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‫בס"ד‬ April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Math = Family Fun for Second Graders! By Miryam Alter, Math Department Chair, malter@mdsweb.org and Julienne Dweck, jdweck@mdsweb.org

This past Friday, the lunchroom was abuzz with excitement as Second Graders, their parents, grandparents, and friends combined math skills and problem-solving strategies to tackle some interesting and enriching math challenges. It was the annual Second Grade Family Math Workshop. The concept of a Family Math Workshop developed from the desire of parents for activities that would cultivate a love of mathematics in their children, in the same way that reading books to children enhances a love of reading. Each activity was a collaboration between adult and child. It was truly exciting to see parents, grandparents, aunts, and uncles thinking together with their second grade partners. They competed in a target addition game, used colorful logic squares and beans to solve complex riddles, and worked with tangram shapes to solve puzzles. Students and grownups both had to put on their thinking caps and delve into some complex mathematical thinking. At the end of the workshop, each family received a booklet of all the activities with related challenges to try at home. All ended well as everyone left with a smile, having enjoyed thinking and learning together. For one morning, it wasn’t about completing any required task or homework assignment but rather simply playing with math! A frequent comment was, “Who knew math could be so much fun!”

Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Celebrating Math at MDS Pictures taken by Messenger Staff and Sarra Schwartz

Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Family Math = Adventures in Numbers! Pictures taken by Messenger Staff and Sarra Schwartz

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

MDS Students Ace the AMC Math Exam By Chaviva Skolnik, cgreenberg@mdsweb.org

This past Friday, the fifth grade boys in Mrs. Skolnik's class participated in the Spring 2013 American Mathematics Contest. This contest is given all over America. The test is made up of 30 very difficult math questions. In fact, any score over a 12 is considered to be a winning the contest. To our delight, the following boys all received scores higher than 17. The MDS winners of the AMC are: Eric Ajdler, Zachary Buller, Ezra Cohen, and Charlie Samuels. Congratulations! All your hard studying has paid off.

Science with Mr. D.: Energy and Motion By Jim DeCarle, jdecarle@mdsweb.org

Second graders were constructing circuits in science recently using batteries, bulbs, wires, and holders. Students made predictions about the results of the different circuit configurations. They tested a variety objects for electrical conductivity using a simple circuit connected with two alligator wires. In addition, they made a brightness tester and used it to estimate the wattage/brightness of several different kinds of light bulbs. A switch was built by students to control lights that were placed on a picture that was designed by each student. These electrical circuit pictures were brought home by the children. Balance and motion topics were explored by using counterweights to balance a variety of objects, including a pencil that was balanced on its point.

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Earth Day: Sounds of Hope A Scholastic News Story Reviewed by Suzy Dweck and Gabriella Steinerman, 6G

Today is Earth day. That means it’s a whole day devoted to making the world a greener place. Here in America we have it so easy, but in Paraguay - no so much. We read the article “Sounds of Hope”. It is very meaningful. The article teaches us that you dont need all of the very expensive items to do what you want to do. Cateura, in Paraguay is a very poor city. Unlike us, they have Earth Day all year round, not just once a year. They can’t afford to throw away anything until it is completely used up. The children there don’t go to school for very long because their families can’t afford it. Chàvez started a music school to keep the children out of trouble. But there was one problem; there weren’t enough instruments and getting more was out of the question. Instruments are very expensive. Nicolas Gómez, a former carpenter, came to help with an idea. He took scraps of debris and made a violin! Soon after, they made a whole orchestra all out of trash. For example, for a saxaphone they use keys, bottle caps and even coins and for violins and drums they would use forks and garbage cans! This helps them let out their passions. It also helps their environment. This just shows us that as Americans we think we are working as hard as we can, but really it is the poorer places like Paraguay that really know what ”work with what you have” means.

Birkat HaIlanot—A Blessing for Trees By Yehuda Marcus, 8B

This past week, we went on a field trip with our Rebbe Rav Gold. No! We didn’t go to visit a museum nor play in the park. We went down the block where our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Reiss, planted two fruit trees in front of their building. One, a peach tree, was in full bloom, while the other, a pear tree, was just beginning to display its first new flowers. We had learned in shiur that when the fruit trees begin to blossom there is a special bracha to recite thanking Hashem for all the beauty that he created in order to enable us to enjoy and have pleasure from trees. Hashem could have made the tree produce fruit without the flowering preceding their growth. Hashem enabled the flowering so that we will be able to learn Torah and do mitzvos in a pleasant environment. Here is a letter that Rav Gold wrote to Mr. and Mrs. Reiss: Dear Mr. and Mrs. Reiss, On behalf of our talmidim at MDS, we wish to express our deep appreciation for your enhancing our environment both physically and spiritually, by planting in your garden two fruit bearing trees. Every neighbor who passes by that corner can enjoy the beauty of the nature that the Ribbono Shel Olam has bestowed upon us. Our talmidim have thereby been able to express their gratitude to Hashem for bestowing upon us such a beautiful world with nothing lacking including such good trees bringing human beings great pleasure. They have come to your corner and recited this bracha. (Brachos 43b as brought in Shulchan Aruch O”C 226). May you continue to be ‫ממזכי הרבים‬. Sincerely, Rav Chaim Gold Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

6G Experiments with Cleaning Up an “Oil Spill” By Adina Horowitz, 6G

On Earth Day, 6G had a wonderful time in science class. My mother, Mindy Chassin Horowitz, came in and talked about her job as an Environmental Engineer and how environmental engineers help clean up contaminated soil and groundwater, and then she led an experiment with the class. She told us about some major oil spills, like the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and the Exxon Valdez, and how to to use some hydrophobic ("scared" of water so it won't absorb water) materials to clean it up. During the BP oil spill several years ago, they were drilling in the ocean floor for oil, and an explosion caused the rig to catch fire and sink, and millions of gallons of oil spilled out of the deep sea well into the Gulf of Mexico. After the slide show, in which we saw many pictures of these disasters as well as learned how soil and groundwater become contaminated, and after she showed us some equipment used by engineers to test the water, Ms. Horowitz led the experiment with us. She split our class into four groups, and assigned us to lab tables. Our experiment was to test different materials to see which ones would be the best sorbents to use during an oil spill. Sorbents are materials that soak up liquids. During an oil spill, it is best to use materials that soak up oil, and not water. Mrs. Khanna came around and gave each group a beaker and a material to test, either paper towels, coffee filters, or some cleanup materials used by Ms. Horowitz's company at spill sites. We were then given a cup of oil. One group was given a sock, meant to replicate a boom, one group was given an oil-sorbent mat, another was given coffee filters, and the last group was given paper towels. The class was going to test which materials were hydrophobic and which materials were hydrophilic ("loves" water and will absorb it). We filled our beakers with water to the 350 ml line and then poured in oil up to the 500 ml line. Everyone then cut up their materials and put them in mesh bags. Everyone put their bags into the beakers at the same time and left them in to soak up water and oil for one minute. All of a sudden, our experiment was interrupted by a fire drill! Ms. Horowitz was very disappointed that we could not complete the experiment, but safety first! Mrs. Khanna promised that we would complete the experiment the next day, and we did. On the second day we found out the results: Coffee Filters are hydrophilic Oil-Sorbent Mats are hydrophobic Sock/Boom is hydrophobic Paper Towels are hydrophilic To clean up an oil spill, it is necessary to use a hydrophobic material so that only the oil will be absorbed, not the entire ocean. This was a great activity for Earth Day and we all enjoyed learning more about caring for the earth. We hope Ms. Horowitz can come do another experiment with us again.

