__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 213

OF A TECHNOFIX Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

This short case study looks at the making of the ‘Smittestopp’ (‘stop transmission’) app in the period March–June 2020 as a public health tool intended for the Norwegian COVID-19 response.1 Norway is a COVID-19 success story. It closed schools, businesses and international travel in mid-March, and significantly restricted freedom of movement within the country. Despite being ‘unprepared’ for a (predicted) pandemic, the health sector has coped. By the first week of April—amidst concerns about the skewed impact on immigrant populations2—the outbreak was declared to be under control.3 The subsequent impact has been comparatively mild. At the end of April, of a population of 5.4 million, there were 7,669 confirmed cases, 209 deaths and a total of 169,124 individuals tested. By mid-June, there were 8,606 confirmed cases, 242 deaths and a total of 277,253 individuals tested.4 While this forceful response had immediate and severe implications for the Norwegian economy, the impact is widely expected to be partly mitigated through use of the country’s sovereign wealth fund.5 The following is an initial attempt to critically conceptualise the rise and fall of the Smittestopp app as a specific cultural project and a domestic human rights issue, drawing on

1

2 3

4

5

211

Profile for Meatspace Press

Data Justice and COVID-19: Global Perspectives  

The COVID-19 pandemic has reshaped how social, economic, and political power is created, exerted, and extended through technology. Through c...

Data Justice and COVID-19: Global Perspectives  

The COVID-19 pandemic has reshaped how social, economic, and political power is created, exerted, and extended through technology. Through c...

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded