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‫בס"ד‬ April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Commemorating Yom HaShoah By Judy Melzer, Associate Principal, jmelzer@mdsweb.org; Picture taken by Nathaniel Lazan

Holocaust study is a significant part of the educational tapestry of Manhattan Day School. Our commitment to Holocaust study includes a class for 8th graders called Senior Seminar as well as teaching the lessons of the Shoah across the grades; especially the importance of tolerance, acceptance, and empathy. Some years ago, Mrs. Melzer and Rabbi Besser attended the workshop for educators at Yad Vashem in Yerushalayim for teaching the Holocaust. That experience enriched Mrs. Melzer's knowledge. Recently, Mrs. Melzer presented a workshop for the American Society for Yad Vashem. She conducted two 1.5 session interactive learning sessions for educators on sensitizing students to the Holocaust. With the help of Danielle Ben David and Richard Acosta, she explained and displayed the numerous projects that her students engaged in and the many articles, poetry, plays, literature, books, interviews, video conferencing, etc. that she has shared throughout the years. In fact, last year and several years ago, the students interviewed and videotaped Holocaust survivors, creating profiles of them in DVD and book form. Many other Holocaust programs included: a visit with Linda Hopper, principal of the Whitwell School in Whitwell, TN and the progenitor of the PaperClips project. In other years, students saw Irena's Vow with Tova Feldshuh, The Diary of Anne Frank, and published their own poetry and created original plays based on their learning. This year, the 8th graders also read Defying the Tide and interviewed the author, Rhea Sokolow. There are so many other numerous programs that we could describe. Speak to Mrs. Melzer for a brief description. We also have a Holocaust section in our library in memory of Annette Lebor Fox's father Jack Rozmaryn, a Holocaust survivor. This year, one of the readings by the seniors was Four Perfect Pebbles by Marion Blumenthal Lazan. The students discussed the book and were very prepared for Mrs. Lazan's visit in commemoration of Yom HaSHoah. What an incredible presenter she turned out to be. For more than an hour, our students from grades 5-8 were totally engaged in Mrs. Lazan's fascinating story. The book describes the changing times in Europe and the life of Marion's family in Germany, their flight to Amsterdam and their capture and internment in Westerbork and Bergen Belsen. She described her arrival in the United States and left the students with a most significant message. She believes in courage, tolerance, understanding of all faiths and races, and bitachon in Hashem. Furthermore, she underscored the students' responsibility of carrying on the memory of all those who were murdered and the honor of those who managed to survive.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Commemorating Yom HaShoah By Nadav Heller, 6B; Picture taken by Nathaniel Lazan

This past week, we went to the Beit Midrash for a special Yom Hashoah program. We were spoken to about the Holocaust by Marion Blumenthal Lazan. She suffered because of the Holocaust from ages four to fourteen. During the Holocaust, at about my age, she didn’t have much to eat. She weighed 35 pounds. Her mother weighed about 60. She had to go two weeks without food or water in a crowded cattle car, where it was easy to get dehydrated. I can’t imagine going more than a day or two without food or water. It is difficult for me to fast. When she was 4, she and her family lost all their belongings in a bombing. They were going to America, but before they left, the harbor was bombed. This took place in Holland. Can you imagine losing all your belongings at 4 years old?! Forget toys! What about: clothing, food, heirlooms, beds, money, etc.!? When she was 10, in a concentration camp, her mother snuck some soup out of the kitchen she worked at and started a fire secretly. Just as the soup was simmering, the Germans popped in for a surprise check. In her haste to hide the soup, Marion’s mother spilled the very hot soup on Marion’s leg. Knowing that by crying out, Marion could forfeit her, her mother’s, her brother’s (Albert), and her father’s lives, she held her voice. Fortunately, she had self-discipline and didn’t move. At first, when Mrs. Blumenthal told us about the burn on her leg, I thought it would go away in a week and a half. She explained how it was swollen and rotting and got worse over the months and that she was lucky that the Russians gave her medication after liberation, and that she did not lose her leg. Once Marion emigrated from Europe to America, since she did not know how to speak English, she was put in a fourth grade classroom. She was a fourteen year old among a group of nine year olds. Then she discovered potato chips and mayonnaise. She gained weight. She didn’t speak as the others did, or act like them for that matter. They had a lot to make fun of in her. They didn’t though; they included her in their discussions, games, works, and groups. They welcomed her as a fellow fourth grader. We learned that Hitler realized that the prior leader wasn’t loved by the German people. He seized the chance to come to power. He was elected and secretly (not proven) bombed the German equivalent to the Capitol. He blamed it on the Russians and asked to combat the Russians by giving him emergency powers. With that power, he fired everyone and replaced the government with his own men. He passed the Nuremburg laws and other laws that limited the freedoms of the Jews. In the end, the world was thrown into war. Marion is alive and well to this day at just below 80 years old. Her mother lived until almost 105, and her father died of typhus right after the war ended. Her brother, Albert, is two year older than she is. I think this was a deeply moving presentation. It changed my view of the Holocaust. At several points during the presentation, I found myself wincing at some of the things she had to go through. I would like to thank Marion Blumenthal Lazan for sharing this incredible story of suffering and survival.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Student Responses to Marion Lazan’s Visit Submitted by Eileen Dahan, edahan@mdsweb.org; Pictures taken by Nathaniel Lazan