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

The Buzz on Books: Earth Day! By Michele Lyons, Librarian, mlyons@mdsweb.org

This week in the library we all went "green" (in honor of Earth Day coming up later this month!) No, we didn't paint ourselves green. We read books that discussed how we can be kind to the Earth. Our nursery classes enjoyed Let's Reduce Garbage! by Sara E. Nelson (one title in the Caring for the Earth series by Pebble). This book is full of great tips for making less garbage: Use dishes instead of paper plates, buy toys with less packaging, buy juices in big bottles instead of juice boxes, etc. We also discussed recycling and read Recycling Is Fun by Charles Ghigna (a new addition to our library). This charming book for young children uses rhyming text to introduce the concept of recycling and explains how "We help the planet when we choose/ to recycle and reuse." There are even instructions at the back of the book for turning a pair of old tights into a toy snake! Our kindergarten classes enjoyed Our Class is Going Green! a book written and illustrated by kindergarten students of the Oak Park Elementary School in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Using simple and informative text, this book shows ways that kids can make a BIG difference in keeping the planet clean. Some great tips: Take one napkin at lunch instead of a handful of napkins. Walk to school instead of riding in cars. Reuse old paper for class lessons and projects instead of using new paper (and use BOTH sides!). These suggestions led to a lively class discussion. We addressed how it may not be possible to follow all of these tips all of the time, but every little bit helps! Our Grades 2 and 3 featured selection was Dinosaurs to the Rescue! A Guide to Protecting Our Planet! by Laurie Krasny Brown and Marc Brown (of "Arthur" fame). The Browns use sensible dinosaurs to regale readers with some advice on how they can rescue our ailing Earth. The authors present major environmental problems with such practical, easy, and entertaining solutions that readers can't help but be enthusiastic from the very beginning. The first page introduces Slobosaurus who is ``full of excuses for why he can't use less, use things again, and give something back to the earth.'' Succeeding pages show the irresponsible way he tosses his empty soda cans on the ground, wastes water, uses electricity unwisely or unnecessarily, etc. He is finally convinced by the hardworking dinosaur children that his help is indeed needed because . . . ``protecting our beautiful planet is a big job. Every one of us can help!'' An important lesson indeed! Our students were very eager to check out books this week after a long break! So we did. Check out the wonderful titles we borrowed from the library -- and enjoy reading them together! Remember, our loan interval is two weeks so be sure all library books are returned on time (a card stamped with a due date can be found in an envelope at the back of each book).

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

How Do You Summarize a Text? By Julia Averbuch, Literacy Coordinator, javerbuch@mdsweb.org

In aligning our curriculum to the Common Core Standards, students are asked to analyze a text and then summarize, verbally and in written form, what they have read. Summarization is a reading strategy taught across the grades. It is an important skill for students to develop. It refers to the practice of reducing a large selection of text into the essential information it conveys. The benefits to summarizing are numerous. Summarizing builds comprehension. Teachers train students to process the information they read, how to discern the most important ideas in a text, how to ignore irrelevant information, and how to integrate the central ideas in a meaningful way. Teaching students to summarize improves their memory for what is read. This strategy can be used with the whole class, small groups, or as an individual assignment. Summarizing text by using writing activities builds on prior knowledge, helps improve writing, and strengthens vocabulary skills. Summarization strategies are used in almost every content area. Teaching summary skills involves teaching young students to read, retain and analyze a passage for its main idea and points.

Summarizing Pandamania Submitted by Yael Glatzer, yglatzer@mdsweb.org; Written by Sarah Kratka, Emmet Ades and Simon Yedid (3A) Panda bears are interesting animals. They live in forests in China and mostly eat bamboo. They use their wrists as thumbs in order to hold the bamboo stems. Their sharp teeth help them bite through the bamboo. Their fur is thick and waterproof to help the pandas stay dry. Panda bears have an unusual look. Their face is white with filled in black circles around their eyes. Their ears, arms and legs are black. Their entire middle is white. The mother panda protects and takes care of her cubs. The cubs follow their mothers for a while. She teaches them how to eat bamboo and become independent. Many researchers study panda bears and are trying to protect them. The panda’s habitat is becoming smaller because people are moving into those areas building cities and farms. Reserves for the pandas were created by the Chinese government to keep them safe. We really enjoyed reading this article and learning about the life of the pandas as well as the work that is being done to avoid the possibility of them becoming extinct.

MDS Hall of Fame: April Winners By Dr. Alli Kert, akert@mdsweb.org

At the start of the school year, we launched our Hall of Fame initiative for students in grades 1-5. The goal of this initiative is to encourage our students to show respect for themselves, their peers, and our school, by demonstrating courteous behavior in our hallways. We asked our students what this means to them, and they helped guide the development of this program. They believed that it is important for their fellow students to speak softly, walk slowly, and use kind words. We agreed, and the Hall of Fame initiative was born. Our faculty watches our students closely to help determine which class should be highlighted as each month’s Hall of Fame honorees. The class that is being honored for the month of April consistently demonstrated the behaviors that we believe help to create an environment of respect, fairness, and integrity. We are proud to announce the following students in 3A: Emmet Ades, Sofie Berger, Ava Eden, Tyler Fischman, Noa Hassan, Avi Herman, Shoshana Horowitz, Sarah Kratka, Maurice Mashiach, Danielle Mero, Lior Rebibo,Ella Shwirtz,Oliver Sohn, Jonathan Stern, Eitan Weinberg, and Simon Yedid. Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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‫פרשת אמר‬

April 26, 2013

Volume 12, Issue 23

Author Study: Cynthia Rylant By Debbie Goodstone, dgoodstone@mdsweb.org

Cynthia Rylant is a renowned author with a wide range of published works. She writes about the topics she loves most and knows the best. The students were easily able to link Rylant’s life themes of family and cherished places, to their own special memories. During our Author Study, the specific mentor texts inspired the children to envision their own pieces of work using a variety of craft strategies revealed by the author herself. My Special Place

