Page 1

MECA MAKES MARKS PROJECT: PLACE: what do you imagine? PROBLEM: The Congress Street block in front of MECA needs to be engaged/ activated for the entire public for an all Portland block party PARTNER: MECA, SPACE gallery and the entire Portland community ACTION: Students asked everyone to “describe this place!” with 10 buckets of chalk, signs, giant sculpture, window prompt OUTCOME: Gigantic mural with thousands of words and images describing ‘place’ in bricks and covering the street

D IGITA A L IMAGING G SPECIALIST / / FINE ARTIST / / WEB TECHNICIAN // GALLERY Y OWNER // CLO O THIER /// JEW W ELR RY DESIG G NER // M ETALS S M ITH // GOLDSMITH H // EDUCATOR // VIDEOGRAPHE E R // P ROF F ES S SO O R // S OFTWA A RE EN N GINEER // LEC C T URER R // PRINT T ING MA A NA A G E R // BOO O K AR RTIST // TEACH H ER //DE E CORATIVE PAINT T E R // INTERIO O R DESIGNER // S ET D ECO O RA ATO O R // M ECH H ANII CAL A RTIST T // D ES S IGN N ER // ASSISTANT G ALLE E RY Y DIREC C TOR // EXEC C UT T IVE E D IR R ECTOR // FRE E ELANCE PHOTOGRAPHER // PROFESSOR OF ART T // PA A INTER // CITY PLL ANNER // A RT MUSEUM M PREPARAT T OR // LIBRA A R I AN // ART T TEAC C HER / / A RT LEAD D ER R // DIREC C TOR R OF CO C MM M UNIC C AT T IONS / / M ARKE E TING G COM M M UN N ICA ATII ONS DIRECTOR / / T HO O UG G HT L EAD D E R // TE E XTILL E DESIGNER // FIBER A RTIST / / SCU U LPTOR // EX X HIBIT D E SIG G N ER / / A NTIQUE DEALE E R / / MODELL MAKER R // MURA A L IST /// EXPRES S SIVE THE E RAPIST / / CA ATA A L OG DE E SIGN N ER /// PRODUCT DES S IGNER // A RT T DIREC C TOR // W EB P R OJEC C T LEA A DER // CA A BINETMA A KE E R // A RCHITE E CTU U RA A L MILLW W ORK CRAFTS S M AN N /// IND D E P END D EN N T R ETA A ILE ER // FINIS S HING MA A NAGER / / YOUT T H P RO O GR R A M C OO O RD D IN N ATOR // FIN N E A RT H A NDLER // DIGIT TAL S TAGE MANAGER // ME E TAL FABRICA ATOR // PRINT DESIGNER / / WEB B D ES S IGNER ER // DIRECT T O R S T R AT T EG G I C HU U M A N C AP P IT TA L /// KIT T CH H EN D E SIGNER R // CA A NVAS S MAN N // YOG GA IN N STRUC C T OR // W OO O DSHO O P MANA A GER / / BAKE E R /// STONE SC C ULPTOR // E D ITORIA AL IL L LU U ST T R ATO O R / / ART T HISTO O RIA A N / / CAK K E DECOR R ATOR R // STORE E DESIGNER R // MUSEUM ASSOCIATE // INTERNET MARKE E TING EXECU U TIVE // CUS S TOM JE E WE E LRY Y DE E SIG G NE E R // CREAT T IV V E DIRECT T O R / / CON N TEM M PO O RARY Y C RAFT A RTIST /// FINE A RT PRINTER // ADV V E RTISING G // EXPRE E S SIVE THERAPIST // PAPER AR RTIST // C REATII VE SE E RVICE E S MAN N A GER R // ART DEPAR RTM M ENT MANA A GER // OCCUPA ATIONAL T HERAPIST / / PO O TT T ER // FLORA AL DESII GNER / / C ER R AM M ICS TEA A CHER R // F INIS S H VA A RNIS S HE E R / / DESIGN N EDITO O R / / WOODW W O RK K ER // WEB B IN N TERFACE E DESIGNE N R // D IREC C TO O R OF IN N T ERN N ET T DEV V ELOPM M ENT T // PH H OT T OGRA A PHER // TENSION FA A BRIC S T RUCTURE DESIGNER R // FASH H ION N PH H OTOGRAPHER // FEATURE A NIM M AT TOR R // FRAME E MAKE E R // FABRIC C DES S IG G NER // PRINT DES S IGNER R /// NE E W ME E D IA EX X E CU U TIV V E PROD D UCER /// / S EAMSTRES S S // FRAME E R // DESIGN DIRE E C TOR // COSTUME DES IGNER // VII SU U AL AR RTS TE E A CHE E R / / G RADU U ATE STUDE E N T // R E S IDE E N T ART T IST T /// STY Y LIS ST / / PUPPET INS S TALLAT T ION AR RTIST /// WRITER R // SEN N IOR A C C OUNT T MA A NAGER R // GR R AP P HIC DESIGNER R /// D E S IG G N PA RT N ER / / LIBRAR RY TECHN N ICAL L ASSIST TANT T // WEB B TECHNOLO O GIS S T /// AR RTIST / / FURN N ITURE MAKER /// N EW MEDIA A FACULTY Y // LITERA ATURE & M EDICINE PROJECT C OORDINA ATOR // BO O OK K MAKE E R // APP P DESIGNER R / / IN N T EGR R ATED A RT TEACHER // ASS S IS S TANT DIRE E CTOR ART MU U SEUM // A PPAR R EL DESIGNER // INTER R A CTIVE D ESIGNER / / ED D ITOR// PUBLIS S HER R // DENTAL LAB TEC C HNICIA A N // GEM M OLOGIS S T // BE E NCH JEW W ELER // PAINTE E R // CARTO O ONIST // TE E CHNOLOGY SU U PPORT ASSISTAN N T // CITY ARTS PROGRAM D IR R EC C T O R // DR R AWING INS S T RUCTO O R // STU U DIO T E CHNICIAN / / CREATOR // FR R AMER /// PE E R F OR R M AN N C E ARTIST T / / O R G ANIC FAR R MER R // ART T S COORDINA ATOR R /// PRO OJECT ROOM D IRE E C T O R / / CERAMIC C S T ECHNICIAN // CARPENTER’S APPRENTICE // SEA A MSTR R ESS /// PRINTMA A KER // K NIT T TER R // APP DEVELOPER R // MA A RKETIN N G DIRE E CTO O R // FREELL AN N CE DESIGNER / / MED E IA P RODU U C TION A S SIST TANT / / META A LSM M ITH H IN N G AND D J EWELRY Y TECH H NIC C IA A N // PROT T OTY Y PE BUIL L DER R / / GAM M E ADVISOR // AP P P DEV V E LOPE E R // S ILVERS S M ITH /// POT T TERY Y ST T UDIO O MANAGER // A CCESS S ORY DES S IG G NER // LIGHTING DESIGNER // CU U RATOR // PUPP P ETEE E R // PRINT T MAKING INSTRU U CT T OR // M USEUM M ASSIS S TANT DIREC C TOR // CHEF // FOUND DRY Y WOR RKER R // EXHIBIT TIONS COORDIN NAT T OR R /// FON N T DESIGN N ER R // M OL LD CASTER // PUBLIC AR RT ADVO O CAT T E /// AR R C HIT T EC C T /// G ALLERY OW W N E R // PA CKA A GING D ESIGNE E R // ENVIRONME E N TAL DES S IGNE E R // IDEN N TITY DESIGNER // CUS S TO O M HOM M E BU U ILDER ER /// FURN N IT T UR R E D E SIG G NE E R /// W E AV E R / / INTERNE ET ADVER RTISIN NG DE ESIGN NER // WE EB DEVELLOP PER // GAM ME DESIGNER /// STUDIO PHOT TOGRAP P HER // VIDEO EDITO O R // FILL M ED D ITOR R /// IN N FO O RMA ATION DESIGNER // SH H O E DES S IGNE E R / / PRODUCTION M AN N AG GER // FU U S ED GLASS ARTIST // ENVIRONMENT TAL PHOTOG G RA A PHER R // FURNIT T UR R E M AKE E R / / PO O ET // ACCOUNT T MANA A GER /// PH H OT T O TEC C HNIC C IAN // DIR R ECT T OR R O F CREA ATIVE T E C HNOLO O G Y // SE E NIOR EN N GINE E ER // LANDSC C APE P HOTOG G RA A PHER /// COMMUNITY DE E VELOP P M ENT T D IRECTOR // A RTIST IN RES S IDENCE E // PRODUCTION D ESIGNER / / US S ER R EXPERIENC CE A RCHIT T ECT / / 3 D D ES S IGNER R // AD D VERTIS S ING AR RT DIRECTOR // ANII MA ATOR // ART THERAPIS ST // ART T IS S AN // AR RTS ADMIN M IST T RATO O R / / COMIC BOO O K ART T IST // C RAF F T AR RT IST T // M E DICAL ILLUSTRATOR // MUSEUM TECHNICIAN // ORNAME E NTAL L BL L ACKSMII TH // R EG G ISTRA A R // A RCHIV V IST T // PU U PPETEER // PRIVA ATE C HE E F / / SOUN N D ENGIN N EER // PU U BLICA ATIONS EDITOR // B OO O K ILLUSTRA AT OR // C ARPENT N ER // FA A S HION N DESIGNER // SEAM M ST T RESS // FRAM M ER // DESIG G N DIRECTOR /// COS S TU U M E DESIGNER // VISU U A L A RT T S TE E AC C HER R /// GR R ADU U AT TE S TUDE E NT / / A RTI T ST-IN-- RESIDE E NCE // STYLIST T // PUP P PET IN N STALLA ATION N ARTIS S T // W RITER / / SEN N IOR OR R AC C C O UNT M A NA A G ER // GRAPH H IC D ESIGNER /// WEB D ESIGN PA A RT T NE E R /// C O MMU U N ITY ART E DUCATOR // W EB TEC C H NOLO O GIST /// AR RTIST T / / F URNITURE MAK K ER R // NEW MEDIA FA CULTY / / LIT T ERA ATURE & M EDICINE PROJEC C T CO O O RDIN N ATOR / / BOOKMAKER /// E NVIRONME E NTALIST // AP P P DESIGNER // INTEGRATED ART TEACHER // A SSISTANT DII RECTO O R ART M USEUM // AP P PAREL DE E SIGNER / / INTERACTIVE E DE E SIGNER / / EDITOR/ PUBLISHER // DE E NTAL L LAB TECH H N IC C IAN /// GEMO O LOGIST T / / B ENCH H JEW W ELER // PAINTE E R // CA A RT OONIST // T ECHN N OLO O GY Y SUPP P ORT ASS S ISTANT T // CITY A RTS PROGRA A M DIRECTO O R // DRA AWING INST T RUC C T O R / / ST STUDIO O TECH H NICIAN N // CREATOR // FRAMER // PE E RFORMANCE AR RT IS S T // ORGANIC FAR R MER // A RTS COORDINATOR // PROJECT ROOM D IREC C TOR /// CER R AMICS TECHNICIA A N /// CARPEN N TER’S APPR R ENTIC C E // Q UILTER // SET DE E CORAT T OR // MECHANICA A L AR RTIST T // DE E SIGN N E R // AS S S IST TAN N T G ALLER RY DIREC C T OR R // E XECUTIVE E D IREC C T OR R // FREE E LA A N CE P HOT T O GRA A PHER // PROFESS S OR OF F ART // PAIN N TER / / C ITY P LANNE E R // AR RT MU U S EUM PRE E PA A RA ATOR // LIBRA A RIAN / / ART TEACHE E R // ART LEADER // C OMMU U NITY-ART EDUCAT T O R // MA A RKET T ING COM M MUNICAT T IONS D IRECT T O R // THOUGHT LE E ADER // TEX X TILE DE E SIGNE E R // F IBE E R ARTIS S T // MOTIO O N G RAPH H ICS D E SIGN N ER R / / EXH H IBIT DESIGN N ER // AN N T IQUE DEALER // MO O DE E L M AK K E R /// MURA A L IST // EXPR R E SS S IV V E T H ERAPIST /// CA A BIN N ETM M AKER // FUR R N ITURE CONSERVATOR // INDEPENDENT RE E TAIL L ER /// FII NISHING NG MANA AGER // YO OUTH PRO OGR RAM COO ORDINAT T O R // F INE ART HA H ND DLER R // MA A STER R PRIN NTMAKE ER /// K NITTE E R // APP P DE E VELOP P ER // M ARKET T ING DIREC C TOR // FREELANCE DESIGNER / / ILLUS S T R ATO O R / / ART T H IST T O RIA A N / / C AKE E DECOR R ATOR R // STORE E DESIGNER R // MUSEUM ASSOCIATE // INTERNET MARKE E TING EXECU U TIVE // CUS S TOM JE E WE E LRY Y DE E SIG G NE E R // MEDIA PRO O DUCT T ION AS S SII STA A N T // M ETALS S M IT T HII NG G AN N D JEW W E LRY T E CHNICII A N // TE E X TILE AR R C HIVIST /// GAME A DVISO O R // A PP DE E VELOPER /// SILVE E RSMITH IN N STALL L AT T ION N ARTIS S T /// T Y P OGRA A PHER R /// RE E TOUC C HER /// CERAMIST // SCREEN PRIN N TE E R / / SIGN N MAKE ER /// ST T ONE CA A RVER /// STOR RY BO O ARD A RTIS S T /// ST T UDIO O ARTIS S T // TATTOO O D ESIG G NER R /// CROSS S -DII SCIP P LINA A RY DE E SIGNER / / L ETT T ER R PRE E S S PRINTE E R /// D OC C UM M EN N TARY V IDEO O GRAPHER // COMM M U NITY-BASED PUBLIC ARTIST // WA ATCH H MAKER // ARCHIT T ECTU U RAL PH H OTO O G R AP P HER // TY Y PE DES S IGNER / / EN N VIRON N MENTAL L GRAPHIC C DE E SII GN N ER R /// C O LOR CO O N SULT TANT T / / VIDEO O GRAPH H ER /// CUL LT URAL L HISTORIAN // MAST T ER R PRINTER // B OOK ARTIST // TEA A CHER //DEC C O RATII VE E PA A INTER R // INTERIO O R DES S IG G NER R /// SET T DE E CO O RATOR // ART T L IBRAR R IA A N // ART TEACHE E R // PO O RTRAIT T ARTIST // AR RT L EADE E R // PHOTO O JOUR R NALIST // M AR R KE E TIN N G C O MM M U NIC C ATIO O NS S D IRE E CTOR // P OTT T ER /// TO O Y D ESIGNER // COMMERC C IA AL P HOT T OGR R AP P HER / / COMMU U NITY L EAD D ER // E SS S AYII S T / / ART CRITIC C /// VIDEO ARTIST // A RCHIT T ECTUR R AL ME E TAL FA A BRICAT T O R // BR R AND DEVELOP P ER // M ED D IA DEVELOPER / / MAKER / / M U LTII DIS S CIPLIN N ARY Y AR RTIST T // D ESIGN N ER // CR R EATIVE E EN N TREPRE E NEUR R //

