Liberty Quays, adjacent to the Medway campus, offers high-quality accommodation for more than 600 students on a 20-acre site. (See p264 for more details.) A state-of-the-art sports centre, Medway Park, is also available to all Kent students at discounted rates (see p266).

Did you know? the Medway The Drill Hall Librar y, ton Building Building and the Pilking awards both s iou stig pre n wo all have for their and nce elle exc for design region’s ay dw Me the contribution to regeneration.

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Where can I study? Medway The Medway region

The Medway region Medway is a vibrant and bustling area with lots of things to see and do. Students are entitled to concessions at many of Medway Council’s leisure centres, attractions and entertainment venues. There are six gyms, five leisure centres, and a fantastic soccer centre, Kicks, which has third-generation astroturf – the best possible artificial surface. There are exciting arts programmes at The Brook and The Central entertainment venues, which are less than ten minutes from the campus. The Brook also hosts a monthly comedy club. There is an annual arts festival and a variety of other festivals are held throughout the year. Kent’s Medway campus is part of Chatham Maritime, on the mouth of the river Medway, and it is next to Chatham Historic Dockyard. The Chatham Maritime area has received a huge investment in recent years and includes a multiplex cinema, a large retail outlet and a number of bars and restaurants, all within walking distance of the main campus.

History, culture and leisure

Transport links

Medway has a rich and fascinating history. Rochester Castle was one of the first large stone keeps built by William the Conqueror after the Norman Conquest, while Rochester Cathedral – where Kent holds its Medway graduation ceremonies – is more than 1,400 years old, making it the second oldest cathedral in the United Kingdom.

Medway has excellent road and rail links and is well served by the M2, M20 and M25 motorways. Heathrow and Gatwick airports, the Channel ports of Dover and Ramsgate and the Channel Tunnel are all about an hour’s drive from the campus. There are direct rail links to London Victoria and Charing Cross – approximately 45 minutes’ journey time. This time will be reduced even further with the 17-minute service from Ebbsfleet to London King’s Cross. The new Ebbsfleet International Eurostar station is just 30 minutes from the campus, and from there you can be in Paris in just over two hours.

Medway also has a long and distinguished naval history. For instance, the first ship built at Chatham’s Dockyard took part in the defeat of the Armada; Lord Horatio Nelson joined his first ship at Chatham; and his famous flagship, The Victory, was built here. One of Medway’s most famous inhabitants was Charles Dickens, who lived in Chatham as a child, and later at Gadshill Place in Rochester for 14 years until his death. The Medway region also features in many Dickens novels and every year the Dickens Festival celebrates his legacy. The £62 million Dickens World tourist attraction is located at Chatham Maritime and has been used as a location for music videos and various BBC programmes. It is a multi-purpose venue, hosting special events such as Jongleurs comedy and theme nights.

“The campus is based opposite Chatham Historic Dockyard, an outlet centre, Dickens’ World and an Odeon cinema. It’s also not far from Maidstone, which has a fantastic nightlife and loads of restaurants.” Lauren Hall Business InformationTechnology

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Where can I study? Medway Accommodation

Accommodation In conjunction with Liberty Living, the University offers Medway students accommodation at our state-of-the-art facilities at Liberty Quays. This development is adjacent to our campus and is part of the new ‘waterside village’ set on the banks of the River Medway. Accommodation is offered to all eligible, new full-time students. Accommodation is arranged in clusters of flats and provides the latest in comfort and amenities. All bedrooms have their own shower and toilet and each room is networked. The flats are for five, six or eight students, each sharing a fully-equipped kitchen. Subject to availability, students also have the option of studio flats with their own en-suite bathroom, shower and cooking facilities. The Liberty Quays development has its own social area, launderette, Tesco Express store, Subway and Domino Pizza. As with all accommodation provided at Kent, the security and welfare of our students is of the highest priority and Liberty Quays features comprehensive CCTV coverage, 24-hour security and electronic entry systems. Accommodation at Liberty Quays is offered on a 42-week contract (50-week contracts are also available).

Parking for disabled students

On-street parking

There is limited parking at Liberty Quays, available only for disabled students who hold an appropriate permit.

Depending on where you live, nearby street parking may be available. In some cases, you may need a parking permit, which is available from Medway Council.

Online application You can apply online for accommodation at Liberty Quays as soon as you receive an offer from Kent, and before 31 July 2011. When all the accommodation has been allocated in mid to late August, Liberty Living will notify you of your allocation, which you will be able to view and accept online direct with Liberty Living.

Campus parking Please refer to www.kent.ac.uk/estates for the latest information.

Further information Medway Accommodation Jackie Warden E: j.r.warden@kent.ac.uk

Off-campus private accommodation For students who prefer to live in private houses off campus, our Accommodation Office can offer advice and assistance when looking for accommodation in the private rented sector.

E: hospitality-enquiry@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/ accommodation

At www.kent.ac.uk/accommodation you can access up-to-date details of off-campus housing in the nearby towns of Chatham, Gillingham and Rochester. Private landlords usually rent their properties on a 12-month contract, although some may reduce rental costs for the period of the summer vacation. All off-campus accommodation has been checked to make sure it meets the standard safety requirements and that it holds current gas and electricity safety certificates.

“I am currently living in Liberty Quays and I think it is really impressive. All newly built, the flats are nicely designed and the en-suite bedrooms are comfortable and provide good amounts of storage.” Andrew Harris Social Sciences 265


Where can I study? Medway Student life

Student life There is a lively atmosphere on campus and a thriving student community, which gives you plenty of opportunities to play sport, join a society, socialise or take up a new interest. Many social activities are run by the Universities at Medway Students’ Association (UMSA), which represents all students at the shared Medway campus and is responsible for making sure you will never be stuck for something to do when you put down your books. UMSA organises social activities and runs the student bars and the campus shop. Ultimate control of UMSA lies in the hands of the students – each year the student body elects officers to lead and oversee the direction of the Association and to make sure that students’ voices are always heard. UMSA has achieved great success, winning three major awards including the National Union of Students (NUS) Best Bar None award and accreditation from the NUS Services Sound Impact Scheme, which rewards good environmental practice. Most recently, UMSA was granted Investors in People (IIP) status after receiving recognition for its staff communication, training and development programmes.

College Master

Sports

The College Master for Medway is there to offer advice, help and support for all Kent students, and is your first port of call when you need assistance of any kind. Students can arrange to see the College Master at any time during the academic year, and all matters will be dealt with in the strictest confidence.

Sport is a great way to get involved in university life and meet new people. There are a growing number of UMSA sports teams based at Medway, which welcome both serious athletes and beginners. Available sports include football (women’s and men’s), rugby, cricket, netball, hockey, golf, rowing, tennis, canoeing, snow sports, badminton and basketball. The men’s football team has even won some silverware in recent times. The Universities at Medway Boat Race is an annual contest between all the universities on the Medway campus. It started in 2007 and has now become a major fixture in both the sporting and social calendars.

The College Master also runs a busy calendar of social and sporting activities for students at Kent, in addition to those provided by the Students’ Association. On the social side, activities include cultural visits, trips to theme parks, club nights, quizzes, stand-up comedy evenings and shopping trips via coach to the famous Bluewater Shopping Centre. Sporting activities in recent times have included specially arranged ‘taster’ sessions for trampolining, horse riding and dry slope skiing, to name just a few. The College Master also has the role of upholding the University’s student regulations and code of conduct. All students are expected to abide by this code while they study at the University, whether they reside on or off campus.

Medway Park To enhance Medway’s sports facilities, the University of Kent has committed £3 million towards the creation of a regional centre of sporting excellence called Medway Park. This £11 million project, led by Medway Council, has produced a multi-sport, state-of-the-art facility, located very near to the campus. Kent students receive preferential rates to use its sports halls, pools, squash courts, health suites and athletics track. The University also has dedicated seminar, research and therapy rooms within Medway Park. The venue has even been approved as a pre-Games training camp venue for 13 Olympic and eight Paralympic sports.

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Where can I study? Medway Student life

Student life (cont) The Medway area includes a range of other sporting facilities, such as a dry ski slope and toboggan run, an ice rink, a go-karting circuit, an Olympic-standard trampoline centre and a number of sports and leisure centres. The Deansgate Ridge Sports Complex has an 18-hole golf course, athletics track and gym, and the Arethusa Venture Centre offers a great climbing wall and sailing activities.

Clubs and bars Coopers is the bar at the heart of the Medway campus and serves quality pub food at studentfriendly prices. It has a welcoming and vibrant atmosphere and is equipped with comfy sofas, widescreen TVs (which show all the major sporting fixtures), a Nintendo Wii, an X-box and a separate pool room. There are regular themed nights and you can party the night away as it has a late licence. Off campus, the Medway towns have great pubs and clubs which offer regular discounts. A student favourite is Preach nightclub in Gillingham, which is open four nights a week. There are three rooms offering themed parties and a range of music styles including dance, R&B/urban and a great mix of 70s and 80s. The Blues Rock Café at Gillingham football stadium is a short walk away from Liberty Quays and is another popular student haunt, with a dedicated student night on Wednesdays, which offers great discounts and plays the very latest in dance, garage and R&B.

Medway’s excellent location also means you can easily venture out and explore other areas. Maidstone is about 25 minutes away and offers great bars and clubs to suit everyone. London is easily accessible by train. The campus is five minutes’ walk from a multiplex cinema and there are two theatres in Chatham that offer the very best in comedy, art, drama and music. Medway is a prime location and regularly attracts big names to its venues. Recent acts include Derek Acorah, Derren Brown, Frankie Boyle and The Backbeat Beatles. The Brook Theatre is home to the Medway Comedy Club, where you can spend an irreverent evening with some of the best comics on the UK circuit.

Further information Universities at Medway Students’ Association, Pilkington Building, North Road, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4JB T: 01634 888989 www.umsa.org.uk

Societies and groups The wide range of societies available at Medway reflects the diverse nature of the campus community and we aim to have something for everyone. Our societies include Amnesty International, Dance, Irish, Islamic, Spanish, Music, RAG and gaming, to name just a few. Different faiths and nationalities are also well represented. UMSA also runs a campus student newspaper and is always on the lookout for budding journalists. Alternatively, if you can’t find something that reflects what you’re interested in, UMSA offers help and financial support to start your own society.

“There is a great sense of community between students and staff alike, with a highly personalised approach from the head of school to administrative staff; no problem is ever too big or small.” Patrick Moynagh Pharmacy

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Where can I study? Medway Student Learning Advisory Service

Student Learning Advisory Service The Student Learning Advisory Service (SLAS) is a free, friendly advice service providing guidance and information on all aspects of effective learning and study skills to all students from the minute they arrive at the University until they finish their studies. SLAS is part of the Unit for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching and is a popular resource for undergraduates, postgraduates, full-time, part-time, mature, European and international students. We also work with academic schools through the Advantage Initiative to help them to embed study skills within their core modules.

Additional help with writing The Royal Literary Fund (RLF) is a national scheme that aims to help students develop their academic writing. The Student Learning Advisory Service hosts a Royal Literary Fellow at the University’s Medway campus where students can make individual appointments to discuss their writing. Email learningmedway@kent.ac.uk or phone 01634 888884.

Programmes SLAS offers a range of programmes aimed at helping students to achieve their potential while at University. These include: Workshops: Each term, SLAS offers a series of generic workshops on study skills for all students from all levels and schools. Additional exam support/VALUE programme: This is a programme for Stage 1 students who are concerned about transferring to Stage 2 of their studies and who might be at risk of failure or underachievement.

What we offer Individual and confidential advice and study guidance Any student or small group of students who wish to improve their learning can make an appointment with a learning adviser who will offer guidance and support. If a student is unable to get to a University campus, they can arrange a telephone appointment or email the Student Learning Advisory Service at learningmedway@kent.ac.uk Mathematics and statistics support In partnership with the School of Mathematics, Statistics and Actuarial Science, we provide mathematics and statistics clinics. Students can get in touch by emailing learningmedway@kent.ac.uk

“There are services here to help you with lots of things, such as essay writing, so you never really feel as if you are on your own.”

VALUE MaP: This is a programme for mature and/or part-time students that takes place on the Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge campuses. It is run as a series of workshops on effective study, and takes place on Saturdays and at varying times of the week to allow for flexible attendance.

Learning resources We have a range of free leaflets on study skills and techniques for students to take, as well as books that students can take out on loan. In addition we have various online study skills resources that also provide links to other web resources. If you have any problems affecting your studies, and don’t know who to talk to or where to get help, we’ll do our best to point you in the right direction.

Further information Student Learning Advisory Service, Room G0-06, Gillingham Building, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG E: learningmedway@kent.ac.uk T: 01634 888884 Fax: 020 83319837 www.kent.ac.uk/uelt/learning OR Room DB034 Drill Hall Library

Alan McGuiness Journalism and the News Industry

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Where can I study? Medway Library and IT services

Library and IT services Drill Hall Library

Term-time opening hours

Help getting started with computing and IT

The Drill Hall Library is a Grade II listed building, and thought to be the longest open library space in Europe. The Drill Hall provides a joint service for all institutions participating in the Universities at Medway initiative. The Library offers state-of-the-art study facilities in an inspiring and historic setting.

Monday-Friday 8.30am – 12midnight Saturday-Sunday 11am – 12midnight

Drill Hall Library, North Road, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4TB T: 01634 883278 http://campus.medway.ac.uk/library

When you arrive at Kent, you receive a guide to IT services and facilities at the University. We also run getting started sessions for less experienced students who may appreciate some extra help. We offer extensive help and support services throughout the academic year, and a range of user guides to help you make full use of the facilities available.

IT services and facilities

Further information

Kent provides computing and IT facilities to help with producing essays and coursework, conducting research and communicating online.

Information Services, University of Kent, Medway Building, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG www.kent.ac.uk/itservices

The rapidly expanding collection contains more than 100,000 items, including books, journal articles and electronic media to support your studies. Kent students also have access to the Templeman Library on the Canterbury campus, easily accessible using the inter-library loan service. Kent’s library web catalogue provides a powerful search facility to help you trace and then reserve or renew items.

Facilities • Over 280 study spaces zoned to provide silent, quiet and group study facilities and approximately 370 open access PCs offering high-speed web access. • Self-service printing and use of Microsoft office and other study-related software packages. • Free access to a range of subscription-only online resources via the library website, which offers a wealth of support for research and study. Examples include full text journals, e-books, newspaper archives and reference works. • Free high-speed wireless network and internet access. • A library enquiry service to help you find the resources you need. • IT support offering help and advice in person.

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Further information

• Computers: there are a large number of computers in PC classrooms and open access areas across the Medway campus. All PCs have a high-speed connection to the internet and offer access to your own area for saving work. • Software: all public PCs run Microsoft Windows and offer Microsoft Office software, as well as specialist and course-specific software. • Printing: self-service printing (in colour or black and white) is widely available for a small fee. • Email: you will be given your own Kent email address, accessible online from anywhere in the world. • Wireless: there is free wireless access to the Kent network and the internet widely available on campus. • Help and support: you can get help and advice for accessing Kent IT facilities by phone or online. Additionally, there is an extensive range of self-help user guides available in print and online.

Did you know? the Medway The Gillingham Building, ll Librar y are Ha ll Dri the and ng ildi Bu all wireless-enabled.


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Where can I study? Medway Student advice and support

Student advice and support We encourage all students who have a disability or specific learning difficulty to contact us before starting at the University of Kent to discuss their support needs.

All our advice and support services at Medway, with the exception of UMSA, are in the Gillingham Building, providing a one-stop shop for student support.

Medical care

Careers Advisory Service

Further information

The Careers Advisory Service is available at any stage of your studies for advice and information on your options after you graduate.

Student Services Graham Gorvett Manager, Student Services T: 01634 888804 E: g.d.gorvett@Kent.ac.uk

Student Services, Gillingham Building, University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG T: 01634 888969 E: medwaystudentservices@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/ddss

Disability and Dyslexia Support Service

Leapfrog Day Nursery

Our core services include:

The Leapfrog Day Nursery is situated close to campus and provides childcare for Medway students. Full and part-time places are available and the nursery has flexible opening hours. The nursery is OFSTED registered and has been rated as ‘outstanding’.

A careers adviser will not tell you what you ‘should’ do; our role is to provide information, advice and guidance to help you make your own decisions. We believe that choosing a career is a process, not an event, that all aspects of your time at University contribute to that process and that it should begin as early as possible. We distribute a Career Planning Guide to all first years, which includes advice on gaining employability skills while you study through volunteering, work experience and participating fully in University life. Our extensive website, www.kent.ac.uk/careers includes an online vacancy database with a wide range of employment opportunities and complements the information available in the open access Careers Resources Room in the Gillingham Building. This all helps you to make a good start in your career planning and contributes to the University’s ongoing success in preparing students for the world of work. In 2008, only 4.8% of our students were without a job or further study opportunity six months after graduating, well ahead of the national average of 8%.

Students should register with a local GP in order to receive treatment under the NHS system in the UK and in many reciprocating countries abroad. Students should also register with a local NHS dentist.

• support for students with specific learning difficulties including dyslexia and dyspraxia • support for students with physical or sensory impairments, medical conditions and mental health difficulties • help with applications for the Disabled Students’ Allowance. We have a team of tutors who can provide individual specialist tuition and support assistants who can help with note-taking and other learning support requirements. We recommend that if you have a specific learning difficulty and/or disability, you apply for the Disabled Students’ Allowance as soon as you make your UCAS choices. You can get further information from the following website: www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

Further information

Further information Karen Povey (Manager) Brunell Chatham Maritime, Chatham Kent ME4 4AF T: 01634 890250 E: chatham@busybees.com www.leapfrogdaynurseries.com OFSTED registration number: EY 289894

Further information Careers Advisory Service, Student Services, Gillingham Building, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG T: 01634 888876 E: j.walters@kent.ac.uk

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Where can I study? Medway Student advice and support

The Chaplaincy The chaplaincy works in co-operation with chaplaincy colleagues at the University of Greenwich and Canterbury Christ Church University. It serves all the main Christian denominations as well as the Jewish, Islamic, Hindu and Sikh faith communities on campus. A chaplain is regularly available on Thursday mornings during term time in the Gillingham Building and may be contacted at other times as needed.

The University Counselling Service, based on the Medway campus offers a completely confidential service. In addition to individual counselling sessions, we run groups, workshops and courses on relaxation, confidence building, increasing motivation, assertiveness and other issues according to demand. We are also helping to develop workshops on well-being and stress reduction and open walks using the University’s indoor labyrinth at Medway.

Security

Further information

Universities at Medway Students’ Association

Muslim students are able to meet for prayer in the Rochester Building and there is a regular chaplain who can arrange introductions to local places of worship and offer spiritual advice to all students.

Student Services, Ground Floor, Gillingham Building, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG T: 01634 888875 E: medwaycounselling@kent.ac.uk

Counselling Service

Equality and Diversity

Going away to university is a time of transition and personal development, and there may be a time of difficulty when you begin to feel that you would benefit from some professional counselling. The goal of counselling is to empower, encourage and support you and to help you to help yourself. Evidence suggests that the vast majority of students who have been for counselling find it a valuable experience.

The University is committed to creating and supporting a balanced, inclusive and diverse community that is open and accessible to all students. We do not tolerate discrimination, harassment or bullying of any groups or individuals, and we provide comprehensive student guidelines that outline ways of ensuring fair and consistent behaviour. We also have equal opportunity representatives or harassment contacts you can get in touch with if you have any problems.

Further information Equality and Diversity Office, T: 01227 827825 or 824781 E: equalityanddiversity@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/hr-equalityanddiversity/

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Access to the Medway campus is monitored by the gatehouse staff and members of security patrol the site 24 hours a day. There is a Police Community Support Officer based in the Pilkington Building who regularly patrols the campus and all areas are covered by CCTV. The new accommodation at Liberty Quays features comprehensive CCTV coverage, 24-hour security and electronic entry systems.

The Universities at Medway Students’ Association (UMSA) has an Advice Centre with two full-time members of staff who offer free, confidential and impartial advice on a range of areas including finance, immigration, housing, academic issues and many more. The Advice Centre is open between 10am and 4pm (term time only) and offers full appointments as well as drop-in sessions for less complicated issues (drop-in sessions are Monday, Wednesday and Fridays between 2pm and 4pm).

Further information UMSA Advice Centre, Room PK – 004, Pilkington Building, Chatham Maritime, Chatham, Kent T: 01634 888989 E: advice@umsa.org.uk www.umsa.org.uk


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In this section 280 Europe 282 University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges

Where can I study? Other locations Jonathan Kasstan French What attracted you to study French at Kent? I’ve always loved languages and could speak French quite well – it was one of my favourite subjects at school. Kent was recommended to me by a teacher; also, it’s so close to the coast and has good ties with French universities. I didn’t know what to expect as I hadn’t come to an open day, so I just threw myself in at the deep end with Welcome Week. I lived in Becket Court and it was brilliant.