By Simon Wildes, 4B

I feel safe. I feel comfortable. It’s a place where I can just do my own thing, and I feel like I am in paradise. I can see all my wonderful books, games, and my favorite areas. My snug bed and sheets are crisp. My blanket is softer and fuzzier than a cuddly puppy’s fur, and you just sink into the mattress, slowly, like you do in quicksand. Then, you get the feeling where you can’t move a muscle until around ten minutes after you wake up. After a long and rough day, my bed opens its arms and motions me to lie down. Somehow, I always fall for the trick, then I am occupied there for a long time, just lying down. There, I also just crumple into a ball and play exciting games, or I read a book. Sometimes I just end up there when I am lazy. I love sitting at my roomy and homey desk. I complete my homework. I look at the schedule for the unstoppable N.H.L. Rangers, play an attractive game, or look at my enormous coin collection. Amusing activities, or ones that keep me occupied, are in abundance there. One of them is when my youngest brother, Henry, shows me his spellbinding and funny magic tricks. I must say some of them are pretty breathtaking, and he gets me most of the time. The chair at my desk is so cozy, soft, and squishy. It feels like I am sitting or bouncing on one of those fluffy clouds in cartoons. Between my bed, desk, and the bookshelves, I have my little place, just for me. I like to call it my desk area. I love to lie down on the deep, fuzzy, carpet and throw a ball up and down, up and down. Also, I toss the ball at my wall, which is my closed Murphy bed. My bedroom is my special place! My Special Place

By Zachary Schwartz, 4B

When I enter my grandma and grandpa’s house I go to the living room and sit on their couches and a special carpet. The couches are so comfy, cozy, and enjoyable. The carpet is soft, lumpy, fancy, and old. I rest and think about what I am going to do on Shabbos with my cousins. I remember that I played many games of Risk on that carpet with my cousins. Then my mom calls me and says, “Come take a shower.” I can’t get off the couch because it’s so comfy. I trick her and say, “I’m coming!” and I stay there for a minute then I run to the shower and I get in. While I was in the shower, a spider crawled out of the drain and said, “I’m not here to scare you; I’m here to live with you!” I called my mom and said “There’s a talking spider in the shower.” I go to the couch and lie there and try to fall asleep. The following day is Shabbos. During lunch my grandma makes the best food. After lunch I declared a game of Risk against my cousins on the carpet. Like always, I had a fantastic time at my grandma and grandpa’s house. Precious Memories

By Charlie Laifer, 4B

My precious memory is the first time I went to Atlantis on Paradise Island in Nassau, Bahamas. I was so excited! My heart was beating like thunder, boom boom boom boom. Finally the day came! I couldn’t go to sleep the night before. I was sure to set my alarm clock for 5:30 AM for our 8:58AM flight UA1458 from Newark International Airport. When I got to Atlantis, I couldn’t believe all the fun in store for me. I went on waterslides, which were rough and scary, and in the pool, which was warm and calm. I also went to a kids and teen only hi-tech nightclub. The music was really loud and the food was tasty and delicious. I love Atlantis! Precious Memories

By Jared Stern, 4B

I was so happy the first time I hit a home run. The ball went through the second baseman’s legs and through the center fielder’s legs and stopped at the wall. I see the field before me, and I smell the sand. I heard the coaches say “Run!” so I ran like a cheetah to 1st base. I looked around nervously and then ran to 2nd base. I looked around again and then ran to 3rd base. Then I heard my teammates yelling for me to run home. I slid and I was safe. It was a home run. I felt the base. I tasted my sweat. My teammates jumped on me. I was so happy. My dad hugged me and my mom hugged me. They were so happy for me. I felt fantastic! Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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‫פרשת אמר‬

April 26, 2013

Volume 12, Issue 23

Author Study: Cynthia Rylant By Debbie Goodstone, dgoodstone@mdsweb.org

Precious Memories - Mimi By Shoshana Epstein, 4G I smiled as I stepped into the beautiful tall house and got attacked by cousins. My Aunt Nili gave me a beautifully wrapped present. I felt like the present was chanting my name, so I swiftly picked it up and opened it. Wow! It was a small, cute, monkey! I was only two, and I called the little brown monkey a mimi, instead of a monkey. From then till age five, I collected more. In the store, they seemed to be shouting my name. When I stopped collecting mimis I had about ten! I treasured all my mimis. I ate all my meals with them, trying to feed them, and I slept with them, every night enjoying the games we played. My family members all knew I loved mimis and my kind Safta even knitted me and him matching sweaters. He loved cookies and gobbled them up. I still have all my mimis. They remind me of my lovely childhood. I always used to laugh hysterically hearing the funny stories my parents told. It turns out that he came with me to school, the doctor, and more. My mimis always make me feel better when I’m sad. They played an important role in my life. Their small cute faces are just so adorable. I still love mimi as much as I did then. Precious Memories

By Noa Klein, 4G

I was in the ski patrol sled. The whistle was blowing and the lady was yelling “GET OUT OF THE WAY!” They put me in a car with my leg still hurting because of THAT accident… In the ski patrol building, they finally let me call my mother. When I called her, before I could even say “hi,” she said, “I’m right outside!” She came in and the doctors started taking x-rays. As soon as I got out of the x-ray room, my older brother Michael POPPED out, nearly making me fall off my crutches. “Are you OK?” he said, a little louder than I would have wanted. I still hadn’t gotten used to my crutches so he scooped me up like I weighed no more that a little baby, and carried me back to my checking room. There he said: “I have a surprise for you in our hotel room!” When they finally let me leave, (three hours later but it felt like three days) I got back and my siblings had set up a comfy chair for me, with my brother’s surprise – two ADORABLE stuffed animals! Then I hobbled to my brother, and hugged him tightly. I was late for school. It was lunch time, and Morah Marsha was taking me to the lunch room, and my stomach was grumbling, so I was happy it was time for my stomach to be filled. I walked into the lunch room. My classmates gasped. No one moved. “Hi everybody…” I said with a sheepish smile. My teacher was the first to speak. “Let’s make room for Noa to sit,” she said. “Actually, I want to get my lunch,” I said. “I’ll get it for you! What do you want?!” Shoshy asked. The eagerness on her face is something I will never forget. Since I had to hold my crutches, everyday I needed a helper to come in the elevator with me and open doors for me. Everyone was so eager to help me; my classmates’ kindness made my pain go away. Precious Memories - My Dad’s Surprise Birthday Party

By Ariella Mero, 4G

Out of nowhere my mom screamed, “Let’s go, let’s hurry up! We have to set up.” I totally forgot about my dad’s surprise birthday party. I needed to get home to finish my dad’s poster. We were all making posters for my dad. There were rosters all over the walls of my house. I walked in and there were delicious treats everywhere and a big buffet! I became hungry. His party was starting in one hour. I was more than excited. It was finally 6:00 PM and our family and friends came. Suddenly, we heard a knock! It was him! We hid under the tables and behind my couch. When he walked in, we all screamed “surprise!” and sang “Happy Birthday.” He was so, so, so surprised. He was shocked. He walked right out of the room, shut the door, and walked back in with a huge smile. We all ate and had an amazing time. This is one moment I will never forget. My Special Place