MECA MAINE COLLEGE OF ART MAKE IT YOUR OWN

MECA FACTS

24/7 access to professional quality studio space for all students & individual studio spaces for all majors. 10:1 faculty to student ratio. 16 average class size. 10 average major class size. 10 majors / 2 minors. 350/30 undergraduate/graduate students. 1882 Maine College of Art founded. Within walking distance of MECA: 300 art events each year. 89 restaurants including sushi bars, Afghan, Eritrean, Chinese, Greek, Vietnamese, Thai, French, Italian and organic. 9 coffee shops (gulp). 68 art galleries and venues. 1/1/1 Portland Museum of Art/Portland Theater Co./Portland Symphony Orchestra. 16 clubs with live music. 1 Portland Seadogs baseball team. 1 Portland Pirates hockey team. 1 Red Claw basketball team. 365 sunrises over water (annually).

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART

We get it. This isn’t your hobby, this is your life. Being an artist or designer—an inspired thinker and expressive creator—is your passion. Now you’re ready to take it further. Make it your career. * MAKE IT YOUR OWN At MECA, you’ll create your unique place among all the possibilities— investigating art forms, blending media and techniques, defining your own voice. You’ll be an important part of a tightly-knit community of artists and designers who constantly challenge you to stake claim to your vision. Question perceptions. Explore edges. Keep discovering. That’s what we’ll spend the next four years doing together: making it happen.

* Take a look at a sampling of career paths of MECA alumni on the cover of this viewbook // WWW.MECA.EDU


INSIDE MECA 2 PROGRAMS / ARTISTS@WORK 4 FOUNDATION 6 GRAPHIC DESIGN 7 ILLUSTRATION 8 NEW MEDIA 9 PHOTOGRAPHY 10 PAINTING 11 PRINTMAKING 12 STUDENT GALLERY 14 SCULPTURE 15 CERAMICS 16 METALSMITHING & JEWELRY 17 WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN 18 LIBERAL ARTS / ART HISTORY / PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT 19 FACULTY / VISITING ARTISTS 20 STUDENT LIFE 21 RESIDENCE HALLS / PORTLAND 22 ICA / MFA / CAREER SERVICES 23 MECA ALUMNI / VISIT / APPLY

WHY MAINE COLLEGE OF ART?

MECA is a place where you can make your mark. // It’s a place to explore your creativity and to experience the time and (generous) space to build a rigorous, disciplined studio practice. /// It’s an exceptional community of emerging and working artists. /// MECA is a refl flection of the diversity in the world of art and design with studios brimming with concepts that challenge conventions, materials that push boundaries and dialogue that creates a place where critical thinking, social responsibility and bold ideas are respected. // It’s at the center of Portland—one of the best cities to live in—a thriving center for the arts, craft, cultural and outdoor experiences. // The life-long skills and professional leadership you develop at MECA will translate into a future of exponential possibilities. //

MECA and Portland are your community, your inspiration and your studio. Elizabeth Jabar, Faculty, t Public Engagement/ Printmaking

Some people say our red staircase is like an artery pumping vitality to all parts of the school. Others say it’s more like a strand of DNA wrapping its way upward, linking us all with a common thread. But more simply, it’s an everyday reminder that this is a small, interconnected place and that finding other talented artists working in every medium imaginable is just a matter of walking up or down a few flights of steps. The red staircase is literally the center of our world. To us, it means MECA.

It’s small enough that the departments interact with each other. You won’t find that in other places. Erika Jensen ’12 New Media

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 1


MAINE COLLEGE OF ART BFA

PRINTMAKING

PAINTING

SCULPTURE

METALSMITHING & JEWELRY

FOUNDATION

O

L

TI

VE

ILLUSTRATION

GRAPHIC DESIGN

M

ED

IA

C

C LE

/

/

L I BER A L A

IMAGING

MECA BFA

//

PHOTOGRAPHY

PAINTING

DR

Y OR

//

FY-IN SY-LAB

OLLECTIVE TS C

ITAL

RT S

AR

T

NDATION

DIG

F OU

/

/

EN

NE

NEW MEDIA

ENGAGEM

BL I C

FI

PRINTMAKING

PU

SCULPTURE

I AW

NG

//

ART

HI

ST

CERAMICS

WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN

METALSMITHING & JEWELRY

CRAFT CO LL

EC

TI

VE

PROGRAMS Not only do we understand that every student is different, we thrive on those differences. That’s why we offer ten different majors—so you can Ànd your place. In the two years before you decide on your major, you’ll learn the principles, history and foundation of art while exploring every form of art making that interests you. Throughout this viewbook, you’ll Ànd students majoring in areas they never before considered—but after a taste in their Àrst two years, they knew they had found something exceptional. At MECA, there are no limits to what you can do—no boundaries or restrictions to your art. Just a community of people who share your deep connection to art and are committed to seeing you develop and succeed as an artist. For the next four years you’ll draw, sculpt, design and create. You’ll reÀne, question and discover. You’ll become a critical thinker, a keen observer and a powerful communicator. Along the way, you’ll experiment with art forms, evolve your technique, create your personal studio space and learn from a faculty of talented working artists. You can blur the lines— blending mediums, styles and techniques into something distinctly yours. You’ll critique and be critiqued. Inspire and be inspired by. Learn and be learned from. Most importantly, you’ll make it your own.

* See what you will study for the next four years on page 18 or visit www.meca.edu/bfa. 2 WWW.MECA.EDU

Every first year student has a faculty mentor here—someone they choose to help guide them through their MECA experience. Ian Anderson, Interim Dean of the College


ILLUSTRATION

WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY

GRAPHIC DESIGN CERAMICS

NEW MEDIA

ARTISTS@WORK CONNECTING YOU TO YOUR FUTURE // At MECA, you’re a working artist from the minute you set foot on campus. It’s built right into the CURRICULUM, your classes and student activities. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT begins the Àrst year with a one-of-a-kind class called First Year Initiative (FY-In). In this class you will work with other students on meaningful and challenging art-based projects that make a positive impact on the community. This is all part of a strong foundation approach and challenging studio classes. In addition, you’ll learn about CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP with classes like Second Year Lab (SYL) and The Art of Business/The Business of Art where you’ll build your portfolio, reÀ Àne your artist’s statement, create your web presence and gain communication skills. Through it all, you’ll have the guidance of CAREER SERVICES, linking you to internship opportunities and jobs. With NETWORKS of thousands of MECA alumni around the world and hundreds in Portland, you’ll have the connections you need to launch your career as a working artist before you even graduate.

CAREER SERVICES // Life after MECA— CURRICULUM

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

CAREER SERVICES

MECA

ARTISTS @WORK

MECAmade

NETWORKS

CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP

My job is to give students the tools to be an artist for the rest of their lives. Meg Brown Payson, Faculty, Foundation/Drawing

that’s something we think about a lot. It’s also something we prepare you for. Our philosophy is this: Passion first. That means it all starts with doing what you love to do. The other part is learning how to sell your work, developing a strong body of work and expressing yourself effectively. That's how you will get people’s attention. And once you have their attention, you can start proving yourself. From your very first day here, you’ll have access to our Career Services office—where staff can help guide you to internships and jobs. With the MECA alumni network, you’ll make the connections you need. You’ll get out there and explore. You’ll meet fellow artists. So by the time you graduate, you’ll have the skills, self-reliance and experience to put your MECA education to work.

I’m into printmaking and textiles. I’ve got my foot in the door for summer jobs at textile studios in Portland thanks to the phenomenal resources in our Career Services—they gave me a list of amazing contacts. Anneli Allard ’14

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // Art’s place is in the world. Sure, you can spend your days and nights in your studio making what you make—but its purpose is to engage others. That’s why, from your first days at MECA, you’ll be deeply involved in the Portland community—making a meaningful difference as an artist collaborating with a non-profit organization. Maybe it’s a youth-driven PR campaign, and you’ll be working with a printmaking studio to create awareness posters. Maybe you’ll be collaborating with writers to help tell the story of new immigrants settling in Portland. Maybe you’ll be snapping images that document the impact other MECA students are making in our community. Through it all, you’ll use your innate intuition, creativity and problem-solving skills as you become a critical part in solving real-world challenges. RECENT PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT ACTIONS // DON’T HIDE THIS NUMBER Students partnered with 350 Climate Change Global Activist Event and ‘tagged’ the entire city of Portland with the number 350 (left) // JAM Students in FY-In harvest ‘free’ fruit from the alleys of Portland and create giant vats of jam as part of a public art project that integrated sound and printed posters // ROLL IT Students collaborated with Lisa Pixley ’07 on large street prints created with a steam roller in front of the residence hall // WRAP Student Maureen Patrick (below) partnered with an organization saving thousands of yards of hospital fabric from landfills creating large, whole building scale installations.

We take the real world challenges and empower students to solve them. Christina Bechstein, Faculty, Public Engagement/Sculpture MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 3


FOUNDATION COLLECTIVE

FOUNDATION IMMERSION // You might be pretty sure about who you are as an artist. You might even be sure which medium you’ll be working in for the rest of your career. That’s why we feel it’s our obligation as teachers and fellow artists to shake things up a bit and introduce you to mediums and ideas you never before considered. We also feel that no matter how talented you are as an artist, the more time you spend learning from other artists and their work and about historical, cultural and personal influences the more powerful an artist you can become. This is why we believe in a strong foundation followed by a year of exploration. Your first two semesters are devoted to the elements of composition through drawing, color theory, digital imaging, 2D design and 3D design. You’ll be doing extensive studio work—seeing, questioning and collaborating. The next two semesters allow for in-depth individual experimentation and discovery that will support and guide you for the rest of your career.

MICHAEL GRASS

JAKE MICHAUD

DRAWING

WANT MORE DETAIL?

INTRO TO DIGITAL IMAGING

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF FOUNDATION STUDIES AT MECA AND SEE SOME STUDENT PROJECTS INCLUDING 1000 THINGS AND 3D DESIGN BODY EXTENSIONS AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/FOUNDATION You can go directly to the links you’ll find throughout this viewbook by scanning this QR code using a smartphone and a QR-reader that can be downloaded free from the web //

2D DESIGN

MARS ARSH RSH ALI A LI MARSH LI

RANGELEY MORTON

GET TO KNOW

4 WWW.MECA.EDU

NICKIE TAYLOR JOANNE GARDINER

MORAN KISER

1000 THINGS

Every core class that you take has a huge impact on how you learn in your other classes. .—Abby Mechanic ’13

FOSSE OSS SSE SE S ETT TT SLOAN S LO L OAN NE FOSS

HOW DID YOU END UP AT MECA? I started doing woodworking when I was a sophomore in high school and knew I wanted to make furniture. When I saw the woodshop here—the space and the machines and the tools—I knew I needed to come here. WHAT ELSE DID YOU LIKE? The size. It’s really small and self-contained, so it’s like a real community. WHAT DID YOU GET OUT OF YOUR FOUNDATION CLASSES? So much. Every core class you take has a huge impact on your other classes. 2D taught me about composition, which relates to furniture design. 3D for me was all about letting go—to just go with it and make it up as I go along and see what happens. ANY SURPRISES ABOUT MECA? I didn’t know I’d be that close with my teachers. I know their families and they know about my life. I can ask them anything at anytime—it’s just really open. I never feel like I’m just a number here.