Marion Blumenthal Rosenthal Inspired Us By Rosie Adelman, 6G This past week, a Holocaust survivor, Marion Blumenthal Lazan, the author of Four Perfect Pebbles, spoke to us. She was very charismatic and brave. I will remember her courage and mostly her game. Her game was to find four perfect pebbles, four for each member of her family. If she could find four perfect pebbles, she was sure that this would mean that her parents and her brother Albert and she would survive. This was a sign of hope, something that she could hold on to. If I was in her situation, I’m not sure if I would be able to stay strong and sane like she did. I read a book over vacation called, Through Our Eyes, a book about what the Holocaust was like for children. The book was upsetting and hard to read, but I did get a feeling of the discomfort of living in ghettos and the scariness of walking around with a yellow star that gives every German soldier “permission” to just beat you up on the street. Mrs. Blumenthal was courageous and by far the most meaningful Holocaust survivor I ever met. I know I will tell her story to all of my children and grandchildren. I will also appreciate even more my ‘three B’s: bed (shelter), bath (sanitary), and bread (food)! Yom Hashoah Program Response By Jonathan Haberman, 6B Today we went into the Beit Midrash for a Yom Hashoah program. We head the honor of listening to Marion Blumenthal Lazar, a Holocaust survivor, speak about her experiences in the Holocaust. I would like to remember throughout my life, her words of wisdom that she shared with us. However, most of all I would like to remember her attitude toward the world. Despite having gone through so much, she still focused on helping people. Instead of talking a lot about the problem, she spoke mostly about solutions. This is a trait I will try my best to remember throughout my life.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Science with Mr. D.: Balance and Motion By Jim DeCarle, jdecarle@mdsweb.org

Kindergartners have been learning about balance in science. Several weeks ago, they balanced a paper clown and other objects. Recently they were challenged to construct different spinning toys by manipulating a few simple materials. The children came up with some wonderful and creative ideas! They learned about the importance of maintaining balance in order for an object to spin efficiently. The objects they had balanced previously worked because the counterweights were placed low for maximum stability. Students used these same principles in their spinning toy designs. The children recently constructed a motion toy which was a unique version of shooting a basketball. They demonstrated good skill in coordinating their eye and hand movements to move the ball into the cup. This week students drew some creative designs using spinning instruments and spirograph.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Building Vocabulary By Julia Averbuch, Reading Coordinator, javerbuch@mdsweb.org

According to Beck and Marzaro, one of the most important factors which contributes to a child’s growth and development in comprehension is their ability to use and understand vocabulary. Instructionally, it is important for our students to learn about multiple meaning words. There are a variety of instructional approaches that teachers will use to address these words: studying idioms, read-alouds, guided reading, and in conversation. A concrete, yet relevant example can be found with the word STRIKE. Whether it be through baseball, bowling, industry, harmony or forceful actions-this word reflects multiple meanings. Moving forward, teachers will be explicitly modeling and extracting multiple meaning words from texts. In addition to this, they will be taking our students through “Tiers” of words (e.g. Tier one: old, Tier two: elderly, Tier Three: ancient/decrepit) in order to support their development in vocabulary knowledge. Please join us with this important endeavor by discussing different vocabulary terms as the reveal themselves in conversations and text.