By Zehava Sanders, 4G

I have a habit. I have always loved sneaking, exploring, and climbing in closets, it always feels calm and as if the air is just resting. I always feel safe because I never fall. This is how it started. I was pretending I was climbing a very steep and rough mountain. I had a play builder’s helmet and I decided that a jump rope would do instead of a rope. I then discovered how much I loved climbing, exploring, sneaking and discovering in closets. They call to me, standing there to play in, arms open wide, pleading for me to come. I see old games, clothes, bags, suitcases, and so much more! I feel like I’m in a world to discover, a new quiet world that people had once left behind, a world full of memories new and old. I learned to climb by experimenting with what would hold my weight. I used the metal clothing racks and shelves, I’m an expert now! I love being surrounded by toys, clothes, cutlery, blankets, bags, suitcases and other dusty objects that everyone except me have forgotten about. I put everything to use. I play dress up, traveling, games, camping, and just plain pretend. I think that it’s relaxing, exciting, and it makes me happy that I have such a perfect secret. I can’t wait to climb some more! Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Teach! Lead! Inspire! Booker T. Washington By Laura Csillag, lcsillag@mdsweb.org

What does it take to inspire others? How does a person become a leader and motivator? What characteristics define his or her personality? The students in Ms. Csillag's Fourth Grade Reading Group studied the genre of Biography and wrote the following summaries about two inspirational figures, each with life events and experiences that help shape our lives today. Enjoy! Describe your chosen person’s inspiring character traits: Ariella Shloush, 4G: Booker T. Washington has many important characteristics. When the Civil War was over and Booker heard that the slaves were free, he was extremely happy. But freedom only meant one thing to Booker, that he could go to school. He was always determined to go to school. But Booker’s grandfather said that the family was very poor and needed money. Booker got a job working for Mrs. Ruffner, a strict lady in his town. Booker was helpful and hard-working. One day, Mrs. Ruffner told Booker to weed the garden. When he was done, he paused. He pretended that he was Mrs. Ruffner, and pointed out to himself everything that was wrong with the garden. When he was done, Booker told Mrs. Ruffner to come check his work. A smile spread across her face and from then on, Booker was always careful with his work. Once he was done working for Mrs. Ruffner, he finally had enough money to go to school. At the age of 16, he finally got to go to school in Hampton, Virginia. He travelled for many months, working odd jobs along the way to pay for his trip. When he finally arrived, Booker waited in the lobby patiently to see whether he would be accepted. Eventually, a lady came out and handed him a broom. Booker politely took the broom and started sweeping. He was very good at it now. Once the lady saw his work, she let him go to school there. Tehila Strulowitz, 4G: Booker T. Washington has many inspiring character traits. As a child, Washington was always hopeful and determined that he would one day be able to go to school, just like other children. He never gave up hope for his dream to go to school. Booker T. Washington was a loving and caring person. He loved all people, regardless of their skin color. Booker was courageous and hard working. As a teenager, he worked in dangerous places like salt and coal mines. When he finally had enough money to go to school, he traveled for many weeks until he got there. He eventually ran out of money and had to sleep by the side of a highway and under a sidewalk in town. Booker T. Washington is an inspiration because he did almost anything in order to fulfill his dream of going to school! What life events led your chosen person to become an inspiration to others? Tehila and Tova Robinson, 4G: Many life events led Booker T. Washington to become an inspiration to others. Booker’s life started in 1856 in Halesford, Virginia. He was born into a family of slaves. As a child, Booker always wondered what it would be like to be a student. He always dreamed of going to school but it was against the law for slaves to go to school. One day, when Booker was nine years old, someone announced that the slaves were now free! It was the end of the Civil War. Booker was so happy but he still couldn’t go to school because his family was very poor and Booker had to earn enough money to help support them. Washington never gave up hope of one day being a student and finally, at the age of 16, his dream came true. Booker became accepted into a school in Hampton and after graduating, he became a teacher and later on in life, a principal and lecturer. Booker T. Washington grew up to be an inspiring and beloved leader. Why should the United States Postal Service choose to print stamps with your chosen person’s face? Ariella Shloush, 4G: There are many reasons why Booker T. Washington deserves to be on a U.S. stamp. Booker became a famous teacher and later on a famous principal. Washington also became a famous lecturer and spoke about how black and white people can get along and have equal rights. Booker T. Washington became a famous leader for the African American people. Did you know that Booker T. Washington is already on a U.S. stamp? Well, he definitely deserves to be!

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Teach! Lead! Inspire! Joe Kittinger By Laura Csillag, lcsillag@mdsweb.org

What life events led your chosen person to become an inspiration to others? Jared Stern and Noah Moore, 4B: Joe Kittinger set a lot of world records. He jumped out of the gondola of a hot air balloon when he was 31,333 meters above earth and was pulled by gravity at a speed of 600 miles per hour as he fell back to earth. Experts say he may have even broken the sound barrier. After two years of college, Kittinger was a test pilot. It took him 72 hours to fly the record setting distance of 3,220 kilometers, from Las Vegas, Nevada to Franklinville, New York. On September 14, 1984, Joe flew across the Atlantic Ocean, a distance of 5,633 kilometers. Joe gave important information to NASA. Project Manhigh helped NASA by telling them what would happen if humans spent a long time in space-like conditions. Project Excelsior helped NASA by telling them what would happen if an emergency exit from a space craft was necessary. Joe Kittinger set many world records and contributed greatly to the world of space exploration. Describe your chosen person’s inspiring character traits: Charlie Laifer and Yonah Bernell, 4B: Joe Kittinger has many interesting characteristics. Joe is brave because he jumped out of a gondola at 31,333 meters above earth. Joe is fearless because he experienced pain in his right arm and still didn’t quit his military career. Joe is extraordinary because he helped space exploration. He is adventurous for serving three combat tours of duty during the Vietnam War, flying a total of 483 missions. Mr. Kittinger is generous for making a park in Orlando, Florida called the Colonel Joe Kittinger Park. At this park, kids are able to see airplanes take off from the nearby airport. Joe is truly an amazing person who helped the world learn more about space. Why should the United States Postal Service choose to print stamps with your chosen person’s face? Zachary Schwartz and Levi Lesches, 4B: There are many reasons why Joe Kittinger’s face should be put on a U.S. stamp. Kittinger broke many world records and risked his life many times. Joe is the first person considered to have “travelled” through space and he was the only person to break the sound barrier, unprotected, in over 50 years. Joe Kittinger helped NASA develop future space crafts with information gathered from his many flights. Joe was also a role model for Felix Baumgartner, who broke Kittinger’s world record. Kittinger had set the world record in 1960 for the highest free fall from space. Sixty-two years later, in 2012, Baumgartner broke this record when he fell 24 miles to Earth.