DAVID LONG

ABBY MECHANIC ’13


3D 3D DESIGN BODY EXTENSIONS

GET TO KNOW

JACOB MICHAUD ’14

SLOANE FOSSETT

IS IT A HUGE TRANSITION FROM HIGH SCHOOL TO MECA? It is, but they do a really fantastic job integrating us and making us comfortable. HOW? I took a philosophy course focused on finding home. It made me think differently about home—and about how MECA is my new home. IS IT A WELCOMING PLACE? Absolutely, you really feel welcome here—and it started with all of the new students working together on community projects. Now everybody knows everybody. WHAT ABOUT PORTLAND? It’s a fantastic city—not a big city, but it has everything big cities have. There’s a nice balance between the urban and the down-to-earth. WHAT’S THE BEST PART OF PORTLAND? Art is really valued here—and there’s such great food!

RANGELEY MORTON ’14

CECEI CECE ECEIL LA A PACKA PACKARD RD

3D carries over into metals. Everyday I apply the things I learned. I sort of wish I could take it over again. Chloe Darke ’12

WHAT’S IT LIKE AS A FRESHMAN? Everybody has different backgrounds, so it’s great that they get us all on the same page with 2D and 3D classes. WHAT DO YOU LEARN IN THEM? We talk a lot about composition, and I think a lot more deeply about my work now—I’m much more conscious. It’s one of those things where you have to know the rules before you break the rules. WHAT’S DORM LIFE LIKE? It’s mellow and accepting. It’s not a big party place, but it can be social. If you need some space though, you can find it. WHAT’S THE BEST PART OF MECA? You feel like you’re really a part of the school. This is a place where you can be an individual and get noticed.

3D FABRICATION

MECAARTISTS@WORK PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // As artists from day one, MECA students bring their creativity to the community through the creation of objects, services and resources that benefit various regional groups. MECAmade // Students in the FY-In program created wire baskets from donated

CURRICULUM IN ACTION

FY-In + SYL

recycled wire. Money generated from the

FY-In. That stands for First Year Initiative. It’s a semester-long, immersive orientation to college life and the greater Portland community. FY-In helps you discover the importance of combining research and practice—and it introduces you to collaborating with other students and partners in your community. Students are matched up with real community problems to answer and address, empowering them to be creative agents of the world in both local and global settings. You’ll read, write, research, make art, discuss and critique in relation to the community-focused work you choose to be part of. We sum it all up like this: FY-In lays the foundation for a lifetime of learning about the value of being an artist in society. Second Year Lab, SYL, takes everything you’ve learned in FY-In and takes it further— letting you explore more deeply. You learn the power of collaboration—working with other MECA students, faculty and our community partners to create change. —Christina Bechstein, Faculty, Public Engagement/Sculpture

KAYLA RICHARDSON

SUBTRACTIVE CARVING

sale was donated to a local non-profit, Cultivating Community.

FY-In takes on issues of place. As artists and designers we solve real creative problems and create visual responses in the city of Portland: printed graphic posters, interventions, public art and more.

Check out a gallery of FY-In projects at www.meca.edu.

WHAT YOU’LL STUDY MECA IS WIDELY RESPECTED FOR ITS FOUNDATION CURRICULUM. INSTRUCTION IN DRAWING, 2D, 3D, AND DIGITAL IMAGING IS RIGOROUS, THOROUGH AND OFTEN TRANSFORMATIVE. FOUNDATION COURSES ARE TAUGHT BY A CROSS-SECTION OF FACULTY, ALLOWING STUDENTS TO BECOME WELL-ACQUAINTED WITH INDIVIDUALS IN SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS BEFORE CHOOSING A MAJOR. BUT FOUNDATION COURSES ARE JUST ONE PART OF MECA’S CORE EDUCATION. IN ADDITION EACH YEAR’S STUDIO-SEMINARS BUILD CORE UNDERSTANDINGS AND CONCEPTS NEEDED BY ALL ARTISTS AND DESIGNERS; IDEAS THAT ARE REINFORCED AND EXPANDED IN STUDIO PRACTICE. //

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 5


MEDIA COLLECTIVE

GRAPHIC DESIGN COMMUNICATING IDEAS // Before you pick up a sketchbook or sit down in front of a computer, there are two elements of graphic design you need to be fluent in: knowing how to turn an idea into a visual message, and knowing what you can bring to it as an artist. You’ll learn how to hone concepts down to their most critical components, how the role of the audience is vitally important and how to best communicate and persuade using your own visual language. You’ll discover the potential of communication through shape, color and imagery. You’ll explore letterforms and typography. You’ll keep your skills broad—delving into web design, animation, video, SCOTT SCOT SC S COTT COT CO C OTT O TT T T LY LYLE LYL L YLE YL Y LE L E

information design and narrative design. You will collaborate with and be inspired by other designers, photographers, illustrators and printmakers. Your techniques and thinking will grow and evolve into your individual working process and become valuable career tools. GET TO KNOW

MORGAN DIPIETRO ’11

LISA WEISS

MATT MCGILLVARY

SARAH YAKAWONIS

SCOTT LYLE

ALYSSA HARVEY/ZANE SODEUR/KATE FAGERSTROM

MORGAN DIPIETRO

HOW DID YOU END UP HERE? I went to Bentley and got a business degree…but it turns out that the business side of business really didn’t interest me. I knew I wanted to be creative in some way. WHY MECA FOR GRAPHIC DESIGN? I knew I could get the knowledge and tools needed to get in the direction I wanted to go in. You find your niche here. AND WHAT KEEPS YOU HERE? It’s very personal—MECA has given me a voice, which I felt I never had before. It’s given me the confidence to speak my voice and speak my opinions…to be able to explain my ideas, and how I really feel. HOW DOES THAT RELATE TO GRAPHIC DESIGN? I can tell the story and communicate ideas visually now as well as verbally. WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM GOING TO BUSINESS SCHOOL AND THEN GOING TO ART SCHOOL? When you follow your passion, things happen for you. You fall into the opportunities.

GET TO KNOW

MECAARTISTS@WORK

CHRIS MOORE ’12

MORGAN DIPIETRO

MAUREEN MANSMANN

ENTREPRENEURSHIP // Each year, D.L. Geary Brewing Company and the students at Maine College of Art team up to design a new package for their Summer Ale. Students submit templates of design concepts, while the chosen winner gets to work with Geary’s to complete the concept into a final package that will sell in New England. (2011 winning design, by Morgan Dipietro ’11, below. Morgan's profile is above.) NETWORKS // Senior graphic design students are encouraged to invite a community design professional to act as professional mentor during their thesis work. They meet weekly in a professional studio setting.

WAS GRAPHIC DESIGN YOUR FIRST INTEREST? I wanted to be a professional skateboarder in high school. AND FROM THERE? I joined the military and then was deployed to Iraq. I started doing some design work there—really basic flyers. I didn’t even think of it as graphic design. It just went from there. WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION OF MECA? I was a little overwhelmed. It seemed everyone already knew their art. AND NOW? It’s such a community here—between faculty and students and between students. It’s very supportive. WHAT DO YOU DO BEYOND YOUR STUDIO? I just got an internship and am working with designers, so I’m seeing the practical application of everything I’ve learned here. It’s made me see that what I’ve learned here is all relevant. It’s all used in the real world. SO HOW WILL YOU MAKE YOUR MARK WITH GRAPHIC DESIGN? I’m focusing on being socially responsible—to use design to make a real change in the world.

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF GRAPHIC DESIGN AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/GRAPHIC-DESIGN

6 WWW.MECA.EDU

RECENT OFF-CAMPUS STUDIO VISITS // NEW YORK CITY STUDIOS: MILTON GLASER STUDIO, PENTAGRAM, DOYLE PARTNERS, AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, AIGA HEADQUARTERS, PSYOPS, COOPER HEWITT NATIONAL DESIGN MUSEUM, MUSEUM OF ARTS & DESIGN, MARTHA STEWART LIVING OMNIMEDIA // BOSTON STUDIOS: COREY MCPHERSON NASH, WGBH, KORN DESIGN //

ACCESS TO INTERNSHIPS // THE GRAPHIC DESIGN PROGRAM CONNECTS ITS MAJORS WITH SUMMER INTERNSHIPS AROUND THE COUNTRY // NEW YORK CITY CHERMAYEFF AND GEISMAR, CHOPPING BLOCK, SIMON & SCHUSTER, AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, MARTHA STEWART LIVING OMNIMEDIA // BURLINGTON, VERMONT JAGER DI PAOLA KEMP DESIGN // BOSTON BIG BLUE DOT // PITTSBURGH AMERICAN EAGLE OUTFITTERS // PORTLAND, OREGON NIKE // PORTLAND, MAINE LL BEAN, WHITE DOG ARTS, ROGUES GALLERY, SIMMONS ARDELL, THE VIA GROUP, ALICE DESIGN COMMUNICATION, TYPECULTURE, ANGELA ADAMS, MAINE MAGAZINE //


MEDIA COLLECTIVE

ILLUSTRATION INTERPRETING STORIES // Illustration is intense. Yes, there’s drawing— and that’s a big part of it. But the real challenge is drawing on demand for clients, on a deadline, within defined parameters while being true to your individual style. We focus on finding your voice as an illustrator—your point-of-view. You’ll learn how to conceptualize, research, observe, refine, and present. You’ll discover, you’ll draw, you’ll be critiqued, you’ll start over from scratch, you’ll refine and ultimately you’ll have a finished product. An illustration that’s undeniably right: conceptual, defendable and absolutely yours. You’ll develop your entrepreneurial skills, as your professors act as your clients—assigning projects as you build your body of work. MECA illustrators are critical thinkers, problem solvers, storytellers—and some

CYNDI CYND Y D NORRI YN NORR E

BRID BRI BR B RID RI R ID DG D GET ET D DUN DUNIG DU UNIG U NIGAN N AN

KREH MELLI KREH MELL CK

of the most talented, successful artists in the business.

MECAARTISTS@WORK CAREER SERVICES // Illustration seniors from the 2011 class exhibited work at Art Haus in Portland in the show 10 x 10. ENTREPRENEURSHIP // Real world assignments provide greater understanding of how to work with an art director. For one assignment for Maine magazine, all illustration juniors submitted 3 concept sketches which generated important feedback and

WYATT BARR

MICHAEL GRASS

resulted in 3 students getting commissions.

WANT MORE DETAIL? RECENT VISITING ARTISTS // LUCINDA BLISS, ARTIST // HENRY WOLYINIEC, ARTIST // DANIEL MINTER, ILLUSTRATOR // DOUG SMITH, ILLUSTRATOR // TASHIKI SAWADA, ILLUSTRATOR // CHRIS VAN DUESEN, CHILDREN’S BOOKS/POSTERS // EDITE KROLL, AGENT MELISSA SWEET, CHILDREN’S BOOKS // MARC TAUSS, CHILDREN’S BOOKS/BOOK JACKETS // SCOTT NASH, SNAP PRODUCTIONS CHILDREN’S BOOK ILLUSTRATORS, TOY AND PRODUCTION DESIGNER CHRIS DEMAREST, CHILDREN’S AND ADULT BOOKS // SVETLANA PRUDOVSKAYA, CHILDREN’S BOOK ILLUSTRATOR AND ARTIST //

CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF ILLUSTRATION AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/ILLUSTRATION

GET TO KNOW

JOE JO OE ROSSH S IRT SH

LORI STEBBINS

SEAMUS DOHERTY

JJOE JO OE O E ROSS ROSSH RO ROS SH HIR IRT RT R T

ROSSH SH S HIIR IRT R

ALYS AVER ALYSA AVERY AVE VERY ERY Y

ALYSA AVERY ’11 WHERE IS HOME? Sebago, Maine. HOW DID YOU DISCOVER MECA? My dad went here. Actually he taught here, too. So I knew it was here. WHAT DID YOU THINK WHEN YOU VISITED? I was like “This is the one.” WHY SO SURE? It’s the community here. It’s so small and personal. You can tell right away in the way people interact with each other. WHAT HAVE YOU GOTTEN OUT OF YOUR TIME HERE? I learned what my work is about. It took four years to learn why I do what I do. I knew how to draw before, but now I understand the “Why.” ANY SURPRISES? I didn’t expect to get to know my teachers so well. To talk to them about life. To really get to know each other. I didn’t expect it, but it’s just so MECA. MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 7


MEDIA COLLECTIVE

NEW MEDIA COMPOSING MOVEMENT // You can’t contain it, classify it or label it. Everything from animation to designing mobile applications—it all finds a place in New Media. New Media attracts an eclectic group of artists whose work can’t be constrained by a single category. Maybe your art involves video installations or video gaming. Maybe it’s about computer animation or interactive art. Maybe it blurs the lines, combining forms of art that have never before been merged together. Stop-motion animation, electronics and acoustic experimentation all find a home here. The defining element that links all New Media majors together is the intersection of technology and discovery.

JJAKE JAK AKE AK KE E FR FRE FRED FREDE F REDE RE EDE ERIIC ICK CK C K

2D ANIMATION

STEPHAN MALLETTE

MECAARTISTS@WORK

ALLE ALL ALLE EN WE EST E

ALEC SHAW ADAMS

ENTREPRENEURSHIP // Students identified the need to help patrons of the popular Portland First Friday Art Walk and designed an app to help participants maximize the three-hour event which brings thousands of art lovers downtown each month. Students created a video, which will be featured on the fundraising website Kickstarter, to generate funds to produce the app (below). CURRICULUM // Students create their own websites targeted to their special interest in digital media.

WEB DESIGN

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF NEW MEDIA AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/NEW-MEDIA

RECENT OFF CAMPUS VISITS // ANNUAL NEW YORK CITY TRIP FOR STUDIO, GALLERY AND MUSEUM VISITS TO: PSYOPS, CURIOUS PICTURES, KUMAR GAMES, ARCADIUM GAMES, BITFORMS, EYE BEAM, THE KITCHEN, MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY, PS1, MOMA, THE MET, MUSEUM OF THE MOVING IMAGE, WHITNEY MUSEUM //

ACCESS TO: ALL DEPARTMENT RESOURCES INCLUDING DIGITAL, VIDEO AND STILL CAMERAS // SOUND, EDITING AND LIGHTING EQUIPMENT // DATA PROJECTORS // COMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE // INDUSTRY-STANDARD PROGRAMS INCLUDING MAYA 3D, TORQUE AND UNITY GAME ENGINES, DRAGON STOP MOTION, PROTOOLS, FLASH, AFTER EFFECTS, FINAL CUT PRO, SOUNDTRACK, MOTION, COMPRESSOR, ADOBE PREMIUM SUITE //

MATT MCGILLVRAY

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET TO KNOW

8 WWW.MECA.EDU

THRESSA WILLETT

ERIKA JENSEN

ARE YOU A CITY PERSON? Not at all. I’m from a small town in Michigan in the middle of corn fields. SO A BIG TRANSITION TO PORTLAND? In some ways. It’s a very easy city if you’re from a small place. WHAT IS NEW MEDIA EXACTLY? I look at New Media as any type of any traditional art practice that also involves technology. For me, the part of putting it together with the computer at the end—that’s just a tool. WHAT’S THE TRADITIONAL PART? I make puppets and hand-drawn animations. DID YOU LEARN HOW TO DO THAT HERE? I learned metalsmithing here, and it’s informed making the armature of the puppets and how I think of their internal structure. SO YOU MAKE THEM COME ALIVE? Exactly—this one is named Remenargog. Sort of a Scandinavian mythological creature. WHAT’S NEXT AFTER MECA? Working for an animation production company, or an artist collective that incorporates animation—hopefully in New England.

ERIKA JENSEN

ERIKA JENSEN ’11


MEDIA COLLECTIVE

PHOTOGRAPHY DEFINING MOMENTS // Photography is changing faster than any other medium at MECA. The way we teach it, however, is not. Content, technique, decisive moment, point-of-view—it is the same whether you are exposing film or pixels. It comes down to one sixtieth of a second. The knowledge, intuition and skill that precede an exposure makes all the difference. You will learn how to create a body of work that engage your audience beyond a single image. You will master framing, editing and sequencing your work until it is “exhibition ready.” Shoot, burn, dodge, scan, print and critique until you have crafted work that communicates

ZAK TAILLON

BEATRICE ABBOTT

BEATRICE ABBOTT

who you are as an artist.

GET TO KNOW

HARLAN CRICHTON

RAY EWING ’12 WHY’D YOU COME TO MECA? The photography program. I knew I’d be a photographer since my second year of high school. WHAT ARE CLASSES LIKE? They’re amazing—just being in such a concentrated place with people who are so into what I’m into. WHAT ARE YOU INTO RIGHT NOW? Besides my major work, I’m doing an independent study. I’m using orthochromatic film that was mostly used before World War II. It registers red as black, so it’s very dramatic. HOW COME NO ONE SMILES IN YOUR PHOTOS? I use a sun gun—a really bright light—to intentionally make them uncomfortable and lose their inhibitions. These are real reactions to the blinding light and heat. HOW DO YOU GET GRADED FOR THE INDEPENDENT STUDY? I chose my own criteria for grading—but I’m my own toughest critic.

MECAARTISTS@WORK

JESSICA CAMMARANO

CAREER SERVICES // INTERNSHIPS Sampling: Russell French photography, Macomber Inc., The Bakery Photographic Collective, Discovery Channel. NETWORKS // 4 MECA photographers were juried into the Photographic Resource Center Student Exhibition 2011 in Boston. The show highlights student photography from colleges and universities throughout New England.

ADVANCED / BEGINNER DARKROOMS

GET TO KNOW

GABRIELLE STURCHIO ’12

KELSEY WEBB

EMMA SAMPSON

LET’S START WITH EQUIPMENT—WHAT DO THEY HAVE HERE? Everything. We just moved into new space, and everything we have is new. Dark room, digital lab, digital cameras, lights, tripods, 4x5 cameras, 8x10s. Almost no school has 8x10s—we’re really lucky. AND YOU CAN JUST USE IT WHENEVER YOU WANT? We just have to check it out. It’s all ours. You can come in here at 3am and get a camera or work in the darkroom. IS THAT WHY YOU CAME HERE? I applied to 13 schools and knew this was the right place for me. I mean, right now I’m taking a class taught by the school president. Where else would that happen? SO WHY PHOTOGRAPHY FOR YOU? It’s about showing the world how I wish they could see it. AND WHAT KEEPS YOU AT MECA? Knowing that I have a voice here— that I’m taken seriously.

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF PHOTOGRAPHY AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/PHOTOGRAPHY

ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING STUDIO RECENT OFF-CAMPUS VISITS // A VIEW CAMERA WORKSHOP IN STONINGTON MAINE AT THE STEPHEN PACE HOUSE // THE PHOTOGRAPHY MAJORS TRAVELED TO NEW YORK CITY TO VISIT THE CHELSEA GALLERIES AND ATTEND THE ASSOCIATION OF INTERNATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY ART DEALERS (AIPAD) SHOW //

ACCESS TO: AT THE HEART OF THE FACILITIES IS ADVANCED AND BEGINNER DARKROOMS FOR BLACK AND WHITE PROCESSING // PHOTOGRAPHY STUDENTS HAVE ACCESS TO LARGE- AND MEDIUM- FORMAT FILM CAMERAS // DIGITAL SLRS // PORTABLE LIGHTING KITS // A FULL ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING STUDIO // ARCHIVAL DIGITAL PRINTERS FOR 44-, 24- AND 17-INCH FORMATS // FILM SCANNERS // A LAB DEDICATED FOR DIGITAL OUTPUT // MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 9


FINE ARTS COLLECTIVE

PAINTING EXPRESSING VOICE // As a Painting major, you’ll develop your skills as a keen observer, critical thinker and thoughtful critic while expressing your ideas. Combining powers of observation and technical skill with a deep and relevant understanding of painting’s history, your work will develop greater meaning and purpose. You’ll learn from professors who have committed studio practices, guiding you as you challenge yourself to explore new directions. Balancing a rigorous curriculum with the freedom to explore and question, you’ll find your place as an artist. Most importantly, you’ll develop the ability to evoke emotion, influence

ABBET AB ABBE A BBET B BET ETH RU RUSSE R USS USSE U SS S S LL LL

RICHA RICH ICHA ICH C ARD RD DS S DANIE DAN DA D AN L R

M MA MAGGI E M MUTH TH

thinking and challenge ideas through your art.

GET TO KNOW

MAGGIE MUTH ’11

MECAARTISTS@WORK

MEGHAN GERVASIO

PAT PAT T LYNCH YNCH NCH CH

WHY MECA? I love Maine, and I like the smallness of MECA. There’s not a highly competitive feel here. I could see it when I visited—sitting in on classes. DID YOU KNOW YOU’D BE A PAINTING MAJOR? I was on the fence between printmaking and painting. I actually majored in printmaking until this year. WHAT’S THE PAINTING DEPARTMENT LIKE? We’re held to very high standards. Of course, you have to show up on time, but you also have to be prepared— and you have to put in a lot of time when you’re not in the classroom. HOW ELSE DO THEY ENCOURAGE YOU? I never had the confidence to paint in a large scale, but last year they encouraged me to paint a fivefoot by seven-foot canvas, and I felt like I really blossomed. I felt totally supported. WHERE DO YOU GET A CANVAS THAT BIG? I made it.

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // The Portland Museum of Art wanted to give visitors the opportunity to see the creative process at work. To make the process visible, four MECA painting students were selected to create educational programming from the emerging artist perspective. CURRICULUM // Students develop a strong work ethic, voice personal opinions and ideas, research and access history and develop an awareness of contemporary culture. They are fully prepared to approach unrelated disciplines in any area with passion, discipline, creative problem-solving and research skills, confidence to take on new challenges and a willingness to

JOHN FITZPATRICK

change paths when things are not working.

ON- AND OFF-CAMPUS VISITS

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF PAINTING AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/PAINTING

10 WWW.MECA.EDU

ACCESS TO // MAJORS HAVE INDIVIDUAL STUDIOS EQUIPPED WITH LIGHTING AND WORK TABLES // STATE OF THE ART VENTILATION SYSTEM // PAINTING MAJORS CRIT SPACE // RACK ROOMS // OPPORTUNITIES TO MOUNT AND CURATE SHOWS // PARTICIPATION IN ONGOING ICA EVENTS AND SHOWS // USE OF EQUIPMENT IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS BECAUSE OF THE CROSS DISCIPLINARY NATURE OF OUR CURRICULUM //

RECENT VISITING ARTISTS // AHMED ALSOUDANI’05, SELECTED FOR THE 54TH VENICE BIENNALE (left) // HELEN MOLESWORTH,MA // DUANE SLICK,RI // DIANA COOPER, SHIRLEY KANEDA, NY // AMY YOES, NY // SARAH CHARLESWORTH, NY // BRUCE PEARSON, NY // ANNE HARRIS, CHICAGO // T.L. SOLIEN, WI // HANNELINE ROGEBERG, NJ // AMY CUTLER, MA // LAURA LISBON, OH // GILES LYON, NY; ED VALENTINE, OH // TOM BURKHARDT, NY // BARBARA ROGERS, AZ // JENNIFER GROSS, CT // ALISON FERRIS, ME // PHILIP ARMSTRONG, OH //


FINE ARTS COLLECTIVE

PRINTMAKING IMPRESSIONS // You’ll get your hands dirty—possibly stained for weeks at a time. What you’ll also do is create some spectacular art, blending cutting-edge technology with century-old printmaking techniques. MECA challenges the idea of traditional printmaking, encouraging you to push your work beyond the 2D, into the world of object-based art. You’ll learn about “thinking print”—the thought process of printmaking—and examine the relationship between the making and the thinking. You’ll work with silk-screening, woodblock printing, lithography, acid etching and computer-based pre-press techniques. Your technical skills will grow, your design sense will evolve and you master a physical process that

TYLER GRENZEBACK

MARISSA STINSON

MIRABAI IWANKO

DENONCOURT DEN EN E NONCOURT N UR UR KAY KAYLA K KA AY AYLA LA D

demands patience, skill and limitless creativity.

MECAARTISTS@WORK

TANNER GASCO-WIGGINS

CAREER SERVICES // INTERNSHIPS // Sampling: King Middle School, Cathedral School, Cultivating Multicultural Alliances, Wolfe Editions, Pickwick Press, various studio and gallery internships. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // Students participate in at least one collaborative project with a local community partner working with students from K-12 schools and/or other art colleges and nonprofit organizations. Students learn project planning, work with community members in real world settings and lead

EMILY MARTINA

community workshops.