Students as Teachers By Holly Tanz, htanz@mdsweb.org

The boys in class 401 have been practicing research skills, while studying Western Expansion in America. Each student was given an explorer or territory to teach the class about. First they highlighted important information on their reading passages and selected resources. Then they wrote the important information onto note cards. Everyone made a poster about their topic, with pictures and images depicting their exploration. When presenting, students shared all the information they had learned with the rest of the class. They each taught the class who or what their person or topic was, when it occurred, the purpose or goal of the journey, and its importance in the history of Western Expansion. Stanley thought learning about the history of the Louisiana Purchase was a great experience. Noam enjoyed writing about Sacagawea and liked presenting his information. Spencer liked learning about John Savier because he was a soldier. Isaac thought Daniel Boone was very creative because he found a path. David said that William Clark was a good explorer because he traveled through Louisiana. Harold taught us that Zebulon Pike has a mountain named after him called Pikes Peak. Jesse shared a lot of information about Meriwether Lewis and his travels with the Corps of Discovery. All of the boys did an excellent job conducting research and sharing their information with the class. They truly became the teachers.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Play ‘B.A.L.’ with MDS! By Rabbi Benjamin Yablok, Assistant Principal, jby@mdsweb.org

This week, we launched a new program encouraging fine manners and Midot at MD. It is intended to parallel the Sefirah period and focus on some desirable student behaviors. We are calling it “Play B.A.L with MDS” which stands for Bein Adam Lachaveiro. To add incentive and fun, teachers who identify one of the six specific areas we are targeting are able to award raffle tickets to deserving students. Teachers are discussing the significance and application of these six areas of behavior in their classes. There will be some nice prizes distributed at the drawings. The six areas include: a) Derech Eretz: Respect in general and specifically for the various non-teaching staff who help us throughout the building b) Shomer Achi: Concern for others involving support and encouragement of fellow students c) Kevod Morim uZekeinim: Cooperating respectfully with Rebbes, teachers, adults, e.g. using appropriate language, holding door, etc. in and out of class d) Ish Lere’eihu Ya’azoru: Helpfulness when a need is there, especially with younger students and in common areas. Also in keeping our building clean, e) Kevod Torah UTefilah: Respecting Torah and Tefilah – Making good use of time, handling of sefarim, decorum in class and Beit Midrash f) Sever Panim Yafot: Positive attitude – pleasant and self-controlled with self and others

Navi Rap: Shoftim, Perek 6 By Jonathan Kloepfer, 5B

[Editor’s note: The students in Mrs. Leora Berkowitz Sulimanoff’s navi class created raps to summarize Perek 6 in Shoftim. Enjoy the following example of student work.] The Children of Israel were really bad. They prayed to other gods and Hashem got mad. Into the hands of Midyan and Amalek Hashem delivered Israel, their crops they would take. After seven years, Israel had enough of being poor. They cried out to Hashem, “Forgive us; no more!” Hashem sent an angel to Mr. Gideon Who said, through you, My people gonna win! Gideon, being a doubting guy, Said, “Do a miracle before my eye.” Gideon went, his sacrifice he fetched. The angel, his staff, he outstretched. Boom, out of the rock, jumped a fire. Gideon knew that he was Hashem’s hire. With Hashem behind him, his Dad’s Baal he did break. The people thought it was a big mistake. “If Baal is a god,” said Gideon’s Dad. “He can defend himself against my lad.” Midyan and Amalek prepared for war. Gideon’s spirits began to soar. He assembled his people, the shofar he blew. Hashem did a miracle with the dew. First the fleece was wet, then it was dry. Israel’s spirits were flying high! Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Visiting the Metropolitan Museum of Art By Messenger Staff; Pictures taken by Sharon Gopin, sgopin@mdsweb.org

Led by special docent MDS art teacher Leyla Demirtas, the first graders enjoyed a tour of some highlights of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s various collections, from Impressionist to Modern Art. Our students not only enjoyed seeing famous pieces, but also brought along clip boards and tried copying the styles of some of the famous artists whose work they admired. Art history, art appreciation, art education, and visual literacy are integral components of MDS curriculum for creating well-rounded learners.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Refuah Shleimah to Ruchama Sarah Miryam! By Bethany Strulowitz, bstrulowitz@mdsweb.org;

"We are all responsible for each other!" !‫ כל ישראל ערבים זה לזה‬This phrase continues to spring to life for the students here at MDS. 5G, 7G, and 8G recently heard about a ten year old girl from Great Neck named Ruchama Sara Miryam bat Tamar who is in critical condition in the hospital due to complications from the H1N1 virus. Upon seeing her pictures and hearing her story, the girls immediately sprang into action and brainstormed numerous ways to help her towards a refuah sheleimah. They made beautiful cards and wrote heartfelt messages, they added her name to the cholim list at school, and they dedicated the mitzvot they did over Pesach in the z’chut of a refuah sheleimah for Ruchama Sara Miryam. Some of the girls even davened for her at the kotel over Pesach! Needless to say, the students felt so honored when they received a response from Ruchama Sara's aunt who not only emailed a thank you but also posted her appreciation on Facebook for the world to see! Below is her Facebook post: "KOL NE'ARIM REACH SHAMAYIM!!! I received the most amazing package filled with cards, artwork and letters of chizuk and inspiration from the students of Mrs. Bethany Strulowitz's classes from the Manhattan Day School. These letters were filled with real thoughts, T'fillot, words of support and so many uplifting sweet smiles! Such love from a group of students she has never met! Mi K'Amecha Yisrael?! Ruchama Sara will love them and be so inspired by you! Thank you so much." Please continue to daven for the refuah sheleimah of Ruchama Sara Miryam bat Tamar!