You also become much more confident about speaking the language, which motivates you to read and listen to more French and talk to French people – there are so many on campus. The European Office can also arrange mentoring with French people.

What about the social scene? The social life is brilliant. I use the gym regularly, food on campus is good, and the bars are great. Canterbury is a small, picturesque city, but there’s always something to do. It’s lively, but you can walk home late at night and still feel safe.

How is your course going? It has been really interesting, you can study so many different aspects of French culture and life – rich and absolutely fascinating stuff. My year abroad was a fantastic experience. The French system is bureaucratic and chaotic, but as a result, when you come back you feel you can tackle anything.

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Where can I study? Other locations Europe

Europe Known as ‘the UK’s European university’, Kent is the closest UK university to continental Europe. Its main campuses are located in the world heritage city of Canterbury and the dynamic, developing area of Medway, both of which have excellent transport links to London, Brussels and Paris. Kent boasts partnerships with some of Europe’s top universities (many of which are the number one university in their country) including Ecole Normale Supérieure, Paris (France), RuprechtKarls-Universität Heidelberg (Germany), the Catholic University of Leuven (Belgium), the University of Amsterdam (Netherlands), Uppsala University (Sweden), the University of Vienna (Austria), the University of Copenhagen (Denmark), the University of Helsinki (Finland), the University of Bologna (Italy) and the University of Barcelona (Spain).

European study and work placement opportunities Most academic schools offer you the opportunity to either study or work in Europe under the Erasmus programme. You can study European languages (French, German, Italian and Spanish), or a non-language subject, taught either in English or in the local language, at one of our many European partner universities. If you prefer to take a job during your period abroad, you can apply for a placement as a language assistant in a school as part of a modern language degree, or a work placement in mainland Europe as part of your year in industry programme. (See p14 for more information on international study and work placements).

Double degree programmes Due to our geographical position, Kent has developed strong partnerships with many continental European institutions. Students on our bilingual double degree undergraduate programme in Politics and International Relations (bidiplôme) graduate with two qualifications – a UK degree from Kent and a French degree from Sciences Po in Lille. Students study in both countries and teaching and assessment is in French in Lille and English in Canterbury. Master’s students on specific programmes in the School of Politics and International Relations also have the opportunity to take one of our double degree programmes with partner institutions in Italy, Poland, Russia or France. Jointly supervised PhDs (cotutelles) offer students the chance to be jointly supervised by Kent and a university in another country, resulting in a dual award: a PhD from Kent and a doctorate from the partner University.

Master’s programmes Many undergraduates decide to stay at Kent to pursue postgraduate studies. As well as Master’s programmes at Canterbury and Medway, this could be on a double-degree Master’s programme, at our specialised postgraduate centre in Brussels or on one of our special Paris MA programmes.

The University of Kent at Brussels The University of Kent at Brussels is the University’s postgraduate school for international studies, with approximately 200 students drawn from over 50 countries. Working closely with the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, we offer students first-class academic and social facilities in one of the most politically important cities in Europe. Studying in Brussels provides students with the advantages of a prestigious degree from a renowned British university with the excellent

opportunities for networking and professional advancement afforded by its location. The city is home to many European Union institutions and multinational organisations which provide our students with a daily gateway to the ‘real world’ of international relations, policymaking and international law. The School has excellent facilities including superior IT facilities and students also have access to up-to-date research and internship opportunities. Conferences, tours, seminars and receptions are organised and students can attend public meetings of the European Union. Practitioners working at the cutting edge of the international world, from NATO, NGOs to thinktanks and lobby groups, regularly teach some of our classes and others are invited to the School for weekly guest seminars and special events.

More information www.kent.ac.uk/brussels, or contact the University of Kent at Brussels T: +32 2 641 1724 E: bsis@kent.ac.uk

The University of Kent at Paris In September 2009, the exciting University of Kent at Paris project was launched. Kent’s premises in the historic heart of Montparnasse, enable students on a range of MA programmes in the Humanities to spend their spring studying in Paris. Our centre is located only a few minutes walk from the Luxembourg Gardens, much frequented by students from the Sorbonne and other Latin-Quarter institutions. Exploring the city’s cultural resources, major libraries and museums is integral to the Paris programmes.

More information www.kent.ac.uk/paris European Office T: +44 (0)1227 824108 E: European@kent.ac.uk 281


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Where can I study? Other locations University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges

University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges University of Kent at Tonbridge The University of Kent has a centre in Tonbridge dedicated to part-time study. The centre is based in the Kent County Council Adult Education Building in Avebury Avenue, a fiveminute walk from the railway station. We also offer some programmes at West Kent College’s Brook Street campus. The centre provides a library of books and journals, and public PCs for student use, with word processing, email and access to the internet. Students can borrow books from this library or order books from the University’s other libraries, which are delivered via a daily courier service. All students at Tonbridge have access to the resources on Kent’s other campuses. The University Centre Tonbridge offers part-time certificates, diplomas and honours degrees in a number of Humanities subjects including Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, English Literature, English Literature and Creative Writing, History and History & Philosophy of Art.

Further information Tonbridge University Centre University of Kent Tonbridge Centre First Floor, Block A Avebury Avenue Tonbridge, Kent TN9 1TG T: 01732 352316 E: tonbridgeadmin@kent.ac.uk

MidKent College MidKent College has around 10,000 students enrolled on courses in Medway and Maidstone, and offers an excellent entry route for students who want to progress to degree courses at the University of Kent. Thanks to the College’s close links with employers and professional bodies, its courses remain firmly in touch with trends in the workplace and provide an appropriate point from which you can launch either into university or your chosen career. Direct progression links mean that MidKent College students can move on from a two-year HND or foundation degree to the first, second or third year of a related degree programme at the University of Kent. In doing so, you can gain both the academic award of a degree and the vocational experience of an HND or foundation degree. MidKent College has an impressive array of learning resources, social facilities and dedicated support services available on demand, which help to ensure that you get the most from your learning experience. The College is a dynamic and dedicated education provider, offering effective teaching in a mature and encouraging environment.

Higher National Diplomas HND in Applied Chemistry UCAS code: 011F:M HND in Business and Management UCAS code: 102N:M HND in Information Technology UCAS code: 105G:M

Foundation degrees FdA in Business and Management UCAS code: N205:M FdEng in Civil Engineering UCAS code: H200:M FdEng in Engineering (Electrical) UCAS code: H624:M FdEng in Engineering (Electronic) UCAS code: H610 FdEng in Engineering (Plant and Processing) UCAS code: H790:M FdEng in Engineering (Manufacturing) UCAS code: H700:M FdEng in Engineering (Mechanical) UCAS code: H300:M FdSc in Construction UCAS code: K220:M FdSc in Information Technology UCAS code: G405:M FdSc in Life Science Laboratory Technology UCAS code: C190:H

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Where can I study? Other locations University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges

Honours degree

Creative studies

How to apply

This is a 15-month top-up degree programme for students who have successfully completed an appropriate HND or foundation degree.

HND in Fine Art UCAS code: 001W:S

Please apply through UCAS under the University of Kent institution code K24, and add the special South Kent College code S as indicated.

HND Interactive Media UCAS code: 054G:S

Further information

Entry requirements

HND Electrical/Electronic Engineering UCAS code:

South Kent College Student Centre, Folkestone Campus, Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, Kent CT20 2TZ

For the majority of HND and foundation degree courses at Mid-Kent College, we recommend that you have at least one of the following:

HND Mechanical Engineering UCAS code:

Ashford Campus, Jemmett Road, Ashford, Kent TN23 4RJ

FdA in Fashion and Textiles UCAS code: W230:S

Dover Campus, Maison Dieu Road, Dover, Kent CT16 1DH

BA (Hons) Fine Art (top-up degree) UCAS code: W101:S

T: 0845 207 8220 E: admissions@southkent.ac.uk www.southkent.ac.uk

BSc in Construction (top-up degree) UCAS code: K222:M

• three GCSE passes at grade C or above and one A level pass • BTEC National Diploma or Certificate • AVCE (formerly known as GNVQ Advanced) • Access course. We may accept mature students without these qualifications, but with relevant work and/or life experiences, subject to interview with the course tutor.

BA (Hons) Visual Design and Communication (top-up degree) UCAS code: W213:S

Further information

HND in Furniture, Fine Craft and Restoration UCAS code: 062W:S

For more information, please see our guide to full-time courses, call our dedicated Course Information Line on 01634 402020, or visit our website www.midkent.ac.uk

South Kent College South Kent College is easily accessible by road, rail and bus, with campuses in Ashford, Dover and Folkestone. The College provides for the needs of over 15,000 students, has up-to-date facilities, including well-equipped learning resources centres, and provides an excellent environment in which to study for a higher education qualification. South Kent College offers a friendly, supportive and adult learning environment and there is also a Students’ Union and a Student Activities Service. 284

FdA Photography UCAS Code: W641:S BA (Hons) Fashion and Textiles (top-up degree) UCAS Code: W232:S

Engineering and construction FdSc in Construction UCAS code: K221:S

Canterbury College Canterbury College is just five minutes from Canterbury city centre and has recently undergone a state-of-the-art £50 million campus redevelopment. There is a wide range of purpose-built facilities on site, including the Carey Learning Resources Centre, graphics and art studios, engineering laboratories and an animal centre. There is an award-winning Students’ Union, which organises sporting fixtures, gigs, trips and outward-bound activities. Students at the College are a vibrant mix of young and more mature students. The College offers Higher National Diplomas and degree programmes in partnership with the University of Kent.


Where can I study? Other locations University of Kent at Tonbridge, Associate and Partner Colleges

Higher National Diplomas

Further information

HND in Applied Animal Science UCAS code: 093D:C

Canterbury College, Student Information Centre T: 01227 811188 E: admissions@canterburycollege.ac.uk www.canterburycollege.ac.uk

HND Business (Marketing) UCAS code: 5N1N:C HND Business (Human Resource Management) UCAS code: 6N1N:C HND Business (Finance) UCAS code: 3N1N:C HND in Business (Law) UCAS code: 1M1N:C HND in Health and Social Care UCAS code: 034L:C HND in Public Services UCAS code: 064L:C HND in Retail Management UCAS code: 042N:C

Honours degrees These are 12 and 15-month top-up honours degree programmes for students who have successfully completed an appropriate HND course or have an equivalent qualification or experience. BA in Public Services Management UCAS code: L433:C BA in Health and Social Care Management UCAS code: L436:C BSc Animal Science UCAS code: D930:C For any of these courses, please apply through UCAS under the University of Kent institution code K24 and the campus code C.

West Kent College West Kent College is a partner college of the University of Kent. The main campus is in Tonbridge, with a second, Construction Crafts Centre, in Tunbridge Wells. The College has nearly 12,000 full-time and part-time learners studying a huge range of subjects and levels of qualification. The College has offered Higher Education programmes for almost 20 years, it provides comprehensive industry-standard learning resources and computer access. The entire campus is currently being re-developed. The completed campus, ready for the 2011 September intake, will provide 21st century education and training facilities including stateof-the-art TV studios, training kitchens and restaurant, hair and beauty salons. Phase one, due for completion summer 2010, includes a brand new fully sustainable performing arts auditorium. Student services include financial guidance, advice on accommodation, counselling, and careers and progression advice. The College also maintains close links with the University, this includes regular visits from Student Union representatives. The University validates the courses listed below.

HND in Graphic Design UCAS code: W210:W BA in Graphic Design (top-up degree) UCAS code: 012W:W HNC in Photography UCAS code: N/A HND in Photography UCAS code: 046W:W BA in Photography (top-up degree) UCAS code: W640:W FdA in Popular Music Performance UCAS code: W310:W BA in Popular Music Performance (top-up degree) Subject to approval UCAS code: W311:W FdA Textiles and Fashion UCAS code: W233:W

Further information West Kent College, Brook Street, Tonbridge, Kent TN9 2PW T: 01732 358101 F: 01732 771415 E: enquiries@wkc.ac.uk www.wkc.ac.uk

HNC in Graphic Design UCAS code: N/A HND (top up) in Graphic Design UCAS code: N/A 285


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In this section 288 Support for international students 290 Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students 294 Finance for international students

International students Alison Hollis, Bermuda Law (LLB) What attracted you to Kent I visited Kent the year before I began my studies here and thought it was really pretty. The campus is very scenic and has a relaxing and laid-back atmosphere. Kent is very diverse – there are lots of different people from different places, which makes it unique. And you learn something new every day! But I chose to study here mainly because Kent has a very good reputation in Bermuda. Bermuda College has an affiliation with Kent Law School, which allows students to complete the first year of their law degree in Bermuda and then study for the remaining two years of the programme here at Kent. However, that’s not the way I opted to do it; I decided that I wanted to study here for all three years!

How would you describe the social scene? There were a number of events organised for international students on arrival to make us feel welcome, including a visit to Leeds Castle and the International Student Welcome Dinner, which gave us the opportunity to network and meet different people – I found that really beneficial. The pubs and bars on campus are good and you have the Gulbenkian Cinema and Theatre, too. I also tend to eat out a lot in Canterbury and have been sightseeing here and in London. I’m a professional photographer in my spare time, so I’ve got involved with the Photography and Modelling Society at Kent (I’m currently the Vice-President), and have even had the opportunity to undertake some photography work for the University!

How have you found the course? I’m in my second year now and it’s going well. I think the modules are really interesting this year. The teaching is very good, too. In fact, one of our lecturers has been shortlisted for the Law Teacher of the Year Award 2010. In terms of support, the seminar leaders are great – they have office hours and are contactable by email. The sound files of the lectures are made available online as well, which I find very useful.

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International students Support for international students

Support for international students The University of Kent is one of the most popular universities in the UK, with a strong international community. Some 25% of our full-time students are from overseas with 139 different nationalities represented. Our popularity is due to many factors, including our academic reputation, safe and friendly campus, great location, good student accommodation and outstanding computing and study facilities. International students also benefit from our English language support, international students’ welcome programme, excellent job opportunities, good student accommodation and a welcoming, multicultural environment.

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent

International qualifications Our excellent knowledge of international qualifications means we can provide specialist advice on applications, equivalencies of qualifications and entry requirements to Kent. Information relevant to specific countries is also provided on our website.

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent

Individual tours of the University If you can’t manage to get to one of our Open Days, we can offer an individual tour of the University during the week (Monday to Friday). You need to give us prior notice of your arrival – please contact the International or European Office to make arrangements.

Further information

Kent Union (Students’ Union)

www.kent.ac.uk/studying/openday/informal.html

The Kent Union Student Advice Centre provides support and information on various legal, academic, financial, immigration and welfare issues. The Student Advice Centre is equipped to help with all visa enquiries. Kent Union currently has many societies for international students, such as African-Caribbean, Asian, Chinese, German, Hellenic and Japanese.

Special welcome To help you feel at home, we organise a special Welcome Week for our new international students before classes start, including a welcome dinner and visits to local tourist attractions.

International and European Offices The International and European Offices provide help and support for all international students, both during their application to Kent and throughout their studies. We have links with the University’s various cultural and international societies and we meet many of our current applicants and former students during visits abroad.

Further information www.kentunion.co.uk

Funding and scholarships The University offers a range of financial support and scholarships for international students.

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent

See p320, or www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/ undergraduate/index.html

Kent representatives

English language tuition

The University has many local representatives around the world. If you wish to speak to a representative in your own country for help with your application, please contact the International Office.

www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent/beforeapply

All international students at Kent have the opportunity to take advantage of up to two hours of free English lessons a week at our English Language Unit (ELU). The ELU also provides pre-sessional English courses and foundation courses that are specially designed to prepare international students for academic study.

Staff visits

Further information

Staff from the University of Kent visit many countries throughout the world, often at higher education fairs, giving you the opportunity to speak directly to someone who can answer your questions about all aspects of life at Kent.

www.kent.ac.uk/cewl

Further information

Further information

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/international/student

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International students Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students

Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students In addition to the 450 honours degrees (Bachelor’s degrees) Kent offers, we also provide programmes of study especially for international students. These programmes are for candidates whose education or experience so far has not given them the qualifications, study skills or ability in English language that they need to take the degree of their choice.

• you have reached an academic standard acceptable for first-year entry to a degree programme, but do not have a high enough standard of English language to cope with the demands of a degree programme.

Kent’s foundation programmes

We offer foundation programmes in Biological Sciences, Electronic and Communications Engineering, Computer Systems Engineering, Forensic Science, Mathematics and Physics. These programmes provide a solid foundation for degrees in the sciences. If English is not your first language, you are also offered tuition in this area.

Foundation programmes help you to gain the entry requirements you need to study at degree level. Students from high schools around the world may need to take a foundation programme before starting a degree in the UK. Foundation courses run on our Canterbury campus from September to June.

International Foundation Programme (IFP) This programme is designed especially for international students and prepares you for studying an undergraduate degree. It includes a mix of academic study skills and English language skills and provides entry to the wide range of subjects in our Faculties of Humanities and Social Sciences. You are eligible to apply for the International Foundation Programme (Humanities or Social Sciences) if: • you are from a country where secondary education does not reach the level needed for direct entry to UK undergraduate degrees or

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Subject-specific degrees with a foundation year These programmes are open to candidates with acceptable English language qualifications, but with either A level equivalent qualifications below the grades required for first-year entry to a degree or national school-leaving qualifications which are at a level below A level.

If you are applying for either type of foundation programme, you should apply through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) – see p226 for details.

Degree entry requirements You only need to take a foundation programme if your qualifications are not suitable for your chosen degree. You can look up the entry requirements at www.kent.ac.uk/studying/ undergrad/subjects The qualifications are listed as International Baccalaureate (IB) or A levels. However, you may have qualifications that are specific to your own country. For advice on whether these are suitable, please go to www.kent.ac.uk/ international/country Feel free to contact us if you are unsure or need further advice. See p293 for our contact details.

Junior Year Abroad short-term students from overseas In an increasingly competitive global job market, employers value graduates with study abroad experience who have proved that they can succeed and function in a different environment. The Kent Junior Year Abroad programme (JYA) attracts hundreds of students every year from around the world including the USA, Japan, Korea and Hong Kong. We offer a full-year JYA that runs for one academic year, from September to the beginning of June in the following calendar year, or has two shorter options, the Fall Semester from September to December, or the Spring Semester from January to the beginning of June. We also offer JYA English PLUS, which is specially designed to meet the needs of nonnative speakers of English. JYA English PLUS has two different length programmes (full year and part year), the full-year programme begins in May and ends in March in the following calendar year: the part-year programme begins in May and ends in December. JYA English PLUS includes intensive English language preparation for study at a British university and has three different pathways, giving flexibility in that it matches individual backgrounds and abilities to appropriate levels of study.

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/studying/short-term


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International students Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students

Diploma programmes

Entry requirements

Kent offers overseas students at Kent the opportunity to study for a diploma in many subject areas in the Faculties of Humanities, Social Sciences, and Sciences. The diploma lasts for one academic year (nine months).

The University of Kent considers a wide range of international qualifications for entry to our undergraduate programmes, including the International Baccalaureate and the European Baccalaureate. As an overseas student, you need to satisfy the general entry requirement and course requirement (see p222 for more details), and proficiency in English. For specific entry requirements related to your country, see: www.kent.ac.uk/international/country/index.html

The diploma programmes have been designed especially for international students, and in particular students already registered for degree courses at overseas universities who want to spend part of their period of study in this country (for example, American students proposing to spend their Junior Year Abroad in Europe). They provide an excellent opportunity to gain two recognised academic qualifications within the normal period of a single degree course. Students who take a diploma programme could be allowed to transfer to a full honours degree programme involving a further year’s study. For suitably qualified candidates, the diploma can be used as a pre-Master’s pathway to postgraduate study in some subjects.

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/studying/short-term

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The University requires all non-native speakers of English to produce evidence of English ability. We ask for the following: Programme

Honours degrees Science foundation years International foundation programme Junior Year Abroad Fall Semester Spring Semester English PLUS Pathway 1 Pathway 2 Pathway 3

English language requirement IELTS TOEFL TOEFL TOEFL 6.5 5.5

paper computer internet 580 237 85 530 197 70

5.0

500

173

60

6.5 6.5 6.5

580 580 580

237 237 237

85 85 85

4.0 5.0 6.0

450 500 550

133 173 213

45 60 80

Alternatively, for an honours degree, you need: • grade C in Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English • grade B in Cambridge Advanced Certificate in English • European Baccalaureate 7.0 in written English first language; 7.5 in written English second language; 8.0 in written English third language • IB higher: 4+ (A1) or 5+ (A2/B). IB standard: 5+ (A1) or 6+ (A2/B). The University also accepts WELT and TEEP.

Pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes The University offers pre-sessional English courses for students who need to improve their English and study skills before joining an undergraduate programme. If your programme of study requires you to have the equivalent of IELTS 6.5, there are three presessional courses you can choose from: a sixweek, 12-week and 19-week course that run during the summer before the start of the academic year.


International students Programmes of study and entry requirements for international students

Entry requirements to the pre-sessional courses: • 19-week course – 5.0 IELTS with minimum of 5.0 in Reading and Writing or TOEFL paperbased 500, internet-based 61 • 12-week course – 5.5 IELTS with minimum of 5.5 in Reading and Writing or TOEFL paperbased 530, internet-based 70 • Six-week course – 6.0 IELTS with minimum of 6.0 in Reading and Writing or TOEFL paperbased 550, internet-based 80. If your programme of study requires you to have the equivalent of IELTS 7.0, there are two pre-sessional courses you can choose from, a six-week advanced course and a 12-week advanced course.

Entry requirement to the advanced pre-sessional courses: • 12-week advanced course – 6.0 IELTS with minimum of 6.0 in Reading and Writing or TOEFL paper-based 550, internet-based 80 • 6-week advanced course – 6.5 IELTS with minimum 6.5 in Reading and Writing or TOEFL paper-based 580, internet-based 85.

How to apply

Further information

For an undergraduate course or foundation course, you need to apply through UCAS by completing the online application form at www.ucas.com/apply For more information, see p226.

International Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 827994 F: +44 1227 823247 E: international-office@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/international

For foundation programmes, if you have difficulty applying through UCAS, it is also possible to apply online via one of our authorised representatives in your own country. The International Office can provide you with details of our specific country representatives, or see our website www.kent.ac.uk/internationalstudent For JYA English PLUS if your university already has an agreement with the University of Kent, then please apply via your university’s own ‘study abroad’ office. If your university does not have an agreement with us, you can still apply directly to Kent. However, you need to check that your university will accept the study credits you gain at Kent. See www.kent.ac.uk/studying/shortterm for more details For a pre-sessional course, please apply directly to the University via the form downloadable from www.kent.ac.uk/cewl If you would like any help, the International Office can refer you to one of our overseas representatives.

European Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 824582 E: eurec@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/european English Language Unit, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: +44 1227 824401 E: eng-lang@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/cewl Kent Union, Mandela Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NW T: 01227 824216 E: union@kent.ac.uk www.kentunion.co.uk Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

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International students Finance for international students

Finance for international students Tuition fees

Living costs

Government funding

You can find information on early-bird discounts and payment through instalments as well as information on how to pay at www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student/fees/index.html

There is a comprehensive list of the costs you could incur studying at Kent on p309, or you can go to our online living costs calculator on www.kent.ac.uk/livingcosts

European Union students

Funding and scholarships

Students from within the EU can apply for a UK government loan to cover the cost of tuition fees, subject to eligibility and financial assessment. This is paid back after graduation at a certain salary level. See www.direct.gov.uk/ studentfinance

Provisional tuition fees for 2010/2011 for full-time students from within the EU are the same as those for students from the UK, that is, £3,290 for the academic year. Eligibility for EU fee status depends on nationality and residency. The fees will be confirmed in 2010. Fees for the academic year 2011/2012 will be available in spring 2011.

Students from outside the EU Annual tuition fees for full-time international students from outside the EU for 2009/2010 are as follows: Undergraduate degree programmes Non-laboratory courses Laboratory courses Architecture Foundation year programmes Sciences foundation year and International Foundation Programme

£10,350 £12,590 £12,590

£9,000

Study abroad – short-term and diploma courses Junior Year Abroad £9,000 Fall Semester £3,600 Spring Semester £5,400 JYA English PLUS full length £10,900 JYA English PLUS part length £7,845 Fees for 2010/2011 were still to be confirmed at time of going to press – please see our website for updated information. Fees for the academic year 2011/2012 will be available in spring 2011.

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University funding All full-time students can apply for University scholarships based on music and sporting ability. The scholarships range from £500 to £5,000 per year. See p310 for further information.

Students from countries outside the EU may be able to apply to their own government for funding. See p310 for more details on financial support.

Full-time students from within the EU can apply for University academic scholarships, alongside students from the UK. See p320 for details. The University offers various sources of financial support to help students from outside the EU, including overseas scholarships, Hong Kong Alumni 40th Anniversary Scholarships and the Chancellor’s Scholarship for Trinidad and Tobago. We also offer a loyalty discount scheme for international students whose family members have also studied at Kent. You can find further details at www.kent.ac.uk/international/ funding/scholarships.html In addition to these sources of income, individual departments at the University offer specific scholarships. For details of these scholarships, please see the Departmental pages of the website. See p320 for further details of general University funding.

“Here you can balance yourself in terms of social life, work and study. When you are independent, you learn the value of money and how to look after yourself.” Rajen Shah, Kenya Business Administration and Computing with a Year in Industry


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Returning to learning Julie Bennett Medical Anthropology What attracted you to Kent? I grew up in Canterbury and always wanted to study at Kent. In fact, I remember watching the University being built! Due to redundancy, I found myself being accepted here through the clearing system in 2007. I have had a background in both veterinary and human medicine and pathology, but had no experience of anthropological-based learning in these areas. I read the prospectus, which gave a good background to both Biological and Medical Anthropology, and I initially started on the Biological course but then changed to Medical Anthropology.

How is the course going? I absolutely love it and can’t wait to graduate next year. It’s a whole new way of learning and of gaining new skills such as essay writing, reviewing of articles and developing research proposals and projects. The most interesting thing I’ve learned so far is in relation to diseases and abnormalaities of the human skeleton and teeth, which has inspired me to follow on from

my undergraduate course to a postgraduate course. I have also been working part-time in the School of Anthropology and Conservation’s osteology research centre, Kent Osteological Research and Analysis (KORA). I’ve had the opportunity to learn new things in a great School with very supportive staff. I’ve also met some really lovely people from many different backgrounds who, despite the age difference, have been very supportive to me as a mature student!

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking of coming to Kent? Enjoy it! Do the reading, don’t leave things to the last minute and, if you need help, ask before it gets too big a problem – nothing is impossible to sort out if you don’t leave it too late! Take time to look at the resources provided by both the lecturers and the library. It’s almost always there if you look for it!

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Returning to learning

Returning to learning The University of Kent welcomes students from all backgrounds. About 20% of our students have returned to study after a few years (or more) out of formal education. Our staff have a wide range of experience in helping students who are returning to full-time or to part-time study. Kent welcomes applications from everyone with the potential to benefit from its programmes. Not all of our students have the traditional entrance qualifications required to take a degree. We will consider your previous experience including work-related skills, alternative qualifications and any other information that you can give us. We want you to enjoy and succeed with your studies. If enrolling on a degree programme is not yet the best option for you, or if you feel that you would like to refresh study skills and take the time to build your confidence, you could consider starting with a shorter part-time higher education (HE) course, or an Access to Higher Education Diploma (which is an FE level 3, A-level equivalent course, see p217). There are also some HE programmes which include a foundation year which then leads on to the full degree programme (see right).

Advice for students returning to learning

Further information

In addition to all the support services and resources described elsewhere in this prospectus, our Recruitment, Information and Guidance Unit can offer friendly, experienced advice if you are thinking of returning to study, if you are unsure about the course you wish to study or want to discuss any topic relating to study in higher education. The Unit can give information and advice on a wide range of topics relating to studying in higher education, including how to choose your course, preparing for your course, admissions processes and general information regarding preparation for higher education.

For guidance information, or to book an individual guidance session, contact the Recruitment, Information and Guidance Unit.

The Recruitment, Information and Guidance Unit is based on the Canterbury campus and is open 9am – 5pm, Monday to Friday. Visitors to the Unit are most welcome and the staff can provide you with information and literature, and generally answer your questions. You can book an appointment for a one-to-one guidance session with a trained adviser. The session can be conducted either by telephone or face to face. Alternatively, you could come along to one of our Open Days – see inside the back cover for dates and more information, or visit our website at www.kent.ac.uk/opendays

T: 0800 975 3777 or 01227 827272 E: guidance@kent.ac.uk For general course information or admissions advice, contact: Recruitment, Information and Guidance Unit, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 or 0800 975 3777 E: information@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/studying

Science foundation programmes Biosciences, Computer Systems Engineering, Electronic and Communications Engineering, Forensic Science, Management Science, Mathematics and Physics offer a four-year programme with a foundation year for all students who don’t have the appropriate qualifications for direct entry to a three-year programme. If you don’t have qualifications in the necessary subjects for your chosen degree, or if, for whatever reason, your grades aren’t high enough, you can apply for this programme. You can find further details under the individual subject entries, or on p220.

“It’s pretty scary when you haven’t studied for 20 years but don’t be put off. Everyone at university is there for the same reason and I’ve never felt out of place.” Kate Sutton Creative Writing with English and American Literature

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Returning to learning

Part-time study Part-time study gives you the opportunity to achieve the same academic standards as a fulltime programme over a longer period of time. It also has the advantage that you can take it a stage at a time – certificate, then diploma, and finally, the degree. There are several types of part-time study at Kent. We have programmes aimed specifically at part-time students at certificate, diploma and degree level. On the new Applied Professional Practice programmes, you can study part-time as well as gain credit for work-based study. Finally, many of our full-time programmes can also be studied on a part-time basis.

There is an explanation of course structure on p216. Part-time courses are offered at Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge. They cover a range of topics from health and social care practice to history & philosophy of art. Some subjects are only available via this route and not as a full-time degree. These include archaeological studies, Christian theology, counselling, local history, and substance misuse management. If you would like to find out more about the different options available to you then please request a copy of the Guide to Part-time Study at Kent booklet, which explains the different levels and types of study.

Part-time study on full-time programmes Students on this route usually take half the modules each year that a full-time student takes. Most of the modules run during the daytime (as they fit with full-time study), but some are available through classes taught in the evening.

For further details of all our certificates and diplomas, see the Part-time Programmes at Kent prospectus, available at www.kent.ac.uk/part-time and as a printed booklet.

Further information A large number of our full-time courses, generally in the Humanities and Social Sciences, can be taken on this part-time basis – check the Facts box on each subject page to see whether the part-time option is available.

Part-time only programmes In several subject areas, we offer a system of awards geared specifically to the needs of part-time students:

Information and Guidance Unit, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 0800 975 3777 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Access programme Access courses are designed for adults of any age who want to learn a new subject or increase their knowledge of a subject they have previously studied. Kent’s programme is nationally validated, and provides advice, academic preparation for degree-level study, and experience of a university environment. You study with other people in similar circumstances to you, who have the same aims and apprehensions. The Kent Access to HE in Social Sciences and Humanities programme offers a range of subjects, normally taken over one year. In recent years, nearly all the students who successfully completed an Access course went on to a degree course. The Access course run at the University of Kent is validated by the Open College Network (OCN), South East Region. For details of Access course providers, check out the OCN South East Region booklet Access to Higher Education Courses.

Further information OCN, Kent Office, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: 01227 827823 E: km.enquiries@ocnser.org.uk www.ocnkm.ac.uk

• Certificates: corresponding to Stage 1 of a degree; normally studied part-time over two years but can take up to four years • Diplomas; corresponding to Stage 2 of a degree and lasting two years • Degrees: these follow on from some diplomas allowing students to complete Stage 3 in a further two years.

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“University is a valuable experience whatever your age. As a mature student I am doing this because I want to. My children know I am at university and I hope they will see that university is an option.� Dawn Hall Electronics and Communications Engineering

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Applied Professional Practice

Certificate in Combined Studies

Further information

These degree programmes are run by our Centre for Professional Practice, designed for working people who want to study for a degree. You combine personal and professional subjects with subjects already offered at the University (currently Computing, Economics and English Language) in a joint honours degree.

The Certificate in Combined Studies (CCS) allows you to choose subjects from a wide range of open entry Stage 1 modules. Open entry means that you can join this programme without having to demonstrate a specific previous qualification. You can build up credit towards the Certificate or, when you have identified your particular subject interest, transfer appropriate credits to a single subject certificate or diploma, or a degree programme.

Centre for Flexible Learning, C1, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: 01227 827647 E: ccs@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/cfl

The programme will allow you to claim academic credit for training or courses you have already completed. This credit claim is called the Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL), and you can claim up to 50% of the credit for the workbased learning programme through APL. Work-based learning is increasingly popular due to its flexibility and tailor-made approach as it allows people who don’t necessarily have enough time outside work for studying to gain graduate-level training and skills focused on learning in the workplace. The Applied Professional Practice programme is run on a part-time basis only. Entry is directly through the University. You can find further details of the programme in our Part-time Programmes at Kent prospectus or on our website.

Certificate in Combined Studies modules run on the Canterbury and Medway campuses, at our University centre in Tonbridge and at Adult Education Centres and other locations across Kent. For specific advice or guidance on studying any of the Combined Studies modules, please contact the Centre for Flexible Learning office at the address below. There are further details of all the part-time options in our Part-time Programmes at Kent prospectus, in The Certificate in Combined Studies Programme prospectus, and on our website at www.kent.ac.uk/studying You can order a copy of these prospectuses from www.kent.ac.uk/studying/form.html

Further information Centre for Professional Practice Applied Professional Practice Programme, Medway Building, University of Kent, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG T: 01634 888953 E: cpp@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/cpp

Day Schools Day Schools allow you to spend time exploring a subject purely for the pleasure of learning, in the company of other people who share your interests and are similarly motivated. Day Schools run on Saturdays in Canterbury, Medway and Tonbridge. For further details and an online booking form, see our website www.kent.ac.uk/dayschools or request a copy of the Day Schools programme leaflet.

Further information T: 01227 823662

Open Studies short courses Open Studies take the form of short courses of varying lengths from a day to a few weeks. They are an ideal starting point for those who wish to gain the confidence to study for credit, for example, on the CCS programme. Of course, they can also be taken entirely for pleasure. For further details and an online booking form, see our website www.kent.ac.uk/studying or request the Open Studies Short Courses booklet.

Further information

“I am a mature student and had not been to university before. The support given on how to format an essay and to use referencing systems is excellent.”

Centre for Flexible Learning, C1, Keynes College, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NP T: 01227 827647 E: cfl@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/cfl

Jo Griffiths Health and Social Care Practice 303


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In this section 306 Fees and costs 310 Financial support

Fees and funding

Chris Henry Politics and International Relations What attracted you to Kent? I was really keen to go to Japan as part of my course and, as Kent was one of the only universities to offer this as an option, my choice was narrowed for me. The course at Kent also has a really good mix of international relations (where you learn about how other countries interact with each other), British politics and political philosophy – which I’m particularly interested in. The University ranks very highly in its research output and this means that you know that you are learning and talking about the issues that you want to with some of the leading academics in the field. On top of that, the campus had a nicer atmosphere than any other university I was looking at. When I came to visit some friends who were already studying here, it seemed like somewhere that I could go and get good work done, but my friends also showed me a couple of really good nights out to balance out the studying.

How have you found campus life? In my first year at Kent, I don’t think I stepped off campus more than four times in the first term – there was no need to! The campus shop, off-licence and bookshop provided

everything I required to live on and get my course materials, as well as the many bars, restaurants and nightclub providing all the relaxation I needed! It was only later on that I began to really appreciate how many other services were available. Academic support is provided by both Kent Union and the University, a jobshop provides a central access point for job hunting around Canterbury, and there’s even a laptop and computer repair service, which sorts out technical problems cheaply!

What has been the highlight? Perhaps the one thing I have enjoyed most at Kent is the satisfaction of knowing that I (and no-one else) have been responsible for everything I’ve done at University and the pride that comes with each new personal achievement. The first ‘1st grade’ essay, being elected as a course representative for over 400 people, each campus tour I’ve lead and living in Japan for a year were all as the result of my efforts, and this is very different to living with your parents when you are back at school. As with the different style of working at a university, the sudden independence of being here can seem intimidating at first, but looking back at what I’ve done and looking forward to the opportunities in front of me are some of the best and most rewarding feelings in my life.

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Fees and funding Fees and costs

Fees and costs Student finance is an incredibly important area. It is also very complex, and the amount of funding you may receive, and spend, during your time at university depends entirely on your individual circumstances. These pages give a very general idea of the type of costs you might incur, and how you can fund your time in higher education. Generally, the figures quoted are for the 2009/10 academic year unless stated otherwise, and cover the period of one academic year.

Is university education worth it? Graduates are able to choose from a wider range of professions and are more likely to start at a higher level or progress faster within a company than a non-graduate. Graduates earn 46% more than non-graduates, and the average lifetime earnings of a graduate are £160,000 more than a non-graduate who holds two A levels. In 2008, the average starting salary was approximately £24,048 per year. Kent has an excellent record of graduate employability and is regularly in the national top 20 for graduate starting salaries. In 2008, six months after graduation, only 4.8% of Kent graduates were without a job or study opportunity.

A Kent degree trains you in your chosen subject, can open up new areas of study, gives you the opportunity to gain extra expertise such as a language or in computing, and provides you with a tool kit of skills valued by potential employers. In addition, our students also value what we call the ‘Kent experience’ – the whole package of living and learning at a university for three or four years.

Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications (ELQ) The Government has announced that it will no longer provide funding for students who wish to study a higher education qualification that is equivalent to, or at a lower level than one they have already achieved. The University will therefore charge a different (higher) rate of tuition fees to students who already have such qualifications. Please see p229 for more details or visit www.kent.ac.uk/studying/ funding/elq.html

What is included in the costs? The cost of studying at university is made up of two main categories: academic costs and living or maintenance costs. Costs can vary tremendously depending on your course, where you live and what you like to do.

Tuition fees The main academic cost is tuition fees. Kent’s tuition fees are £3,290 for 2010/2011 for home and EU students on full-time degree-level courses. International students’ fees had not yet been finalised at time of going to press, but for the 2009/2010 academic year were £10,350 for non-laboratory courses, £12,590 for laboratory courses, £12,590 for Architecture and £9,000 for foundation year programmes. Students taking full-time courses on a part-time basis of 50% of the course pay fees pro rata. Other part-time courses are priced on an individual basis and you can find these costs in Part-Time Programmes at Kent.

Books, course materials and computers Academic costs also include books and course materials, including computer printer credits and photocopying. These can vary widely depending on what subject you study, and the bulk of the expenditure generally comes in the first term, but you can reduce costs by buying secondhand books.

Studying abroad Students on Erasmus exchange schemes (see p326) do not currently pay any fees as part of the year abroad. Students spending a year in places or countries outside the scheme may have to pay some fees for the year abroad.

“If you are thinking of going to university I would say ‘go, don’t be put off by tuition fees’. I am doing something that I really enjoy and having the time of my life.” Arjun Mittra Accounting & Finance

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Fees and funding Fees and costs

Living costs

Food

Living costs include things such as accommodation, food, clothes, laundry, socialising, travel and emergencies. The costs listed below are for the academic year 2009/10. We have produced a living costs calculator on our website, which you can use to make a rough estimate of the expenses you may incur while studying at Kent. See www.kent.ac.uk/livingcosts

The amount you spend on food varies according to what sort of accommodation you live in and personal taste. Students living in college ‘bed and breakfast’ accommodation can prepare drinks and snacks in small kitchenettes, but have to buy their other daily meals. If you live in selfcatering accommodation (on a 39-week lease or off campus on a 52-week lease), you must buy all your own food, although you can of course take advantage of campus catering. The average figure could be between £27.50 and £55 per week.

Accommodation Costs for accommodation at Canterbury (see p238) range from £89 per week for a self-catering room up to £163.33 per week for an en-suite room. For example, a standard college room costing £106.11 per week for a 31-week rental would amount to £3,289 for the year. If you are living in college, the cost of breakfast (or part of another meal) is included in the rent. Students living in the Liberty Quays accommodation at Medway (see p264) will pay £100 per week. This includes all utility charges and personal contents insurance. Students in private accommodation pay between £70 and £85 per week, for a 52-week rental, plus costs for electricity, gas and water. See www.kent.ac.uk/hospitality for a full list of accommodation costs.

“The social life is excellent; we have the Venue nightclub, lots of bars on campus, the theatre and restaurants. It’s cheap here as well.” Laina Shah Social Policy and Public Sector Management

Parking on both campuses, for students living off campus and travelling in, is £20 or £30 per year, but there are strict parking restrictions on the Canterbury campus. For current guidance and information regarding parking on campus, see www.kent.ac.uk/estates/transport/parking All full-time students can apply for a railcard, which gives reductions for travel in off-peak periods, and can get you subsidised bus and coach travel.

Insurance

We estimate a reasonable cost of up to £30 per week for laundry plus clothing. Costs of personal items (for example, toiletries) vary considerably from individual to individual, but we estimate between £5 and £10 per week.