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

What Is Functional Writing? By Dara Abrams, dabrams@mdsweb.org

First graders are currently studying the genre of Functional Writing. Functional writing is real- world writing, which we are surrounded by and often do as part of managing our homes or conducting our jobs. During this unit of study, first graders have been viewing and generating their own letters, postcards, to-do lists, and invitations. This week first graders identified and defined the parts of a friendly letter. First graders then wrote his/her own friendly letter to a peer. The students of 1A wrote letters to the students of 1C, and the students of 1C wrote letters to the students of 1A. Each letter was put into an individually addressed envelope with its own unique (hand drawn) stamp. Over the weekend the letters will be “mailed,” readying them to be personally delivered by the “mail carrier” bright and early Monday morning. The students also made invitations to send to their parents—inviting them to our publishing party next month.

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‫פרשת אמר‬

April 26, 2013

Volume 12, Issue 23

Fiction Corner: Cannon Ball By Rosie Adelman, 6G

For my 10th birthday, I had the party at my grandparent’s house. Together my father and I created unique invitations on hard paper with the information in a circle and pictures of pools surrounding it. The invitation read: “Please come to celebrate Rosie’s 10th Birthday! It will be lots of fun and there will be arcade games and pool! Please bring a towel, bathing suit, and change of clothes…” When the kids in my class began reading their invites, confused glances were exchanged across the room. Finally a girl named Sarah spoke up. “Pool? A pool party in January? I don’t understand…” People nodded and continued questioning me. “But Rosie,” said Hannah, “I’m too young to freeze to death! Couldn’t you just have done a movie, like last year?” “You’ll see, you’ll see.” I responded to the room just as my teacher walked in. After the three cars we had arranged to take everyone to the party were loaded, the guessing started. “It’s obviously in indoor pool! It’s the most logical thing,” said Elena, sitting in the front seat. “Maybe, there’s a hot tub, outside in the snow!” suggested Ella, grinning form her seat in the back. “I think it’s all a prank and Rosie’s going to say ‘April Fools!’ then bring us to some sledding party or something more winterish,” Hannah said. “Patience, young ones. You will find out when the time comes,” I said, imitating a karate kid accent. Eventually the subject changed, from snow, to puppies, to silly bands, and all sorts of things that popped into our heads until finally, we arrived to my grandparent’s house in Roslyn. We pulled up and the doors flew opened. Kids piled out, bringing the conversations back to what the pool was going to be. I led the large group down the stairs and to the bathrooms where we all changed to bathing suits. Then, I led them into the pool. Amazement swept over my friends like a forest fire. The pool was an indoor pool, with a hot tub a couple feet away. But what really amazed them was the sky. The entire ceiling was glass. You could look up and see the snow falling on the glass and the tall trees outside. It covered everything like a large white quilt and then, suddenly, Hannah screamed, “Cannon ball!” and jumped into the refreshing pool water. She was followed by fifteen more laughing kids jumping in and screaming the same thing. “Cannon ball!” After about forty five minutes, which included a five minute retire to the hot tub we went back to change into regular dry clothes. “Cool party, Rosie.” “Awesome Party.” “That was so fun!” I heard from everyone, but little did they know, that wasn’t the end at all. I took them to my grandparent’s basement where people really gasped. The whole floor and walls were cheetah print carpeting, and they had to stare for a few moments to take it all in. There was a large flat screen TV with wii and guitar hero. As they walked down a little more, they found the air hockey table, the Mrs. Packman machine, the ping pong table, the pin ball machine, and the big leather couch. These were the main attractions, but if they looked a little harder, they would have found my grandfather’s office, a guest room, and a bathroom. The pizza came in about two minutes later, and my birthday cupcakes were brought down from the kitchen. We had so much fun, and we stayed there for about an hour before reloading the cars and bringing everyone home again. Sitting in the car, I smiled back at all my friends and said, “Now, which one of you guessed that this was going to be my party?” Ella giggled followed by Hannah and then the whole car exploded with laughter like a volcano.

Reunite with your lost items! Visit our Lost & Found area in the corridor below the Lower Mezzanine

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Watch Out, Ken Burns! By Susan Kurnit, skurnit@mdsweb.org

Watch out, Ken Burns, you have a little competition. The 8 th grade students of MDS spent the last six weeks preparing videos chronicling different eras in U.S. history. Different groups of three were chosen based on their skills as researchers, writers and filmmakers. Using iMovie and PowerPoint, the Great Depression, The Women’s Movement, The Jazz Age, Civil Rights, and World War II will come alive on the SmartBoard in room 406 over the next few weeks while these talented 8th graders strut their stuff. Some of the work has been previewed, and it is definitely “Oscar” worthy. Danielle Bendavid, Hannah Hudes and Esther Seligman created a moving and dark documentary chronicling the “Great Depression” and the effects on the country. They included the responses of both Presidents Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt to this sad time in our history. The music and the narration, along with the visuals evoke empathy to all those who suffered through this terrible time in our country. Stephanie Kirshenbaum, Devora Goldstein, and Estee Gerber produced a whimsical look at the women’s movement from the founding of our country in 1776 to the Nineteenth Amendment which finally gave women the vote. They cleverly presented both sides of the issue and included live action as well as historical documents and pictures. Sarah Lidagoster, Nikki Flamenbaum and Rachelle Benedict became students of the “Jazz Age.” With sultry jazz music as a backdrop, the girls explained the significance of the era as a whole, and how it expressed itself through music, literature, dance, and the flapper. The documentary conveyed the history of the time through videos, pictures, music and informational scenes without using voice-over narration. The success of this project was based on ideas for “Teaching in the Twenty-first Century.” The students were given choices, within a reasonable set of parameters, and they were able to express their individual talents through the use of technology. The idea was to learn about an important era in United States history, and teach the rest of the class via the media they chose. The different groups became experts in their era and both classes will be assessed on what they learned by watching others’ presentations. Stay tuned for coming attractions – more videos and powerpoints are coming in each day.

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

My Visit to Dusseldorf, Germany By Flo Fruchter, Director of Student Services, ffruchter@mdsweb.org

Last week, I traveled with my cousins to my mother’s hometown of Dusseldorf, Germany. My mother was born in Dusseldorf, and in 1939, at the age of 9, she was deported by the Nazis together with her parents to Poland. We spent 48 hours in Dusseldorf visiting the Jewish archives, the Jewish cemetery where my great grandfather is buried, the Jewish School that my mother attended as a young girl, and the house that she lived in. We were invited by the Yitzchak Rabin Schule (the Jewish Day School) to attend their Yom Haatzmaut celebration. We were pleasantly surprised to find 200 children dancing and singing to Jewish music, holding blue & white balloons. The Yitzchak Rabin Schule ranges from grades 1-4, and will be adding grades 5-8 next year. In addition, they have 75 kindergarten children on the grounds in a Jewish Community Center early childhood program. The principal of the school welcomed us and took us on a tour. We observed a first grade class during Tefilah, and a second grade class having a Hebrew Lashon lesson using the Tal Am program. All of the students had made cards for Israel’s 65th birthday in Hebrew. Initially I felt uncomfortable knowing I would be celebrating Yom Haatzmaut in Germany, but ultimately it was a rewarding experience to be in a flourishing Jewish school on Yom Haatzmaut celebrating Israel’s 65th birthday, in a school that the Nazis had shut down in 1941.