Jewish Troops Thank MDS By Messenger Staff

We reached out to Jewish troops stationed around the world. They received our holiday cards and packages. And some of them wrote heartfelt thank you notes in return. Here are two that we received: To Whomever It May Concern (including Aaron and Avigail), My name is Brent and I am a C-130 pilot in the Air Force deployed to the Middle East from Little Rock, Arkansas. I am originally from Charlotte, North Carolina. Thank you so much for the letters and goodies you all sent us for Purim. We all got together and enjoyed the festivities and company of each other during the holiday. I am looking forward to Passover and especially to getting back to my family. I have a little girl (four years old) and a wife who are ready to see me after being out here for six months. The care packages you all sent to us helped make the time pass a lot more easily, thank you! To Avigail, thank you for the letter and I have one brother. Keep practicing your basketball and have fun with your new brother! Oh, and my daughter was the cutest little Esther at the carnival this year. To Aaron, thank you for your letter too, the drawings were great! You like to cook; what is your favorite thing to cook? My family loves my French Toast. When I am not working, I enjoy cycling, I ride at least 100 miles a week. I wish I could write to everyone, but thank all your friends for me! Have a wonderful Pesach! Capt Brent "HULK" Reiss, USAF, Afghanistan Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Where Are They Now? Matti Blackman By Messenger Staff

The Messenger periodically reconnects you with alumni and former teachers. This week, we reconnect you with Matti (Gewirtz) Blackman, who taught Middle School Judaic Studies last year: I live in Yerushalayim. I am learning through YU’s Azrieli program in Jewish Education. I’m also taking some classes at Machon Lander (a division of Touro), and I work for an outreach organization. I also tutor some of my former MDS students on Skype. My husband Shlomo learns at the Mir. What I do now makes me miss MDS more; I miss being in this atmosphere – the closeness, everyone being one family here and caring so much about each other. The kids here are really good and positive. I’m so glad that technology has made it possible for me to maintain my relationship with my former students and colleagues.

Family Fun Days Pesach Adventures By Nancy Miller

MDS kids had fun in New York over Passover break learning to improve their soccer skills and trying their hands at movie-making, thanks to the Parents’ Council Family Fun activities. At the start of the break, a group of MDS kids braved the cold in Riverside Park @103rd Street learning to dribble, pass, and score with the Carlos Oliveira Soccer Academy. The children came home tired, pink, and ready to show off the finesse of Brazilian style football. Thanks to COSA for offering MDS families a special discount on a package of four classes! As some tired moms and dads returned to work (or spent the day restoring their kitchens), 18 MDS students gathered at the Apple Store on the Upper West Side to learn how to make an iMovie. The topic? What else: My Passover Vacation! Thanks to Jeanne at Apple for a fun morning of high-tech creativity.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Au Revoir Rosanna Aquino! By Messenger Staff