WANT MORE DETAIL? ACCESS TO: 2 LITHOGRAPH AND 3 ETCHING PRESSES, A ROLLING CYLINDER PROOF PRESS, SILKSCREEN PRINT FRAMES AND AN EXPOSURE UNIT FOR PHOTO SILKSCREEN PROCESSES // THE 2 LARGE IRON HAND PRESSES, MORE THAN 100 YEARS OLD, WORK PERFECTLY FOR WOODBLOCK PRINTS // DIGITAL IMAGING/DIGITAL PRINT PROCESSES AND COLOR & B/W ARCHIVAL DIGITAL PRINTING EQUIPMENT // ETCHING FACILITIES FOR COPPER AND ZINC, TRADITIONAL STONE LITHOGRAPHY AND PHOTO-LITHO PROCESSES // THE CURRICULUM SUPPORTS THE EXPLORATION OF TRADITIONAL AND CONTEMPORARY PRINT PROCESSES AND PRACTICE // 2 LARGE SPACIOUS STUDIOS THAT LOOK OUT ONTO CASCO BAY //

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF PRINTMAKING AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/PRINTMAKING

GET TO KNOW

SABRINA METIVIER

SABRINA METIVIER

SHAWN BREWER

KAYLA DENONCOURT ’11 HAVE YOU ALWAYS BEEN A PRINTMAKER? I came here for Graphic Design, but I took my first printmaking class sophomore year. It incorporated the physical part of art that I missed. It was very hands-on. Very accessible. That’s when I started thinking about Printmaking and textile design. LET’S TALK ABOUT YOUR WORK. There’s a lot of flexibility here. My work isn’t traditional printmaking. I’m doing large-scale embroidery on Mylar. It lets people see both sides of the piece. This is my way of turning away from the digital world where everything is about perfection. AS A SENIOR, DO YOU FEEL READY FOR THE REAL WORLD? Completely. I have a paid internship now, so I feel like I’m already out there. And I took Professional Practices. WHAT’S THAT? Everyone takes it. We learn everything: creating a resume, cover letter, web presence— even about taxes. WHAT’S NEXT? I actually have a job offer from the place where I’m interning, but I’m keeping my options open. MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 11


MAKE IT YOUR OWN

MECA STUDENT GALLERY BLUR THE LINES TO SHARPEN YOUR FOCUS // At MECA, cross-disciplinary work is the connective thread that’s woven through every field of study. Walk along the art-covered walls on all five floors of our building in downtown Portland, Maine, where the array of materials is matched only by the range of perspectives. Painting goes 3D. Illustration gets theatrical. Graphic Design animates. New Media sculpts. Printmaking KAYLA DENONCOURT

layers traditional and technical. Ceramics takes on color. Woodworking molds. Metalsmithing & Jewelry weaves. Photography makes movies. Sculpture illustrates. This is what it means to be an artist at MECA. MEDIA COLLECTIVE

MATTHEW MCGILLVRAY

LISA WEISS

STROM KATE FAGERSTROM

ABBY TOWNE

MORGAN DIPIETRO

LISA WEISS

KATE FAGERSTROM

JEFF HOFFMAN

GRAPHIC DESIGN

AUSTIN SCRIVENS

SAMANTHA GUAY

LORI STEBBINS

DAELYNE BELL

SHEYENNE RIVERS

SPENSER MACLEOD

LORI STEBBINS

ILLUSTRATION

ERICA JENSEN

ALEC ADAMS

STEPHAN MALLETTE

BRAD WERLEY

NEW MEDIA

EMMA SAMPSON

RAY EWING

ZAK TAILLON

HARLAN CRICHTON

PHOTOGRAPHY

MINORS

DIALOGS IN DIVERSITY: EDWIGE CHARLOT

OLIVIA HARKNESS

COREY ZINGG

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT

BONE

INDEPENDENT

R

ROGE O ER RKERS CAL IAL WO

KEITH

JUDD

CHAR

BALD LES INDEP W ENDE IN CONS

TITUT

ION

12 WWW.MECA.EDU

UNDOING RACISM PROJECT

RACHEL KOWALIK

JAMES SALETENDRE

INDEPE

NT

AMERICA’S

NT

ROBERT

INDEPEN DENT LIBERTAR IAN PARTY

INDEPEN

BRADFORD

TLENT LYTENDE INDEP PARTY U.S PACIFIST

THOMAS

STEVEN

OBJECTIVIST

JOH N CAI CUBL MREP ICAN

FF

BLAINE

DEMOCRAT

EN ALEPLENDENTCYNT HEAR

HILLDENT

BARR

PART Y

TAYLOR

THAN JONA

INDEPENDE

LIBERTARIA N

S THADDU

N

RONALD

BS HOBNDENT

IND

CAROLYN

GRENIER

SOC

DEPENDENT

ALAN

KEYEST

ENDEN INDEP AMERICAN

MCK HIA INNE

LYNNE

Y STARR

EN T

TH

BROEODIS WN DE

INDEP EN

KE TQUA

GREEN

JE ST FAMICHAE BOS NDEN INDEP IT INDEPE EN H D

NT

INDEPENDENT

GE

GEOR PS LIRIAN ILTA PH LIBER BARACK

DONALD

OBAMA

ALLEN

DEMOCRAT

RON

NDEPENDENT

NETGARY JAN S INDE TIE SSKYEENT PE ND

ND

ENT INDEPE

GENE

ON AMONDSON

PATITUUTILON

BRIAN

CONS

TA

BR

POLAADFORD IND CHEC EPEN K

LA INDE

DENT

RE MOO Y UNION LIBERT

SAN S CLAU NDENT EUG ZA ENE EL RIVA REPRW UB

GLORIAINDEPE

LIC

THE VOTE PROJECT: LUKE DUBOIS, EDWIGE CHARLOT, MEGAN LAMBERT

DRAWING


NICOLE FARRAND

LUC COLLETTE

STEVEN ANDERSON

CALEB PINE

NICOLE FARRAND

CALEB PINE

BEN MORRIS

AMY YEATES

EMILY ROGSTAD

JOHN HUCKINS

CHLOE DARKE

ADDISON DELISLE

EMILY SECOY

TESSA WEBER

CHRISTINE LUCARZ

MAXINE HARMON

NATE WILLEVER

ADAM ADA A DAM DA D AM A M CH CHA C HA H AU A U

CARLA GEHMAN

EKKA NAIGLE

TESSA WEBER

ALEX ASPLUND

STACEY SMITH

DANYA PUGLIESE

SEAN CAMPBELL

FIGURE SCULPTURE

KYLE DIMARE

LIZ HARDY

TANNER GASCO-WIGGINS

SHAWN BREWER

TYLER GRENZEBACK

KAYLA DENONCOURT

EMILY MARTINA

PAT LYNCH

ABBETH RUSSELL

JOHN FITZPATRICK

AMY A AM MY Y MOREY M MO MOR

NICOLE STROUMBOS

FINE ARTS COLLECTIVE

PAINTING

PRINTMAKING

SCULPTURE

CRAFT COLLECTIVE

CERAMICS

METALSMITHING & JEWELRY

WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN

SEE MORE EXAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK AT WWW.MECA.EDU/GALLERIES/GET/TYPE/3/.

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 13


FINE ARTS COLLECTIVE

SCULPTURE FORMING DIMENSION // At MECA, sculpture is broadly defined and ever expanding. It’s material, three-dimensional, spatial and sometimes even ephemeral or four-dimensional. The form it takes always expresses something from within the artist. Beyond that, there’s plenty of room for exploration and experimentation. Sure, you can work in mediums like stone, clay, wood and metal—but your materials may also come from the grocery store, the fabric store or even the dumpster. You may blur the lines so much that your sculpture becomes something you wear, the room itself— or even yourself as living sculpture. What’s certain is that you’ll develop your individual process and a deep understanding of your

SUARE SUAR SU UAR Z VICK VICKY VIC V ICKY ICK IIC CKY CK C K S

ALEX A LEX AS ASPLU A SPL SP LU L UND ND

ALE ALEX A L ASPLU PLU UND ND

own voice as you create meaningful art.

GET TO KNOW

CAREER SERVICES // Student opportunities at the ICA / Institute for Contemporary Art located at MECA include exhibition preparator and reception. MECAmade // The Maine chapter of the National Alliance of Mental Illness contracted with MECA students, Evee Dupuis and Nathan Plourde, to produce cast bronze trophies for Maine Walk // Students translated community-developed designs into brick-size bronze castings for a Portland Public

MAURE MAUR MAU AURE AUR A AU REEN EN PATR PATRI ATRI ATR A TR T RI C CK K

ALEX ASPLUND

MECAARTISTS@WORK

Art Committee installation, Art Underfoot.

ELI B ELIZ ELIZA BETH ET H E HARDY HAR HARD HA ARDY ARD A RD

EVEE DUPUIS

WHY DID MECA STAND OUT FOR YOU? My high school had a great art department and lots of catalogs, and MECA’s got my attention. When I went on a tour, it seemed small and approachable—like I could personalize my education here. DID YOU? Definitely. MECA is what you make of it. SO WHAT ARE WORKING ON NOW? I just did a live-feed performance that was broadcast online. WHAT WAS IT ABOUT? Identity, feminism and how we all take on roles. It’s performance art—the performers are the sculpture. HOW DO YOU DEFINE SCULPTURE? Sculpture is about affecting space—transforming space through form. SO IT’S A BROAD TERM? It is. Sculpture is great here because there’s an opportunity to explore every other medium and incorporate it into your work.

NATHAN PLOURDE

SHERIDAN CUDWORTH ’11

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF SCULPTURE AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/SCULPTURE

ACCESS TO: SCULPTURE STUDENTS AT MECA HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE A RANGE OF FORMS, MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES INCLUDING: METAL-WORKING, LOST-WAX CASTING OF BRONZE, IRON FORGING, WELDING, WOOD AND STONE CARVING, FABRICATION INSTALLATION, PUBLIC ART, PARTICIPATORY PRACTICE, TEXTILE TECHNIQUES, PERFORMANCE ART AND DIGITAL VIDEO. THE FACULTY, DRAWING FROM PERSONALLY DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS AND INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION EXPERIENCES, SUPPORT CREATIVE PRACTICE AND MEDIA THAT MERGE TRADITIONAL, EXPERIMENTAL AND NEW FORMS. //

14 WWW.MECA.EDU

VIRGI V VI VIRG IRG NIA N A JARV NI JARVI ARVI RV

ELIZA EL LIZ B BETH ETH E TH HARDY HA HAR ARDY

JOHN OHN OH H NELSO ELSO LSON

NATH NAT ATHA AT ATH TH N PL LOUR LO OUR UR RDE DE

WELDING


CRAFT COLLECTIVE

CERAMICS GIVING SHAPE // Fearlessness for experimentation and an open mind are the prerequisites for thriving as a Ceramics major. You’ll test the bounds of materials, techniques and processes as you create functional art, large sculptural pieces, mixed media projects and installations. You’ll learn how to Àre your own kilns—gas, electric, raku and soda. You might experiment with mold-making one day and Eastern-inspired traditions the next. Mixing clay, creating your own glazes, dipping, pouring, carving, painting and drawing will become your way of life. You’ll be immersed in every facet of ceramic art—and when you Ànd your Àt, you’ll make it

TE TE ESS SSA SA A WEBE WEBER WE WEB ER R

NATE WILLE NAT NATE WILL VER R

BERNIE DAROUX

your own.

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF CERAMICS AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/CERAMICS

INDOOR RAKU KILN ACCESS TO: THE CERAMICS FIFTH FLOOR STATE-OF-THE-ART KILN ROOM FEATURES 6 LARGE ELECTRIC KILNS AND FIVE GAS FIRED KILNS, INCLUDING A SODA KILN AND AN INDOOR RAKU KILN NEXT TO A VENTILATED REDUCTION PIT. THREE OTHER ROOMS ARE DEVOTED TO CLAY MIXING, GLAZE MIXING AND SLIP-CASTING. MAJORS LEARN HOW TO MIX THEIR OWN CLAYS AND GLAZES, AS WELL AS FIRE KILNS. EACH MAJOR HAS AN INDIVIDUAL STUDIO SPACE WITH THEIR OWN SHELVES, TABLES AND, IF REQUESTED, WHEELS. //

GET TO KNOW

MECAARTISTS@WORK

MAX HARMON ’11

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // Ceramics students have taught in the Cathedral School program // MECAmade // Participated in Holiday Sale events // Held annual an Senior Ceramics exhibition // Shown in galleries outside of MECA. NETWORKS // Many students have attended summer workshops at national craft centers including Haystack, Penland

MAX HARMON

and Watershed Center for Ceramic Art.

EKKA NAIGLE

ADRIAN KING

WHERE’S HOME? Buxton, Maine. WHAT IS IT ABOUT MECA? Faculty, facilities and the family atmosphere. ANYTHING THAT DOESN’T START WITH F? Location. WHAT’S THE BEST PART? We’ve got the best ceramics facilities anywhere for undergrad. We’re one of the only places in the country where students can fire gas kilns. SOUNDS DANGEROUS. We take a Glaze Chem class. You learn all the materials, firing processes, safety, health. WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON TODAY? I just had 81 pots come out of the kiln. 81? Studio potters make a lot. It’s not all pots—but I call anything that serves a purpose a pot. WHY CERAMICS? So much of what people use is mass-produced. There’s something about using something handmade everyday. People used to make what they needed and I like the historical aspect. WHAT WILL YOU DO WITH ALL THESE POTS? I do the Art and Soul show, the holiday sale at MECA, a big sale at DiMillo’s at the wharf. SO YOU ALREADY HAVE CUSTOMERS? I do. When you sell something, it’s not just about the money. It’s about someone using it and loving it. It becomes part of their life.

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 15


CRAFT COLLECTIVE

METALSMITHING & JEWELRY FORGING IDEAS // In our innovative Metalsmithing and Jewelry department, you’ll develop a deep understanding of the intimate connection between object and body. The wide range of tools and techniques you’ll master in metal can be applied to fabric, resin, wood and paper—allowing you the freedom to combine materials as you create. Throughout your studies, you’ll learn the vast history of the Àeld and contemporary craft theory as you question concepts of beauty, power and the meaning of function. By fostering personal vision and critical thinking, student work ranges from production jewelry to pieces that have incorporated political and social commentary, personal narratives and poetic abstractions. As a Metalsmithing and Jewelry major, you’ll not only learn how

CHLOE DARKE

ANDREW HAVILAND

to design beautiful objects, but how to forge ideas to create meaning.

GET TO KNOW

MATT RAND ’12

ADDISON DELISLE

WHY MECA? I knew I was coming here. I applied to other schools because I felt like I had to, but I had a feeling about MECA. AND? I still have that feeling. DID YOUR PARENTS SHARE THAT FEELING? My parents were like, no, you have to get a real education. Now they’re into it, though.They’re supportive. They see what I’m doing and what I’ve learned. IS METALS WHAT YOU CAME HERE FOR? No. I came here to be a printmaker or a photographer. I took metals on a whim. From the first technical class I was sold. It’s intense. Very focused. SO WHAT’S NEXT? My work is more wearable and functional, so a gallery isn’t the right setting. I’d like to open my own studio and be part of fashion shows. Not traditional fashion shows—but shows where people wear what I make.

