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March/April 2012 $3.95 The Official Publication of

Nonprofit Holder 2450 Maitland Center Pkwy., Ste. 201 Maitland, FL 32751-4140足


what’s inside CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Kieshalia stephens; CHARLES HOSMER Morse Museum OF AMERICAN ART; Florida Film Festival; hye shin; phelan m. ebenhack

March/April 2012 Vol. 15 No. 2

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Departments From the Editor | 6 Grassroots Creativity

People | 8 Winter Park Playhouse cofounder Roy Alan, conductor JoAnn Falletta, and ballet dancer A Reum Chung.

Cultural Eye | 10

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30

32

We’re out on the town capturing the excitement of Central Florida’s cultural scene.

Dr. Phillips Center Update | 15 The latest on the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

UA Insider | 16 Living in a Cultural Mecca by Linda Landman Gonzalez; United Arts of Central Florida’s 2011 Financial Report; The Arts Matter; Business Buzz—Downtown Credo; and Grant Opportunities from United Arts.

Brush Strokes | 20

Features

A collaborative exhibit offers a behind-thescenes look at the art of the theme park.

Brush Strokes | 21

From Figures to Farms |28| The Morse Museum presents a premiere exhibition of watercolors by one of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s contemporaries.

Diverse programming makes the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra more accessible than ever.

Arts Education | 22 Local public school systems offer arts magnet programs for students of all ages.

Teachers’ Turn |30| This spring, Crealdé School of Art spotlights the talents of its diverse instructors.

Decor | 24

A Smash Hit |32|

Cultural Calendar | 50

The reviews are in: The Florida Film Festival will be a blockbuster!

A cozy Colonialtown cottage is a designer’s artistic retreat.

What’s happening in March and April.

Artist’s Space | 62

Creative Kids |36|

Parker Sketch

Central Florida cultural venues roll out summer camps for every age and interest.

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On the cover: Eye of the Hurricane, written and directed by Orlando filmmaker Jesse Wolfe and starring Campbell Scott, is just one of more than 160 films that will be screened at the 21st Annual Florida Film Festival.


from the editor

Orlando Arts Magazine

Grassroots Creativity S

Cindy Bowman LaFronz Editor Orlando Arts Magazine Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Phelan M. Ebenhack

chedules are hectic for most families. Many households need two incomes to survive, with some parents even holding down two or more jobs in order to make ends meet. Parents oftentimes feel out of balance when it comes to work and family time. When everyone is home, the tendency is to go our separate ways: plugged into computers, gaming systems and televisions scattered throughout the house. So, our family decided to have a movie night recently. It started out tenuous—so many different tastes with so many choices. Remember when your only choice at home was a Sunday night movie on one of the three major networks? Things are certainly different today. I personally do not like really scary movies, so that was out (after all, this was my idea). My two daughters wanted a love story that made my husband and son ill, so they lobbied for a war movie—ugh. It’s a good thing that our 2 ½ year old was sleeping, because making a choice would have been even more impossible. After much debate, we decided to watch an indie movie. It was great to not only talk about the subject of the film, but also why it was considered an independent film. Those filmmakers face so many challenges, such as exposure and financing, but they continue to share their grassroots creativity. It’s akin to going to an art exhibition that’s a little off the main stream. We should always remember to stretch, especially today when we are all bombarded by every media outlet imaginable. It’s OK to walk away and say “that wasn’t for me,” but the opposite could be just as easily true. That’s how I feel every year at the Florida Film Festival (FFF). Some films I can’t wait to share with others and some are not for me. In my mind there are five reasons you should go to FFF beyond just supporting our local gem: 1.) For those of us who are nearsighted, the screen is so much larger than the one at home 2.) The surround sound actually works 3.) I’m not forced to feel guilty if I don’t eat healthy snacks— the food is outstanding 4.) There are really cool people there (I’m obviously not one of them) 5.) You can escape into adventure and story, so when you go out afterwards you can talk about something other than your kids. Enjoy and remember to unplug at home, so you can eventually become one of those cool people.


Editor Cindy Bowman LaFronz Managing Editor Jessica Chapman Contributing Writers Sandra Carr, Nancy Curry, Denise Bates Enos, Sarah Kinbar, Kristen Manieri and Esteban Meneses Contributing Photographer Phelan M. Ebenhack Graphic Designer Michele Mitchell Senior Publications Advertising Coordinator Shelley Hampton Associate Vice President, Partner Development Sheryl Taylor 407.354.5568 Associate Director of Sales, Partner Development Sandi Daugherty Sr. Managers, Partner Development Terri Dougherty, Dottie Healy Managers, Partner Development Laura Bonniville, Timothie Tinsley Subscriptions Interactive/Print Support Services 407.354.5552 Publisher Gary Sain Associate Publisher Deborah Kicklighter Henrichs

United Arts

of

Central Florida Officers

Chair Tony Jenkins, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida Vice Chair Linda Landman Gonzalez, Orlando Magic Treasurer Jean Nowry, Massey Services, Inc. Secretary Bob McAdam, Darden Restaurants, Inc. Interim President Juliana M. Steele

Trustees The Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation Thomas P. Warlow, III Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Florida Tony Jenkins Bright House Networks City of Orlando The Honorable Buddy Dyer CNL Financial Group Lisa A. Schultz Darden Restaurants, Inc. Clarence Otis, Jr. Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation, Inc. Alan Ginsburg Family Foundation Alan H. Ginsburg Orange County, Florida The Honorable Jennifer Thompson Orange County Public Schools Ronald Blocker Seminole County, Florida The Honorable John Horan University of Central Florida Dr. John C. Hitt Walt Disney World Resort Jill Estorino

Orlando Arts Magazine is produced by everything ink, a division of Visit Orlando®, for United Arts of Central Florida. Visit Orlando: 6700 Forum Drive, Suite 100, Orlando, FL 32821, Phone: 407.363.5805, Fax: 407.370.5018. Subscriptions: $18 for six issues, $25 for 12 issues. Orlando Arts Magazine is published bi-monthly. Orlando Arts Magazine assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, negatives or transparencies. United Arts of Central Florida, 2450 Maitland Center Pkwy., Suite 201, Maitland, FL 32751-4140, UnitedArts.cc. ­Telephone: 407.970.2831, Fax 407.628.9110. Email: Cindy@UnitedArts.cc. This publication is sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Arts Council, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Advertising information: 407.354.5568. Copyright 2012 United Arts. All rights reserv­ed. Any reproduction in whole or in part without the express written consent of United Arts is prohibited. Printed in the U.S.A. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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oam people