We wish au revoir to Rosanna Aquino from our kitchen staff who is moving on to a career in accounting. Please read her inspirational story below: I’m from the Dominican Republic. I came here through relatives nine years ago, in 2003. When I first came here, I started working in a restaurant in Washington Heights. I stayed there for five years. But I was young when I got here – I was only 20. I realized that I had a future, and I wanted to grow. I decided to go to school to learn English and get a job that would force me to speak English. That’s when I started working for Five Star Catering. I began at SAR in Riverdale, and then in 2010, I began working at Manhattan Day School. We are able to have a closer relationship with the kids here, because it’s a smaller school, so you have more time to get to know the teachers and students. The job here wasn’t hard for me because I’ve been working in the field for many years. Everyone is very friendly in the kitchen – we are like a family. While I was working at MDS, I was also working on an Associates degree. I realized that I needed more education. I wanted to invest my time in more learning. I got interested in earning a BA. It was very hard to work full time and go to school full time, with four classes a semester. Aleta is a great person, a great manager, and she was very supportive of my being in school while working. The main focus of all of my efforts was my family. I send money back to them in the Dominican Republic each month for my younger brothers to motivate them to build themselves up. Being here was hard – when I first came, I had a hard time communicating. But I kept trying. My younger brothers and sisters look to me as a role model – I’m the second of seven children, but my parents are no longer alive, so my siblings look up to me. My oldest sister is now in college studying psychology in the Dominican Republic. And now my other younger siblings are also working hard and being productive. I am a motivator for them and for my other friends. When I decided to go for my citizenship, at first I was reluctant because of the time and money involved. But as I was helping four of my friends go through the process of preparing for the citizenship exams and encouraging them to master the material, I realized that I had already learned the material, and I could do this myself. Once day I realized that I should fill out the application and talk to the lawyer. It made me so happy to complete the process in March 2012. I finished my accounting degree this past fall. I did my internship over the summer at the NY Liquidation Bureau in downtown Manhattan. I was working in the insurance division. I was also helping the auditors, and I learned a lot about the insurance industry. Aleta was very encouraging, and she said I could come back here while I was looking for an accounting position. Since then, I found the opportunity to be in a company in Queens. I will be there learning the process of accounts payable and accounts receivable, etc. Many thanks to Manhattan Day School for being such a great institution and so friendly over the years – you don’t have any fears to express yourself and talk with people. I will miss the staff and the students so much. This is such a nice place to work, and I enjoyed my years here very much. Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Did You Catch the Dinner Theme? By Messenger Staff; Pictures taken by Norman Goldberg

We wanted to make sure you were able to appreciate the dinner theme of different countries. Please enjoy these pictures by Norman Goldberg. Once again, thank you to dinner co-chairs Leyla Posner and Tracy Gerber for tremendous efforts in organizing an outstanding and highly memorable evening.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Sharsheret Thanks MDS

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

8G Devar Torah Project: Shmini Submitted by Bethany Strulowitz, bstrulowitz@mdsweb.org; Devar Torah written by Stephanie Kirshenbaum, 8G

[We are sharing Stephanie’s devar torah as we did not have a Messenger last week and we want to help you stay current with the parshiyot.] When I was eight years old my mom gave a big donation to tzedakah. I remember so clearly how everyone was complementing her on how she was such a good person. I decided that I should be a good person too, and give things to tzedakah. I took whatever I saw, a kitchen plate, a glass vase, a couch pillow, and more. Then, when I got about ten things I gave them to the charity. I was so excited for everyone to be complementing me when my mother came over to me and asked where all of our things had gone. I that I gave everything to tzedakah, and she explained to me that what I had did was wrong because I had not told her what I was doing beforehand and that I had not asked for her permission first. But I didn't understand, I thought I was doing something good. In Parshat Shemini, Moshe tells Aharon two take two young bulls and a ram as a Korban for Hashem. Aharon then did what Moshe had told him and Hashem made a fire come down which consumed the korban. Aharon’s two eldest sons, Nadav and Avihu, decided to make an offering for Hashem too even though it had not been commanded by Hashem. They brought it before Hashem, and He sent down a fire which killed them instead. How could Nadav and Avihu do such a bad thing? Rabbi Solovetichik explains that the Torah says that Nadav and Avihu each took a fire pan and put fire and incense on them and brought before Hashem an alien fire. They did this freely and they knew it was wrong. He also suggests that what they did wrong only because they were so excited about giving a Korban to Hashem that they brought incence that wasn't commanded by Hashem. This shows that you always have to listen to Hashem and think before you do anything. I believe that they knew that what they did was wrong, although they didn't realize it was wrong because they were so excited to give a korban. Aharon found out that his sons had died. Moshe told Aharon not to mourn over the death of his sons and to teach B’nei Yisrael all the laws of Hashem. He also told him to take the meat that was left over from the fire-offering and to eat it there near the Altar because it is very holy. Aharon then accepted and listened to what Moshe had told him, with no complaints and no questions. How could Aharon accept his sons’ death with no pain? Shlomo Shulman explains that it is almost impossible to accept such a loss with no pain. The Torah says that Aharon was silent and he had no questions and no complaints. Aharon accepted and appreciated Hashem's decision because he knew that Hashem only does the everything for everyone's benefit. This shows that Aharon greatly believed in Hashem and that you should always listen to Hashem because he only does the best for you. Moshe saw that the meat was burnt and he started asking people who had done this. He blamed Elezar and Itamar, Aharon's two other sons. Aharon said that he had done this because it was during a time of mourning. Moshe realized that it was hard for Aharon not to mourn over his sons so he accepted what he had done.