We strongly recommend that you insure your valuables such as laptops, TVs and mobile phones, and it goes without saying that you should insure cars and motorbikes. Students living in privately rented off-campus accommodation may also have to pay housing insurance.

Socialising and entertainment

Other costs

We suggest about £25 per week. Of course you can spend much more (or less!) depending on how often you go out and where you go. If you bring a television to University, or want to use our IPTV service, you should have a TV licence, which is £48 for black and white and £142.50 for colour. You also need to think about the cost of your mobile phone.

This isn’t an exhaustive list of costs you may need to meet during your time at university. You should think about any other maintenance costs, and the Kent Union Student Advice Centre recommends that you allow a certain amount of money for emergencies.

Clothing, laundry and personal items

Travel Normally you have two types of travel costs: daily costs and costs for travelling home or away on visits. Students living on the Canterbury campus do not normally incur daily travel costs, as everything is within walking distance. If you are living off campus in both Canterbury and Medway, your travel costs will vary depending on distance, the time of travel and the number of days you need to attend your course. For instance, students on laboratory courses are likely to be on site for most of the day, five days a week. 309


Fees and funding Financial support

Financial support The University provides a generous package of financial support for students. This includes bursaries for students from lower income households, and a range of scholarships awarded for academic, musical and sporting excellence which are open to all students (see p321 for details.) Government support is generally for UK/EU students or UK students only. The precise amount varies depending on your or your household’s circumstances, so you should contact your local authority to get an exact calculation of the amount that you are entitled to.

per year. If your or your household’s residual income is below £25,000, you may qualify for a full grant, or for a partial grant if it is between £25,001 and £50,020. The grant does not have to be repaid.

The figures quoted here are for the 2010/11 academic year unless otherwise stated.

The special support grant is up to a maximum £2,906 and is assessed against exactly the same income criteria as the maintenance grant. The only difference is that the grant entitles students to an increased student loan for maintenance.

Deferred payment of tuition fees Home fee-paying students do not need to pay the £3,290 tuition fee up front. If you are a UK student, you can take out a student loan to cover the tuition fees charged while you are in higher education, and the government then pays the fees directly to the University. You start paying back the loan after you have finished studying and are earning more than £15,000 a year. The rate of repayment is linked to your income. EU (non-UK) students can apply for help towards fees subject to eligibility and financial assessment at www.dcsf.gov.uk/studentsupport

Grant for living costs The maintenance grant is for UK students from lower income households to help with living costs. The grant is up to a maximum of £2,906 310

Residual income is your or your household’s gross income, less certain allowances. The exact amount varies according to individual circumstances and is calculated by your local authority. The government has not yet finalised amounts for 2010.

Special support grant The special support grant is again for UK students (and eligible EU students) from lower income households, who are lone parents with dependent children, have dependent children and a partner who is also a student, who are aged 60 or over, or who are eligible for certain disability benefits.

For 2010/2011, the maximum student loans for students living outside London are: Students living away from home Students living at home

£4,950 £3,838

Part-time students For 2010/2011, part-time students are entitled to two types of grant: a grant of up to £1,230 to cover fees (UK and EU students) and a grant of £265 towards course costs such as travel, books and other costs (UK students only). The amount you can claim depends on the level at which you are studying; see the table below.

% of full-time course Course Course Max fees costs grant grant grant 50-59% 60-74% 75%

£820 £265 £985 £265 £1,230 £265

£1,085 £1,250 £1,495

In 2010/2011, part-time students whose household income is £16,845 or less qualify for the full grant, and partial support is available to students earning between £16,846 and £25,419.

Student loan for living costs

Other special grants

UK students can apply for a student loan to cover living costs, in addition to the grant for maintenance and the loan for tuition fees. How much you can borrow depends on the level of the maintenance grant or special support grant to which you are entitled. 72% of this amount is your basic entitlement regardless of any other income, and the remaining 28% is means tested by your local authority, based on your household income.

The government provides a number of grants for UK students with extra needs. These include allowances for disabled students, for students with adult dependants, and two types of grant for student parents – the childcare grant and parents’ learning allowance, or child tax credits. Some students who are entitled to special grants may also be entitled to other government allowances such as income support, housing benefit or working tax credit. Again, this depends on your individual circumstances.

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Students from outside the EU

Other sources of financial help

Students from outside the UK and EU pay higher tuition fees. However, if you live overseas you can usually get information on scholarships from your Ministry of Education, inter-university organisations, or from the British Council.

Further sources of funding could include: student accounts with interest-free overdrafts, career development loans (for up to two years vocational education) and charitable trusts – although these are national trusts and competition for help is stiff.

Term-time and holiday working Most students find a term-time or holiday job to supplement grant income, and Kent’s Jobshop is an excellent source of part-time paid work. We would expect students to do up to 15 hours paid work per week.

University bursaries and scholarships

At the minimum wage (£4.83 an hour for workers aged 18-21), we hope you would earn enough to more or less cover the costs of your socialising! There are more details about the Jobshop on p317.

The University awards scholarships totalling £3 million every year. University scholarships are awarded for academic, musical and sporting excellence and are open to all students regardless of household income. (See p321.)

Extra financial support

Repayments

The main source of extra help for UK students is the Access to Learning Fund (ALF). The ALF is for full-time students and part-time students taking 50% or more of an equivalent full-time course who are on a low income and may need extra support for the course. The Fund can help you if you are in financial hardship, have unexpected emergency costs, or if you are thinking of giving up your course because of financial difficulties. The ALF does not cover tuition fees.

The government maintenance grant and special support grant, University of Kent bursaries and scholarships, grants from the Access to Learning Fund and special grants and allowances do not need to be repaid.

The University assesses the amount you get according to individual circumstances. Kent Master’s also have a loan fund from which they can lend students up to a maximum of £200 to cover essential expenses when all other sources of funding have been exhausted, and access to Tyme Grants (Medway students only), which are also up to £200.

Kent offers bursaries aimed at students from lower income households at approximately three times the rate required by government, with a full award of £1,000 per year. (See p321.)

The student loan for tuition fees and the student loan for living costs do need to be repaid, but you do not have to start paying anything back until the April after you have left your course. The rate of repayment is linked to your income, and starts when you are earning £15,000 or more. You pay a percentage of your income above £15,000. The percentage is currently set at 9%.

Further information Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 F: 01227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Kent Union Student Advice Centre, Mandela Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NW T: 01227 824216 E: advice@kent.ac.uk www.kentunion.co.uk/pages/support Financial Aid Office, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 823488/824876 F: 01227 827024 E: financialaid@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student Student Loans Company Limited, 100 Bothwell Street, Glasgow, G2 7JD T: 0800 405010 (Freephone) www.slc.co.uk Department for Business, Innovation and Skills General Information Line T: 0870 0010 336 www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

“The whole experience has made me appreciate things more; for me it has made me think about the cost of living and budgeting. I feel lucky that I can do this and come out with a degree. ” Helen Bluck Anthropology

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In this section 316 320 324 328

Jobs and employability University funding for students International opportunities Working in industry

Kent gives you added value These are just some of the added extras that students benefit from at Kent.

Mansoor Shar Computer Science with a Year in Industry

Which parts of the course have you most enjoyed?

What attracted you to Kent?

I’ve generally enjoyed all the modules I’ve studied – even the ones I didn’t do so well in as they’ve taught me to learn from my mistakes and improve the way I work next time.

I’m intrigued by science and technology in general, and so chose a Computer Science degree to satisfy this curiosity and help me gain a better understanding of the world. I felt Kent was the best option for studying this subject. I think doing this course at this University will give me an advantage when applying for a job as Kent really does provide the right kind of environment for those aiming to move on to a good career.

I spent my year in industry at an asset management firm, where I worked as a junior developer, working on projects for the company and its clients – I thoroughly enjoyed the experiences I had there. By working in a real-world environment and doing work that I could be undertaking after I graduate, I developed a greater awareness of the industry and what working in it is really like.

The student lifestyle here is very good and the people are great! Not to mention the city itself, which is a truly great place to study.

I also feel that the year in industry has given me a head start when looking for a job. The year has profoundly affected the way I tackle my final year and I have a better understanding of the sort of jobs to look for and how best to approach the employer.

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Kent gives you added value Jobs and employability

Jobs and employability Employers are looking for more than just academic knowledge: they expect you to use your time at university to gain employability and life skills.

Paid work at university Paid work through temporary or part-time jobs helps to meet your living costs and gives you the opportunity to gain practical experience and work-related skills while you are studying.

Jobshop staff provide information on National Insurance, CVs for part-time work, finding a summer job, international student status and other employment advice. Generally, we advise students to take up to 15 hours of paid work a week during term-time.

Jobshop At Kent, the University, Universities at Medway Students’ Association (UMSA) and Kent Union (the Students’ Union) work together to offer you a comprehensive package of volunteering opportunities, paid work and careers advice to enhance your employability upon graduation. Kent also gives you opportunities to strengthen your CV by studying abroad, going on a sandwich year, or taking a module in Enterprise, in addition to the transferable skills training you get on your course. Kent has its own student website, RoundOne, which promotes all the employability events on campus. It’s easy to see why; in 2008, only 4.8% of Kent graduates were still looking for a job six months after graduation. This puts us well ahead of the national average, which is 8%.

Jobshop@kent is run by Kent Union and can provide part-time or temporary work for students. In the 2008/9 academic year, over 4,000 students registered with Jobshop@kent, and approximately 3,000 vacancies were advertised including IT support workers, web developers, market researchers, personal tutors, bar and waiting staff, child carers and publishing assistants. In addition to advertising vacancies for local employers, jobshop@kent also places students in temporary roles through its agency-style service and utilises the students’ language skills by employing them as translators. The vacancies are displayed in the Jobshop centres on the Canterbury campus or Medway campus, where you can drop in for advice, or on our regularly updated website so that you have access to them 24/7, and you can register with us online.

Did you know? s in the Kent regularly feature highest for y ntr cou the in 20 top according s, arie sal g rtin sta e averag iversity Un od Go es to the The Tim Guide 2010.

Volunteering Volunteering is an opportunity to put into practice things you learn whilst studying, or to try something new. You can volunteer to do practically anything, such as school tutoring, working with the elderly, mentally or physically disabled, conservation or stewarding at concerts. Kent Union can arrange for placements locally to where you live, and by arranging your hours with your placement you can be sure it fits in with your studies. These are some of the specific ways in which you can volunteer. • Student media – magazines, Canterbury Student Radio (the UK’s first student run community FM radio station), or Kent Student Cinema, which runs alongside the Gulbenkian Cinema. • Societies – join and help run some of the many student societies. • Course reps – most courses have student representatives who give input into how the programmes are run on behalf of the other students on the course. • RAG (raise and give) fundraising – a chance for you to do completely off-the-wall things while raising money for charity, or get involved in planning major events.

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Kent gives you added value Jobs and employability

Kent Union and the University also run the KSCV – the Kent Student Certificate for Volunteering. The Certificate formally acknowledges the efforts of student volunteers and can help build your CV and skills profile. An advanced KSCV can even lead to credits towards your degree programme.

through your studies, work experience and other interests can help you to make career decisions. This helps you to make a good start in your career planning and, along with the other support and resources we offer, to continue this process throughout your time at university. This support includes:

www.kentunionvolunteering.co.uk

Careers advice The Careers Advisory Service is available at any stage of your studies for advice and information on your options after you graduate. These options may include employment, further study or time out before making a career decision. The careers advisers at the University of Kent are not here to tell you what you ‘should’ do; our role is to provide a full range of information, advice and guidance to help you come to your own decisions. We believe that choosing a career is a process, not an event, that all aspects of your time at university contribute to that process and that it should begin as early as possible. We therefore distribute a careers pack to all firstyear students to introduce the Careers Advisory Service and to advise on how the skills gained

“There are careers talks, external firms are coming in recruiting, different careers fairs, posters, booklets – if you want it there is lots of help.” Suzan Doerr Economics 318

• an extensive website that includes introductory information on 90 popular graduate careers and also covers topics such as career choice, employability skills, work experience, and postgraduate study • an online vacancy database with a wide range of local and national employment opportunities • a well-stocked Careers Information Room, providing reading material on occupations, employers, job-seeking skills and much more • personal advice and guidance from careers advisers including in-depth vocational guidance interviews and a ‘drop-in’ service to help students with quick queries • careers education programmes and information linked to specific degree subjects • talks and seminars on general topics related to choosing a career and opportunities for graduates • help with developing employability skills through work experience, including careerrelated vacation experience • talks and workshops on job-seeking and selection, with advice on making successful applications and honing your interview technique • visits and talks from graduate employers • help with CVs, application forms and interview preparation • information on graduate destinations • an Alumni Careers Network that puts you in touch with Kent graduates for a first-hand insight into careers.

Enterprise module Enterprise module (CB612) and Year in Industry Business Start-up Scheme (YIBSS) In the second or third year it is possible for anyone with a wild option to take the CB612 module on how to set up a new business. As part of the module you produce a business plan for a theoretical new enterprise to a standard that would meet the requirements of most lending banks or potential investors. It is also possible to actually set up your own business while at Kent. As well as supporting students with innovative ideas, we also run the Year in Industry Business Start-up Scheme (YIBSS). The aim is to provide support and resources to you, as a student, to develop and roll-out your business ideas.

Further information Jobshop and volunteering Kent Union Activities Manager, Student Activities Centre, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7UG T: 01227 824251 E: kentunion@kent.ac.uk www.kentunion.co.uk www.kentunionjobshop.co.uk

Careers advice Canterbury Careers Advisory Service, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7ND T: 01227 823480/823481

Medway Gillingham Building, Chatham Maritime, Kent ME4 4AG T: 01634 888876 www.kent.ac.uk/careers


319


320


Kent gives you added value University funding for students

University funding for students At Kent we believe that all students who can benefit from our courses should have the opportunity to come to university so we have put together a generous package of non-repayable bursaries and scholarships. Bursaries are aimed at UK students from lower income households, while scholarships are open to all full-time students regardless of household income and are awarded on merit. Unlike student loans, neither bursaries nor scholarships have to be repaid. You can hold a University bursary and a scholarship at the same time. University of Kent bursaries (UK full-time undergraduates) Bursaries are financial support for UK full-time undergraduates from lower income households. Kent has put in place a generous range of bursaries approximately three times the rate required by the government, with a full award of £1,000 per year. In addition, we know that students from households on the borderline of receiving a full maintenance grant also need additional financial support. Therefore we provide the full bursary funding to students with a residual household income of up to £25,000 and support to students with a residual household income of less than £40,000 per year. £0 – £25,000 £25,001 – £28,500 £28,501 – £34,000 £34,001 – £40,000

£1,000 £750 £500 £250

The bursaries are payable in cash and can be used either towards tuition fees or living costs. You can estimate the amount you are entitled to using the ready reckoner on our website at www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student/estimatesupport/index.html

Further information and applications www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/undergraduate/ ug_study_abroad_scholarship.html

Further information www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student/bursaries

The University of Kent offers a range of sports scholarships for students who excel in their particular sport.

Sports scholarships (All full-time students)

University scholarships Scholarships are open to all full-time students regardless of household income, and are awarded on merit.

University scholarships for academic excellence (UK/EU full-time undergraduates) Each academic school at Kent offers one scholarship of £1,000. They are awarded for one year in the first instance, and are renewable for the duration of a degree programme. The scholarships are awarded on the basis of academic attainment (tariff points) and an essay or project work on a selected topic. Further information and applications www.kent.ac.uk/ugfunding

Applicants must be registered to study at the University and be committed to participating in University sport. All applications are submitted to the Sports Scholarship Committee, which considers each case on its own merit and determines the size of scholarship awarded. The decision of this committee is final. The scholarships available are: • University of Kent Scholarships of between £250 – £5,000 are available for all sportsmen/ women from any sport. Applicants must demonstrate a high level of performance and commitment to their chosen sport and represent the University in BUCS competitions. Minimum standard is playing at County level.

Study abroad scholarships (UK/EU full-time undergraduates)

Did you know?

The University of Kent is proud of the extensive opportunities we offer to allow students to study abroad as part of their undergraduate degree. A full academic year is offered as an integral part of our special four-year degrees.

scholarships The University awards year. ry eve lion mil £3 totalling

As the UK’s European university, we offer a specific scholarship of £2,000 to support students who are studying abroad. The scholarship is awarded on the submission of an essay on a selected topic.

Continued overleaf 321


Kent gives you added value University funding for students

• Partnerships The University of Kent endeavours to forge partnerships with highly rated local sports clubs to help retain sporting talent in Kent. The aim of these partnerships is to offer athletes a high standard of training and playing competition, which will enhance their overall performance.

University music scholarships

Partner school scholarships

Patron: Dame Anne Evans (All full-time students)

Partner school scholarships are awarded to eligible students from partner schools and colleges of the University. Partner scholarships are worth £1,000 per year for the duration of a full-time undergraduate degree programme studied at the University of Kent.

Partnerships currently exist with the following sports:

University Music Scholarships worth up to £5,000 per year, and Music Lesson Scholarships, which enable students to continue with their instrumental and vocal tuition.

You can apply for a partner scholarship if you currently attend one of the University’s partner schools or colleges and you have applied to the University of Kent for a full-time undergraduate programme.

For further information and an application form, see www.kent.ac.uk/music/scholarships.html

A full list of partner schools can be found at www.kent.ac.uk/schools/partner/schools.html

Loyalty scheme

Funding for non-EU international students

Cricket The J & K Huntley Scholarship of £2,500 per year is offered to applicants who are willing to register and play for Kent County Cricket Club (KCCC). The selection for this scholarship is made between the University and KCCC. Rugby In partnership with Canterbury Rugby Club, the University offers two rugby scholarships of up to £2,000. The successful applicants will be of a high enough standard to represent both the University’s and Canterbury Rugby Club’s first teams. Hockey The University offers in partnership with Canterbury Ladies’, Canterbury Men’s, Maidstone, Holcombe & Old Bordenians Hockey clubs scholarships of up to £2,000 per year. Successful applicants will be able to represent both the University and the hockey clubs’ first teams. Our partners make the selections for these scholarships. Further information For further information on criteria, what support is available to scholars, and an application form, visit www.kent.ac.uk/sports/scholarships

Kent offers two different kinds of music scholarship to talented instrumentalists and singers applying for any degree.

The University has set up a loyalty discount scheme for students whose parents or sisters or brothers have also studied for degrees at Kent. The scheme offers a discount of 10% on the first year’s tuition fee on registration and payment of tuition fees. Further information www.kent.ac.uk/finance-student/fees/ loyaltydiscount.html

The University offers a number of generous scholarships for our international students at undergraduate level. The scholarships will be worth £5,000 per annum (for up to three years of study) towards the cost of tuition fees and are offered to nationals of any country paying international fees.

Hong Kong Alumni scholarship This scholarship is for outstanding students from mainland China or Hong Kong. The awards are £15,000 for the year of entry and renewable for up to a total of three years.

“I would say don’t worry about the fees. It is all about learning something totally new, making friends and having fun and really I would recommend university to anybody who is thinking about it.” Ryan King Accounting & Finance

322

Overseas scholarships

Loyalty scheme International students are also eligible for the University’s loyalty scheme. See left for details. Further information www.kent.ac.uk/international/funding/ scholarships.html


323


324


Kent gives you added value International opportunities

International opportunities Kent’s links with prestigious universities and leading business organisations around the world open up a range of possibilities for our students. From a period of study at a top university in France or the USA, to an exciting work placement at a high profile business in Japan, Kent literally offers a world of opportunities to internationalise your education.

“While tackling a variety of tasks and learning about office life is already useful for any future career, the fact that the office is in Brussels is an incredible bonus and I would especially recommend this post to anybody studying or interested in languages, politics or European studies. This job gave me the chance to visit the places where European policy is debated and implemented, as well as to meet the people who make things happen in Europe.” Chris White Stagiaire Placement – Kent County Council Brussels Office

Why add an ‘international element’ to your degree? Adding an international placement is an excellent way of enhancing your CV and gaining valuable skills that will impress future employers. ‘A third of employers view a graduate with any overseas study experience as more employable. Sixty-five per cent of international employers indicate that having overseas professional work experience makes graduates more employable’ (CIHE and i-graduate).

A different way of doing things Studying abroad gives you the chance to learn in a different environment and context at one of Kent’s partner universities. By approaching your subject from the point of view of a different culture you gain new insights which will help you in your further study. While working abroad, the valuable international work experience you gain will help you to stand out when applying for your first job.

Stand out in the job market

Reduced tuition fees

The valuable international work experience you gain while working abroad will help you to stand out when applying for your first job. The fact that you’ve spent time in another country shows prospective employers that you’re adaptable, resourceful and independent, all the key skills they are looking for.

If you are studying or working abroad for a full academic year under the Erasmus programme and are classed as a UK or EU student, you do not pay tuition fees while you are abroad. In addition, you are likely to be eligible for an Erasmus grant for the period spent abroad.