Who’s news in the arts

Acting Up Roy Alan

Phelan M. Ebenhack

Winter Park Playhouse cofounder

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hen The Andrews Brothers opens at Winter Park Playhouse (WPP) in March, Roy Alan will sing and tap dance in dozens of musical numbers in this comical romp about inexperienced male stagehands called on to impersonate a world-famous female singing trio. But Alan, WPP’s cofounder and artistic director, is anything but an amateur—he’s been performing professionally for 42 years. You could say he tumbled into his career: acrobatic lessons prescribed to correct an inner-ear imbalance as a toddler in Texas led to dance lessons from renowned instructor Patsy Swayze, alongside her son, Patrick. Alan’s abilities led to parts in professional productions of Peter Pan, Carousel, Gypsy and Showboat. “Being a kid in those shows, I got bitten by the bug,” he says. Alan graduated from Houston’s High School for the Performing Arts and taught at theater schools for two years, then tried his luck in New York, where he landed roles on Broadway in The Pirates of Penzance with Kevin Kline and Linda Ronstadt, Nine with Raoul Julia and in the national touring company of The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, among others. After 13 years, Alan relocated to Jacksonville, where he met and married Heather Alexander, his co-star in a production of Singin’ in the Rain. He later played Groucho Marx at Universal Studios Florida, then worked as Assistant Director of Show Development for the theme park for six years. In 2001, he and his wife cofounded WPP, Central Florida’s only professional musical theater company. “We’re dedicated to presenting rarely seen and new works of musical theater,” says Alan. WPP has grown continuously, moving into a 123-seat theater in 2009. “This is a labor of love,” Alan says. And love it he does, “because the way music and song carry a story touches people even more than just dialog. It touches their hearts and souls and has more of an impact.” You can catch the multitalented Alan in The Andrews Brothers at WPP, March 2 to 24. Showtimes are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m., and Saturdays and select Sundays at 2 p.m. For more information, call 407.645.0145 or visit winterparkplay house.org. —Nancy Curry


oam people

Cheryl Gorski

Robert Mannis Michael Cairns

Who’s news in the arts

Musical Maestra JoAnn Falletta, conductor

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oming from the tradition of Leonard Bernstein, conductor JoAnn Falletta has had a sensational career to date. In addition to conducting both the Virginia Symphony and the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, Falletta recently became the first woman and the first American to lead Northern Ireland’s Ulster Orchestra. On March 24, she will make her debut with the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra (OPO). “It’s going be a big discovery for me because with a new orchestra, you don’t know the musicians and you only have a week to work with them,” she says. “But I know they’re first rate and it’s going to be wonderful.” Falletta’s career began as a virtuoso guitar and mandolin player, and she was performing with both the Metropolitan Opera and the New York Philharmonic when she was just a teenager. In 1971, she enrolled in Mannes College of Music as a guitar student, but began conducting the student orchestra in her freshman year. She did her postgraduate studies at Queens College and Juilliard School of Music. “What drew me to conducting was the music for orchestra. I fell in love with the repertoire

and had to be in the middle of that. Being on the podium, in the middle of that field of energy, is amazing,” says Falletta. The program includes the world premiere of Overture to The Old Man and The Sea, a commissioned work by John Callahan, the 2009 winner of the Young Composer’s Challenge. Falletta explains that one of the advantages of playing contemporary music is being able to discuss the score with its composer. “It’s like having Beethoven there to ask him about his music. It enhances the creative process,” she says. The evening performance will include Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 5 and Lalo’s Symphonie espagnole, “one of the great masterpieces,” according to the conductor. “It speaks powerfully about the human spirit in the face of dire political oppression in the Soviet Union. It is one of the most powerful and optimistic statements about how strong the Human Spirit is.” JoAnn Falletta Conducts starts at 8 p.m. at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre. Call 407.770.0071 or visit orlandophil.org for more information. —Esteban Meneses

Dancing Queen A Reum Chung, dancer

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rlando Ballet’s (OB) A Reum Chung has been passionate about dance since she was a child. “I live and breathe ballet. If I don’t dance, then I feel empty.” Chung, 24, started taking lessons at The Ballet Academy in her hometown of Pohang, South Korea, when she was 8 years old. She has won numerous awards, including a gold medal at the Korea Folk Art Research Center’s 2001 competition and third place at the 2006 Seoul International Dance Competition. Chung has been with OB since 2007, when she graduated from the Korean National University of Arts in Seoul with a Bachelor of Fine Arts, and says Orlando is her second home. “I really love Orlando’s weather, the dancers and people!” she says. “I have learned a lot from the directors and teachers. I think I have grown and become a mature dancer after joining the company.” Chung will portray Queen Odette and Odile in Swans: Black & White, OB’s version of Tchaikovsky’s classic. “It’s going to be a big challenge. Swan Lake’s Queen Odette is the hardest role in classical ballet. The movements are really fluid, while showing expression. I want the audience to actually feel the swans and the two different characters.” Performances of Swans: Black & White will take place March 30 to April 1 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre. Call 407.426.1739 or visit orlandoballet.org for more information. —Sandra Carr


culturaleye

Eye on the Town

Festival W Frames Films, Food & Fun By Gary C. Sain

ast November, the Orlando Calling music festival was held for the first time at the Florida Citrus Bowl. The two-day concert, produced by a partnership between Festival Republic and Visit Orlando, was attended by more than 50,000 fans who listened to a wide range of headlining bands and local acts. This new musical event was designed to appeal to both Orlando residents and visitors, and it was scheduled during a period of the year that is generally considered “soft” for travel. Yet tens of thousands bought tickets to Orlando Calling because they wanted to experience a show. A big one. My point? Sometimes we must create what we do not already have. Other times, the excitement folks are seeking is already here. Such as the Florida Film Festival, taking place April 13 to 22. Now in its 21st year, it has become one of Central Florida’s defining cultural events. The 2012 edition—appropriately themed “Film. Food. Fun.”—brings together more than 160 films and 100 visiting filmmakers for 10 days of cinematic excellence. Of course, the Florida Film Festival has evolved during the past

two decades to include a wide range of related activities. Guests can enjoy multiple wine and food tastings, industry panel discussions, celebrity sightings, parties and special events. The independent and foreign films that are screened during the festival represent a myriad of genres and places Orlando in the center of it all. Since many of the estimated 25,000 cinephiles in attendance are visitors, the festival also plays an economic role: The associated movie tickets, dining, hotel stays, rental cars and entertainment have a direct impact on local businesses, as well as on the people whom they employ. At the same time, it provides an opportunity to position the region as a bastion of arts and culture, something we should be rightfully proud of. Now, let’s just continue to get the word out.

orld-class plein-air artists from around the country will converge on Central Florida when the Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens holds its 4th Annual Winter Park Paint Out, April 22 to 28. A total of 26 artists——13 of whom are new to the event——will be in town for what has become the museum’s signature fundraiser. Plein-air, a French term meaning “in the open air,” describes artworks painted outdoors with the subject in view, rather than in a studio. “One of the things that makes Winter Park so great for plein-air is that we have everything from very natural settings to a wide variety of architecture and cityscapes——that adds a great dimension,” says Executive Director Debbie Komanski. Artists will be seen painting at locations of their choice, and as soon as pieces are finished they are framed and displayed at the museum for sale. There will be workshops and artist demonstrations and the week concludes with the Paint Out Garden Party on April 28 from 6 to 9 p.m. Participating artists will be present, and their works will be available for sale. Tickets are $45 in advance, $60 at the door; but act fast, as the event has sold out every year. For more information, call 407.647.6294 or visit winterparkpaintout.org.