MECAARTISTS@WORK CAREER SERVICES // INTERNSHIPS Working for Portland jewelers and galleries, students have been exposed to a number of new technical skills and begin to see the inside operations of what it takes to own and run a business of one’s own. ENTREPRENEURSHIP // If a student is interested in developing a production line we will work with them to find the appropriate person to do an internship with so that they also learn the many

NATAL ALIE AL IE E REED

AMY YEATE Y S

MEGHAN GERVASIO

aspects of designing for production.

WANT MORE DETAIL?

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF CERAMICS AT MECA AT

16 WWW.MECA.EDU

ERIKA E KA A JENSE JEN NSE SEN

EMILY SECOY

METALSMITHING-AND-JEWELRY/

EMILY ROGSTAD

WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/

ACCESS TO: MATERIALS WILL INCLUDE PRECIOUS METALS, STEEL AND NON-FERROUS METAL SUCH AS COPPER, BRONZE AND BRASS. STUDENTS WILL ALSO HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE NUMEROUS ALTERNATIVE MATERIALS THAT MAY INCLUDE WOOD, MARBLE, FABRIC, GLASS AND MORE. PROCESSES YOU WILL HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO EXPLORE INCLUDE ENAMELING, CASTING, RAISING, FORGING, FORMING, HOLLOW CONSTRUCTION, SOLDERING, STONE SETTING, DIE-FORMING, PRODUCTION DEVELOPMENT, TOOL MAKING AND TOOL CARE. YOU WILL HAVE YOUR OWN STUDIO SPACE DURING JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR. //


CRAFT COLLECTIVE

WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN BUILDING STRUCTURE // Woodworking and Furniture Design have deep New England roots—a tradition of transforming Maine-grown timber into functional artwork. At MECA, you’ll quickly move beyond basic woodworking skills into designing and crafting complete projects. You’ll learn to take your concepts from sketch to technical drawings, Ànd your raw materials at the local lumberyard, mill them down to size and then get creative with steaming, bending, planing and joinery, using both classic and modern tools. The knowledge and connections you make here will prepare you for a career in wood craftsmanship—part of the next generation of talented New England-trained artists.

NICOLE FARRA FARRAND ND

OLI A HARKN OLIV OLIVI RKN KN K NE ESS ES S

JOHN NELSON

STEVE STEV STE EVE EV VEN AN V ANDER A NDER N DE ERS SON ON ON

GET TO KNOW

WANT MORE DETAIL? GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF WOODWORKING & FURNITURE DESIGN AT MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/ WOODWORKING-AND-FURNITURE-DESIGN

STUDIO ACCESS 24/7 ACCESS TO: MECA’S WOODWORKING STUDIOS ARE EQUIPPED WITH A FULL RANGE OF TOP-NAME TOOLS, INCLUDING TWO SAWSTOP TABLE SAWS THAT ELECTRONICALLY SENSE SKIN MOISTURE AND STOP INSTANTLY IF SOMEONE ACCIDENTALLY CONTACTS THE SPINNING BLADE. OTHER EQUIPMENT, MUCH OF IT FROM THE ITALIAN COMPANY MINI-MAX, INCLUDES A 16-INCH JOINTER, 20-INCH PLANER, 16-INCH BANDSAWS, A VACUUM VENEER PRESS SYSTEM, A ONEWAY LATHE AND A VARIETY OF SANDERS (TIMESAVER, OSCILLATING SPINDLE, OSCILLATING EDGE AND 20-INCH DISK). EACH MAJOR HAS THEIR OWN STUDIO SPACE EQUIPPED WITH A HOFFMAN & HAMMER WORKBENCH. //

GET TO KNOW

MECAARTISTS@WORK

AB ABBY MECHA MECH MEC M ECHA ECH EC E CH C HA H ANI NIC IC

MECAmade // First art school to be selected for inclusion in Craft Boston, an annual juried exhibition (below). CAREER SERVICES // Connects students with scholarships such as Powermatic and with national summer workshops. NETWORKS // Majors join the Furniture Society // MECA is hosting the 2012 Furniture Society Conference.

LUC COLETTE

CALEB PINE CALEB PINE

WHY WOOD? I came here with an interest in woodworking. My dad is a cabinetmaker. I knew I wanted to do something 3D, so I took Intro to Woodworking my first semester. WHAT’S IN YOUR STUDIO SPACE NOW? I’m working on a reliquary assignment for the studio majors. WHAT’S A RELIQUARY? It’s a vessel to hold a relic. But mine won’t hold a relic. The vessel is the relic. HOW’D YOU LEARN THE VOCABULARY? We’re guided to develop our process of communicating with people just as much as we’re taught the process of making. We’re pushed to understand why we’re doing what we’re doing and how to explain it to people so they understand. AND THE CURVED WOOD HERE? I’m doing wood bending. We built a large steamer to soften the wood, and then we shape it. AND HOW HAS MECA SHAPED YOU? In this department I’ve learned how to present myself as an artist and how to understand and carry out a conversation with someone who wants to commission work or show my work in a gallery. IS THAT WHAT YOU’LL DO? Actually, I’d love to take over my father’s business someday.

BEN B EN E N MO MORRI MOR M OR RRI R RI S

TANNER PRICE ’11

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART


ACADEMIC STUDIES COLLECTIVE

LIBERAL ARTS TAKING IT IN // Liberal Arts at MECA provides you with the context and knowledge to inform and inspire your artwork. The courses span literature, history, philosophy and the social and natural sciences. Our students say that the discussions and readings in the liberal arts curriculum have made them more aware of their environment, conscious of the impact of world events and sensitive to how their own history affects their work. These studies will help you to generate ideas and form opinions that develop into meaningful art. GET TO KNOW

DEVON JOHNSON ’13 HOW IS LIBERAL ARTS DIFFERENT AT MECA? It’s taught in a way that really appeals to art students—it’s tuned for us. HOW SO? Instead of being told to just read a textbook and memorize facts, it’s much more visual. We’re all visual thinkers. ARE CLASSES BIG? Twenty students at the most. They’re all small—very intimate and personal. WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITES? I love our Art History class, because it’s being taught by an artist and we can relate to it as makers. WHAT’S A MAKER? We say that instead of saying “artist.” We make things. That’s what we do. It’s humble and realistic. WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN FIVE YEARS? In grad school, studying advertising and graphic design. AND AFTER THAT? Packaging design, magazine editorials—doing illustrations.

We want our students to paint like writers and write like painters. Chris Thompson, Faculty, Art History

ART HISTORY TRACING CREATIVITY // To get better at what you do, it’s always a good idea to know what others did before you. Studying Art History will broaden your understanding of the historical and social contexts of your own work. There’s an emphasis on writing and critical thinking— important skills for succeeding after MECA. But there also are plenty of assignments that involve creating art—individually and collaboratively. The people who teach you have diverse, interesting backgrounds in art, including Medieval, Renaissance, Asian, African, modern and contemporary.

THE POWER OF EXPRESSION

When you take Liberal Arts at MECA, it’s focused on empowering you as an artist. It’s relevant and interesting to someone embarking on a career in art. Dana Sawyer, Faculty, Liberal Arts

No matter how much technological advancement happens, the power to write and express yourself clearly and intelligently is still the bedrock of any human being’s presence in the world. Claude Caswell, Faculty, Liberal Arts MECA has helped me to fully develop my concepts and ideas through writing. I can clearly see how creating and writing go hand in hand. Victoria Statsenko ’14

ACADEMIC MINOR

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT BEYOND THE CLASSROOM // MECA offers a minor in Public Engagement. The Public Engagement curriculum solves real PROBLEMS and establishes collaborative community PARTNERS. Through self-actualized projects, with ACTIONS and OUTCOMES, you’ll learn skills that prepare you for a variety of careers, for graduate study and your own entrepreneurial studio practice. As your senior thesis in the PE minor, you take on and lead a community-based project. Public Engagement provides the opportunity to create change right here and to learn the skills to be a leader in any path you choose to follow as an artist or designer.

WHAT IS TRUTH? PROBLEM: Take on the issue of representation, ‘truth’, design and literacy with local children

WHAT IS YOUR SOUNDTRACK? PROBLEM: Create/support a youth driven public relations campaign for SPACE Gallery in Portland PARTNER: SPACE Gallery, Satronen Sound

PARTNER: King Middle School ACTION: Students worked with local school children, teaching them graphic design skills and collaborated on the theme of truth

ACTION: Creative collaboration with partners using letterpress/hand printed posters, sound making, recording and more

OUTCOME: Public poster series (sample at right)

OUTCOME: Public actions with posters, sound recording and signage

* Read about another Public Engagement action on the back cover of this viewbook. WHAT YOU’LL STUDY

YEAR

1

WANT MORE DETAIL?

YEAR

2

YEAR

3

YEAR

4

FY-In (Seminar, Community

SYL (Second-Year Lab)

Intro to the Discipline

Professional Studio

Partnerships, Portable Studio)

Foundation (fabrication, drawing,

Junior Seminar (Media/Fine Arts/

Senior Synthesis Seminar

Foundation (drawing, 2D, 3D, and digital imaging)

or digital video) 4 studio electives

Craft collectives) Major (2 studio seminars,

2 studio electives

Art History Survey

2 major specific studios,

Composition & Literature

Art History: Critical Approaches

2 elective studios)

Art History Survey

to Contemporary Art Western History Western Philosophy

18 WWW.MECA.EDU

Art History (Non-Western and elective) 2 Liberal Arts electives

Major (2 studio seminars, 2 major specific studios, 2 elective studios) 4 Liberal Arts electives

GET INFORMATION ON ALL THE CLASSES THAT ARE A PART OF A MECA BFA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/BFA/


AWARD-WINNING FACULTY

MECA FACULTY PRACTICING PROFESSIONALS // The faculty at MECA are working artists and scholars—professionals with studios, gallery shows, museum exhibits and clients. So, naturally, they have a lot of real-world experience to share. Their job is to encourage you to discover what you want to say and to find the best way to say it. Standards of craft are important. But so is integrity of expression and development of concept. Through critiques of your work, you’ll constantly be challenged to raise your expectations of yourself. The relationships between students and faculty tend to be close—caring about each other as people and fellow artists.

ACCOMPLISHED ARTISTS, DESIGNERS, SCHOLARS The life lessons learned at MECA— the skills to put a body of work together and focus on a discipline— translate to any career. It’s a very practical and adaptable set of skills. Honour Mack, Faculty, Painting

MECAARTISTS@WORK

professional opportunities.

EMILY ILY LY SEC SECOY S ECOY COY OY Y

PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // MECA faculty are at the heart of meaningful engagement in the community. They are committed, active, working artists who create partnerships, initiatives and programming that foster creativity and purposeful engagement. NETWORKS // Our distinguished, award-winning faculty connect students to their professional worlds through galleries, exhibitions, grants, internships, lectures and

MECA students are always problemsolving. You learn how to design, but more importantly, you learn how to assess, approach and solve challenges. Sharon Portelance, Faculty, Metalsmithing & Jewelry

Our Foundation Studio provides broad experience designed to give students flexibility, courage and the critical awareness necessary to follow their interests in many, often unanticipated, directions. Meg Brown Payson, Faculty, Foundation

We really focus on getting our students prepared for professional life, providing real career skills. We have students working every way imaginable. You’ll see everything in the studios. Lucy Breslin, Faculty, Ceramics

EXPANDING DIALOGUE RECENT VISITING ARTISTS //

VISITING ARTISTS

MILLER & SHELLABARGER ALIX LAMBERT ANDREW RAFTERY ILANA HALPERIN

FRESH PERSPECTIVES // Throughout your education at MECA, you’ll get

EDWARD MEADER

the benefit of working closely with visiting artists from around the world.

CYNTHIA CONSENTINO

These outside voices—artists, scholars and curators—give a unique perspective

MELLE HAMMER

and offer valuable advice about your work, your studio practice and your

AHMED ALDOUSANI ’05 SAM GOULD

career. They’ll spend time in your classes, participating in critiques across a

KHEN RINPOCHE TSETAN

range of disciplines and majors. Their lectures bring new ideas, sharpen

WENDY KLEMPERER

our dialogue, provoke debate and inspire our students and faculty.

SERGEY JIVENTIN & JENNIFER TRASK DANIEL ROZIN JAMES VOORHIES JENNIFER GROSS JEREMY BAILEY DANIEL ROZIN

RANDAL THURSTON ELLEN DRISCOLL DAVID HUTCHINS PHIL GOLDBERG SARAH SINGH KATE BINGAMAN-BURT

JULIE POLTRAS SANTOS

CRYSTAL CAWLEY KAREN GELARDI MARTY POTTENGER MARILYNN GELFMAN KARP DUTES MILLER PETE PINNELL MIA HALL DAVID CLEMONS BEN POTTER

MARILYNN GELFMANN KARP

STAN SHELLABARGER

MISTY GAMBLE RAECHELL SMITH DOUG SCOTT DUANE SLICK LISA YOUNG MYRON BEASLEY ARTHUR GANSON NINA KATCHANDOURIAN HELEN MOLESWORTH KHENMO DROLMA JEN MERGEL

KATE BINGAMAN-BURT

SAM VAN AKEN

EDDIE OPARA

Ahmed Alsoudani ’05 returned to MECA in the fall as a visiting artist and met with students in the painting department. Later in the academic year, painting students visited his studio in New York City.