In today’s international job market, you will be competing with people from all around the world so demonstrating that you have an international perspective enables you to compete more effectively.

Gain new skills and experience There is no doubt that living and travelling abroad broadens your outlook. Studying or working abroad teaches you lots of new skills and you’ll never forget the amazing experiences you have. Many students tell us that their time abroad was the best part of their course.

Improve your language skills A year studying or working in a foreign country will improve your language skills significantly. Even if your placement is one where the teaching is in English, you will absorb some of the local language. Those following degrees where the study abroad element is in the local language are given language preparation as part of their course.

Periods abroad not covered by the Erasmus scheme, such as those outside Europe, incur reduced tuition fees for the period abroad. You pay 50% of the tuition fee you would normally pay to Kent. This information is correct at the time of going to print.

Did you know? e noted a rise Academic schools hav formance after per t den stu r yea in final r studying or yea a nds a student spe working abroad.

325


Kent gives you added value International opportunities

How do I include an ‘international element’ in my degree? If your course offers you the opportunity to study or work abroad, this will be highlighted on each individual course page.

For more information, see www.kent.ac.uk/european or contact the European office (see right).

Further information European Office

*Funded by the EU, whose support the University gratefully acknowledges.

T: +44 1227 827818/824042 F: +44 1227 827115 E: euroff@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/goabroad

Study and work placements outside Europe

International Office

A number of programmes offer the chance to study for a year in the USA, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Thailand, Uruguay, Argentina and Canada. Kent offers language courses in Chinese, Japanese and Spanish, which you can take in the year before you go.

(for information about Argentina, Canada, China, Hong Kong, Japan, Thailand, Uruguay and the USA) T: +44 1227 827994 or +44 1227 823095 F: +44 1227 823247 E: international-office@kent.ac.uk www.kent.ac.uk/goabroad

Study and work placements in Europe The European Union’s Erasmus programme* gives you the opportunity to do your study or work placement in one of the EU or EEA member states and, if you are from the EU, receive an Erasmus grant for the period spent abroad. On study placements, depending on your degree, courses are taught either in English or in the local language. Where the teaching takes place in the local language, you are given language preparation as part of your degree before you go. For a list of courses, including study abroad placements in Europe, see www.kent.ac.uk/goabroad If you are taking a single or joint honours degree in one of our modern languages, or European Studies, there is also the possibility of working as an English language assistant in a school abroad.

Did you know? rk abroad Kent offers study or wo , Canada, ina ent Arg in ties opportuni Thailand, an, Jap g, Kon China, Hong ll as we as y, gua the USA and Uru Europe nd inla ma in es ntri cou m, the Czech including Austria, Belgiu d, France, lan Fin , ark nm Republic, De lta, the Ma y, Ital , Germany, Greece Poland, Spain, y, rwa No ds, rlan the Ne d. Sweden, and Switzerlan 326

“The best thing about my placement was the opportunity to live and work in Hong Kong. The business environment is exciting and fast paced, the people are extremely welcoming and the cuisine of the region is absolutely phenomenal. I had an awesome time.” Richard Cohen Computer Science with a Year in Industry


327


Kent gives you added value Working in industry

Working in industry Kent offers a number of different ways of gaining work experience while you are studying at the University. What are the benefits? Employment skills Prior experience working in industry is always popular with employers when you come to look for a job after your degree, and some students have returned to work full-time for their industrial placement company.

Greater subject knowledge The vast majority of students who take this option come back to the University with increased enthusiasm and subject knowledge, applying their work experience to future study.

Earning a salary Students spending a year in industry earn a salary for the year – always helpful in for paying costs. The salary varies depending on the industry and the company, but typically students can earn between £14,000 and £25,000. Students only pay a quarter of the home fees rate for their year in industry – no matter where they are from. If the placement is taken as part of an Erasmus year, it is a possibility that the fees will be waived.

Sandwich courses

International work opportunities

The sandwich course is an excellent way of immersing yourself in the working world. It gives you hands-on experience, teaches you new skills and allows you to put into practice what you have learned. While applying for your placement, you will have the support and guidance of your department, the Careers Advisory Service and the University’s Placement Officer. While you are on your placement, your department keeps in touch with you, offering support and advice should you need it. Previous students have worked in hospital research laboratories, forensic science laboratories (Biosciences), IBM, Intel, Microsoft (Computer Science), Arthur Andersen Business Consulting, Esso Petroleum, British Airways (Kent Business School), the NHS and the Home Office (Psychology).

Many Kent students spend part of their degree in a professional placement outside the UK. Countries that Kent students have been to in the past year include Hong Kong, Japan, the US, China, Mexico, Austria, France, Belgium and Luxembourg. For placements in continental Europe, you could be eligible for an Erasmus grant in addition to your salary. For more information, see www.kent.ac.uk/european/study/erasmus

You will be required to undertake some academic work, such as a report on your sandwich year, as these marks contribute towards your final degree result.

Applied Professional Practice is a new part-time joint honours degree that offers the opportunity for you to use your workplace as the main place of study and learning. You can gain academic credit for existing knowledge and skills. See p32 for more details. For more information on work placements, please contact the Placements Officer on placements@kent.ac.uk or visit www.kent.ac.uk/enterprise

Shorter work placements Degrees such as Social Work or Health and Social Care Practice require students to spend time in work placements as an integral part of their course. An increasing number of degrees such as Business Studies offer modules during which you spend very short periods on work observations or work with ‘real-life’ problems. Kent Law Clinic, Kent IT Clinic and the Centre for Sports Studies clinic offer the chance to gain experience working for clients. There is also a growing trend towards ‘vacation placements’, where students use their vacation time to gain relevant experience in the world of work. The Kent Careers Advisory Service offers help and advice to students considering vacation placements. For more information, see www.kent.ac.uk/careers

328

Learning through work

“I chose to do the four-year forensic science with a year in industry degree, which gave me the opportunity to work in a laboratory for 12 months, gaining practical and analytical experience. Most forensic jobs require previous laboratory experience, so I have no doubt that this has greatly strengthened my future career prospects.” Rachel Wellington Forensic Sciences


329


330


In this section 332 Honours degree quick reference guide 354 Glossary 362 Index

Quick reference guide, glossary and index Stephanie Ham Religious Studies and Philosophy What attracted you to Kent? I visited Kent during an open day and was impressed by the physical structure of the University, the way the course is run, and what I would be studying. The campus is beautiful, the staff and students seemed friendly, and Kent is close enough to home for me to commute, which is an added bonus. The best thing about being at Kent is the diversity of people that I’ve met – I already feel that I have made friends for life. It’s great that there are many ways to get involved in University life, such as being a part of Kent Union and representing students on your course or in the community.

How is your course going? I’m really enjoying the course, especially the Philosophy seminars where we often have a philosophical debate. I am pleased that I can do a broad degree, with elements of Philosophy, Religious Studies and Spanish (via my wild modules in Learning Spanish). The most interesting things I’ve learnt so far are the history of religious traditions and the background behind schools of thought in philosophy. I find the lectures very informative and the lecturers always provide us with the background

information so that we gain a full understanding of a topic or idea, such as a particular philosophical movement. The lecturers are really helpful and approachable, and treat their undergraduate students as their equals, which really adds to the success of the course. We are also each assigned a personal tutor, who we can chat to if we need pastoral or academic support, or just someone to talk to.

How would you describe the social scene? There's something for everyone: there are various bars catering to different tastes in music, food and drink, as well as our own student nightclub, The Venue. There are also hundreds of different clubs and societies. Kent is like a village – it has everything you need, from bars to banks and shops.

Do you have any advice for anyone thinking of coming to Kent? It’s important to think carefully about the course and the University, and to visit the University as many times as possible to get a feel for the place. I think any prospective student should talk to University staff and students, and to go with their instinct. I felt that Kent was a place I would feel at home and that the course would be enjoyable. Now that I’m here, I love it!

331


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

Accounting and Finance – Canterbury Accounting & Finance Accounting & Finance with a Year in Industry

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

24 N400 N404

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

BB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above)

Multidisciplinary honours Accounting & Finance with Computing Accounting & Finance with French Business Studies

N4G4 N4N1

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

Accounting & Finance with German

N402

4

N

320

33/16

British and French Accounting

N403

4

N

320

33/16

(as above) BB at A level inc French grade B where taken or GCSE in a modern European language other than English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB/BC at A level inc German grade B/C +GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc French grade B or GCSE in a modern European language other than English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade B

Joint honours Accounting & Finance and Business Administration Accounting & Finance and Computing Accounting & Finance and Economics Accounting & Finance and Law Accounting & Finance and Management Science

NN42 GN44 LN14 NM41 NN24

3 3 3 4 3

N N N N N

320 320 320 AAB 320

33/16 33/16 33/16 33/16 33/16

Accounting & Finance and Mathematics

GN14

3

N

300

33/15

Actuarial Science – Canterbury Actuarial Science

N323

3

N

360

33/17

Actuarial Science with a Year in Industry

N324

4

N

360

33/17

American Studies – Canterbury American Studies American Studies (History) American Studies (Literature)

T702 T701 T700

3 4 4

N N N

320 320 320

33/16 33/16 33/16

BB at A level BB at A level inc History grade B BB at A level inc English Literature grade B

Anthropology – Canterbury Anthropology

L601

3

N

300

33/15

Anthropology with a Year in Europe

L603

4

N

300

33/15

Anthropology with a Year in Japan

L604

4

N

AAB

33/16

BB at A level inc A level language grade B for some variants + GCSE Mathematics grade C + GCSE single science grade B BB at A level inc A level language grade B for some variants + GCSE Mathematics grade C + GCSE single science grade B A level science (Biology preferred) + GCSE Mathematics grade C + GCSE single science grade B

332

BB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above) (as above) GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Mathematics/Statistics/Economics/ Physics or + AS level grade C in quantitative subject + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Mathematics grade B (not A level Use of Mathematics) 26 AA at A level inc Mathematics grade A (not A level Use of Mathematics) AA at A level inc Mathematics grade A (not A level Use of Mathematics) 28

30


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

Joint honours Archaeology and Anthropology

UCAS F/T codes yrs

QL86

Applied Professional Practice – Canterbury or Medway Applied Professional Practice N/A

P/T

3

N

Y

Y

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

320

AB at A level inc Classical Studies, Classical Civilisation or Archaeology grade B where taken

33/16

Page number

32 No pre-requisites but the academic modules chosen may require specific prior qualifications

Architecture – Canterbury BA (Hons) Architecture

34 K100

MArch Architecture Art and Film – Canterbury Art and Film

3

N

2

N

3

Y

320

33/16

BB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C Good degree in Architecture with Part 1 exemption (ideally 2.2 or higher) 36

WV63

300

33/15

BB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken

Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics – Canterbury BSc (Hons) Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics Physics with a Foundation Year

38

F590 F305

3 4

N N

300

33/15

Inc Mathematics and Physics at BC Individually considered, please contact Physics Admissions Officer

F592 F591

4 4

N N

300 300

33/15 33/15

(as above) (as above)

Audio Design and Production – Medway Audio Design and Production

J930:K

3

N

300

33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Biochemistry – Canterbury Biochemistry

C700

3

Y

BBB

33/15

Biochemistry with a Sandwich Year Biochemistry with a Year in Europe Biology with a Foundation Year

C702 C701 C101

4 4 4

Y Y Y

BBB BBB

33/15 33/15

A level Chemistry and either Biology or Human Biology preferred, + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) (as above) Individual consideration, contact Admissions Officer

Biological Anthropology – Canterbury Biological Anthropology

L620

3

Y

300

33/15

Biological Anthropology with a Year in the USA

L622

4

Y

AAB

33/17

Biology – Canterbury Biology

C103

3

N

BBB

33/15

MPhys Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics with a Year in the USA

40 42

44 BB at A level inc science (Biology preferred) or Psychology grade B + GCSE Mathematics grade C A level science (Biology preferred) or Psychology grade B + GCSE Mathematics grade C 46 A level Biology or Human Biology preferred, + GCSE Mathematics grade C

333


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Biology with a Foundation Year Biology with a Sandwich Year

C101 C105

4 4

N N

BBB

33/15

Biology with a Year in Europe

C104

4

N

BBB

33/15

Biomedical Science – Canterbury Biomedical Science

B940

3

Y

BBB

33/15

Biomedical Science with a Sandwich Year

B942

4

Y

BBB

33/15

Business Administration – Canterbury Business Administration N222 Business Administration (European Management) N223

3 4

Y Y

300 300

33/15 33/15

Business Administration Business Administration Business Administration a Year in Industry Business Administration

Page number

Individual consideration, contact Admissions Officer A level Biology or Human Biology preferred, + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) 48 A level Biology or Human Biology preferred + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) 50

with a Year in Industry with Computing with Computing with

N224 N1G9 N1GX

4 3 4

N Y N

300 300 300

33/15 33/15 33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C BC at A level inc German grade C (German option) or GCSE modern European language grade C (French, Italian, Spanish options) + GCSE Mathematics grade C BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) (as above)

with Studies in Asia

N227

4

N

320

33/16

AB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Joint honours (For joint honours with Accounting Business Administration and Computing Business Administration and Computing (Sandwich) Business and Economics

& Finance, see under Accounting & Finance) GNL2 3 Y 320 33 GNK2 4 Y 320 33 LN11

3

Y

300

33/15

Business Administration and French

NR21

4

Y

320

33/16

Business Administration and German

NR22

4

Y

320

33/16

Business Administration and Hispanic Studies

NR24

4

Y

320

33/16

Business Administration and Italian

NR23

4

Y

320

33/16

Business Administration and Law MN12 Business Administration and Management Science N250 (Business Analytics)

3 3

Y Y

AAB BBB/ABC

33/17 33/15

Business Administration and Management Science N201 (with a Year in Industry) Business Administration and Philosophy VN52

4

Y

BBB/ABC

33/15

3

Y

320

33/16

Business Administration and Politics

3

Y

300

33/15

334

Subject requirements

LN22

Inc 3 A level passes + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) BB at A level inc Economics if taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages + GCSE Mathematics grade C AB at A level inc German grade B/C + GCSE Mathematics grade C AB at A level inc Spanish grade C where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade C AB at A level inc Italian grade B/C where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade C GCSE Mathematics grade C Inc Mathematics /Statistics/Economics or + AS level grade C in quantitative subject + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above) AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade C BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

Business Studies – Medway Business Studies with a Year in Industry

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

52 4

Y

280

33/14

CC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

N104:K

3

Y

320

33/16

European Culture and Thought Q8R9 3 Y 320 (Classical & Archaeological Studies) (For single honours with Anthropology or History, see under relevant subject)

33/16

AB at A level inc Classical Studies, Classical Civilisation or Archaeology grade B where taken (as above)

Classical & Archaeological Studies – Canterbury Classical & Archaeological Studies QV84

Joint honours Classical & Archaeological Comparative Literature Classical & Archaeological Computing Classical & Archaeological Classical & Archaeological and American Literature

54

Studies and

QQ28

3

Y

320

33/16

Studies and

QG84

3

Y

320

33/16

Studies and Drama Studies and English

QW84 QQ38

3 3

Y Y

320 300

33/16 33/15

Classical & Archaeological Studies and Film Studies

QW86

3

Y

320

33/16

Classical & Archaeological Studies and French

QR81

4

Y

320

33/16

Classical & Archaeological Studies and History & Philosophy of Art Classical & Archaeological Studies and Italian

VQ38

3

Y

320

33/16

QR83

4

Y

320

33/16

Classical & Archaeological Studies and Philosophy QV85

3

Y

320

33/16

Classical & Archaeological Studies and Religious Studies

QV68

3

Y

320

33/16

Q200

3

Y

320

33/16

Q2R9

3

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature – Canterbury Comparative Literature European Culture and Thought (Comparative Literature)

Page number

(as above) inc English Literature/English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc Classical Studies, Classical Civilisation or Archaeology grade B where taken (as above) inc Drama grade B where taken AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade C where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken and Film Studies grade B where taken AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken and French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken and Italian grade B where taken/GCSE modern European language other than English grade B AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken and Philosophy grade B where taken AB at A level inc Classical Studies or Archaeology grade B where taken and Religious Studies grade B where taken 56 AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken (as above)

Joint honours (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies, see under Classical & Archaeological Studies)

335


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

BB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc German grade B and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc History grade B where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc Italian grade B where taken/ GCSE in related language grade B and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken AB at A level inc Religious Studies grade B where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B where taken

Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies

QV29

3

Y

300

33/16

Comparative Literature and Drama

QW24

3

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and English and American Literature Comparative Literature and Film Studies

QQF3

3

Y

320

33/16

WQ62

3

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and French

RQ12

4

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and German

RQ22

4

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and History

QV21

3

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and History & Philosophy of Art Comparative Literature and Italian

VQ32

3

Y

320

33/16

QR23

4

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and Philosophy

VQ52

3

Y

320

33/16

Comparative Literature and Religious Studies

VQ62

3

Y

320

33/16

G400 G4G7 G4GR

3 3 4

N N N

320 320 320

33/16 33/16 33/16

Inc 3 A level passes + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) (as above)

GN42 GN4F

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

(as above) (as above)

G403 G406

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

(as above) (as above)

G421

3

N

320

33/16

(as above)

Computer Science – Canterbury Computer Science Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) Computer Science (Artificial Intelligence) with a Year in Industry Computer Science (Business) Computer Science (Business) with a Year in Industry Computer Science (Consultancy) Computer Science (Consultancy) with a Year in Industry Computer Science (Networks)

336

58


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Computer Science (Networks) with a Year in Industry Computer Science with a Year in Industry

G420

4

N

320

33/16

(as above)

G404

4

N

320

33/16

(as above)

Joint honours Computer Science and Management Science

NG2L

3

N

320

33/16

NG2K

4

N

320

33/16

Inc 18 units at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above)

GG41 GGC4

3 4

N N

300 300

33 33

Computer Science and Management Science with a Year in Industry Computer Science and Mathematics Computer Science and Mathematics with a Year in Industry

Page number

BB at A level inc Mathematics grade B (as above)

Computer Systems Engineering – Canterbury BEng Computer Systems Engineering

Computer Systems Engineering including a Foundation Year Computer Systems Engineering with a Year in Industry MEng Computer Systems Engineering

Computer Systems Engineering with a Year in Industry

60 H618

3

N

300

33/15

H614

4

N

160

H615

4

N

300

Admissions Officer 33/15

H613

4

N

320

33/16

H617

5

N

320

33/16

CC at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C EE at A level + GCSE Mathematics and Science grade C CC at A level inc A2 or AS level Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C BB at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C (as above)

Computing – Joint Honours – Canterbury 62 (For joint honours with Accounting & Finance, Business Administration or Classical & Archaeological Studies, see under relevant subject) 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc English Literature or English Computing and English and American Literature QG34 Language and Literature grade B Computing and Film Studies WG64 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken Computing and French RG14 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages Computing and German RG24 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B Computing and Hispanic Studies GR44 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Spanish grade B where taken, or good GCSE or A Sub in related modern language Computing and History VG14 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History grade B where taken Computing and Management Science NG24 3 N BBB/ABC 33/15 Inc Mathematics/Statistics/Economics or + AS level grade C in quantitative subject + GCSE Mathematics grade B Computing and Management Science NG24 4 N BBB/ABC 33/15 (as above) with a Year in Industry 337


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Computing and Philosophy

VG54

3

N

320

33/16

AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken

Conservation – Canterbury Biodiversity Conservation and Management

CD94

3

N

280

33/15

Wildlife Conservation

CD14

3

N

300

33/15

BB at A level inc A level natural science or Geography + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above)

Criminal Justice Studies – Medway Criminal Justice Studies

M900:K

3

Y

240

33/13

CC at A level

Page number

64

66

Criminology – Canterbury Joint honours Criminology and Criminology and Criminology and Criminology and

Cultural Studies Law Social Policy Sociology

Cultural Studies – Canterbury Cultural Studies

68 MV99 MM19 LM49 LM39

3 3 3 3

N Y Y Y

300 AAB 300 300

33/15 33/17 33/15 33/15

BC/BB at A level BC/BB at A level (as above)

V900

3

N

300

33/15

BB at A level

70

Joint honours (For joint honours with Comparative Literature or Criminology, see Cultural Studies and History & Philosophy of Art VV93 3 Cultural Studies and Philosophy VV59 3 Cultural Studies and Social Anthropology LV69 3 Cultural Studies (Combined Languages) R9V9 4

under N N N N

relevant section) 300 33/15 320 33/16 300 33/15 320 33/16

Cultural Studies (German) Cultural Studies (Hispanic Studies)

R2V9 R4V9

4 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

Cultural Studies (Italian)