Debbie Komanski

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Get In on Paint Out

Gary C. Sain President and CEO, Visit Orlando Publisher, Orlando Arts Magazine

Plein-Air artist Don Sondag will be participating in this year’s Winter Park Paint Out, which takes place April 22 to 28 at the Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens.

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culturaleye

Eye on the Town

Eye on

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

Society

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OMA (3)

n January 7, Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) hosted the opening reception for Barbara Sorensen: Topographies, the first major retrospective ever of the prominent sculptor’s work. The show kicked off Made in Florida, a series of three exhibitions at OMA that pays homage to artists inspired by the Sunshine State.

FLORIDA ARTIST BARBARA SORENSEN stands with OMA Executive Director Marena Grant Morrisey.

Local ARTS SUPPORTERS CONNIE AND ROY BRAND, who also collect Sorensen’s work, were on hand for the festivities.

Trinity PREP

Mennello MUSEUM

A&HM—M

TRINITY PREPARATORY SCHOOL SENIOR TOMMY PRAST has been named a YoungArts Honorable Mention Award Winner in theater. YoungArts is the core program of the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, the nation’s only organization that recognizes art students in nine different disciplines.

On January 20, the Mennello Museum of American Art held a special reception to open the Style & Grace exhibition and to unveil a new life-size bronze sculpture of the late Marilyn Mennello. Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer and Michael Mennello were among those in attendance.

JFS

Bok TOWER GARDENS

Sandra Varry

MENNELLO MUSEUM

Rita Bornstein, president emerita of Rollins College, with Lawrie Platt Hall of Platt Hall and Associates.

deborah knispel

CASSIE JACOBY (2)

Art & History Museums—Maitland held its first Culture & Cocktails event of 2012 on January 13 at the Germaine Marvel Building. Guests enjoyed artwork by Doug Rhodehamel, literary readings from Maitland Poets and Writers and fine fare from the Winter Park Fish Co. Food Truck.

Jewish Family Services’ (JFS) 2nd Annual Glow & Golf event was held at the Winter Park Country Club. From left: Dean Demos, Mike McKee, David Cobb, Billy Bishop, JFS Executive Director Eric Geboff and Pat Goetz.

On JanUARY 12, animal lovers and their furry friends braved the chilly weather to attend Bok Tower Gardens’ Winter Dog Day, a benefit that raised $400 for the Humane Society of Polk County.

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MORE THAN 160 DOGS attended Bok Tower Gardens’ second Dog Day event. Every fourlegged visitor received a Bok bandana and a goodie bag. Veterinarians and trainers were on hand and activities included fun contests.


culturaleye

Eye on the Town

Seeing Red

Folksy Fun O

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Anna Jannotti

rom March 21 to April 22, Orlando Shakespeare Theater (OST) presents the Central Florida premiere of 2010 Tony Award-winning play, Red. The story follows artist Mark Rothko at the height of his career as he’s struggling with a major commission for New York’s Four Seasons restaurant. Preview nights are March 21 and 22. Opening night is Friday, March 23, and festivities include an informal preshow discussion with Red Director Patrick Flick and the creative team from 7:15 to 7:45 p.m. in the Patron’s Room. After the show, join the cast, crew, designers and OST staff at the opening night party, which will feature a cash bar and complimentary hors d’oeuvres from Edible Orlando. Special programming includes the Red Chat Back on April 5, when the audience can ask the directors, actors and designers questions after the show. On April 22, a caption-display performance will include readable captions for the hearing-impaired and others with disabilities. OST also will be partnering with local museums to present several Red-inspired events. For tickets or more information, call 407.447.1700 or visit orlandoshakes.org.

n April 21, bring the whole family to the 3rd annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Craft Festival. Local artists, as well as legendary Florida Highwaymen painters and missionary Mary Proctor, will be on hand. Festivities include live music by The Porch Dogs, drumming and storytelling by Orisirisi African Folklore, and a free children’s folk art workshop. For more information, call 407.539.2680 or visit hannibalsquareheritagecenter.org.

South beach palms by Heidi Hopwod

Get the Picture

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rom April 21 to July 15, Orlando Museum of Art (OMA) will host Picturing My Florida: A Grassroots Portrait of the Sunshine State, the museum’s first-ever exhibition based on a Facebook photo contest. Part of its Made in Florida series, which showcases exemplary work of Florida artists, Picturing My Florida was open to both amateur and professional photographers. Images were posted on OMA’s Facebook page, and the ones with the most “likes” were reviewed for inclusion. The exhibition shows Florida as people see it in their everyday lives, with subject matter ranging from the bright lights of cities and attractions, to portraits of hometowns and neighborhoods, to scenics of the state’s natural environment. Picturing My Florida winners will be revealed at 1st Thursday on April 5 and the exhibition will run simultaneously with Reflections: Paintings of Florida 1865-1965 From the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown, offering a unique perspective on the state by some of the most prominent artists that worked here over a period of 100 years. For more information, call 407.896.4231 or visit omart.org.

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culturaleye

Eye on the Town

his year, Cirque du Soleil® and Orlando Ballet have once again teamed up in a collaborative effort that was nothing short of jaw dropping in its 2011 premiere. On March 12, under the guidance of Orlando Ballet Artistic Director Robert Hill and La NoubaTM Artistic Director Daniel Ross, the two groups will present A Choreographers’ Showcase, a project designed to stimulate and encourage artistic growth. This oneof-a-kind performance will feature young, emerging talent from both companies performing together in a variety of numbers that highlight their creative, acrobatic and athletic abilities. The show will start at 6 p.m. at La Nouba Theater in Downtown Disney Westside. Tickets are $15 for general admission, $25 for VIP seating and can be purchased by calling 407.426.1739.

A Meal with Meaning O

n April 25, the Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida (HMREC) will hold its annual Dinner of Tribute at the Rosen Plaza Hotel. This year’s honoree is Dr. Richard Lapchick, DeVos Sport Business Management program chair at University of Central Florida. The son of famed basketball player and coach Joe Lapchick and an acknowledged leader in diversity training in sports, he has written a number of books and is a columnist for ESPN.com. The evening starts with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres at 6 p.m. and dinner is at 7 p.m. Tickets start at $180 per person; sponsorship tables are available. For reservations or more information, call 407.628.0555 or visit holocaustedu.org.

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Artful Evenings Tree of Life by Midge Baudouin

Used with Permission of the Orlando Sentinel, © 2011

Twists, Turns & Top Talent T

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dd some art to your evening during the monthly Art Walk in downtown Sanford. Featuring a range of fine and funky art and everything in between, the event is held the fourth Friday of each month from 6 to 9 p.m. Multiple businesses stay open late and offer original art, refreshments and opportunities to meet visiting artists. Participating venues include Jeanine Taylor Folk Art (JTFA), Gallery on First, Hyder Gallery and The Sanford Flower Shop, among others. The next Art Walk is March 23, when JTFA will host Alison Stilwell and Midge Baudouin in their debut show, Raw Edges. At Gallery on First, Kevin and Debe Abbott will present Turn the Page, a show of new work in Studio 8. For the April 27 Art Walk, Gallery on First will hold its annual 100 for $100 show, which features original art priced at $100 or less. For more information, call 407.323.2774 or visit jtfolkart.com.