The Box Tops contest continues! Submit your box tops to Sharon Newman in a bag clearly labeled with your name and class. Help your class win an ice cream party! Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

8G Devar Torah Project: Tazria-Metzora Submitted by Bethany Strulowitz, bstrulowitz@mdsweb.org; Devar Torah written by Sarah Lidagoster, 8G

Imagine you're on a football team and you talk back to your coach. Now your coach was very upset about that. He decided that you would be on probation and that you were not allowed to even practice on the football field. You feel embarrassed and ashamed, and you regret that you talked back to him. This is like what happens in this week's double parsha, Tazria-Metzora. The parsha talks about how when a person gets Tzaraat, he must be sent away from the camp and cannot enter until the Tzaraat is declared gone. This is much like the football player; he is not allowed to be near the football field until his probation is finished. Parshat Tazria begins by continuing the laws of tumah and taharah. The parsha speaks about halachot relating to childbirth and the obligation of the woman to bring special offerings to the Beit Hamikdash. Then the Torah speaks of the laws of a new baby and the obligation to circumcise a male baby on the eighth day of life. Parshat Metzora discusses the laws of Tzaraat, which is a plague afflicted on one who spoke lashon harah that affects garments or homes. They are white or pink patches that come on a person's skin which appears following a burn to the skin. The Torah also discusses that tzaraat appears on a bald spot, as well a white discoloration streaked with red which can appear anywhere on the body. Then the kohen pronounces whether it is impure or pure by the growth of the patch within a seven day time period. A person with Tzaraat has to live outside of the camp or city until he is declared healed. I had a question regarding this commandment. Why is it that a metzora is commanded to dwell in isolation? An answer that I believe is appropriate to the question is that, since tzaraat is a punishment for lashon harah which creates a space between people, the Torah punishes that person by placing a temporary division between him and others. The area which was afflicted with Tzaraat, depending on the circumstances the garment is either declared pure, or completely burnt, or only the part which was discolored is torn out and burnt, is then removed and if found again the garments or home is destroyed. The person with Tzaraat is then purified by the kohen with a special ceremony involving two birds, water in a vessel, a piece of cedar wood, a scarlet thread, and a bundle of hyssop. A meaningful lesson that we learn from this week’s double parsha is to always do the right thing and do many mitzvot because that way we can always be pure. We see that HaShem teaches us in the parsha to be pure when he tells us constantly that we can become impure even from small situations. This shows that HaShem wants us to be as best as we can because He always wants what’s best for our relationship with Him. We should always strive for purity and constantly do mitzvot so that our relationship with HaShem can grow bigger and we can bring the mashiach.

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Parsha Challenge: Tazria-Metzora Submitted by Rabbi Binyamin Yablok, Associate Principal, based on questions from Congregation Rinat Yisrael in Teaneck, New Jersey