R3V9

4

N

320

33/16

Cultural Studies and Film Studies

VW96

3

BC/BB at A level AB at A level BC/BB at A level AB at A level inc one of French, German, Italian or Spanish grade B AB at A level inc German grade B AB at A level inc Spanish where taken or good GCSE or A Sub in related modern language AB at A level inc Italian grade B where taken, or good GCSE or A Sub in related modern language BC/BB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken

N

300

33/15

Design: Creative Events: Design and Production – Medway Creative Events: Design and Production W900:K 3

N

280

33/14

BC at A level inc grade B in one or two of Design, Art, Graphics, Media or Performance

Design: Design for Performance – Medway Design for Performance

WW24:K 3

N

280

33/14

BC at A level inc grade B in one or two of Design, Art, Graphics, Performance/Theatre Studies or Media

Design: Experience Design – Medway Experience Design

W901:K

3

Y

280

33/14

BC at A level inc grade B in one or two of Design, Art, Graphics or Media

Digital Arts – Canterbury Digital Arts Digital Arts with a Year in Industry

TBC TBC

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

BB at A level BB at A level

338

72

74

76

78


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

Drama and Theatre Studies – Canterbury MDrama (Hons) Drama and Theatre Studies

80 W421

4

N

AAB

33/17

Inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken

Joint honours BA (Hons) (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies or Comparative Literature, see under relevant subject) Drama and English and American Literature QW34 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B Drama and English Language and Linguistics WQ43 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and English Language grade B where taken Drama and Film Studies WW46 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and Film Studies grade B where taken Drama and French RW14 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages Drama and German RW24 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and German grade B Drama and Hispanic Studies WR44 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and Spanish grade B/C where taken Drama and History VW14 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and History/Archaeology/ Classical Civilisation grade B where taken Drama and History & Philosophy of Art VW34 3 N 300 33/15 BC at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken Drama and Italian RW34 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and Italian grade B where taken/GCSE in related language grade B Drama and Multimedia GW44 3 N 300 33/16 BB at A level Drama and Philosophy VW54 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken Philosophy grade B where taken Drama and Religious Studies VW64 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Drama and Theatre Studies grade B where taken and Religious Studies grade B where taken Economics – Canterbury BSc (Hons) Economics

82 L100

3

N

320

33/16

BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B 339


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken and Spanish grade B where taken or GCSE in a modern European language other than English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above) BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken and Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B and French grade B where taken or GCSE French grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B and German grade B + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken and Spanish grade B where taken or GCSE in a modern European language other than English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken and Mathematics grade B

Economics with a Language (Spanish)

L1R4

3

N

320

33/16

Economics with a Year in Industry

L102

4

N

320

33/16

Economics with Computing Economics with Econometrics

L1G4 L141

3 3

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

European Economics

L171

4

N

320

33/16

European Economics (French)

L176

4

N

320

33/16

European Economics (German)

L174

4

N

320

33/16

European Economics (Spanish)

L177

4

N

320

33/16

Financial Economics

L111

3

N

320

33/16

Financial Economics with Econometrics

L142

3

N

320

33/16

Page number

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business or Accounting & Finance, see under relevant subject) BA Hons Economics and Law

ML11

3

N

AAB

33/16

Economics and Politics

LL12

3

N

320

33/16

Economics and Social Anthropology

LL16

3

N

300

33/15

Economics and Sociology

LL13

3

N

280/300

33/15

Inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B BC/BB at A level inc Economics grade B where taken + GCSE Mathematics grade B

Electronic and Communications Engineering – Canterbury BEng Electronic and Communications Engineering

Electronic and Communications Engineering with a Foundation Year

340

84

H619

3

N

300

33/15

H605

4

N

160

Admissions Officer

CC at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C EE at A level + GCSE Mathematics and Physics/Science grade C


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

300

CC at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C Foundation Degree/HND in Electronic and Computer Systems or another appropriate subject

Electronic and Communications Engineering with a Year in Industry

H604

4

N

Electronic and Computer Systems

H691

1

N

MEng Electronic and Communications Engineering

H607

4

N

320

33/15

H608

5

N

320

33/15

Employment Relations and Human Resource Management – Canterbury Employment Relations and Human Resource N620 3 N 300 Management

33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Electronic and Communications Engineering with a Year in Industry

Joint honours Employment Relations and Human Management (Accounting) Employment Relations and Human Management (Economics) Employment Relations and Human Management (Law) Employment Relations and Human Management (Politics) Employment Relations and Human Management (Social Policy) Employment Relations and Human Management (Social Psychology) Employment Relations and Human Management (Sociology)

33/15

Admissions Officer

Page number

BB at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C BB at A level inc A2 in one and an AS level in a second from Mathematics and a science/technology subject (Physics, Computing or Electronics) grade C 86

Resource

NN46

3

N

300

33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade B

Resource

LN16

3

N

300

33/15

(as above)

Resource

MN26

3

N

300

33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Resource

LN26

3

N

300

33/15

(as above)

Resource

NL64

3

N

300

33/15

(as above)

Resource

CN86

3

N

300

33/15

(as above)

Resource

LN36

3

N

300

33/15

(as above)

English Language and Linguistics – Canterbury English Language and Linguistics QQ13

3

N

320

33/16

AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B where taken

88

Joint honours (For joint honours with Comparative Literature or Drama and Theatre Studies, see under relevant subject) English Language and Linguistics and Q391 3 N 340 33/17 AB at A level inc English Language or English English and American Literature Language and Literature grade B English Language and Linguistics and French RQ13 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B and/or French grade B where taken or GCSE grade B in modern European language other than English

341


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B where taken and German grade B AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B and/or Spanish grade B where taken or GCSE grade B in modern European language other than English AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B where taken and/or History grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B and/or Italian grade B where taken or GCSE grade B in modern European language other than English AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B and/or Philosophy grade B where taken AB at A level inc English Language or English Language and Literature grade B where taken

English Language and Linguistics and German

RQ23

4

N

320

33/16

English Language and Linguistics and Hispanic Studies

RQ43

4

N

320

33/16

English Language and Linguistics and History

VQ1H

3

N

320

33/16

English Language and Linguistics and Italian

RQ33

4

N

320

33/16

English Language and Linguistics and Philosophy VQ5H

3

N

320

33/16

English Language and Linguistics and Politics and International Relations

LQ23

3

N

320

33/16

Q302

3

Y

340

33/17

Q303

4

Y

340

33/17

Q300 Q324

3 3

Y Y

340 340

33/17 33/17

Q325

4

Y

340

33/17

(as above) AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B (as above)

Q301

4

Y

340

33/17

(as above)

English Literature – Canterbury English, American and Postcolonial Literature English, American and Postcolonial Literature with an Approved Year Abroad English and American Literature English and American Literature and Creative Writing English and American Literature and Creative Writing with an Approved Year Abroad English and American Literature with an Approved Year Abroad

Page number

90 AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B (as above)

Joint honours (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Computing, Drama, English Language and Linguistics see under relevant subject) English and American Literature and Film Studies QW36 3 Y 340 33/17 AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B, and Film Studies grade B where taken English and American Literature and French QR31 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages English and American Literature and German QR32 4 Y 320 33/16) AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and German grade B

342


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and Spanish grade B where taken/GCSE in related modern language grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and History/Archaeology/Classical Studies grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B BC at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and Italian grade B where taken/GCSE in related modern language grade B Inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and, where taken, Philosophy grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and, where taken, Religious Studies or Theology grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B, and Film Studies grade B where taken AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B BC at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B AB at A level inc English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B and Philosophy grade B where taken

Page number

English and American Literature and Hispanic Studies

QR34

4

Y

320

33/16

English and American Literature and History

QV31

3

Y

340

33/17

English and American Literature and History & Philosophy of Art English and American Literature and Italian

VQ33

3

Y

280

33/14

QR33

4

Y

320

33/16

English and Law

MQ13

4

Y

AAB

33/16

English and American Literature and Philosophy

QVH5

3

Y

320

33/16

English and American Literature and Religious Studies

QV36

3

Y

320

33/16

English and American Literature and Sociology

LQ33

3

Y

320

33/16

English, American and Postcolonial Literature and Film Studies

WQ63

3

Y

340

33/17

English, American and Postcolonial Literature and History

VQ13

3

Y

340

33/17

English, American and Postcolonial Literature and History & Philosophy of Art English, American and Postcolonial Literature and Philosophy

VQH3

3

Y

280

33/14

VQ53

3

Y

320

33/16

F9L9

3

Y

280/300

33/15

BC/BB at A level

R904

4

N

320

33/16

R190

4

N

320

33/16

R290

4

N

320

33/16

AB at A level inc French or German and one of Italian/Spanish as required AB at A level normally inc French grade C/GCSE French grade B/aptitude in modern foreign language AB at A level inc German grade B

Environmental Social Science – Canterbury Environmental Social Science European Studies – Canterbury European Studies (Humanities) – Combined Languages European Studies (Humanities) – French European Studies (Humanities) – German

92 94

343


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AB at A level inc Italian/Spanish grade B where taken or AS or good GCSE in related modern language AB at A level normally inc French grade C/GCSE French grade B/aptitude in modern foreign language AB at A level inc German grade C AB at A level inc Italian/Spanish grade C where taken or GCSE grade B in related modern language for beginners variants

European Studies (Humanities) – Spanish or Italian R903

4

N

320

33/16

European Studies (Social Sciences) – French

R191

4

N

320

33/16

European Studies (Social Sciences) – German European Studies (Social Sciences) – Spanish or Italian

R291 R901

4 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

W610 W616 W612

3 4 4

N N N

340 340 320

33/17 33/17 33/17

Film Studies – Canterbury Film Studies Film Studies with a Year Abroad European Arts (Film Studies)

Page number

96 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken (as above) (as above)

Joint honours (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Computing, Drama, English and American Literature and English, American and Postcolonial Literature see under relevant subject) Film Studies and French RW16 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages and Film Studies grade B where taken Film Studies and German RW26 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B and Film Studies grade B where taken Film Studies and Hispanic Studies WR64 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken and Spanish grade B where taken/GCSE in related modern language grade B Film Studies and History VW16 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B + A level Film Studies grade B where taken Film Studies and History & Philosophy of Art VW36 3 N 280 33/14 BB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken Film Studies and Italian RW36 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken and Italian grade B where taken/GCSE in related modern language grade B Film Studies and Philosophy VW56 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken and Philosophy grade B where taken Film Studies and Religious Studies VW66 3 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Film Studies grade B where taken and Religious Studies/Theology grade B where taken Fine Art – Medway Fine Art

98 W100:K

3

Y

280

33/14

BC at A level inc Fine Art, Art and Design or History of Art grade B where taken Portfolio of practical work of an acceptable standard

Forensic Sciences – Canterbury BSc Forensic Chemistry

344

100 F1F4

3

N

280

33/14

BC at A level inc science subject, preferably Biology, Human Biology or Chemistry, + GCSE Mathematics grade C


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

Forensic Forensic Forensic Forensic

Chemistry with a Year in Industry Science Science with a Foundation Year Science with a Year in Industry

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

(as above) (as above) Individual consideration BC at A level inc science subject, preferably Biology, Human Biology or Chemistry, + GCSE Mathematics grade C

F1FK F410 F412 F411

4 3 4 4

N N N N

280 280

33/14 33/14

280

33/14

MSci Forensic Chemistry

F1FL

4

N

280

33/14

Forensic Science

F414

4

N

280

33/14

Foundation Programme for International Students – Canterbury International Foundation Year Humanities Q308 1 N L590 1 N International Foundation Year Social Sciences

Page number

BC at A level inc a science subject, preferably Biology, Chemistry or Human Biology + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above) 102 Good school-leaving certificate Good school-leaving certificate, for progression to Accounting/Business Administration/Economics/ ERHRM/Management Science/Psychology high enough standard of Mathematics, Architecture/ Interiors portfolio

French – Canterbury

104

BA (Hons) French

R101

4

Y

320

33/16

European Culture and Thought (French)

R1R9

4

Y

320

33/16

BA/Licence de Lettres French

R120

4

Y

320

33/16

Post A level: AB at A level inc French grade B, Post GCSE: GCSE French grade B, Beginner’s level: some aptitude for modern languages AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern European languages AB at A level inc French grade A

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business Administration, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Computing, Drama, English and American Literature, Film Studies, see under relevant subject) French and German RR12 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and German grade B at A level French and Hispanic Studies RR14 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and Spanish grade B where taken French and History RV11 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B French and History & Philosophy of Art VR31 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages

345


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and Italian grade B/C where taken AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and Philosophy grade B where taken AB at A level inc French grade B/GCSE French grade B/aptitude for modern languages and Religious Studies grade B where taken

French and Italian

RR13

4

Y

320

33/16

French and Philosophy

RVC5

4

Y

320

33/16

French and Religious Studies

RV16

4

Y

320

33/16

German – Canterbury German European Culture and Thought (German)

R220 R2R9

4 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

Page number

106 AB at A level inc German grade B (as above)

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business Administration, Comparative Literature, Computing, Drama, English and American Literature, Film Studies, French see under relevant subject) German and Hispanic Studies RR24 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B and Spanish grade B where taken German and History RV21 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B and History/ Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B German and History & Philosophy of Art VR32 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B German and Italian RR23 4 N 320 33/16 AB at A level inc German grade B and Italian grade B where taken German and Religious Studies RV26 4 N 320 33/16 BC at A level inc German grade B and Religious Studies grade B where taken Health and Social Care – Canterbury Health and Social Care

LL45

3

Y

260

33/13

CC at A level

108

Health and Social Care Practice – Medway Health and Social Care Practice

L431:K

3

Y

200

33/12

CD at A level, MPP BTEC National Diploma/ Certificate in Health and Social Care

Hispanic Studies – Canterbury Hispanic Studies

R400

4

Y

320

33/16

European Culture and Thought (Hispanic Studies) R4R9

4

Y

320

33/16

AB at A level inc Spanish grade B where taken/ aptitude for modern languages for beginner’s level (as above)

110

112

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business Administration, Computing, Cultural Studies, Drama, English and American Literature, Film Studies, French, German see under relevant subject) Hispanic Studies and History RV41 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Classical Civilisation/ Archaeology grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B and Spanish grade B where taken Hispanic Studies and Italian RR43 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Italian grade A/B or Spanish grade A/B

346


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B + GCSE chosen language grade B AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B

History – Canterbury European History with a Year Abroad

V221

4

Y

300/340

33/15,16,17

History

V100

3

Y

300/340

33/15,16,17

Page number

114

Joint honours (For joint honours with Comparative Literature, Computing, Drama, English Language and Linguistics, English and American Literature, English, American and Postcolonial Literature, Film Studies, French, German, Hispanic Studies see under relevant subject) History and Archaeological Studies VV14 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B History and History & Philosophy of Art VV31 3 Y 320 33/16 (as above) History and Italian RV31 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B + A level Italian grade B where taken History and Law VM1C 3 Y AAB 33/16 Inc History grade B where taken or + GCSE in History grade B History and Philosophy VVC5 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B + A level Philosophy grade B where taken History and Politics LV21 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B History and Religious Studies VV61 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B + A level Religious Studies grade C where taken History and Social Anthropology LVP1 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B History of Science and Philosophy VV55 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Civilisation grade B where taken or GCSE History grade B and Philosophy grade B where taken History & Philosophy of Art – Canterbury European Arts (History & Philosophy of Art)

V351

4

Y

300

33/15

116

History & Philosophy of Art

V350

3

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level inc modern European language grade B where taken BB at A level

Joint honours (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, Drama, English and American Literature, English, American and Postcolonial Literature, Film Studies, French, German, Hispanic Studies, History, see under relevant subject) History & Philosophy of Art and Italian RV35 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Italian grade B where taken or GCSE in related modern language grade B 347


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

History & Philosophy of Art and Philosophy

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

VV35

3

Y

320

33/16

AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken

NG14:K NG1F:K

3 4

N N

280 280

33/14 33/14

Inc 3 A level passes + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above)

G503:K G505:K G508:K G509:K

3 4 3 4

N N N N

280 280 280 280

33/14 33/14 33/14 33/14

(as (as (as (as

G5G6:K 3 G5GP:K 4

N N

280 280

33/14 33/14

(as above) (as above)

G5G4:K 3 G5GK:K 4

N N

280 280

33/14 33/14

(as above) (as above)

Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities – Canterbury Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities L512 3

Y

200

Interiors – Canterbury Interiors

KW12

3

N

320

33/16

BB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C

International Business – Canterbury International Business International Business with a Year in Europe

N126 N127

3 4

N N

300 300

33/15 33/15

BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C BC at A level inc GCSE in a modern European language other than English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Information Technology – Medway Business Information Technology Business Information Technology with a Year in Industry Information Technology Information Technology with a Year in Industry Information Technology (Consultancy) Information Technology (Consultancy) with a Year in Industry Information Technology (Software Engineering) Information Technology (Software Engineering) with a Year in Industry Information Technology (Web Applications) Information Technology (Web Applications) with a Year in Industry

118

above) above) above) above)

120 CD at A level 122 124

Italian – Canterbury

126

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business Administration, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, Drama, English and American Literature, Film Studies, French, German, Hispanic Studies, History and History & Philosophy of Art see under relevant subject) Italian and Philosophy RVH5 4 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Italian grade B where taken or GCSE in related modern language grade B and Philosophy grade B where taken Journalism – Medway Journalism and the News Industry

128 P500:K

3

Y

ABB

33/16

At least two, preferably three A levels in traditional academic subjects such as English, Mathematics, History, Politics, Chemistry and Modern Languages, GCSE Mathematics grade C + admissions test

Law – Canterbury LLB (Hons) English and French Law English and German Law 348

130 M121 M122

4 4

N N

AAB AAB

33/17 33/17

Inc A level French grade B Inc A level German grade B


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

English and Italian Law English and Spanish Law European Legal Studies Law Law with a Year in China Law with a Year in Hong Kong Law with French and a Year in Canada Law with a Language (French or German only) Law with a Language (Spanish)

UCAS F/T codes yrs

M123 M125 M120 M100 M103 M104 M1R1 M124 M1R4

4 4 4 3 4 4 4 3 4

P/T

N N N N N N N N N

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

AAB AAB AAB AAB AAB AAB AAB AAB AAB

Inc A level Italian grade B Inc A level Spanish grade B

33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17

Page number

Inc relevant language grade B Inc A level Spanish where taken or + good GCSE or A Sub in related modern language

Joint honours (For joint honours with Accounting & Finance, Business Administration, Criminology, Economics, English and American Literature, History, see under relevant subject) BA (Hons) Law and Philosophy Law and Politics Law and Psychology Law and Social Anthropology Law and Sociology Law and Welfare

MV15 LM21 CM81 ML16 LM31 ML14

3 3 4 3 3 3

N N N N N N

AAB 320 ABB AAB AAB AAB

33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17 33/17

Inc Philosophy grade B where taken AB at A level AB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C AB at A level

Law – Medway LLB (Hons) Law

132 M102:K

3

Y

AAB

33/17

Management Science – Canterbury European Management Science (French)

N110

4

N

BBB/ABC

33/15

European Management Science (Italian)

N243

4

N

BBB/ABC

33/15

Management Science Management Science with Computing Management Science with Computing with Studies in the USA Management Science with Studies in the USA

N200 N2G4 N2GL

3/4 3/4 4

N N N

BBB/ABC BBB/ABC BBB/ABC

33/15 33/15 33/15

Inc French grade B + Mathematics/Statistics/ Economics or + AS level grade C in quantitative subject (preferably Mathematics) + GCSE Mathematics grade B Inc Mathematics/Statistics/Economics or + AS level grade C in quantitative subject (preferably Mathematics) + GCSE Mathematics grade B (as above) (as above) (as above)

N202

4

N

BBB/ABC

33/15

(as above)

134

Joint honours (For joint honours with Accounting & Finance, Business Administration, Computer Science, Computing, see under relevant subject) Mathematics for Management GN12 3/4 N 300 33 BB at A level inc Mathematics grade B Marketing – Canterbury Marketing

136 N500

3

N

300

33/15

GCSE English grade C + GCSE Mathematics grade C 349


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

Mathematics and Statistics – Canterbury Business Mathematics Financial Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics and Statistics Mathematics including a Foundation Year

G1N1 GN13 G100 GG13 G108

3/4 3/4 3/4 3/4 4

Y Y Y Y Y

300 300 300 300

33/15 33/15 33/15 33/15

BB at A level inc Mathematics grade B (as above) (as above) (as above) Individually considered, contact Admissions Officer

138

Medical Anthropology – Canterbury Medical Anthropology

L621

3

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level inc a science subject (Biology preferred) or Psychology grade B + GCSE Mathematics grade C

3 4

N N

320 320

33/16 33/16

BB at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above)