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Israeli Dignitaries Visit MDS By Rabbi Mordechai Besser, Principal, mbesser@mdsweb.org and Mrs. Judy Melzer, Associate Principal, jmelzer@mdsweb.org

On Wednesday, MDS was honored by a visit from five women, political leaders from Israel. This visit was orchestrated and organized by the United States Department of State. These women were on a mission in the US for two weeks, and spent time in four major cities to examine “Women as Political Leaders in the US”. The participants included: 

Christina El Khazen, Manager of the Haifa Municipality, Arab Christian

Edna Friedman, Member of the City Council, Municipality of Jerusalem, Orthodox Jew

Enak Mawasse, Political and Social Activist, Arab Muslim

Tsega Melaku, Anchor, Good Week TV Program, Israel Broadcast Department, Jewish immigrant from Ethiopia

Shulamit Sahalo, Deputy Mayor, Kiryat Gat Municipality, Jewish immigrant from Ethiopia

The group toured the school, and the women were very impressed by so many of our students. They remarked on the respect and friendliness that our students exhibited, on the high academic level of our curriculum, and on the aesthetic appearance of our building. They particularly enjoyed conversing in Hebrew with our students in many grades. Over lunch, we had a lively discussion on many educational similarities and differences between Israel and New York. They took lots of pictures and copious notes. We would like to thank this group of outstanding women, and John King of the Department of State for setting up this visit, and bestowing such an important honor on MDS. Directly from MDS, the women were driven to the United Nations to meet with some of the leaders there.

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‫‪Volume 12, Issue 23‬‬

‫פרשת אמר‬

‫‪April 26, 2013‬‬

‫?‪Should Small Animals Be in Cages‬‬ ‫‪By Havi Pesso, hpesso@mdsweb.org‬‬

‫אנחנו לומדים על חיות קטנות‪ :‬עכבר‪ ,‬דבורה‪ ,‬נמלה‪ ,‬עכבישים ועוד‪ .‬בחוברת קראנו על ילד שרוצה להביא לכתה עכבישים‬ ‫בצנצנת‪ .‬הוא חושב שזה מאוד מעניין להסתכל על העכבישים‪ .‬קראנו גם על ילדה שחושבת שאסור לשים חיות בצנצנת או‬ ‫בכלוב‪ .‬שאלנו את הילדים בכיתה מה הם חושבים‪ :‬זה טוב לשים חיות בכלוב או בצנצנת‪ ,‬או זה לא טוב?‬ ‫צפורה קרמייאר ‪ :‬אני חושבת שכלובים מאוד לא "פייר" לחיות‪ .‬זה לא "פייר" כי חיות לא יכולות לרוץ או לעשות דברים‬ ‫שהם רוצים‪ .‬איך אתה היית מרגיש אם אתה היית בכלוב כל היום? אני חושבת שזה מאוד לא כיף‪.‬‬ ‫שיינדל ברגר‪ :‬אני נגד כלובים לחיות‪ .‬כי גם חיות מרגישות‪ .‬לדוגמה‪ ,‬כלבים מזיזים את הזנב אם הם שמחים‪ .‬גם אם זו חיה‬ ‫קטנה ואין מקום לרוץ לחיה היא יכולה להיות כועסת והיא יכולה לתקוף בעלי חיים אחרים‪.‬‬ ‫שמואל הלפרן ‪ :‬מה אני חושב על חיות קטנות? אני בעד כי אנחנו שומרים על החיות הקטנות‪ .‬אנחנו נותנים להם אוכל וגם‬ ‫מענין למסתכל עליהם‪ .‬אני נגד כי החיות הקטנות צריכות להיות בטבע‪.‬‬ ‫זכריה בלר ‪ :‬אני בעד חיות בכלובים כי אני חושב שאם הם מקבלים אוכל ומים הם יהיה אוקי‪ .‬גם‪ ,‬הם צריכים הרבה זמן‬ ‫לשחק‪ .‬אני גם חושב שרק חיות שאוכלות חיות אחרות יהיו בכלובים‪.‬‬

‫!‪The Box Tops contest continues‬‬ ‫‪Submit your box tops to‬‬ ‫‪Sharon Newman‬‬ ‫‪in a bag clearly labeled‬‬ ‫‪with your name and class.‬‬ ‫‪Help your class win‬‬ ‫!‪an ice cream party‬‬ ‫‪Page 18‬‬

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

8G Devar Torah Project: Emor Submitted by Bethany Strulowitz, bstrulowitz@mdsweb.org; Devar Torah written by Alissa Mackey, 8G