1. (a) Why do Parashat Tazria’s childbirth laws follow Shemini’s kashrut laws (2 reasons)? (b) Since the mitzvah of brit mila is in Lech Lecha, why is it repeated here (2 reasons)? (c) (1) Why may a mila not be done before the 8th day (4 views)? (2) For whom may a mila be done before the 8th day? (d (f) If a woman had triplets, how many korbanot did she bring? (Vayikra 12:2-6) 1. (a) Non-kosher animals’ tuma is followed by tuma of humans, who were created after animals (Rashi) – starting with a woman’s tuma at the start of life (ibn Ezra). (2) It teaches that if one is worthy, all was created before him for his benefit – if unworthy, even a gnat and earthworm preceded him (Vayikra Raba). (b) This mitzvah, adjacent to the korbanot laws, teaches that a mila (1) like korbanot, may not be done at night (Ohr haChaim). (2) must be done on the 8th day, even on Shabbat – one may do melacha for it on Shabbat – like for korbanot (Chizkuni). (c) (1) (i) Hashem told us to wait until the day He knows the boy has enough strength to endure the surgery; (ii) mila is like a korban, bringing the boy under the Shechina’s wings – like all korbanot, the baby must live through at least one Shabbat to elevate his kedusha as a fit “korban”; (iii) Extensive research shows that a baby lacks sufficient Vitamin K (prothrombin) for blood clotting before the 8th day – the 8th day is the only day of his life that he naturally has more than 100% of the normal level and is the ideal day for surgery (S.I. McMillen, M.D., None of these Diseases). (iv) 7 represents nature – by waiting till the 8th day, we remove the natural barrier to kedusha to bring us close to Hashem (Maharal). (2) For a non-Jewish convert (Torah Temima). (d) (1 (f) She would still bring only 2 korbanot, which atone for her, not the babies (Keritut 9b). 2. (a) Why did Hashem transmit the tzara’at laws to Aharon, as well as Moshe (2 views)? (b) What are 10 differences between (i) the natural disease of leprosy and (ii) Divine tzara’at? (c) Where in Tanach do we see tzara’at resulting from (1) idol worship? (2) immorality? (3) murder? (4) blasphemy? (5) acting in an improper capacity? (6) falsely swearing? (7) lashon hara? (d) Since the tzara’at laws follow the kashrut laws, why was tzara’at not a punishment for eating non-kosher food? (e) Why was a metzora expelled from the city and isolated? (Vayikra 13:1-3) 2. (a) (1) Only a kohen could declare an affliction as tzara’at (ibn Ezra). (2) The laws were directed primarily to kohanim, since a metzora would rush to rid himself of zara’at – there was no need to urge Bnei Yisrael in this regard (Ramban). (b) (1) (i) Leprosy begins with a swelling and darkening of the skin – (ii) tzara’at had no swelling, the skin turning white; (2) (i) Shechin Mitzrayim, the most severe leprosy, does not make one tamei – (ii) tzara’at did; (3) (i) for leprosy, raw flesh in the diseased area indicates an improvement – (ii) for tzara’at, raw flesh indicated tuma; (4) (i) disappearance of healthy flesh indicates the leprosy’s return – (ii) the tzara’at’s return was a sign of tahara (purity); (5) (i) leprosy is diagnosed anywhere on the skin from a complete physical exam – (ii) the kohen examined only skin visible to his eye, not the hidden folds; (6) (i) for a natural disease, potentially infected items would not be put in a public area – (ii) before examining a house for tzara’at, the kohen ordered all objects removed; (7) (i) leprosy is examined whenever it occurs to prevent its spread – (ii) tzara’at would not be examined on Shabbat or Yom Tov, when many gathered in Yerushalayim; (8) (i) leprosy could occur anywhere – (ii) in Yerushalayim, no house could be declared tamay; (9) (i) lepers have to be isolated – (ii) in unwalled towns, a metzora could remain in the town; (10) (i) leprosy could affect anyone – (ii) a non-Jew could not be declared tamay (Hirsch). (c) (1) The cheit ha’eigel worshippers were stricken with tzara’at; (2) Pharaoh, who kidnapped Sarah for immoral purposes, was stricken; (3) after Yoav murdered Avnair, David haMelech cursed him with tzara’at; (4) Goliat mocked Hashem – he was stricken; (5) King Uziah entered the Beit haMikdash to offer ketoret (incense) that only kohanim may offer – he was stricken; (6) Geichazi falsely swore to Na’aman that Elisha had sent him – he and his sons were stricken; (7) Miriam spoke lashon hara against Moshe – she was stricken (Vayikra Raba). (d) One is careful about what he puts in his mouth but is lax about what comes out – Hashem brought tzara’at not on one who devoured pork, but to warn one who “devoured” people with careless evil speech (Y. Salanter). (e) Since, through lashon hara, one separates a man from his wife and people from their neighbors, the metzora was punished mida ke-neged mida with separation from society (Arachin 15b). 3. (a) Why did Hashem afflict houses and clothing with tzara’at nega’im? (b) Why do they no longer occur (3 views)? (c) (1) Why is poverty the punishment now (2 reasons)? (d) Why is ve-hitgaleich ([the metzora] shall shave himself) with a large gimel (3 views)? (Vayikra 13:33, 47) 3. (a) Inflicting nega’im on houses and clothing alerted the owner to repent his sins, before they affected his body – they showed Hashem’s compassion for Bnei Yisrael’s acceptance of their mission as an am kadosh (holy people); (b) (1) nega’im came when Bnei Yisrael had great kedusha – when their kedusha descended, they no longer were worthy of reminders to repent (Sforno). (2) Nega’im were open miracles we do not merit today (Ramban). (3) There is no cure without purification in the Beit haMikdash (Shalah). (c) Because (1) both a metzora and a pauper are considered “dead”, and (2) poverty atones for lashon hara (Chofetz Chaim). (d) (1) It teaches that 3 people’s bodies had to be shaved – (i) levi’im when they were consecrated; (ii) a nazir; (iii) a metzora; (2) the shaving supersedes 3 bans on shaving one’s beard with a razor (Otzar Chaim). (3) It is the basis for giving a boy his first haircut at age 3 – this is verse 33, hinting the haircut should be on Lag baOmer (Arizal). Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

April 12, 2013

Volume 12, Issue 21

The MDS Parents Council Thanks You ROSH CHODESH TEACHERS’ BREAKFAST FOR THE MONTH OF IYAR IS SPONSORED BY: Zalta Family, in honor of their daughter Ariella’s teachers (Toddler Alef): Morah Lynette, Morah Dossie and Morah Daniella. Mackey Family in honor of Alissa’s 8G teachers. Thank you to Dalia Debora for purchasing the food.