Field Report

rom award-winning authors and popular musicians to economists and environmentalists, Rollins College’s Winter Park Institute (WPI) brings a diverse array of intellectuals to town each year. This year’s lineup includes world-renowned primatologist Dr. Jane Goodall, who will be on campus on April 19 to offer insight into the world of the Gombe chimpanzees. “Our goal is to raise the level of intellectual engagement in the community—and we’re excited to bring such high-caliber intellectuals and artistic leaders not only to Rollins, but also to the Central Florida community,” says WPI Executive Director Gail Sinclair. During Making a Difference: An Evening with Dr. Jane Goodall, the researcher will share her experiences, observations and the latest news from the field, while discussing the current threats facing the planet. The presentation begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Alfond Sports Center and is free and open to the public. For more information, call 407.691.1995 or visit rollins.edu/wpi.

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culturaleye

Eye on the Town

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Art in the Park

Painting with a twist/lady lake

reative studios that offer painting lessons in a casual environment are cropping up all over. And most are independently owned small businesses that are making significant contributions to their communities. These companies supply the canvases, brushes, paint and instruction for people to create their own version of an existing painting, and patrons get to bring their favorite beverages. Ideal for group parties and family or corporate gatherings, these painting workshops offer a new option when it comes to entertainment. Painting with a Twist is a franchise with locations in 15 states, including two in this area. Redington Shores Mayor Bert Adams and his significant other, Sharon Boyd, were sold on the concept after Boyd visited one for a girls’ night out. “I consider myself to have zero artistic ability,” says Boyd, yet at the end of her class, “we were all so pleased and it was just a good feeling. I come from a court-reporting background, which is very serious. I just wanted to do something that makes people happy.” Last fall, Adams and Boyd opened a Painting with a Twist in Lady Lake (352.750.9800; paintingwithatwist. com/ladylake), where five instructors offer classes Tuesdays through Saturdays. But the business does more than put a smile on people’s faces, it betters the community by hosting fundraisers for local charities through the Painting with a Purpose program. Mother-daughter team Anna and Bailey Perez run a Painting with a Twist studio in Windermere (407.601.7800; paintingwithatwist.com/orlando), which offers a beer and wine bar, adult and kids’ classes, monthly family days, and more. And you don’t have to come as part of a group;

Studios that offer art classes in a casual atmosphere, such as Painting with a Twist, are a hot trend in the cultural community.

individuals can check the online calendar to find a class they want to take. In Altamonte Springs, Creative Canvas and Wine (407.260.9463; creativecanvasandwine.com) is a project of owners and sisters Karen Woodall and Amye Adkins. After going to a similar studio in Denver, they decided to open their own. They host family days, kids’ parties and other private events, including fundraisers for nonprofits. No matter where you live in Central Florida, you can easily get in on the latest trend in cultural entertainment.

Alice moulton

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rawing more than 300,000 attendees each year, the Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival will be held March 16 to 18 in Central Park and along Park Avenue. More than 1,100 artists from throughout the country applied for 225 openings. They will compete for 62 awards totaling $67,500 in categories including digital art, glass, jewelry, painting, sculpture, and more. Visitors also can check out work by the next generation of artists at the Leon Theodore Schools Exhibit, which showcases hundreds of pieces by Orange County students. The three-day event also includes live entertainment and concerts, food and beverage vendors, and hands-on arts activities for kids. Admission is free, and patrons’ programs at a variety of levels are available. For more information, call 407.644.7207 or visit wpsaf.org.

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DPCupdate

T h e L a t es t fr o m t h e D r . P h illips ce n t er

A Friendly Rivalry

craig mullins

Orlando and las vegas expand cultural landscapes with new performing arts centers.

Rivaling the smith center in Las Vegas, the new Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts will open its doors in 2014.

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rlando and Las Vegas have long enjoyed a friendly rivalry. Each city offers world-class entertainment options. Each city has a robust tourism and convention market that generates tremendous economic impact. And now, each city is enhancing its local arts and cultural scene with a major new performing arts center. This month, Las Vegas is opening the doors to its $425 million Smith Center. The state-of-the-art facility, which began construction in 2009, has not only attracted history-making gifts from local philanthropists and businesses, but it also has brought in its 10,000th Broadway-season subscriber, three full months ahead of grand opening. Orlando isn’t far behind. The Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts broke ground last June with a three-day celebration attended by more than 1,000 local residents. The project will open its doors in 2014. While these destinations have established their own signature identities—casinos and entertainment in Las Vegas, theme parks and attractions in Orlando—they both are creating arts centers for the benefit of their local communities, as well as to enhance their cultural tourism appeal. “It is no coincidence that these two major cities are building performing arts centers at the same time,” says Dr. Phillips Center President Kathy Ramsberger. “We share the perspective that a performing arts center will transform the local and tourism landscapes of each of these cities.” Now with their major performing arts centers, the friendly Las Vegas–Orlando rivalry continues! Follow the progress of the Dr. Phillips Center at drphillipscenter.org. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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UA insider

NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

Living in a Cultural Mecca by Linda L andman Gonz al ez

I

Those of us who appreciate the arts and artists know that we are living in a mecca for both. On any given day you can attend a concert or go to a theater. Our downtown galleries are thriving and our arts groups continue to offer an abundance of quality experiences to meet any taste. Last year there were nearly 2.5 million cultural offerings in Central Florida. I hope that you had the opportunity to enjoy a few of the hundreds of free experiences at ArtsFest in February. This year marked its 10th anniversary and for the first time ArtsFest was held for an entire month. More than 80 cultural organizations offered 302 events in 87 venues throughout Lake, Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties. ArtsFest featured visual art, music, dance, drama and so much more. From belly dancing to clogging, there was something for everyone. I trust

Phelan M. Ebenhack

grew up in New York City, came of age in Mexico City and built my life and career here in Orlando. Since childhood I have loved and gravitated to the arts. They have inspired and educated me throughout my entire life. I was fortunate enough to take cursory ballet, piano and voice lessons. I sang in the church choir and led the neighborhood kids in plays, dance spectaculars and anything else that we thought someone would pay a dime to see. I auditioned to attend the High School of the Performing Arts and even gave a piano recital at Carnegie Hall. All this to say ... I am not an artist. I am a spectator——and a very appreciative one at that. Linda Landman Gonzalez, board vice chair and search committee chair, United Arts of Central Florida

that you took advantage of Free Days at Orlando Museum of Art and enjoyed the A Cappella Barbershop Open House at City of Maitland’s Truck Café. ArtsFest also kicked off United Arts of Central Florida’s (UA) annual fundraising campaign, and I hope that you will continue to support the organization with your time and resources so that we may once again reach our goal. More than 74 percent of all dollars raised go back to the arts community as direct support in the form of grants, contracted services, designated gifts and sponsorships. United Arts of Central Florida is a dynamic collaboration of 164 businesses, eight governments and school districts, 38 foundations, more than 50 arts and Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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cultural organizations, and 3,188 artists and individuals. This partnership works to enhance the quality and variety of cultural experiences available throughout the four counties that it serves. Since its inception in 1989, UA has invested more than $117 million in local cultural organizations and cultural education. Our search continues for our new CEO, and we look forward to featuring that person in our next issue. UA is thriving and continues to facilitate arts and cultural education programming that reaches students in public schools within the counties it serves. This programming is conducted by the region’s major cultural organizations and is funded through government contracts, as well as through foundation, corporate and individual support. We cannot do it without you. Please join us so that we may continue to inspire and educate our children and our community. I know what an impact art and culture has had on my life, and I know that it makes a difference in our community and enhances the economic vitality of our region. The Arts Matter™.

