Issuu on Google+

baskerville (48pt regular)


Baskerville is a transitional serif created by John Baskerville in 1757. Baskerville’s font consists of contrast between thick and thin strokes creating a sharp tappered sarif. He worked with type in experiments to increase legability and Baskerville is his perfected typeface which reflects his studies. Although Baskerville has been around for centuries it is still used to this day. This type face looks great on buisness cards, building signs and corparate signage. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baskerville

(10pt/12 regular) (9pt italic)


e i T Suit & )

(72pt italic

Baskerville is a transitional serif typeface designed in 1757 by John Baskerville (1706-1775) in Birmingham, England. Baskerville is classified as a transitional typeface, positioned between the old style typefaces of William Caslon, and the modern styles of Giambattista Bodoni and Firmin Didot. The Baskerville typeface is the result of John Baskerville’s intent to improve upon the types of William Caslon. He increased the contrast between thick and thin strokes. This is great for classy Buisnesses. (12pt/16 regular)

The curved strokes are more circular in shape, and the characters became more regular. These changes created a greater consistency in size and form. Baskerville’s typeface was the culmination of a larger series of experiments to improve legibility which also included paper making and ink manufacturing. The result was a typeface that reflected Baskerville’s ideals of perfection, where he chose simplicity and quiet refinement. His background as a writing master is evident in the distinctive swash tail on the uppercase Q and in the cursive serifs in the Baskerville Italic. The refined feeling of the typeface makes it an excellent choice to convey dignity and tradition. In 1757, Baskerville published his first work, a collection of Virgil, which was followed by some fifty other classics. In 1758, he was appointed printer to the Cambridge University Press. It was there in 1763 he published his master work, a folio Bible, which was printed using his own typeface, ink, and paper. The perfection of his work seems to have unsettled his contemporaries, and some claimed the stark contrasts in his printing damaged the eyes. Some claimed the stark contrasts in his printing damaged the eyes. (8pt/10 regular)

Baskerville was


(40pt regular)

(12pt semibold italic)


Baskerville was revived in 1917

by Bruce Rogers, for the Harvard University Press and released by Deberny & Peignot. (19pt regular) In 1923, the typeface was also revived in England by Stanley Morison for the British Monotype Company as part of its program of revivals.Most recently, the Baskerville typeface was used as the basis for the Mrs Eaves typeface in 1996, designed by Zuzana Licko.The font is used widely in documents issued by the University of BirminghamAfter falling out of use with the onset of the modern typefaces such as Bodoni, Baskerville was revived in 1917 by Bruce Rogers, for the Harvard University Press and released by Deberny & Peignot. (8pt/10 regular)

In 1923, the typeface was also revived in England by Stanley Morison for the British Monotype Company as part of its program of revivals. Most recently, the Baskerville typeface was used as the basis for the Mrs Eaves typeface in 1996, designed by Zuzana Licko.The font is used widely in documents issued by the University of Birmingham. A modified version of Baskerville is also prominently used in the Canadian government’s corporate identity program – Typography (Etymology: typos—type, graphos— written) is the art and technique of arranging type, type design, and modifying type glyphs.

(7pt/9 regular)

The arrangement of type involves the selection of typefaces, point size, line length, leading (line spacing), adjusting the spaces between groups of letters (tracking) and adjusting the space between pairs of letters (kerning). [1]Typography is performed by typesetters, compositors, typographers, graphic designers, art directors, comic book artists, graffiti artists, and clerical workers. Until the Digital Age, typography was a specialized occupation. (10pt/10 semibold italic)


Q

(481pt regular)


Baskerville Type Specimen