You are sitting comfortably on the dark gray cushioned seats of an exciting movie theater. You have your favorite soda in one hand, and a snack that makes your tastebuds sing in the other. The theater is full, you feel the warm air with a hint of popcorn all around you, and the lights begin to dim, slowly, slowly, slowly. Now you are seated in near darkness, bursting with anticipation as the loud voices on the enormous screen begin to talk starting the plot of your movie, an in-depth conversation about laws and holidays between Hashem and Moshe. Parshat Emor begins with Hashem speaking to Moshe, and informing him of his duty to speak to the Kohanim. Moshe should explain to them the many rules and regulations of their holy job to Hashem. Firstly they must be taught about the important momentous laws regarding the hazardous state of tumah, which is spiritual impurity. Now the Kohanim learn that their becoming tameh is forbidden, and they can only become tameh for a special close group of family members. These members are a Kohen’s mother, father, son, daughter, brother, and lastly his unmarried sister. While reading the list of people, I wondered why it seems that a kohen cannot become tameh for his wife? I then decided to read over the pesukim again, more carefully this time, and saw that before introducing the list of people applicable for a kohen to become tameah for it adds an extra word ;‫שארו‬this word seems unnecessary, but surely has meaning and was properly placed here. Rashi says that this extra word is not extra at all however it means a kohen’s wife because the word means part of him, and a kohen’s wife is part of the kohen. Next, the Kohanim are told that they cannot make bald spots on their heads, nor should they shave their beards edge, or make cuts in their flesh. The Kohanim must be separate, and completely holy to Hashem. They must be pure while serving in Hashem's home and must eternalize these laws. Hashem continues talking to Moshe and tells him to speak to Aharon saying that any person with a defect, or imperfection should not come near the mishkan to offer a sacrifice. Furthermore, any man with a defect is prohibited from being a kohen, and performing the holy work in the mishkan, because Hashem is holy, and only the extremely holy and pure should perform His work. While reading this, I immediately wondered why a kohen with even a simple flaw was prohibited to serve Hashem in the mishkan. Rashi says that this blemish is not referring to a simple scratch, bruise or bump that quickly flees once it arrives; a blemish refers to the extreme cases with injuries that time can never heal, like a missing limb. Next Hashem tells Moshe of the complicated laws pertaining to tumah and tahara, and the detailed restrictions for each. Any man who is stricken with tzarat, a skin disease which results after saying lashon hara, is forbidden to eat from the sacrifices in the mishkan, until he cleanses himself. Also anyone who touches one who is tameh becomes unclean and tameh like him. A person who is Tameh remains unclean until nightfall, and once the sun sets, after soaking in water, he becomes pure, and can one again eat from holy things. However only Kohanim may eat from the holy things of the mishkan, unless the kohen has a daughter who is unmarried, widowed or divorced, in which case she may also eat from the holy food. Next Hashem tells Moshe to inform Aharon that any man from Yisrael can bring a Korban for atonement of their sins. The animal should be either cattle, goats or sheep, and should be an unblemished male older than eight days old. An animal who has any sort of blemish should not be brought as an offering because it is not acceptable before Hashem. This prohibition is mentioned three times, Rashi asks why this information is repeated; he explains that there are three warnings that can be found here. We must be careful with the korban’s holiness and to make sure no blemish can be found in it, also about the shechting of the korban, and making sure it’s done correctly. Finally, the last warning is about spilling the blood of the animal. If a person brings a korban, he must make sure these fundamental principles are done correctly, to ensure complete acceptance by Hashem. Hashem continues speaking to Moshe and tells him to explain to Benei Yisrael about all of the holidays, and holy days of Hashem. For six days work can be constantly done, however now the seventh day should be separated, and transformed to a day of complete rest, and connection with Hashem - this day is called “Shabbat.” Next, Hashem explains to Moshe about the holiday of Pesach in the first month, on the fourteenth day. On this day, Benei Yisrael will eat unleavened cakes, for seven days, and the first and seventh days should become holy times. Hashem continues and tells Moshe about the special mitzvah of counting seven holy weeks after the holiday of Pesach until Shavuot. Moshe is then instructed to create an extremely holy day of atonement for all sins. Each man should stop all work, and afflict themselves in fast, from evening to evening. Anyone who violates this extremely holy occasion will suffer greatly and severely become cut off from the nation. Next Moshe learns about the extremely special seven day holiday of Succot. The first and eighth days should be holy, and no work should be performed. During this holiday Bnei Yisrael will not live in permanent houses, only in temporary shacks, eternally celebrating Hashem's festival. Hashem concludes his momentous instructions to Moshe with a commandment to the Kohanim instructing them to bake twelve loaves of bread, and stack them in two. Then on each stack they should place a coating of frankincense, and on each shabbat day, the bread should be remembered as the eternal promise between us and Hashem. Finally, Hashem concludes his wisdom to Moshe with laws of injury in Benei Yisrael. Any man who harms another should be punished with the equivalence of the same injury. For example if a person fractures someone’s hand, they will have to pay monetary value for losses due to the injury. Lastly, any man who says Hashem's name in vain which means swearing on something obvious, or extremely unlikely to happen, should be immediately put to death, and stoned by the whole nation. The last momentous law taught to Benei Yisrael is that the convert and the resident are equal, and should be treated exactly alike. A meaningful lesson we can learn from this parsha is that all these laws and mitzvot are created not as a burden to us, but rather to connect us with Hashem. Although it may seem difficult to keep all these holidays, we must keep in mind that through each one we come one step closer to Hashem. Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Parsha Challenge: Emor Submitted by Rabbi Binyamin Yablok, Associate Principal, based on questions from Congregation Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck, New Jersey