Linda Landman Gonzalez Vice President of Community Relations and Government Affairs Orlando Magic Board Vice Chair Search Committee Chair United Arts of Central Florida


2011 Financial Report Where Our Support Comes From: 1%

13%

Where Our Support Goes: 7%

14%

7%

19%

14% 19%

2%

17%

74%

7%

4% 2%

n Corporations n Orange County n City of Orlando n Seminole County n Other Local/State Government n Individuals n Foundations n Workplace Giving n Contracts/Sponsorships/Grants n Other Income/Gifts in Kind

n Grants & Designated Support n Programs n Fundraising n Management and General

United Arts of Central Florida Inc.

Financial Activities Summary Year ended June 30, 2011

Where Our Support Comes From: Campaign and Other Revenue: Corporations Orange County City of Orlando Seminole County Other Local/State Government Individuals Foundations Workplace Giving Total Campaign Revenues:

Grants, Support and Operations: Grants & Designated Support $4,247,103 Programs 1,005,860 Fundraising 379,900 Management and General 103,990 Total Grants, Support and Operations: $5,736,853

$841,924 1,108,882 427,791 126,030 208,981 1,098,150 853,550 424,842 5,090,150

Other Revenue: Contracts, Sponsorships and Grants Other Income/Gifts in Kind Total Support and Other Revenue:

Where Our Support Goes:

Unrestricted Net Assets at 6/30/11:

$726,769

767,117 80,118

$5,937,385

A copy of our audited financial statements is available at UnitedArts.cc, or call 407.628.0333.

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UA insider

NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

The Arts Matter u

nited Arts of Central Florida (UA) launched TheArtsMatter.com in 2010 as an awareness tool and outlet for arts enthusiasts, donors and artists. Since then, hundreds of people from across the nation have logged on to share their personal experiences connected to the arts. The Arts Matter™ is more than a slogan—the arts are part of our everyday lives. UA hopes to encourage community involvement and to advocate support for quality cultural experiences for every taste and pocketbook.

When you log on and share your thoughts and stories, you’ll receive an exclusive The Arts Matter car magnet. You also will have the opportunity to sign up for UA’s email advocacy alerts, which will help you to keep up with efforts to support arts education and funding in Florida. While on the site, you can also view featured videos and stories from the community about why The Arts Matter. Visit TheArtsMatter.com today and share why The Arts Matter to you.

Business Buzz

Roman Rusinov

Downtown Credo

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owntown Credo is more than your average coffee shop; it’s a creative space with purpose. Located in College Park, the organization operates through three distinct divisions——Coffee, Rally and Conduit——to create new opportunities for people to develop lives that are meaningful, impactful and community oriented. The Coffee division promotes responsible global commerce by offering direct-trade, small-grower Guatemalan coffee at its donation-only coffee shop. The idea is that when customers assign their own value to a product, they become more conscious of where their money is going. Downtown Credo’s Rally division serves select charities, such as the Downtown and Parramore branches

of Central Florida Boys and Girls Club, New Image Youth Center, Keeping Orlando Beautiful and Green Up Orlando. The public is encouraged to participate in activities such as refurbishing playgrounds, tutoring children and cleaning up neighborhoods. The third division is Conduit, in which a range of creative professionals engage members of the community with free skill-share workshops. The aggregate of Downtown Credo’s efforts is a burgeoning network of Central Floridians from all walks of life who are embracing its positive influence——both locally and globally——as well as doing their best to live with meaning and develop an authentic community. For more information, please visit DowntownCredo.com.

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Artist Rick Jones received a PDG from UA in 2011.

2012 Grants U

nited Arts of Central Florida (UA) is pleased to offer grants for nonprofit organizations and individuals. Nonprofit cultural organizations in Lake, Orange, Osceola or Seminole counties that have a mission focused on arts, culture, history or science are eligible for an Organizational Project Grant. These provide funding for onetime projects or entire seasons during the grant period of October 1, 2012 to September 30, 2013. Last year, $204,670 was awarded to 36 groups, with grants ranging from $1,000 to $7,360. As of April 2012, this year’s guidelines and application will be available online at UnitedArts.cc (click on Programs, Grants, then Organizational Project Grants). Free workshops will be offered from April to June; the application deadline will be in July. Individual artists and arts administrators who work in the visual or performing arts, media or literature in the same counties are also eligible for awards. Artists can apply for up to $2,500 ($1,000 for emerging artists) for a project or training, and arts administrators can get up to $500 to attend a class or conference with UA’s Artist Development Grants & Arts Administrator Grants (ADG) program. The grant period is February 1, 2013 to January 31, 2014. Last year, 39 artists and arts administrators were awarded a total of $33,579. This year’s guidelines and application for ADG will be available at UnitedArts.cc as of August 2012 (click on Programs, then Grants, and Artist Development Grants & Arts Administrator Grants). Free workshops will be offered in August and September, and the deadline will be in October. For more information, contact Mary Patrick Giraulo at Mary@United Arts.cc or 407.628.0333 x232.


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brush strokes

What’s news in Culture

Making Magic A collaborative exhibition offers a behind-the-scenes look at the art of the theme park. By Jessica Chapman

oth history buffs and theme park fanatics alike are flocking to the Orange County Regional History Center (OCRHC), where a new exhibition is the result of the museum’s first-ever collaboration with Universal Orlando® Resort. On display through April 29, The Serious Art of Make-Believe offers an in-depth look at the creative process behind some of the theme park’s signature events. Among the 1,000 pieces of artwork and artifacts are more than 200 original, detailed drawings, architectural plans and models for events ranging from Halloween Horror Nights® (HHN) to Grinchmas to Mardi Gras, and more.

The museum worked on it for more than a year, with the exhibition staff collaborating with Universal’s Art & Design department. “They knew people were familiar with the theme parks, but not what’s going on behind the scenes,” says OCRHC Assistant Director Andrew Sandall. “It’s a pretty important story to tell about Central Florida.” With 14 permanent staff members, the Art and Design Department in Orlando is Universal’s largest and includes illustrators, writers, costume designers, and special effects and makeup artists. The team has one common goal for every project: to provide larger-than-life entertainment. The seeds of the exhibition were planted when Universal’s creative team went on a research trip to OCRHC to see Out of This World, a traveling exhibition of costumes and props from popular TV shows and movies. “We were really impressed by the way they did their displays and exhibits,” says T.J. Mannarino, director of art and design in Universal’s

Orange County Regional History Center

B

The history center’s newest exhibition, The Serious Art of Make-Believe, features art and artifacts from some of Universal Studios Florida’s most iconic events.