140

Multimedia Technology and Design – Canterbury Multimedia Technology and Design G4W2 G4WF Multimedia Technology and Design with a Year in Industry

142

Joint honours (For joint honours with Drama, see under Drama) Music Technology – Medway Music Technology

W351:K

3

N

300

33/15

Pharmaceutical Chemistry – Canterbury Pharmaceutical Chemistry

F153

3

N

300

33/15

144 BC at A level + some practical muscial ability inc ability to read music notation to Music Theory grade 3 equivalent (A level music grade C or above also considered as equivalent) + GCSE Mathematics grade C 146 A level Chemistry grade C and A level Biology recommended + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Pharmacy – Medway (Apply to the Medway School of Pharmacy, UCAS institution code M62)

148

MPharm Pharmacy

B230

4

N

300

32/15

A level Chemistry, and one of Biology, Physics or Mathematics, + GCSE Mathematics and English grade C

Philosophy – Canterbury Philosophy Philosophy with an Approved Year Abroad

V500 V501

3 4

Y Y

320 320

33/16 33/16

AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken AB at A level inc French grade B and Philosophy grade B where taken

150

Joint honours For joint honours with Business Administration, Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Computing, Cultural Studies, Drama, English and American Literature, English, American and Postcolonial Literature, Film Studies, French, History, History of Science, History & Philosophy of Art, Italian and Law, see under relevant subject) Philosophy and Politics LV25 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken Philosophy and Religious Studies VV56 3 Y 320 33/16 AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken and Religious Studies or Theology grade B where taken

350


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

Philosophy and Social Anthropology Philosophy and Social Policy Philosophy and Sociology

UCAS F/T codes yrs

LVP5 LVK5 LVH5

3 3 3

P/T

Y Y Y

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

320 320 320

AB at A level inc Philosophy grade B where taken (as above) (as above)

33/16 33/16 33/16

Physics – Canterbury

152

BSc (Hons) Physics Physics with a Foundation Year

F300 F305

3 4

N N

300

33/15

Physics with Astrophysics

F3F5

3

N

300

33/15

Inc Mathematics and Physics at B/C Individually considered, please contact Physics Admissions Officer Inc Mathematics and Physics at B/C

MPhys Physics F303 Physics with Astrophysics F3FN Physics with Astrophysics with a Year in the USA F3FM Physics with a Year in the USA F304

4 4 4 4

N N N N

300 300 300 300

33/15 33/15 33/15 33/15

Inc (as (as (as

3 3 3 4 4

Y Y Y Y Y

320 320 320 320 320

33/16 33/16 33/16 33/16 33/16

AB at A level (as above) (as above) AB at A level inc French grade A AB at A level (see also main entry)

4

Y

320

33/16

(as above) (see also main entry)

4

Y

320

33/16

AB at A level

4

Y

320

33/16

AB at A level inc French grade B (or + GCSE French grade C) AB at A level inc German grade B/C AB at A level + good GCSE or AS level in related modern language (as above)

Politics and International Relations – Canterbury Conflict, Peace and Security L252 L242 Politics Politics and International Relations L258 Politics and International Relations (Bidiplôme) L291 Politics and International Relations with a Year L257 in Japan Politics and International Relations with a Year L254 in China/Hong Kong Politics and International Relations with a Year L255 in Continental Europe Politics and International Relations with French L243

Mathematics and Physics at B/C above) above) above) 154

Politics and International Relations with German Politics and International Relations with Italian

L271 L273

4 4

Y Y

320 320

33/16 33/16

Politics and International Relations with Spanish

L2R4

4

Y

320

33/16

Joint honours (For joint honours with Business Administration, Economics, History, Law Politics and Social Anthropology LL62 3 Y Politics and Social Policy LL42 3 Y Politics and Sociology LL32 3 Y Primary Dental Care – Medway Primary Dental Care

Page number

and Philosophy, see under relevant subject) 320 33/16 AB at A level 320 33/16 (as above) 320 33/16 (as above) 156

A900:K

3

Y

Must be qualified Registered Dental Care Professional with at least an NQF Level 4 qualification and registered with General Dental Council

351


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

GCSE Mathematics grade B (and English grade B tbc) (as above) (as above) A level French or German grade C (Italian/ Spanish/Finnish/Polish versions GCSE grade B or AS level in a modern European language other than English) + GCSE Mathematics grade B and English grade B GCSE Mathematics grade B and English grade B (as above) (as above)

Psychology – Canterbury Applied Psychology

C850

4

Y

AAA

33/17

Applied Psychology with Clinical Psychology Psychology Psychology with Studies in Europe

C823 C800 C881

4 3 4

Y Y Y

AAA AAB AAB

33/17 33/17 33/17

Psychology with Clinical Psychology Social Psychology Social Psychology with Clinical Psychology

C822 C882 C842

3 3 3

Y Y Y

AAB AAB AAB

33/17 33/17 33/17

Page number

158

Joint honours (For joint honours with Computing, Law and Philosophy (titled Philosophy and Social Behaviour) see under relevant subject) Psychology and Social Anthropology CL86 3 Y AAB 33/17 (as above) Psychology and Sociology CL83 3 Y AAB 33/17 (as above) Religious Studies – Canterbury Religious Studies

160 V616

3

Y

320

33/16

AB at A level inc Religious Studies or Theology grade B where taken

Joint honours (For joint honours with Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, Drama, English and American Literature, Film Studies, French, German, History and Philosophy, see under relevant subject) Social Anthropology – Canterbury Social Anthropology Social Anthropology with a Year in Denmark Social Anthropology with a Year in Finland Social Anthropology with a Year in Japan

162 L600 TBC L677 L612

3 4 4 4

Y Y Y Y

300 300 300 AAB

33/15 33/15 33/15 33/17

Social Anthropology with a Year in the Netherlands L610 Social Anthropology with French L675

4 4

Y Y

300 300

33/15 33/15

Social Anthropology with German

L676

4

Y

300

33/15

Social Anthropology with Italian

L673

4

Y

300

33/15

Social Anthropology with Spanish

L674

4

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level exc General Studies/Critical Thinking BB at A level exc General Studies/Critical Thinking BB at A level exc General Studies/Critical Thinking Inc science (Biology preferred) or Psychology grade B + GCSE Mathematics grade C BB at A level exc General Studies/Critical Thinking BB at A level inc French, exc General Studies/ Critical Thinking BB at A level inc German, exc General Studies/ Critical Thinking BB at A level inc Italian at grade B, exc General Studies/Critical Thinking BB at A level inc Spanish at grade B, exc General Studies/Critical Thinking

Joint honours (For joint honours with Cultural Studies, Economics, History, Law, Philosophy, Politics and Psychology, see under relevant subject) Social Anthropology and Social Policy LL46 3 Y 300 33/15 BB at A level, exc General Studies/Critical Thinking Social Anthropology and Sociology LL36 3 Y 280/300 33/15 BC at A level, exc General Studies/Critical Thinking 352


Honours degree quick reference guide

Degree programmes

Social Anthropology and Sociology with a Year in Finland Social Policy – Canterbury Social Policy

UCAS F/T codes yrs

P/T

Typical offers (grades/points) A level IB overall/Higher

Subject requirements

Page number

LL63

4

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level, exc General Studies/Critical Thinking

L430

3

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level

164

Joint honours (For joint honours with Criminology, Law (titled Law and Welfare), Philosophy, Politics and Social Anthropology, see under relevant subject) Social Policy and Sociology LL34 3 Y 280/300 33/14,15 BB/BC at A level Social Sciences – Medway Social Sciences

L340:K

3

Y

240

33/13

166

Social Work – Medway Social Work

L508:K

3

N

280

33/14

Sociology – Canterbury Sociology Sociology with a Year in Finland Sociology with Italian

L300 L301 L373

3 4 4

Y Y Y

280/300 280/300 280/300

33/15 33/15 33/15

CC at A level 168 BC at A level + GCSE Mathematics grade C + relevant experience inc awareness and understanding of the needs of a person requiring social care assistance 170 BC/BB at A level (as above) BC/BB at A level + GCSE or AS level in related modern language

Joint honours (For joint honours with Criminology, Economics, English and American Literature, Law, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Social Anthropology, Social Policy, see under relevant subject) Sport and Exercise Management – Medway Sport and Exercise Management

C601:K

3

Y

260

33/13

BC at A level inc appropriate subject (eg Human Biology, Sport, Physical Education) + GCSE Mathematics grade C

172

Sports Science – Medway Sports Science

C602:K

3

Y

260

33/13

(as above)

Sports Therapy – Medway Sports Therapy

C600:K

3

Y

300

33/15

BB at A level inc appropriate subject (eg Human Biology, Sport, Physical Education) + GCSE Mathematics grade C

Visual and Performed Arts – Canterbury Visual and Performed Arts

W000

3

Y

280

33/14

BC at A level

War Studies – Canterbury War Studies

V391

3

Y

300/320

33/16

AB at A level inc History/Archaeology/Classical Studies grade B where taken or + GCSE History grade B

Web Computing – Canterbury Web Computing

G450

3

N

320

33/16

Web Computing with a Year in Industry

G451

4

N

320

33/16

Inc 3 A level passes + GCSE Mathematics grade C (as above)

174 176

178 180

182

353


354


Glossary

Glossary Academic school: An academic school is a division of a faculty that focuses on a particular academic subject. For example, at Kent, the School of English is part of the Faculty of Humanities (see Faculty). Academic year: An academic year refers to a university’s teaching period. In the UK, the academic year runs from the start of the first term (normally in September) to the last day of the final term (normally in June). Access to Learning Fund: The Access to Learning Fund can provide extra help if students are in hardship and need additional financial support. Kent has an Access to Learning Fund to assist UK home fee-paying students in financial difficulty. EU and international students are not eligible. Admissions office: The office that processes university applications and makes formal offers to prospective students. At Kent, this office is called the Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office, which sends out offers to prospective students and gives advice on choosing programmes of study. Advanced Vocational Certificates of Education (AVCE): These are qualifications that emphasise knowledge, skills and understanding in broad vocational areas. They create links with employers, help you to work as part of a team, and can be taken as double or single awards. The double award is equivalent to two A levels and the single award is equivalent to one A level. Alumni: Former students of a university. Assessment: The review and marking of academic work, which can include exams, essays, coursework, projects and presentations.

Award: The degree certification that a student will achieve on successful completion of a university programme. For undergraduate students, this is usually a Bachelor’s degree. BA: Bachelor of Arts. A degree traditionally awarded for subjects based in the humanities, but can include subjects such as social sciences. BBA: Bachelor of Business Administration. A degree awarded for subjects based in the field of business administration. BEng: Bachelor of Engineering. A degree awarded for subjects based in the field of engineering. BSc: Bachelor of Science. A degree awarded for subjects based in the field of science and can include social science. BTEC National Diploma: This is a vocational qualification taken in England, Wales and Northern Ireland by adults and young people aged 16 and over. They are graded as ‘Pass’, ‘Merit’ and ‘Distinction’, and can earn points equivalent to AS and A levels. For example, a BTEC National Diploma with three merit grades has 240 UCAS tariff points (one A level at grade A has 120 UCAS points). Bursaries: Means-tested funding available to home fee-paying undergraduate students. Certificate of Higher Education: Certificates of higher education are academic, rather than vocational qualifications. They are broadly equivalent to a Higher National Certificate (HNC) and usually take one year of full-time study to complete.

Certificates and diplomas: Interim awards are available on some university courses: • Certificates: these are equivalent to Stage 1. A certificate representing 120 credits can be awarded from a selection of undergraduate programmes • Diplomas: these are equivalent to Stage 2. A certificate representing 240 credits can be awarded from a selection of undergraduate degree programmes. Once a student has successfully completed Stage 1 and Stage 2, they may wish to progress to a full degree programme. Clearing: The admissions system that operates after A level results are published in August. It allows prospective students without a university place to apply for one. Universities publish their clearing vacancies on their websites and in national newspapers such as The Guardian and the Independent. College master: Each college at Kent has a Master – a senior member of staff who is responsible for the pastoral care of the members of that college. Colleges: Some universities have a collegiate system, where academics and students from different subjects and year groups (as well as different cultures and countries) come together to share ideas. Kent has a collegiate system and there are five colleges at the University: Rutherford, Eliot, Keynes, Darwin and Woolf (our postgraduate-only college). The colleges provide student accommodation and social space as well as academic offices. All Kent students are assigned to a college, whether they live in the college or not. All postgraduate students become members of Woolf College.

Continued overleaf 355


Glossary

Glossary (cont)

356


Glossary

Conditional offer: An offer made by a university or college where the applicant must fulfil specified criteria (usually the achievement of certain grades or tariff points) and, for some non-native speaking applicants, a satisfactory English Language assessment before they can be accepted onto the course. See IELTS. Congregations: The ceremony where students formally collect their degree certificates. Kent holds its congregation ceremonies in Canterbury and Rochester cathedrals. Deferred entry: A student can apply for a university place but request that they start the following academic year, thus deferring their entry to the course. Diploma of Higher Education: Diplomas of Higher Education are similar to Higher National Diplomas (HNDs). They are accredited professional qualifications and are highly respected by employers both in the UK and overseas. They usually take two years to complete and offer a range of subjects. Students can normally convert their higher education diploma to a full degree with an extra year of study. Diplomas: Interim award geared specifically towards part-time students. See Certificates. Diplomas for 14 to 19-year-olds: The Diploma qualification is designed in partnership with employers and universities and offers 14 to 19-year-olds practical, ‘hands-on’ experience as well as classroom learning. Diplomas are available in selected schools and colleges in ten subject areas. The Diploma is flexible, so students can combine it with GCSEs and A levels. There are three levels of Diploma, each taking two years to complete:

• Foundation Diploma – equivalent to five GCSEs at grades D to G • Higher Diploma – equivalent to seven GCSEs at grades A* to C • Advanced Diploma – a qualification for those over 16, equivalent to three and a half A levels. Advanced Diplomas can lead either to university entrance or into a career. Doctor: Holder of a doctorate, the highest level of formal study/research qualification in a given field – usually a PhD. Dorms: See Halls of Residence. Enrolment: The formal process of starting at university. All new students at Kent receive a Getting Started booklet, which gives them important information and guides them through the enrolment process. Entry requirements: The required grades or qualifications a student needs to achieve to apply for a programme of study. Normally this is measured in tariff points. ie 320 points = one grade A at A level, plus two grade Bs at A level. Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications (ELQ): The government no longer provides funding for students who wish to study for a qualification that is equivalent to, or at a lower level, than one that they have already achieved. Universities are now required to charge a higher rate ‘ELQ fee’ to all students who hold an equivalent or higher level qualification. See p229 for more detailed information. Erasmus programme: This programme enables students to study in one of the EU or EEA member states as part of their degree. Students receive an Erasmus grant for the period spent abroad.

European Credit Transfer System (ECTS): This system enables students to transfer their academic credits when they complete part of their studies at another participating EU university or college. Kent has adopted the ECTS system. European Economic Area (EEA): The economic area encompassing all the members of the European Union and the European Free Trade Association. The EEA includes the non-EU countries Norway and Iceland. Faculty: A faculty is a collection of academic schools grouped together for teaching, research and administrative purposes. At Kent, there are three faculties: the Faculty of Humanities, the Faculty of Sciences and the Faculty of Social Sciences. Finals: ‘Finals’ is the name given to the last set of examinations taken by students at the end of their final year at university. Firm offer: The offer of a place that has been accepted as the applicant’s first choice of course and university. Foundation degrees: These qualifications are designed and delivered in partnership with employers to equip students with the relevant knowledge and skills for business. They are equivalent to the first two years of an undergraduate degree and may be taken full-time over two years or part-time over a longer period. Students will normally already work within a related industry, as much of the programme assessment is work based.

Continued overleaf 357


Glossary

Glossary (cont) Foundation programmes: A course designed to prepare students who have qualifications that are acceptable for general university entry, but are not at the appropriate level or coverage for a specific course of study. Once a foundation level is successfully completed, a student can gain entry onto a full degree programme.

Higher National Diploma (HND): This vocational qualification is equivalent to the first two years of an undergraduate degree. It is usually taught on a full-time basis over two years and prepares students for careers in industry. Students wishing to complete a full degree may be able to take a ‘top-up’ award upon successful completion of their HND.

Further education (FE): Further education provides education and courses in a wide range of subjects and levels. These include A Levels, AS Levels, Vocational A Levels, National Diplomas and key skills, and can be offered in school sixth forms, further education colleges, adult education colleges, etc.

Home students: Students who have been ordinarily resident in the UK or elsewhere in the European Union for the three years preceding 1 September, 1 January or 1 April closest to the beginning of the first term before the start of their course.

Graduate: A person who has successfully completed their degree and has been awarded their qualification.

Honours degree (Hons): A course taken at university, normally a first degree that lasts three or four years.

Halls of residence: Accommodation blocks that traditionally provide catered or self-catered rooms and a variety of amenities, including common rooms and launderettes. Kent offers first-year students the opportunity to live in purpose-built student flats at the Canterbury and Medway campuses (see p238 and p264).

Humanities subjects: These are subjects that explore cultural themes. At Kent, humanities subjects include history, English, philosophy, music technology, creative events, religious studies, languages and architecture.

Higher education (HE): Higher education provides education and training for students of 18 years of age and older, who have completed the required amount of study at school, or in further education. Higher National Certificate (HNC): This vocational qualification, highly valued by employers, is equivalent to the first year of an undergraduate degree. Usually taught on a parttime basis over two years, the HNC prepares students for careers in specific areas of industry. Students can take additional modules to ‘top-up’ to a Higher National Diploma (HND).

358

Insurance offer: The offer of a place at university that an applicant accepts as a second choice. This is the place the applicant may attend if the requirements of the firm offer are not met. International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IB): An internationally recognised qualification for students aged 16 to 19. It leads to a single qualification, rather than separate qualifications for individual subjects. An IB Diploma total of 24 points is worth 260 UCAS points – the same as a ‘B’ and two ‘C’ grades at A level. The maximum of 45 points earns 720 UCAS points, equivalent to six A levels at grade ‘A’.

International English Language Testing System (IELTS): An English language qualification that overseas students may need to complete before starting a degree course in the UK. International students: This term is used to describe students from outside the EU who come to the UK to study. Internships: See Year in Industry. Joint honours: An honours degree where two subjects are studied on a 50:50 basis. Key skills: Key skills refer to skills that are required in education, training and work. They are also known as transferable skills because they can be used in different situations. They include communication, IT, literacy, numeracy, team work, problem solving, initiative and self management. Key skills attract tariff points for entry into higher education. The points awarded for each Key skill depends on the level of qualification achieved: Key skills level 2 3 4

UCAS points 10 20 30

Lecturer: Academic staff who teach in their first permanent post at university, or who are at an early stage of their career. They may lead research groups and supervise postgraduates. Maintenance grant: This is a non-repayable grant that can help with living and study costs. All UK students are eligible for a maintenance grant and should apply through Student Finance England.


Glossary

Major/minor honours degree: A degree programme where the majority of study is in one subject and the minority in another. For example, at Kent, a student can choose to study Accounting & Finance with Computing and focus 25% of their study at Stages 2 and 3 on computing. Module: A unit of study that explores a specific area within a subject and is given a credit rating. Some modules are optional, while others are compulsory and are known as ‘core’ modules. For example, at Kent, ‘Introduction to Government’ is a 15-credit module of the Politics and International Relations degree programme. OCR Nationals: These are work-related qualifications aimed primarily at 14 to 16-yearolds, especially those with a particular career in mind or who want to find out more about a certain sector. Offer levels: Offers are made by the Admissions Office and are usually conditional, upon the applicant satisfying a range of entry criteria. See firm offer and conditional offer. Ordinary degree: This is also known as a ‘pass’ degree. It is awarded where students complete the requisite number of credits for an award, but not at a sufficiently high level to achieve an honours award. Overseas students: See International students. Personal statement: This is a section of the UCAS application form that must be completed by all prospective students. It is an opportunity for the applicant to demonstrate their suitability and enthusiasm for their chosen course.

Personal tutor: When they start university, students are allocated a personal tutor, usually a member of staff in their academic school who is responsible for their academic welfare. Postgraduate: The next level of education after undergraduate study (eg MA, MSc, MPhil, PhD), sometimes known as ‘graduate study’. Professional recognition: Some universities offer routes for qualifying in a particular profession and give exemption from entrance exams. Examples of such courses at Kent include Law, Architecture and Accounting & Finance. Professor: A senior academic who holds a departmental chair (ie, head of academic school/department at the university). Programme type: How a student may choose to study their subject. Subjects can be run as full-time, full-time and part-time or part-time-only courses. To find out how a particular Kent course is run, look at the coloured boxes on each of the subject pages in this prospectus. Quality Assurance Agency (QAA): A government agency that assesses the quality and standards of UK higher education. Students should look for judgements of confidence in the following areas: the quality of learning opportunities, support and advisory services. Kent’s QAA audit in 2008 confirmed the quality and standards of all the University’s degree programmes. Reader: A senior academic with a distinguished international reputation in research.