1. (a) (1) Why do Emor’s kohanim laws follow Parashat Kedoshim (2 views)? (2) Why did Hashem tell Moshe, “say to the kohanim”, then repeat, “say to them” (3 views)? (b) (1) Why must kohanim stay away from human corpses? (2) Why does this ban not apply to Aharon’s female offspring ? (c) (1) How does the phrase, “[the kohen] shall be holy to you”, teach us that there are times a kohen must be given priority over others? (2) What are 6 such instances? (3) What did beit din have to do to fulfill this? (4) Why is a kohen banned from marrying certain women? (d) What did the Sanhedrin in the Lishkat haGazit (Temple Mount Chamber) spend most of its time doing? (Vayikra 21:1,7-8,21) 1. (a) (1) In Kedoshim, Bnei Yisrael were told to (i) strive for kedusha – Emor describes the higher kedusha that kohanim maintained to do the avoda; (ii) separate from the nations by avoiding their practices – Emor tells the kohanim to separate even further with higher purity; (2) Moshe (i) first taught Kedoshim’s laws and their interpretations to the kohanim to teach Bnei Yisrael, then he taught the kohanim their special laws (ibn Ezra). (ii) doubled the expression to stress the of these laws’ importance, which run counter Bnei Yisrael’s prevalent habits (Ramban). (iii) instructed the kohanim to repeat these laws to their children to admonish them not to become tamei mayt (Rashi Yevamot 114a). (b) (1) Since kohanim had to be tahor for the avoda, they had to separate from a corpse’s tuma (Chizkuni). (2) Women did not do the avoda – they did not have to be tahor like the males (c) (1) A kohen’s sanctity is greater than a non-kohen’s, meriting priority in ritual and non-ritual events (Gittin 59b). (2) A kohen has priority in (i) getting an aliyah; (ii) speaking publicly at events; (iii) reciting kiddush, and (iv) hamotzi; (v) being served food; (vi) leading birchat ha-mazon (Mishnah Berurah 201:2). (3) If a kohen married a zona (immoral woman), chalala (daughter of a forbidden relationship), or gerusha (divorcee), beit din forced him to divorce her (Rashi). (4) A wife influences a man’s thoughts – a kohen, to maintain his kedusha, must marry a woman with an unblemished background, assuring that his holy work is undisturbed (Sefer haChinuch – Mitzvah 269). (d) Investigating and examining kohanim’s lineage and blemishes that could disqualify them from doing the avoda (Mitzvah 276). 2. (a) What is the difference in (1) 22:18? and (2) 22:23 between offering a korban as (i) a “neder” or (ii) a “nedava”? (b) Why could an animal not be a korban until it was 8th days old (3 views)? (c) (1) The verse “ve-lo techalilu et Shem Kadshi” (you shall not desecrate My Holy Name) teaches that a person must sacrifice his life rather than commit which 3 sins? (2) In which 2 situations must one sacrifice one’s life to not violate any mitzvah? (3) How can we fulfill the mitzvah of kidush Hashem on a daily basis (2 ways)? (Vayikra 22:18,23,27,32) 2. (a) (1) A (i) neder is the offerer’s obligation – if the animal was not valid as a korban, he must bring another; (ii) nedava is a donated animal – if that animal could not be offered, he does not bring another (Megila 8a). (2) (i) neder is an animal that must be a korban; (i) nedava is designated for bedek haBayit (“Sanctuary upkeep”) – it could be redeemed and the money used to maintain the Mikdash (Rashi). (b) (1) Until the 8th day, the newborn could be a non-viable birth (Chizkuni). (2) Shabbat testifies to Hashem’s Creation – the animal must be elevated by a Shabbat (Tzror haMor). (3) Before 8 days, an animal is unfit for anything – no one wants it for food, trade or a gift (Mitzvah 293). (c) (1) (i) Murder; (ii) idolatry; (iii) immorality; (2) (i) if 10 Jews are present, one must not commit any sin to degrade the Torah; (ii) during shemad (religious persecution), one must sacrifice his life, even for a private sin; (3) (i) If one refrains from a sin, not from pressure or for reward, but solely for Hashem’s sake; (ii) by acting so others are struck by a Torahobservant Jew’s greatness (Rambam – Hilchot Yesodei haTorah 5:1-4,10-11). 3. (a) Why does the mitzvah of kidush Hashem precede the mo’adim’s (holidays’) descriptions? (b) (1) Why are Bnei Yisrael told “asher tikre’u” ([the mo’adim] which you shall declare) twice, in 23:2 and 23:4? (2) Why do the mo’adim require special food and drink, festive clothing and additional tefilot? (3) Why, among the Yamim Tovim that Bnei Yisrael are required to declare as “mikra’ei kodesh” (holy convocations), is the first one mentioned Shabbat, that Hashem, not Bnei Yisrael, declared? (Vayikra 23:2-4) 3. (a) Since a Yom Tov celebration can easily degenerate into a chilul Hashem, we are warned that the mo’adim must sanctify Him (Ha’amek Davar). (b) (1) Beit din is commanded to (i) designate a 13th month when required – 23:2; (ii) sanctify each new moon – 23:4 (Rashi). (2) These give honor and distinctiveness to the mo’adim, to help us focus on achieving spiritual elevation (haKetav vehaKabala). (3) One could think that Yamim Tovim, whose dates are set by beit din, are less important than Shabbat, which Hashem set at Creation – the Torah teaches that violating Yom Tov is as serious as violating Shabbat, and celebrating Shabbat and Yom Tov properly are equally rewarded (Rashi). 4. (a) (1) Which 3 of the 613 mitzvot are done only on Shavuot? (2) Why is Shavuot one day, unlike 7 days for Pesach and Sukkot (3 views)? (b) Why are the mitzvot to leave some of the farmer’s crops for the poor stated among the mo’adim’s halachot (2 views)? (Vayikra 23:15-22,36) 4. (a) (1) To (i) offer the sh’tei halechem (2 breads) mincha (Mitzvah 307); (ii) rest (Mitzvah 308); (iii) do no work (Mitzvah 309). (2) (i) Since Shavuot falls during the crops’ growing season, Hashem did not bother farmers with a long holiday (Sifri). (ii) Just as Shemini Atzeret is Sukkot’s 1-day finale, Shavuot is Pesach’s 1-day finale (Medrash Tanchuma). (iii) Sharing one’s harvest with the poor on the days after Shavuot equals the mo’adim’s holiness (Chatam Sofer). (b) (1) So a farmer realizes that his crops are really Hashem’s, and he must give them to those He designates (Meshech Chachma). (2) Doing these mitzvot equals building the Beit haMikdash and bringing Yom Tov korbanot (Rashi). 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April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

May Menu (Also Posted on mdsweb.org) Prepared by Aleta Gelb, Director of Food Services, agelb@mdsweb.org

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Page 21


April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

MDS Book Fair, 4/30-5/2

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Page 22


April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

Rabbi Jonathan Rietti Visits MDS, 5/1

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Page 23


April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

MDS Soccer Tournament, 5/1

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Page 24


April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

MDS Auction, 5/5/13

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Page 25


April 26, 2013

‫פרשת אמר‬

Volume 12, Issue 23

MDS Summer Camp

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Page 26


‫פרשת אמר‬

April 26, 2013

Manhattan Day School 310 West 75th Street New York, New York Tel: 212-673-3066 212-376-6800 Fax: 212-376-6389

www.mdsweb.org

Email all articles and graphics to Yehudit Robinson, Director of Educational Technology, yrobinson@mdsweb.org

In the MDS Family... 

Mazal tov to Eileen Dahan (Middle School Faculty) on the engagement of her daughter Victoria to Jakey Dweck.

Mazal tov to Alex Klein (mother of Regina, 2A) on her engagement to Chalom Silber.

Mazal tov to Ally (Early Childhood Department Faculty) and Aryeh Cooper on the birth of a girl (pictured right).

Mazal Tov to Sharon Gopin (Lower School Faculty) on the birth of granddaughter Chana to Dani and Tova Gopin in Atlanta (pictured right).

Correction: last week’s student devar torah was written by Rachel Lubitz, 8G.

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Benjamin Leitner, father of MDS parent, Ken Leitner, and grandfather of MDS students Talia Leitner (7G), Eitan Leitner (5B), and Oren Leitner (1A). Shiva has concluded. May the entire family be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

Yashar koach to this week’s Winning Wednesday Raffle winners: Renee Gershuni (1A), Yehuda Goldman (6B), and Yael Skydell (7G).

Upcoming Events (all events are also posted on ParentLocker): Monday, April 29th Yom Iyun in Tefillah, Grades 6-8 Monday, April 29th School-wide Lag BaOmer Festivities April 30th-May 2nd Book Fair Friday, May 3rd Celebrating Nursery 1 and Nursery 3 Sunday, May 5th Cinco de Mayo Auction Friday, May 10th Celebrating Nursery 4 May 14-17 Shavuot Recess Sunday, May 19th SoulCycle Fundraiser May 22-23 Grade 7 Boston Trip Monday, May 27th Memorial Day—No Sessions Thursday, May 30th Sephardic Culture Day Friday, May 31st Celebrating Kindergarten Sunday, June 2nd Celebrate Israel Parade Monday, June 3rd 6G, 7G, 8G Guest Speaker: Mrs. Slovi Jungreis Wolff: The Power of Women Monday, June 3rd Celebrating Toddler Alef and Bet Tuesday, June 4th 7th Grade Parents High School Meeting, 7:30 pm Thursday, June 6th Grade 3 Rashi Play Friday, June 7th 4th Grade Play, 9:30 am Monday, June 10th 7B Bar Mitzvah Program Tuesday, June 11th 8th Grade Graduation Friday, June 14th Last day of Preschool Tuesday, June 18th Last day of school Grades 1-7

… 

Thank you for keeping our school a nut-aware environment.

Please join our daily parent tehillim group which meets in the library at 8:15 AM.

Candle Lighting Time - 7:28 PM

Volume 12, Issue 23

Page 27

MDS Messenger April 26, 2013  

MDS Messenger April 26, 2013

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