Entertainment Division. “That’s how we struck up a conversation.” OCRHC expressed interest in a collaboration that keyed in on the creative process, showing all the steps between concepts and finished pieces. For the first time ever, Mannarino offered full access to Universal’s prop warehouse and art and design archives. “We’re used to people being excited about the final product,” says Mannarino, “but they were very excited about the process pieces—doodles, drawings, etc. A big part of why Andrew and the group got so excited is that we keep everything— stuff we’ve used, stuff we haven’t used. Everything has value to us, especially in the creative world.” Museum staff spent several days poring over the contents of every box, bag and drawer they opened. “In my 20 years working in museums, I’ve never seen people so willing to open doors,” says Sandall. After they made their selections, Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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the Universal team identified the pieces and the projects they came from. The Serious Art of Make-Believe shows the attention to detail and extraordinary planning (about 16 to 18 months for HHN) that goes into Universal’s signature events, as seen in everything from HHN scale models to Mardi Gras costumes and props such as the Terra Queen’s bike from the 2005 HHN. Located at the entrance to the exhibition, the piece stretches a full 10 feet from its head to its batwings. What’s interesting is that much of what is on display is working material that will likely be used again, as the park’s creative team often modifies or enhances items to repurpose them for other shows or events. All of the HHN memorabilia is in good taste and the exhibition is a familyfriendly one that ends in the “Art and Design Director’s Office,” which offers hands-on activities for all ages. For more information, call 407.836.8500 or visit thehistorycenter.org.


brush strokes

What’s news in Culture

The People’s Music Diverse programming makes the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra more accessible than ever. By Krist en Manieri

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According to OPO Music Director Christopher Wilkins, few orchestras in the country rival OPO when it comes to its range of styles and collaborations. “We’ve always wanted to find ways to make the orchestra very accessible to the Central Florida community, and to get past this idea of classical music being refined and remote,” he says, recalling that one of OPO’s very first performances was in a shopping mall. From concert opera to outdoor concerts, OPO’s upcoming offerings stay true to that goal. OPO has always carried the torch when it comes to keeping opera alive in Central Florida, and it continues that tradition on March 2 and 4 when it pre-sents Rigoletto, in conjunction with the Florida Opera Theatre. In his debut with OPO, conductor Joel Revzen will bring to life what he calls the tragic and heartfelt story of how power and revenge have the ability to destroy everything around them. One of OPO’s fully staged “concert operas,” Rigoletto will feature the orchestra performing on stage rather than in the pit. “This format is the perfect fit for the power and drama of the opera itself,” says Revzen. “It makes the orchestra sound very immediate to the audience. From

DAVID WHITFIELD

oday’s cultural organizations know that the scope of their audiences is limited only by how far they cast their nets. With that mindset, local arts leaders, such as the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra (OPO), are reaching beyond their traditional patronage. This spring, OPO takes a “something for everyone” approach to its lineup, offering a multiplicity of musical genres in a wide variety of settings.

THIS MARCH, OPO and Florida Opera Theatre present Rigoletto. As with La Bohème, the orchestra will perform on stage during the concert opera, which is just one of OPO’s spring collaborations.

the very opening chords, the audience is swept along with the drama.” OPO welcomes more talented guest performers the following weekend when it hosts renowned violinist Midori and the Minnesota Orchestra on March 9. The next day, Orlando pop sensation Michael Krajewski helps OPO shake—not stir—things up when he conducts Bond and Beyond, a special concert featuring favorite music from classic James Bond films, that takes place at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Central Floridians love outdoor concerts, and OPO offers several throughout the year. On March 11, pack a picnic and some chairs and head to Winter Park’s Central Park, where a free Spring Pops concert conducted by Dirk Meyer will start at 7 p.m. On April 7, theater fans won’t want to miss the concert staging of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel, conducted by Wilkins. As with its other Super Series offerings, OPO will present a matinee Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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at 2 p.m., as well as an 8 p.m. evening performance of what Rodgers called his favorite of all of his musicals. OPO will go high tech on April 21 when it collaborates with Full Sail University on Symphony in HD at Full Sail Live, a gala event that will combine live symphony with multimedia elements to showcase how classical music and technology intersect. “I like to call the OPO a cornerstone cultural organization,” says Executive Director David Schillhammer. “We’re flexible, malleable and able to collaborate with other ensembles or cultural organizations to continue to keep ourselves relevant to our community.” And that is very likely the secret to its success. Call 407.770.0071 or visit orlandophil.org for tickets or more information. Kristen Manieri writes lifestyle and travel articles about Orlando and other locales.


arts education

What’s news in education

Pulled to the Arts Local public school systems offer arts magnet programs for students of all ages.

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By Sarah Kinbar

Midway Elementary School for the Arts (407.320.5950; midway.scps.k12. fl.us) in Seminole County uses Artful Learning™, an arts-based, K-5 plan core curriculum based on legendary American composer Leonard Bernstein’s belief that the arts can be used to improve academics and instill a love of learning. Students also are encouraged to develop their individual talents with a variety of age-appropriate offerings, such as creative movement/ ballet, music, digital arts and even mime, juggling and unicycle riding. Seminole County’s Millennium Middle School (407.320.6550; millennium.scps. k12.fl.us) is a fine arts and communication magnet with a huge range of classes in performing arts, including dance, orchestra, band, chorus, guitar and piano, and musical theater. In addition, “visits from visiting artists and musicians make the experience at Millennium an extraordinary one,” says Choices Coordinator Pam Mazzotta. This year, every one of the 24 students who auditioned for the All-State Chorus was invited to participate—a record number. The academic accomplishments of the students at Osceola County School of the Arts (OSCA) (407.931.4803; thearts. osceola.k12.fl.us) have earned the school an “A” grade from the Florida Department of Education for eight consecutive years. OSCA offers accelerated arts programming for students in grades 6 through 12. Enrique Sanchez, a jazz trumpet virtuoso and 2011 OSCA graduate, became their first graduate to attend the Juilliard School in New York City.

Mike Hoffman

f your child prefers a sketchbook to an iPad, one of Central Florida’s arts magnet programs may be worth exploring. These innovative, themebased offerings are gaining momentum throughout the region.

Students perform Annie Jr. at Howard Academy for the Visual and Performing Arts, one of the area’s arts magnet public schools.