DIANA COOPER BEN POTTER YUMI JANAIRO ROTH YOONMI NAM MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 19


CREATING COMMUNITY

STUDENT LIFE A VIBRANT COMMUNITY // There’s always something happening at MECA— and you’re always invited. Use your free-admission pass to check out an exhibit at our own Institute of Contemporary Art. Head over to a residence hall for an evening of chocolate mold making or Bad Movie Night. When you need a little nourishment, stop by the MECA Cafe for a plateful of deliciousness made by our own chef. Of course, the library’s always a good choice for researching your latest project, and the computer lab has cutting-edge equipment to help you along. And sometimes, you may just need to let off some steam over a game of table tennis in the Student Center. All this community goodness extends beyond our campus, into the neighborhoods that surround us—with our Public Engagement commitment where you can put your talent to work for a local non-profit or public school. Whatever you choose to do and however you choose to spend your time, you’ll be surrounded by people who share your commitment to art and thrive on the freedom to explore new things.

THE VIEW FROM THE SCULPTURE STUDIO

MECA HOLIDAY WINDOW DESIGNED BY MORGAN DIPIETRO ’11

GATHER, LEARN, SHARE, EAT, EXPLORE, LAUGH, CREATE, RELAX, REPEAT

CITY SKINNY PORTLAND POPULATION: 64,000 // LOCAL BANDS: 405 // ART GALLERIES:

MECAARTISTS@WORK

30 // PARTICIPATING VENUES IN FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK: 68 // PORTLAND MEDIA ARTISTS MEMBERSHIP: 1082 // NUMBER OF DAILY DEPARTURES AND ARRIVALS AT INTERNATIONAL JETPORT: 125 // PORTLAND IS SAID TO BE 2ND IN THE NUMBER OF RESTAURANTS PER CAPITA IN THE UNITED STATES, BEHIND SAN FRANCISCO, CA. // PREVIOUS NAMES: MACHIGONNE (GREAT KNEE), CASCO, OLD FALMOUTH // FIRST BRITISH SETTLEMENT: 1632 // PORTLAND OFFERS MORE THAN 2,000 ARTS EVENTS EACH YEAR, MORE THAN HALF OF WHICH ARE FREE // 81.9 PERCENT LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANTS // 19 BREWERIES // 15 FARMERS MARKETS //

20 WWW.MECA.EDU

MECAmade + ENTREPRENEURSHIP // First Friday Art Walk is a big part of Portland life and MECA is at the heart of that. There are monthly opportunities to show and sell your work and be part of what’s happening. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT // Digital imaging students met with a local client and created “Safe Passage” packaging concepts to help Guatamalian mothers sell their handmade beads to area supporters.


FEEL AT HOME AT MECA

RESIDENCE HALLS // Oak Hall offers students single and double rooms and a shared bathroom with an adjoining room. The atmosphere within Oak tends to be lively with students from all floors socializing with each other and students often gather in the hallways to work on homework projects together. // Shepley Hall offers two, four and five person apartments. Each apartment has a kitchen, living room, bathroom and bedroom(s). The atmosphere within Shepley tends to be quieter with strong community within each apartment //

RESIDENTIAL LIFE

RESIDENTIAL LIFE SHEPLEY HALL //

WELCOME HOME /// We’re a close-knit community at MECA, and for many students

OAK HALL // COMMUNITY //

that feeling of family extends into residential life. Our two residence halls are only

CONVENIENCE // RESIDENT ASSISTANTS // MEAL PLAN //

steps from our front door—so you’re never far from home. Beyond providing a safe,

ARTISTS // HARBOR VIEW // SPONTANEOUS SKI TRIPS //

comfortable place to live and study, living on campus is a great way to connect

APPLE DIPPING // MOVIE &

with other students. Poetry nights, movies, games, hiking trips, museum outings,

DINNER // CAFE ON THE CORNER // HEART OF DOWNTOWN //

volunteer opportunities and community meals are planned each month, and you’re

JACK-O-LANTERNS // SLEDDING

always invited to join in. There are full-time student affairs professionals on

// BBQ FESTIVALS // LAUNDRY ROOMS // ART EVERYWHERE //

campus, as well as trained Residential Advisors

CAMP-OUTS // CHOCOLATE CARVING // COMMUNITY ROOM //

who are there to answer your questions and help

BAD MOVIE NIGHT // VIDEO GAME COMPETITIONS // MARSHMALLOW

you settle in to life away from home. When you

ROASTS // RECYCLING CONTESTS

live on campus, you become a part of an exciting

// COMFY FURNITURE // MIDNIGHT

community that thrives on new experiences with

SNACK // COMMUNITY KITCHEN // NEARBY GALLERIES // BIKING //

the opportunity to bring these new experiences

COOL SHOPS // DELICIOUS RESTAURANTS // PORTLAND

to your studies and your artwork.

IS OUR CAMPUS //

WALK, GALLERY HOP, SURF, CYCLE, SNOWBOARD, DANCE, SHOP, RUN, EAT, EXPLORE, REPEAT

LISA WEISS

PORTLAND

PORTLAND, MAINE—MAKING THE GRADE // FORBES RANKS PORTLAND THE #1 MOST LIVABLE CITY IN THE COUNTRY // PORTLAND CHOSEN ONE OF THE TOP 10 PLACES TO LIVE BY OUTSIDE MAGAZINE // BON APPETIT MAGAZINE NAMED

Flash mobbers and a figure sculpture by MECA student Virginia Jarvi converged in front of the Portland Museum of Art during the First Friday Art Walk. To see the video, go to www. youtube.com/watch?v=znkTjE0r_oo.

PORTLAND AMERICA’S FOODIEST SMALL TOWN // PORTFOLIO.COM NAMED PORTLAND TO ITS TOP 100 FUN CITIES LIST // PORTLAND IS ON THE THE LIST OF TOP 20 BEST SMALL CITIES FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS BY THE AMERICAN

THIS ISN’T LIKE ANY OTHER CITY /// It’s got the

INSTITUTE FOR ECONOMIC RESEARCH // CNBC.COM RELEASED

look of a city, the advantages of a city and the

A LIST OF THE NATION’S 10 TOP FOODIE CITIES PEGGING PORTLAND

population of a city—but it feels like a small

AT NO. 4 // PORTLAND, MAINE,

town. Walk down the street and people smile

RANKED ONE OF BEST CITIES FOR GENERATION Y BY BUSINESS WEEK

and say hi. Stroll into a cafe and they know

// PORTLAND HAS BEEN NAMED THE TOP GREEN CITY IN THE U.S.

you by name. That’s how we know we chose

(UNDER 150,000) BY ORGANIC

just the right place for our school. The unique

GARDENING MAGAZINE // PORTLAND HAS BEEN NAMED ONE OF THE

combination of urban style and approach-

50 FABULOUS GAY-FRIENDLY PLACES TO LIVE // AMERICAN

ability is inspiring and comforting. When

PLANNING ASSOCIATION SELECTED

you want to share your art, you can ask a

COMMERCIAL STREET AS ONE OF THE 10 GREAT STREETS IN THE U.S. //

restaurant owner for some space. When you want to clear your mind, just walk two blocks to the harbor, take a yoga class, wander the town or surf the nearby waves. It won’t take long for Portland to feel like it’s yours—your inspiration, your canvas and your home. PORTLAND SPECIALTIES FIRST FRIDAY ART WALKS // $5 TUESDAYS, NICKELODEON THEATER // CASABLANCA COMICS // AURORA’S SCONES // THE OBSERVATORY // WESTERN AND EASTERN PROMENADES // SPACE GALLERY // VIDEOPORT // GILBERT’S CHOWDERHOUSE // COFFEE BY DESIGN // OTTO’S PIZZA // MARCY’S DINER // BANGKOK THAI RESTAURANT // ULTIMATE FRISBEE // ICE SKATING // PORTLAND SEADOGS // PORTLAND PIRATES // BARD COFFEE // LONGFELLOW BOOKS // MI CASA RESTAURANT // MIYAKE // ARTEMISIA // FLATBREAD // MACKWORTH ISLAND // SURFING AT HIGGINS BEACH // GENO’S // MERRILL AUDITORIUM // ST. LAWRENCE COMMUNITY CENTER // GREEK FESTIVAL // ITALIAN FESTIVAL // MAINE JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL // HUMAN RIGHTS FILM FESTIVAL // LITTLE FESTIVAL OF THE UNEXPECTED // MAINE COMIC ARTS FESTIVAL // OLD PORT FESTIVAL // ALIVE AT FIVE

Portland’s creative community of designers, musicians, architects and artists is constantly growing and getting stronger. Having the College at the center of the city really says something about Portland. Honour Mack, Faculty, Painting

CONCERT SERIES // MR. BAGEL // POOL AT THE STADIUM // MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 21


BOLD VISIONARIES

ICA AT MECA The Institute of Contemporary Art at Maine College of Art features innovative exhibitions and public programs that showcase new perspectives and trends in contemporary art. Located in stunning galleries in our landmark Porteous Building, the ICA at MECA presents cutting edge work by local, national and international artists. A lively schedule of public programming includes lectures, workshops and performances. The ICA at MECA provides a unique resource to the MECA community, offering insight into the practices of the professional field and firsthand experiences with renowned visiting artists. Internships are also available, providing hands-on museum experiences ranging from the research and development of exhibitions to teaching to museum management. 2011 EXHIBITIONS // MECA FACULTY SELECTS— JUDITH ALLEN, PHILIP BROU, EIRENE EFSTATHIOU, JOHAN GRIMONPREZ, MATT HUTTON AND COREY ROBINSON // 2011 ALUMNI SHOW—QUINLAN J COREY, EDWARD F LOTT, KREH R MELLICK, ANDREA RAYNOR, AARON S WILLIAMS AND BRETT A WALKER // DRAWN TO DISASTER—ANTHONY CAMPUZANO, DAVE MCKENZIE, CHRISTIAN HOLSTAD, SUN XUN, DOMINIC MCGILL, STACY HOWE, DEB SOKOLOW, YAEL BARTANA, DANIEL GUZMÁN AND LISI RASKIN // LILI REYNAUD-DEWAR: CLÉDA’S CHAIRS // FOREST— FOREST TRANSFORMED THE ICA AT MECA INTO A HIVE OF ACTIVITY. VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTISTS DEVELOPED HANDS-ON PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES TO UNCONVENTIONAL AND IMAGINATIVE WAYS // FRACTURING THE BURNING GLASS: BETWEEN MIRROR AND MEANING—GWENÄEL BÉLANGER, SUSAN LEOPOLD, DANIEL ROZIN

ANGELA WARREN

ENGAGE STUDENTS AND THE PUBLIC IN

AND ALYSON SHOTZ // ICA COLLABORATION WITH THE PORTLAND PIRATES —FEATURING VIDEOS: GRAEME PATTERSON’S “TEN POINT GAME, WITH DARRYL SITTLER NARRATING, 2008”, JEN DENIKE’S “AIR-HOCKEY, 2003” AND ANNIKA LARSSON’S “HOCKEY, 2004” //

MFA AT MECA The Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts at MECA is a fully accredited graduate program. Our residency structure offers periods of both on-campus and off-campus study. MECA’s MFA does not divide students into media-specific majors, but

FOR MORE ON THE ICA AND

rather favors an interdisciplinary approach that encourages students to

PAST EXHIBITIONS, VISIT

think across traditional boundaries.

WWW.MECA.EDU/MECA-LIFE/ICA/

The academic year begins with an eight-week summer intensive in Maine. During RESOURCES

CAREER SERVICES CAREER SERVICES OFFICE // At MECA, we believe that preparing students for entrepreneurial opportunities and careers in the workplace is as important as helping them succeed in the classroom and studio. Our Career Services ofÀ fÀce provides information and counsel to students while serving as a hub for job- and intern-related resources. The Career Services staff provides advice and resources for students to Ànd art-related employment and internship opportunities. Lists

this dynamic trimester, each student is provided with an individual studio space and 24-hour access to all the resources of our 200,000 square-foot facility. Students participate in rigorous academic seminars, weekly group critiques and chose a topical elective. A distinguished roster of visiting artists join the program, one per week, to present a public lecture and conduct individual studio visits. From their home studios, students work one-on-one with an individual studio advisor to support the needs of their unique projects. Core faculty use our dynamic interactive teaching website to deliver rigorous academic courses, supplemented by podcast lectures, individual research, discussion forums and personal conversation.

of job, internship and art-related websites are available for on-line research. Faculty and artists-in-residence serve a vital role in their students’ PROFESSIONAL

DEVELOPMENT by providing guidance, mentoring, technical, professional and conceptual information speciÀ Àc to each major. The Career Services offÀce supplements the professional curricular experience by bringing professionals, alumni, speakers and members of the business community to campus to present workshops, lead panel discussions, provide tips and interview on-site with students for employment opportunities. RACHEL HERRICK MFA ’11

An important aspect of Career Services at MECA is the emphasis we place on

INTERNSHIPS. MECA students are encouraged to pursue internships during their undergraduate education. Faculty highly recommend and value these experiences because of the knowledge gained through supervision under a professional working in the student’s chosen Àeld. Students may earn course credits as well.