Required subjects: In order to be eligible for certain courses, students may be required to have studied specific subjects (ie required subjects) and achieved a desired level of proficiency in those areas. For example, at Kent, if an applicant wishes to study Social Anthropology with French, they must achieve a grade ‘C’ in A level French. Not all courses have required subjects; check the coloured boxes of the subject pages for more information. Research Assessment Exercise (RAE): The Research Assessment Exercise assesses the quality of research in universities and colleges in the UK. Departments or Schools rated 4* indicates that their research is of “world-leading” or “internationally excellent” standard. The RAE is to be replaced by the Research Excellence Framework (REF). Returning to learning: Students who are considering a return to higher education after a few years (or more) out of formal education. Scholarships: Scholarships are a financial award in recognition of excellence to support students while they are at university. Scholarships are awarded on merit only and do not have to be repaid. Kent awards scholarships on the basis of academic, musical and sporting excellence. Sciences: At Kent, science subjects include: actuarial science, astrophysics, biosciences, computing, engineering and digital arts, forensic science, mathematics, pharmacy, physics, space science and statistics. Semester: See Term.

Continued overleaf 359


Glossary

Glossary (cont) Seminar: A small meeting of students and their lecturer to discuss aspects of the course or a specific topic covered in lectures. Senior lecturer: A member of staff who demonstrates strong research prowess, as well as sound teaching and academic skills. Single honours: An honours degree course in which a student studies a single subject. Social sciences: These are subjects that explore human society. At Kent, social sciences subjects include: anthropology, business, conservation, criminology, cultural studies, economics, environmental social science, journalism, law, politics, professional practice, psychology, social policy, social sciences, sociology and sports studies. Student Finance England: A partnership between the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) and the Students Loan Company (SLC) to provide financial support to students on behalf of the government. All students living in England and entering higher education should apply to Student Finance England (SFE) for core financial support, which includes the tuition fee loan, the student loan for maintenance and the maintenance grant. Students in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland will have their finance applications processed by authorities in their own region. All UK and EU students should visit www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance.co.uk for further information. Student loan for maintenance: This loan assists with living and study costs. It is paid directly into the student’s bank account at the start of each term. Every UK student is eligible for 72% of the loan; the remaining 28% is means-tested on household income. EU and international students are not eligible.

360

Student Union: All universities have a Students’ Union. They provide a variety of facilities, represent students’ interests at the university and offer help, support and advice. At Kent, Kent Union is based on the Canterbury campus and the Universities at Medway Students’ Association (UMSA) is based at the Medway campus. Students can get advice on many issues at the Student Advice Centre and receive help with finding part-time work at jobshop@kent Tariff points (also referred to as ‘UCAS points’): An offer of a place may be made in terms of a tariff points score rather than grades (eg 300 tariff points rather than three grade B A levels). Some programmes will request specific grades (eg ABB at A level); however, most now use this tariff system. See www.ucas.com Term: Academic years are normally divided into periods known as ‘terms’ or ‘semesters’. At Kent, terms run from September to December, January to March and April to June. Tuition fee loan: This loan covers the cost of university tuition fees. Both UK and EU full-time students are eligible for the loan, which is paid directly to the university. Students apply through Student Finance England (See entry left). UCAS: The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service helps prospective students to find the right higher education course in the UK. UCAS is also the clearing house through which the majority of applications to universities from prospective students are processed. Their application form is available online and students can apply for financial support at the same time. See www.ucas.com

UCAS Extra: This offers applicants the opportunity to apply for another course if they have used all five choices but have not secured a university place. This facility is available from the end of February to the end of June. See www.ucas.com UCAS Track: Students can track the progress of their application online, reply to any offers and make amendments to their UCAS form (eg a change of address or email) This facility is available via UCAS. Unconditional offer: An unconditional offer is made when a student has fulfilled all the criteria for admission to a university programme. Undergraduate: A student studying for their first degree. Visit days: Applicants who have been made an offer, or requested to attend an interview, will be invited to a subject-specific Visit Day. At Kent, these run from December to April. Welcome Week (sometimes referred to as ‘Freshers’ Week’): New students are known as ‘freshers’ and all universities offer a series of activities to help them settle into university life, make friends and find their way around. Year abroad: Some universities offer students the opportunity to live and study in another country as part of their studies. At Kent, students have the opportunity to study in many different countries. See also Erasmus. Year in industry: This takes place between the second and final years of study and gives students the opportunity to work in real-life roles that relate to their programme of study.


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Index A Academic costs credit excellence scholarships Access programme to Learning Fund Accommodation Canterbury costs Medway Accounting & Finance Actuarial Science Administration, Business Advice and support (Medway) Aerial picture (Canterbury) American and Postcolonial Literature, English and Literature, English and Studies Animal Science (Canterbury College) Anthropology Biological Medical Social Applied Chemistry (MidKent College) Professional Practice 32, Psychology Applying to Kent Archaeological Studies, Classical and Archaeology and Anthropology Architecture Art and Film Art Fine (South Kent College) History & Philosophy of 362

306 217 6 321 300 313 238 309 264 24 26 50 274 232 90 90 28 187 30 44 140 162 188 303 158 226 54 30 34 36 98 199 116

Artificial Intelligence (Computer Science) 58 Arts 242 Digital 78 European 96, 116 Visual and Performed 178 Associate and Partner Colleges 283 Astronomy, Space Science and Astrophysics 38 Astrophysics, Physics with 152 Audio Design and Production 40

B BA/BSc top-up Biochemistry Biodiversity Conservation and Management Biological Anthropology Biology Biomedical Science Brussels, University of Kent at Bursaries 313, Business Administration and Management (MidKent College) (Canterbury College) Computer Science Information Technology International Mathematics Studies (top-up)

186 42 64 44 46 48 281 321 50 191 189 58 118 124 138 52 190

C Canterbury and the region campus from the air College

236 234 232 284

Careers Advisory Service Canterbury 318 Medway 275 Certificate in Combined Studies 303 Certificates and diplomas 186 Chaplaincy Canterbury 257 Medway 276 Chemistry Applied (MidKent College) 188 Forensic 100 Pharmaceutical 146 Choosing a course and applying 228 Cinema, Gulbenkian 242 Civil Engineering (MidKent College) 192 Class hours 218 Classical & Archaeological Studies 54 Clinical Psychology 158 Clubs and societies 246 Colleges Associate and Partner 283 The (Canterbury campus) 235 Come and visit 20 Communication, Visual Design and (South Kent College) 212 Communications Engineering, Electronic and 84 Community Pharmacy Practice 193 Comparative Literature 56 Computer Science 58 Systems Engineering 60 Systems, Electronic and 84 Computing Joint Honours 62 Services Canterbury 250 Medway 272 Web 182 Concerts on campus 245 Conflict, Peace and Security 154


Index

Conservation Construction (MidKent College) (South Kent College) Consultancy Computer Science Information Technology Costs academic living Counselling Service Canterbury Medway Course structure Courses Creative Events: Design and Production Writing, English and American Literature and Credit, academic Criminal Justice Studies Criminology Cultural Studies

64 194 195 58 118 306 309 257 276 216 22 72 90 217 66 68 70

D Day schools Deferred entry payment of tuition fees Degree pathways Dental Care, Primary Design and Communication, Visual (South Kent College) Experience for Performance Graphic (West Kent College) Multimedia Technology and

303 228 310 217 156

212 76 74 200 142

Design and Production Audio Creative Events Developmental Disabilities, Intellectual and (Foundation) (Honours) Digital Arts Diploma programmes (international students) Disability and Dyslexia Support Service Canterbury Medway Drama and Theatre Studies Drill Hall Library

40 72 203 120 78 292 254 275 80 272

E Economics 82 Electronic and Communications Engineering 84 and Computer Systems 84 Equivalent or Lower Level Qualifications (ELQ) 229, 306 Employability, jobs and 316 Employment Relations and Human Resource Management 86 Engineering Civil (MidKent College) 192 Computer Systems 60 Electronic and Communications 84 (MidKent College) 196 Software (Information Technology) 118 (South Kent College) 197 English Language and Linguistics 88 requirements 225, 292 tuition 289 English Literature 90 Enterprise module 318

Entry requirements general (international students) 224, Environmental Social Science Equality and Diversity Canterbury Medway Erasmus programme Europe European Arts 96, Economics History Legal Studies Management (Business Administration) Office students Studies university Events, Creative: Design and Production Excellent job prospects Exercise Management, Sport and Experience Design Extra financial support

222 290 92 257 276 326 280 116 82 114 130 50 289 286 94 12 72 16 172 76 313

F Facilities Fantastic locations Fashion and Textiles (South Kent College) Textiles and (West Kent College) Fees and costs and funding international students Film Art and Studies

10 4 198 211 306 304 294 36 96

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Index (cont) Finance Accounting & 24 for international students 294 Financial Economics 82 Mathematics 138 support 310, 313 Fine Art 98 (South Kent College) 199 First-class facilities 10 Food and drink Canterbury 239 (costs) 309 Forensic Sciences 100 Foundation degrees 186, 220 Programme for International Students 102, 220 programmes 220, 290 year for international students 220 French 104 Funding 320 fees and 304 for international students 294, 313, 322

G General entry requirements German Glossary Grant for living costs special support Graphic Design (West Kent College) Gulbenkian Cinema Theatre

364

222 106 354 310 310 200 242 242

H Health and Social Care (Canterbury College) Practice Higher National Certificate Diploma Hispanic Studies History & Philosophy of Art American Studies Hong Kong Alumni scholarship Honours degrees with a foundation year Human Resource Management, Employment Relations and

108 201 110 186 186 112 114 116 28 322 220 86

I Information Technology Technology (MidKent College) Insurance Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (Foundation) (Honours) Interactive Media (South Kent College) Interiors International Business and European students Foundation Programme Office opportunities 14, Relations, Politics and Students, Foundation Programme for students students’ fees work opportunities

118 202 309 203 120 204 122 124 286 220 289 324 154 102 286 294 328

IT Services Canterbury Medway Italian

250 272 126

J Jobs and employability Jobshop Journalism and the News Industry Junior Year Abroad Justice Studies, Criminal

16, 316 317 128 290 66

K Kent: The UK’s European university Kent gives you added value studying at KentOne card Kent Union Jobshop

12 314 214 239 246, 289 317

L Laboratory Technology, Life Science (MidKent College) Language, English and Linguistics requirements tuition Law (Canterbury) (Medway) Leapfrog Day Nursery Learning through work Legal Studies, European

205 88 225, 292 289 130 132 275 328 130


Index

Library and IT services (Medway) Drill Hall Templeman Life Science Laboratory Technology (MidKent College) Literature American Studies Comparative English Living costs grants and loans Loans repayments Locations Loyalty scheme

272 272 252 205 28 56 90 309 310 310 313 4 322

M Management, Biodiversity Conservation and Business and (MidKent College) Employment Relations and Human Resource Retail (Canterbury College) Science Sport and Exercise Marketing Mathematics and Statistics Business Financial Media, Interactive (South Kent College) Medical Anthropology care (Medway) Centre Medway campus Park region

MidKent College Modes of study Modules Multimedia Technology and Design Music Canterbury Popular, Performance (West Kent College) scholarships Technology

283 217 218 142 244 208 245, 322 144

N National Student Survey Teaching Fellowships Networks (Computer Science) Nursery Canterbury Medway

6 6 58 254 275

64 191

O 86 210 134 172 136 138 138 138 204 140 275 254 260 266 262

Oaks Day Nursery Open Days Open Studies short courses Our students Overseas scholarships

254 20, 368 303 18 322

P Paris, University of Kent at Parking on campus Canterbury Medway Part-time students’ grants study Partner Colleges, Associate and Partner school scholarships

Performance Design for Popular Music (West Kent College) Performed Arts, Visual and Personal support services (Canterbury) Pharmaceutical Chemistry Pharmacy Practice, Community Philosophy of Art, History & Photography (South Kent College) (West Kent College) Physics Politics and International Relations Popular Music Performance (West Kent College) Pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes Primary Dental Care Production Audio Design and Creative Events: Design and Professional Practice, Applied Programmes degree foundation of study for international students Progression routes Psychology Public Services (Canterbury College)

74 208 178 254 146 148 193 150 116 206 207 152 154 208 292 156 40 72 32 217 220 290 218 158 209

281

Q 239 265 310 300 282 322

Quick Reference Guide

330

R Radio, student Religious Studies

246 160 365


Index (cont) Repayment of loans Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) Retail Management (Canterbury College) Returning to learning

313 6 210 296

S Sandwich courses Science Actuarial Animal (Canterbury College) Biomedical Computer Environmental Social foundation programmes Life, Laboratory Technology (MidKent College) Management Sports Sciences Social Scholarships Security Canterbury Medway Social Anthropology Care, Health and (Canterbury College) Care Practice, Health and Policy Psychology Science, Environmental Sciences Work Societies Canterbury Medway Sociology Software Engineering (Information Technology) 366

328 26 187 48 58 92 299 205 134 174 166 313, 321 257 276 162 108 201 110 164 158 92 166 168 246 269 170 118

South Kent College 284 Space Science and Astrophysics, Astronomy 38 Special support grant 310 Sport and Exercise Management 172 Canterbury 240 Medway 266 Sports Centre 240 Federation 241 scholarships 241, 321 Science 174 Therapy 176 Stages of study 217 Statistics, Mathematics and 138 Student advice and support (Medway) 274 Student Learning Advisory Service Canterbury 248 Medway 270 Student life (Medway) 266 loans 310 radio 246 support (Kent Union) 246 Students 18 from the EU 286 international 286 Students’ Union Canterbury 246, 289 Medway 266, 276 Study modes of 217 stages of 217 Studying abroad 325 at Kent 214 Support for international students 288 Systems Electronic and Computer 84 Engineering, Computer 60

T Technology and Design, Multimedia Information (MidKent College) Life Science Laboratory (MidKent College) Music Templeman Library Term dates Term-time and holiday working Textiles and Fashion (West Kent College) Fashion and (South Kent College) Theatre Gulbenkian Studies, Drama and Therapy, Sports Tonbridge, University of Kent at Transport links Canterbury Medway Travel costs Tuition fees international students

142 118 202 205 144 252 229 313 211 198 242 80 176 283 236 262 309 306 294

U UCAS applications timeline Visit Days UK’s European university UMSA Universities at Medway Students’ Association University funding for students University of Kent at Brussels at Paris at Tonbridge

227 228 368 12 276 261 266, 276 320 281 281 283


Index

V Venue, The Visiting the University Visas Visual and Performed Arts Design and Communication (South Kent College) Volunteering

246 20, 368 225 178 212 246, 317

W War Studies Web Applications (Information Technology) Computing Welcoming environment West Kent College When to apply Where can I study? Canterbury Medway Other locations Wildlife Conservation Work-based learning Working in industry Work placements

180 118 182 8 285 228 230 258 278 64 303 328 328

Y Year in industry

328

The University will use all reasonable endeavours to deliver courses and other services in accordance with the descriptions set out in this prospectus. However the University does not provide education on a commercial basis. It is also largely dependent on charitable and public funds which the University has to manage in a way which is efficient and cost effective in the context of the provision of a wide range of courses and services to a large number of students. The University therefore reserves the right to make variations to the contents and method of delivery of courses and other services, to discontinue courses and other services and to merge or combine courses, if such action is reasonably considered to be necessary by the University. If the University discontinues any course it will use its best endeavours to provide a suitable alternative course. All students will be required as a condition of enrolment to agree to abide by and to submit to the procedures of the University’s Regulations as amended from time to time. A copy of the current Regulations is available on our website at www.kent.ac.uk/regulations/

Data protection and consent to process For the University to operate efficiently it needs to process information about you for administrative, academic and health and safety reasons. Any offer this institution makes to you is subject to your consent to process such information and therefore a requirement before we can register you as a student.

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Visiting the University Come along to our campuses to see for yourself what it’s like to be a student. We hold both Open Days (for everybody) and UCAS Visit Days (for students who have already applied to Kent and their families and friends).

Edinburgh Glasgow

Open Days Durham

Canterbury Canterbury Open Days are held in June and October for potential students and their family and friends to have a look round the campus. The day includes a wide range of subject displays, demonstrations and informal lectures and seminars, and the opportunity to tour the campus with current students to view student accommodation and facilities. You can also meet staff to discuss course options or admissions, disability and dyslexia support, and study skills. For more detailed information, see our website. Canterbury Open Days 2010 Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Medway Open Days are held at our campus in Chatham (adjacent to the Historic Dockyard) in July and October. You have the opportunity to tour the campus with current students, speak with academic and support staff, attend subject presentations and get advice on admissions procedures. For more detailed information, see our website. Medway Open Days 2010 Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

Further information about Open Days www.kent.ac.uk/opendays/ 368

Liverpool

Manchester

United Kingdom Cambridge Oxford

London KENT

UCAS Visit Days

Further information

UCAS Visit Days run between December and April each year at our campuses in Canterbury and Medway. They include a tour of the campus, a general talk on the University and a talk from a departmental representative. You have the opportunity to meet academic staff from your chosen subject and to discuss any queries you may have about the courses, the department or the University.

Recruitment, Information and Guidance Unit, The Registry, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: 01227 827272 or 0800 975 3777 E: information@kent.ac.uk

If you are invited for an interview, it will usually be held on one of our Visit Days. If we make you an offer without an interview, it usually includes an invitation to a Visit Day, but this might not be possible if you have applied late.

Further information about UCAS Visit Days www.kent.ac.uk/visitdays/

“The campus is beautiful. I came on a visit day and just got the feeling that, yes, I could be happy here.” Damian Wrigley History


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How to reach us Canterbury and Medway have good road and rail links to Gatwick and Heathrow airports. The Channel ports at Dover and Ramsgate are approximately 30 minutes from Canterbury and just over an hour from Chatham; and the Channel Tunnel stations at Ashford and Ebbsfleet are within easy reach. Canterbury By rail London (Victoria) to Canterbury East: journey time approx 85 minutes. London (St Pancras) to Canterbury West: journey time approx 60 minutes. London (Charing Cross or Waterloo) to Canterbury West: journey time approx 90 minutes.

Addresses Medway By rail

Information, Recruitment and Admissions Office

London Victoria and Charing Cross or Kent coast to Chatham: journey time approx 55 minutes.

The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 (0)1227 827272 F: +44 (0)1227 827077 E: information@kent.ac.uk

By road From London, the north and west: M25, M2. Follow signs for Gillingham, then the Historic Dockyard and Chatham Maritime via the A289 and the Medway Tunnel. From the East, turn off the A2, A289, the Gillingham Northern Link Road, follow signs for the Medway Tunnel. For satellite navigation, the postcode for central campus is ME4 4EU.

By bus From Chatham Station to Chatham Maritime/ Compass Centre, journey time approx 15 minutes.

European Office The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 824921 F: +44 1227 827115 E: euroff@kent.ac.uk

International Office The Registry, The University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 1227 827994 F: +44 1227 823247 E: international-office@kent.ac.uk

By bus Acknowledgements

London Victoria to Canterbury bus station. Canterbury bus station to the University, regular service, journey time approx 15 minutes.

By road From London, the north and west: M25, (M20), M2, A2. Canterbury central ring road, A290 Whitstable Road, St Thomas Hill, approx one mile (1.6km) up the A290, University entrance on right (signposted) near top of hill.

Open minds: at Kent, we will encourage you to ask tough questions, think for yourself and draw your own conclusions, something which stems from what we call critical thinking.

Broad horizons: situated at the heart of Europe, with campuses in Canterbury, Medway, Brussels and Paris, studying at Kent will help you develop an international outlook on the world and open up a range of opportunities for future work and study.

For satellite navigation, the postcode for the nearest buildings to the visitor’s car park are CT2 7NF or CT2 7NN.

Open Days in 2010 Canterbury Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

Published by the University of Kent 2010 Š. Design by UffindellWest and University of Kent Design and Print Centre. Photographs by Simon Jarratt, Martin Levenson, Mike Dye, Jim Higham. Illustration on p99 taken from 'Men at Work' by Elizabeth Akehurst, Alison Hollis, Liz Mason, istockphoto.com, www.sxc.hu. Printed by Belmont Press Ltd If possible please recycle this prospectus when you have finished using it. Thanks to all the staff and students who helped to make this prospectus.

TT COC 002168


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University of Kent The Registry, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NZ T: +44 (0)1227 764000 E: information@kent.ac.uk

Undergraduate Prospectus 2011 The UK’s European university Undergraduate Prospectus 2011

Open Days in 2010 Canterbury Saturday 26 June Saturday 9 October

Medway Saturday 10 July Saturday 16 October

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