Poinciana Academy of Fine Arts (407.343.4500; pe.osceola.k12.fl.us) is only in its second year as an arts magnet, but in that short time it has gone from having low enrollment to needing a waiting list for its pre-K to grade 5 program. “It is such a happy place to be,” says Debbie Fahmie, a fine- and performingarts resource teacher. “We have art, dance and drama, and a string program in music. Plus, teachers of traditional subjects have received professional development training for art integration in the classroom.” One of the newest arts magnets is Howard Middle School in downtown Orlando, which will become Howard Academy for the Visual and Performing Arts (407.245.1780; howard.ocps.net) in the 2012 to 2013 school year. Academy Assistant Lee Ramsey says that “dance, guitar and string classes have already been added.” Ramping up for the transition, students staged a production of Annie Jr. in December and will be presenting Honk Jr. May 10 and 11 at 7 p.m. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Also in Orange County, Dr. Phillips High School (407.355.3200; dphs.ocps. net) has an intensive Visual and Performing Arts (VPA) magnet program with five available specialties: dance, music, television production, theater and visual arts. Modern equipment, numerous performing opportunities and the chance to work with Partners-in-Education Walt Disney Company and Universal Orlando are just some of its benefits. VPA students have received high ratings at district and state competitions and have won prestigious awards, such as the Presidential Scholar of the Arts. Graduates have gone on to attend Juilliard, Rollins College, Ringling College of Art and Design and more. No matter what grade your children are in or where their interests lie, Central Florida’s arts magnet programs can help them reach their full potential. Sarah Kinbar is a local design, arts and photography writer and the former editor-inchief of Garden Design magazine.


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oam decor

Living with art

The Art of Living Well A cozy Colonialtown cottage is a designer’s artistic retreat. By Deni sE Bates eno s | Phot ography by Phel an M. Ebenhack

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esigner Jose J. Cabrera of C L Studio, Inc. in Orlando is known for his bold, contemporary interiors. So it’s a delightful surprise to discover that his own personal space is a charming interpretation of French Provençal with a dash of Nantucket cottage thrown in for good measure. Underlying it all is a subtle Spanish accent with tropical flair, a tribute to Cabrera’s Cuban heritage.

INTERIOR DESIGNER Jose Cabrera has turned his Colonialtown home into a personal retreat where he surrounds himself with artwork and an intriguing array of decorative items.

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His cozy Colonialtown home is abrim with all sorts of intriguing treasures, including his collections of blue-andwhite porcelain pieces and cloisonné boxes. On one wall of his quaint living room, beneath a soaring, white-planked ceiling, a pair of urns is punctuated with two whimsical starfish, and a framed shadowbox holds ceramic molds for wax seals. Opposite hangs one of Cabrera’s most remarkable finds: a charcoal drawing by Albert Sterner. But as lovely as that work is, the frame that came with it is the greater treasure; Cabrera found out later that it’s a Louis XIV Italian piece. Cabrera’s art collection ranges from intricate engravings pulled from centuries-old books to contemporary oils and photography. One of his favorite pieces wouldn’t be considered art by most people, but for Cabrera, it’s a treasured and significant possession. It’s a tiny blackand-white photograph of his grandfather; His grandfather’s back, to be exact. In the early days of photography, a preliminary “test portrait” was often taken with the subject facing away from the camera. Such photos were never meant to be displayed, but its unusual nature makes it all the more intriguing to Cabrera. Also intriguing is the fact that Cabrera’s collection includes a number of paintings and drawings of rear-facing human subjects. An unintended homage to his grandfather? Perhaps—Cabrera had never made that connection before this journalist pointed it out. His love for art exceeds his wall space, but that doesn’t stop Cabrera: He simply stacks the extra pieces he adores against the walls. The intriguing layers of art invite visitors to stop and peruse, a process of discovery that reveals much about Cabrera’s eclectic taste, the deeper one digs. He’s so passionate about collecting


oam decor

Living with art

Cabrera’s personality is reflected in the Orlando home where he has lived for 20 years.

art, as well as fostering up-and-coming artists, that he’s created an online gallery, tangorenholf.com, in order to promote their works. Some of the pieces on the site currently take up residence in his own home, including Prada Marfa at Dawn, a photograph by Gray Malin. In Cabrera’s bedroom, an oil painting of a matador hangs over the bed, and a primitive wooden angel stands sentry on the Dutch armoire. Colorfully painted, the angel resembles a Mexican santo figure, but it’s actually a Christmas decoration that Cabrera couldn’t bear to put away after the season ended. More treasures are on display in the guest bedroom, which looks as if it’s been transported from an artist’s 19th-century Parisian garret. Here, an old iron bedstead serves as a foundation of sorts for the diverse works above it. These include a trio of arresting black-and-white portraits by Turkish photographer Aram Alban. Cabrera had them developed from tiny glass negatives that he purchased, not knowing whether the photos could be successfully reproduced. On the door hangs one of his favorite finds: an oil and

the ambiance of a french farmhouse meets a relaxed island style throughout the home, which is dotted with blue-and-white porcelain pieces, favorite books and other collectibles.

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oam decor

Living with art

acrylic painting by Winter Park artist Laura Lacambra Shubert that he found at an estate acquisition sale. He mailed a photo of the piece to the artist, who sent a personal note in return confirming that it is, indeed one of her works, which was once displayed in a designer show home. Cabrera’s home’s intimate scale lends itself to comfy corners for coffee and conversation, including the breakfast nook in the kitchen, which boasts a timeworn farmhouse table and slipper chairs upholstered in red and gold fabric. Art is on display here as well, including an oil still life and a piece entitled Water Color, 1938. His personal space speaks volumes about Cabrera’s love of art, beauty and meaning in his life. Every piece has significance to him, and he likes to describe his art and other decorative pieces as “well collected.” For him, his home is his personal respite, filled with treasures that move and inspire him. “It makes me happy to live with art,” he says. “It’s my zen.” Denise Bates Enos is a regular contributor to OAM and to Orlando magazine.

cabrera’s COZY kitchen boasts an aged farmhouse table with slipper chairs upholstered in lush red and gold fabric.

IN THE GUEST BEDROOM, an antique iron bedframe anchors the room, where artwork in a variety of styles is juxtaposed against neutral walls.

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An antique PHOTOGRAPH of his grandfather is one of Cabrera’s most treasured pieces.


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From Figures to Farms

Raymond Martinot (5)

The Morse Museum presents a premiere exhibition of watercolors by one of Louis Comfort Tiffany’s contemporaries.

Seated Woman, c. 1880, watercolor on paper, 6.75" x 9.8"

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t the height of his career, American glass designer Otto Heinigke (1850– 1915) and his Brooklyn studio were receiving commissions from such prominent institutions as the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in New York City and the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. Heinigke’s talents as a glassmaker, however, developed from his work as a painter. In Watercolors of Otto Heinigke— A Glass Artist’s Palette, the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art presents a selection of approximately 30 watercolors and drawings that reflect the artist’s interest in form and color.

Drawn from the museum’s extensive collection of objects from the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Heinigke paintings, which were gifts of Eric Green and Jock Truman, have never been exhibited before. These works, beautiful meditations on the world around him, range from figural and still-life studies to mid-Atlantic farms, forests and river shorelines. His father, a well-known miniature painter, brought from his native Germany a tradition for brilliant detail. His son inherited this and spent his life observing nature and people and recording his interpretations. By the 1870s, Heinigke’s Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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expanding career included designing rug patterns for the Hartford Carpet Company. He learned to juxtapose color and form, and these skills served him later in producing the geometric patterns in his glasswork. Like Louis Comfort Tiffany, Heinigke was deeply influenced by the bold color of medieval windows. His travels in Europe inspired the opalescent glass windows created at Heinigke and Bowen, the Brooklyn studio he established in 1890 with Owen J. Bowen that secured his place in the history of American glass art. Watercolors of Otto Heinigke will be on view through February 3, 2013.