* Take a look at a sampling of career paths of MECA alumni on the cover of this viewbook. THE JOANNE WAXMAN LIBRARY MECA’s library is one of the largest independent art and design libraries in New England and a major resource for the region. The library’s handsome quarters feature original tin ceilings and large, Chicago-style windows that overlook historic Congress Street and bathe the reference, study and reading areas in natural light. Furniture custom-designed for the space by one of MECA’s woodworking faculty provides a variety of work areas for individual and group study. The library’s collections number more than 33,000 volumes and 100 periodical subscriptions as well as DVDs and other materials. The library’s Special Collection contains 19th-century publications and specialized materials in the arts as well as over 170 artist books. State-of-the-art software links the library with other educational institutions in Maine and throughout the world, and to a variety of commercial online information databases, available to students and faculty through the library’s website. The library staff provide reference assistance and research support as well as in-class library research skills instruction. Further information on the library and its resources is available at http://www.meca.edu/meca-life/library. 22 WWW.MECA.EDU

POST-BACCALAUREATE PROGRAM

ART EDUCATION TEACH WHAT YOU LOVE // Become an art educator in a place that offers an exceptional program for artists who wish to teach. MECA’s 10-month, post-baccalaureate program in Art Education prepares you for certification in all fifty states. The program includes student teaching and classes in community-based collaborative art and museum education—as well as education theory, history and methods.


ALUMNI NETWORK

FROM THE PRESIDENT As we look to the future, MECA is well positioned to have its graduates be working artists who are also public intellectuals

LIFE AFTER MECA

and visionaries for what is possible in our society.

AND THEN? // An education at MECA prepares you for more than a career in art—it prepares you for life. Your critical thinking and problem-solving

—Donald Tuski, President, Maine College of Art

skills will be valuable assets in the years after MECA. You’ll approach challenges with an open mind, patience and creativity—characteristics and skills that are rare, in-demand and rewarded. As an artist, you’ll have the confidence and tools to promote your artwork and yourself. Whether you choose to continue your education, start an internship or immediately begin your professional career, you’ll be undeniably ready. ALUMNI IN ACTION

BRENT ’97 AND JESSICA

No other education prepares people for success like art school. It’s becoming clear that artists, with their unique understanding of the world and their ability to innovate, are becoming the problem solvers of our time. The College’s new Artists@Work program provides a platform for creative entrepreneurship to flourish in an environment where students, faculty, staff, local artists and businesses work together to improve our communities through active and innovative partnerships. Not surprisingly, many of our alumni are taking their entrepreneurial skills into the world—working across art mediums, solving problems, creating social change and adding value to their workplaces and communities.

MICHAEL DESOUZA ’05 AND JUSTIN VELGOS ’05, NEW MEDIA /// Michael and Justin founded Tap Tapas, an iPhone app design firm. Some of their cool apps include Parking Mate, Surf Watch h and Mock Draft. They have been featured by the New York Times, Apple, Reuters and MSNBC. They continue to stay connected to MECA by teaching the class “Designing Mobile

Donald Tuski—President Elizabeth Elicker—Executive Vice President Timothy W. Kane—Vice President for Advancement and College Relations Ian Anderson—Interim Dean of the College

Martha Stewart DIY Wedding Crafts Contest. Brent manages the product line, while Jessica handles the marketing and e-commerce piece for their growing business.

BLIER

KARI RADASCH ’97, CERAMICS // Kari epitomizes the versatile MECA student. “I believe that I am a potter by chance, but a maker at my core,” she says. Kari has been a Lecturer in Art and Visual Culture at Bates College, taught workshops, and been a visiting artist at art centers and universities around the country.

VIVIAN BEER ’00, SCULPTURE /// Selected by the Smithsonian Institution as one of 40 artists to represent the future of craft, Vivian has carefully crafted her career as a furniture maker and “sophisticated daydreamer” who successfully blends the worlds of craft, design and sculpture.

ADMISSIONS OFFICE admissions@meca.edu Grace Hopkins-Lisle—Director of Admissions Shannon Cote—Associate Director of Admissions Amanda Barrett Cohen—Assistant Director of Admissions Steven Emmons—Assistant Director of Admissions Megan Lloyd—Assistant Director of Admissions Stacy Howe—Admissions Operations Coordinator

After MECA, she received her MFA in Metalsmithing and then went on to win a series of prestigious awards and honors. In 2007, Vivian was selected to participate in MECA’s Alumni Biennial Exhibition.

REGISTRAR’S OFFICE registrar@meca.edu Anne Dennison—College Registrar Julie Smith—Registration and Academic Advising Nick Gill—Associate Registrar for Continuing Studies

RYAN GREENE ’02, SCULPTURE /// With his masters degree in historic preservation and museum science, he has restored vintage U.S. rockets, outdoor monuments and even

FINANCIAL AID OFFICE finaid@meca.edu Adrienne Amari—Director of Financial Aid Joeline York—Assistant Director of Financial Aid

artifacts from the Titanic. Now a conservator in Washington DC, Ryan’s college experience was essential to his current practice: “My MECA education has helped me enormously. I’ve discovered that artists can provide a lot of perspective to those working in the commercial industries.”

STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE studentaffairs@meca.edu Mary Ann Benson—Assistant Director of Career Resources Daniel Gardner—Interim Director of Residential Education and Housing Sheila Geant, Lindsey Furtney—Counseling and Mental Health Anna K. Schwartz—Interim Director of Student Engagement Erin Hutton ’98—Associate Director of Retention and Special Projects

OLAN BOARDMAN ’01, SCULPTURE // After 5 years in the textile industry in New York City, Olan returned to Maine to start her own company. Every Ktaadn product is designed, printed, sewn and bound by the designers in their studio right here in Maine and she uses environmentally safe water-based inks, natural linens and recycled papers. Olan was the recipient of a MECA professional development grant given to young alumni to help advance their careers.

JUSTIN RICHEL ’02, PRINTMAKING /// Justin’s cartoon-

ACCREDITATION Maine College of Art is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD).

like flying desserts are brilliant. Throw in some flying furniture and you have an event. Since graduating, he has had exhibitions throughout the US and Europe. He has been awarded fellowships and been selected for the Portland Museum of Art Biennial. Justin enjoyed participating in MECA’s annual Alumni Print Session, working alongside other grads making great art.

VISIT MECA

*

Take a look at a sampling of career paths of MECA alumni on the cover of this viewbook. Find out more about MECA alumni at wwww.meca.edu/alumni.

APPLY ONLINE YOU’LL FIND INFORMATION EXIT 7

MECA PORTEOUS BUILDING

E PIK RN TU

SHEPLEY APARTMENTS

RK PA

E AV

ND LA ER B M CU

E AV O SC CA ST

GH HI ST

K OA ST

HOW TO APPLY TO MECA AT WWW.MECA.EDU/ADMISSIONS/ HOW-TO-APPLY.

E. AV

E DL ID M

ST EE FR

NG RI SP

ST

ST

CO M M ER CI AL

ST SS RE NG O C

CONTACT US MAINE COLLEGE OF ART CASCO B BAY

CUMBERLAND COUNTY CIVIC CENTER

PORTLAND, MAINE PORTLAND MUSEUM OF ART

CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

522 CONGRESS STREET PORTLAND, ME 04101

OAK STREET RESIDENCE HALL

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART POINTS OF INTEREST

PORTFOLIO, DEADLINES AND MERRILL AUDITORIUM

AL RI TE AR

<

E IN MA TO

TE TA RS TE IN

ABOUT PREPARING A

ST

NORTH

5 29

ST RE FO

DESIGN: FRISKEY DESIGN / JANET FRISKEY, MORGAN DIEPIETRO ’11

created a loyal following for their signature “fingerprint” wedding

Experiences”.

IN KL AN FR

WRITING: GABE GOLDBERG

PRINCIPLE PHOTOGRAPHY: RICHARD HOWARD, STACEY CRAMP

ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY: MECA FACULTY, STUDENTS AND STAFF, LUC DEMERS

STUDENT ART ATTRIBUTED WHEREVER POSSIBLE

MAINE COLLEGE OF ART

© 2011 MAINE COLLEGE OF ART / MECA

bands and were finalists in the

Fair, Esquire e and American Vogue. Robert often advises MECA students and alumni on the importance of building a portfolio.

Donald Tuski President

AICAD INTERNATIONAL AFFILIATES Alberta College of Art and Design, Calgary, Alberta, Canada | Burren College of Art, Ballyvaughan, Ireland | Emily Carr University of Art and Design, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada | Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada | Ontario College of Art & Design, Toronto, Ontario, Canada | Osaka University of the Arts, Osaka, Japan |

country of Iraq in the 2011 Venice Biennale. Ahmed is deeply proud of his MECA experience and returns to the College for occasional student critiques and other special events.

ROBERT DIAMANTE ’93 PHOTOGRAPHY /// Robert came to MECA from New York because he fell in love with Portland. Today jewelry artisans and designers from around the country seek out Robert to photograph their best work. His photographs of clients’ work have appeared in Vanity

I’d like to personally invite you to visit MECA and see our college for yourself. I look forward to meeting you on campus.

AICAD COLLEGES OF ART AND DESIGN Art Academy of Cincinnati | Art Center College of Design | Art Institute of Boston | California College of the Arts | California Institute of the Arts | Cleveland Institute of Art | College for Creative Studies | Columbus College of Art & Design | The Cooper Union | Corcoran College of Art & Design | Cornish College of the Arts | Kansas City Art Institute | Laguna College of Art & Design | Lyme Academy College of Fine Arts | Maine College of Art | Maryland Institute College of Art | Massachusetts College of Art | Memphis College of Art | Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design Minneapolis College of Art & Design | Montserrat College of Art | Moore College of Art & Design | Oregon College of Art & Craft | Otis School of Art & Design | Pacific Northwest College of Art | Parsons The New School for Design | Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts | Pennsylvania College of Art and Design | Pratt Institute | Rhode Island School of Design | Ringling College of Art & Design | San Francisco Art Institute | School of the Art Institute of Chicago | School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston | School of Visual Arts | University of the Arts |

specializing in customized jewelry. Brent and Jess have

signature Vectorfunk design on Rayban sunglasses, Ford Fiestas, Gravis footwear, K-2 snowboards, Almond surfboards and Chiarelli. He has exhibited his work in Brazil, Scotland, New York, Ohio, England and France and had his work featured in Dazed, Computer Arts, Wired d and Fast Company magazines. He is also co-founder and designer for Glyph Cue Clothing. Oh, and he does all this from Portland, Maine.

Above all, the MECA community will provide the support you need to become the best artist you can be. Together, we’ll work hard, overcome challenges, embrace change and ultimately find success as a community of artists who make things better for the world.

AICAD Maine College of Art is a member of the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD), a consortium of 36 internationally recognized colleges of art and design. The association provides numerous benefits to its member colleges, including a student mobility program, ready access to internship and study opportunities in New York City, faculty and staff development programs and advocacy for the strengthening of visual art education in our society.

his MFA from Yale and had his first solo show in New York in 2007, moved to Berlin and returned to New York to manage his skyrocketing career. His works are now being collected and exhibited internationally. He represented his home

MATT W. MOORE ’06, GRAPHIC DESIGN /// You see Matt’s

Our small size means you’ll get individual, one-on-one time with the people teaching you—working artists with a passion for sharing their knowledge and experience. At MECA, you give and get feedback constantly. You learn how to give criticism and how to take it. You master your own creative process and offer new ideas— the most valuable skill any person can have. You’ll be immersed in a city that offers the best of all worlds: the energy and vibrancy to fuel your creativity and the space to spread out and think deeply. You’ll take your skills into the community and make meaningful change, as a powerful communicator, intelligent thinker and practical problem solver, like some of our alumni featured on this page.

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY It is the policy of Maine College of Art not to discriminate on the basis of sex, sexual preference, handicap, race, age, creed, color, national or ethnic origin in its educational programs, admissions policies, employment policies, financial aid, or other College administered programs. This policy is enforced by federal law under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Title IV of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. Inquiries regarding compliance with these statutes may be directed to Maine College of Art, 522 Congress St., Portland, ME 04101 (800) 639.4808 or (207) 775.3052, or to Director, Office of Civil Rights, Department of Education.

WILLIAMS ’99, METALSMITHING & JEWELRY /// Owners of Brent & Jess, a company

AHMED ALSOUDANI ’05, PAINTING /// Ahmed received

ST

I’ve always been a big believer in artists as public intellectuals. Artists are people who say things no one else can say—or are willing to say; people who see the world in fresh and exciting ways; and people who are thoughtful and thorough in life. The purpose of MECA is to foster and support those qualities—to provide a place where artists can explore, experience and find their own way to give back to society.

CO N GR ES S

WELCOME

1.800.699.1509 CASCO BAY LINES

WWW.MECA.EDU MAINE COLLEGE OF ART 23


Maine College of Art Viewbook  

Maine College of Art Viewbook

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you