PESACH FAMILY FUN DAYS Thank you to Nancy Miller for organizing the Pesach Family Fun Days.

WINNING WEDNESDAYS Yashar koach to the Winning Wednesdays lunch raffle prize recipients: Isaac Ayal (6B), Avi Solomons (7B), Noah Spear (2C), Ava Eden (3A), Eli Jesselson (5B), and Kayla Friedman (7G).

UNIFORM SWAP COMES TO MDS! By Riva Atlas-Atik This week, MDS parents got to do a little spring cleaning. In the first half of the week, parents brought in uniforms their kids outgrew; then, on Wednesday through Friday, they were able to select, free of charge, from gently used clothes provided by others. The selection included skirts, jumpers, and pants. Our hope is to offer this service next year too, so hold on to any clothes your kids outgrow during the summer! Any feedback on when or how often to hold the swap would be welcome. Contact Riva Atlas-Atik at rivaatlas@gmail.com. Thanks to Riva Atlas, Pia Rubin, Rachel Solomons, and Ruth Schwarcz for organizing this event.

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

Dr. John D’Auria, 4/24, 7:30 PM

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Book Fair, 4/30-5/2

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Soccer Tournament, 5/1

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Auction, 5/5/13

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Auction, 5/5/13

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Soulcyle Fundraiser, 5/19

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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April 12, 2013

‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

Volume 12, Issue 21

MDS Summer Camp

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

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‫מצרע‬-‫פרשיות תזריע‬

April 12, 2013

Manhattan Day School 310 West 75th Street New York, New York Tel: 212-376-6800 Fax: 212-376-6389

In the MDS Family... 

Mazal tov to Rebecca and Josh Tenzer (Middle School Faculty) on the birth of Ezra Harry and Nathaniel Mel (pictured right).

Mazal tov to Stephanie Bronstein (Middle School Faculty) on the birth of Haley Ella (pictured right)

Mazal tov to Julia Averbuch (Reading Coordinator) on the birth of grandson Ariel Aharon Averbuch (pictured right).

Mazal tov to Dr. Brenda Reiss (School Psychologist) on the birth of granddaughter Rifka Reiss.

www.mdsweb.org

Email all articles and graphics to Yehudit Robinson, Director of Educational Technology, yrobinson@mdsweb.org

Mazal tov to Dr. Israel and Michelle Deutsch and Avigail (6G) and Devora (1C) on the birth of a boy.

The MDS community is invited to a memorial for Herb Lauer, late husband of former MDS teacher Eileen Lauer on April 17th at 8 pm at the Jewish Center.

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Mrs. Martha Melohn, mother of Avremi (and Ruchie) Melohn and Leon (and Simi) Melohn and grandmother of MDS students Sara (TA), Moshe (N4C) and Avi (K5A). Shiva through Tuesday morning, April 16th, will be observed at 365 West End Avenue, #801. May the entire family be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

Thank you for keeping our school a nut-aware environment. 

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Joel H. Shiff, father of Adam (and Deena) Shiff and Gabriel (and Ranit) Shiff, and grandfather of MDS students, Charlie Shiff (K5C)and Eliana Shiff (N3). Shiva through Monday morning, April 15 will be observed at the Shiff home: 59 Merrall Drive, Lawrence, NY 11559, (516) 239-2126. May the entire family be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Mr. Jacob Glueck, the father of Vivian Rosenberg, father-in -law of our esteemed Board member, Henry Rosenberg, and grandfather of our students Joseph and Leo. Shiva has concluded. May the family be comforted among all those who mourn for Tzion and Yerushalayim.

Please join our daily parent tehillim group which meets in the library at 8:15 AM.

Candle Lighting Time - 7:13 PM

Ezra and Nathaniel Tenzer

… 

Volume 12, Issue 21

Haley Ella Bronstein

Ariel Aharon Averbuch

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Robert Hahn, father of Betsey Knapp, father-in-law of David Knapp and grandfather of our student Alexander Knapp. Shiva has concluded. May the family be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

It is with deep regret that we inform you of the passing of Mr. Kenneth Siegel, brother of Dr. Brenda Reiss (School Psychologist). Shiva has concluded. May the entire family be comforted among the mourners of Tzion and Yerushalayim.

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MDS Messenger April 12, 2013  

MDS Messenger April 12, 2013