The Connoiseur [sic], c. 1880, watercolor on paper, 6.3" x 9.8"

Watercolors by Otto Heinigke—— A Glass Artist's Palette March 1 to February 3 The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art 407.645.5311 • morsemuseum.org

Beach, c. 1880, watercolor on paper, 5" x 7"

Still Life of Leaves and Flowers, c. 1880, watercolor on paper, 7" x 4.8" Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Woman from Poetry, 2007, Stefan Alexandres, repoussé on copper, 22" x 25"

Silver Bullet, 2011, Jon Manchester, photography, 9" x 13"

©Michael van Gelder

Teachers’ Turn This spring, Crealdé School of Art spotlights the talents of its diverse instructors.

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realdé School of Art has been a mainstay of the Central Florida cultural community for nearly four decades. Known for the depth and breadth of its visual arts classes, gallery exhibitions and special events, the school celebrates its talented instructors in Director’s Choice II. On view in the Showalter Hughes Community Gallery, the exhibition is a followup to the first faculty show, which opened in fall 2010. Crealdé’s teaching staff of more than 50 working artists has included some of the area’s most accomplished and influential names in art and art education. Director’s Choice II features recent work from eight current instructors—artists long associated with the school, as well as new additions to the faculty. The show was curated by Executive Director Peter Schreyer and the school’s three Artistic Directors: Rick Lang for photography, Henry Sinn for painting and drawing, and Vincent Sansone for ceramics and sculpture. Participating senior faculty include painters Stacy Barter and Donne Bitner, while ceramics instructors Adelia Acker and Vadim Malkin and photographer Michael van Gelder are three of Crealdé’s newest faculty members. Fiber artist Hye Shin, sculptor and jeweler Stefan Alexandres and photographer Jon Manchester also have pieces in the exhibition. Director’s Choice II will be on display through April 28. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Craig Chaquico, 2010, Michael van Gelder, digital photography, 11" x 14"

Scheherezade and 1001 Arabian Mice, 2011, Adelia Acker, ceramic, 12" x 11"


Italian Vase, White Cloth, 2009, Stacy Barter, oil on linen, 24" x 30"

It Will Rise Again, 2010, Hye Shin, mixed media, 60" x 60"

Director’s Choice II March 1 to April 28 Crealdé School of Art Showalter Hughes Community Gallery 407.671.1886 • crealde.org

Amazing Grace, 2010, Donne F. Bitner, acrylic on panel, 26" x 24"

Duke of Tea, 2011, Vadim Malkin, ceramic, 16" x 19" x 8"

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A Smash Hit

The reviews are in: The Florida Film Festival Will Be a Blockbuster! By Denise Bates Enos

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his year marks the 21st anniversary of the Florida Film Festival (FFF), and it’s slated to be a bigger hit than ever. With a record-breaking number of submissions—more than 1,700, according to Matthew Curtis, the festival’s director of programming—there’s an “exciting and diverse selection of films this year; something for everybody.” The event takes place April 13 to 22, with the Enzian partnering again this year with Full Sail University. “We’re looking forward to another amazing lineup of movies this year at the 2012 Florida Film Festival, which is an incredible showcase for both local and national talent,” says Anne Watters, the school’s program director for film. “At Full Sail University, we actively support film production in Central Florida and beyond, and we see our involvement as the primary sponsor of the festival as an important aspect of that. It’s an exciting time for our local community and our students.” The theme for the 2012 festival is “Film. Food. Fun.,” which is a succinctly

accurate description of what attendees can expect. It’s ten days of more than 160 films, some of which are Oscar contenders; 100 visiting filmmakers; special guests and celebrities; and top chefs of local and national renown serving up delectable dishes paired with top-flight wines. The festival has grown since the first one was held in June 1992. Only 62 films were screened that year, when attendees included such luminaries as Paul Newman, Oliver Stone and Robert Wise. Now the festival shows almost three times as many films, and it’s held in the far cooler month of April—just two of the ways the festival has improved since the beginning. Food for Thought One of the festival’s most tasteful improvements from those early days is in the food offerings. The Film and Food Celebration was introduced to the festival in 2007 as a part of the opening weekend activities. Featuring celebrity chefs and interactive film and food activities, the event has welcomed notable participants Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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in the past, including Anthony Bourdain, Iron Chef Cat Cora, Matt and Ted Lee, Eric Schlosser and Chef Norman Van Aken. As this year’s theme attests, food remains a key aspect of the festivities, with favorite components, including the Awards Brunch, on tap. The lineup of national culinary masters wasn’t available at press time, but top chefs from some of Central Florida’s best eateries also will be dishing out their finest fare. Chefs James and Julie Petrakis from The Ravenous Pig, K Restaurant and Wine Bar’s Chef Kevin Fonzo,
Chef Andres Corton of Black Bean Deli, Chef John Rivers of 4 Rivers Smokehouse, and Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress Chef Steven Rujak will all help present this year’s “Food” events. During the opening night festivities, Enzian’s Eden Bar and Whole Foods Market will be a part of the celebration, as well. Reel Appeal Fine food and lots of fun are guaranteed draws at the festival, but the films are the real headliners here, of course. All of


the films will be announced on March 21, but Curtis spotlights three must-sees among the offerings. The first, a special screening of Under African Skies by director Joe Berlinger, is a documentary that revisits the controversy surrounding Paul Simon’s Grammywinning album, Graceland, when it was released in 1986. The album was a big hit at the time, but South African leaders protested that Simon violated the cultural boycott of the nation’s oppressively racist apartheid regime by recording the album, which fused American and South African pop music, in that country. “It’s an extraordinary film and the music is stunning,” says Curtis. “It was an unbelievably controversial thing to do to defy a U.N. boycott.

The film documents Simon’s return to the country 25 years after the album’s release and 18 years after South Africa officially ended apartheid. There, he reunites and reminisces with the South African musicians who collaborated with him on the album back in the 1980s. The documentary also includes interviews with Oprah Winfrey, Quincy Jones, Lorne Michaels, David Bryne and Sir Paul McCartney, who describe the impact that Graceland had on them. Curtis’s second pick is the narrative feature An Ordinary Family directed by Mike Akel. The film portrays the experiences of the adult children of the Biederman family and their partners during the family’s annual summer reunion. Conflict ensues when Seth surprises his

THE DOCUMENTARY UNDER AFRICAN SKIES revisits the controversy caused by the release of Paul Simon’s album, Graceland, which he recorded in violation of a United Nations boycott.

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ENZIAN

MATTER MEDIA STUDIOS, LLC

FFF NARRATIVE FEATURES INCLUDE AN ORDINARY FAMILY, which centers on two brothers in the midst of a major conflict that could cause a permanent rift in the family.

FINE FARE has been a key component of FFF since 2007.

Local Color

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lorida’s filmmakers get their own shout-out at Best of Brouhaha, a showcase of talent that includes fiction narratives, documentaries and animation. The films shown are the winners of Brouhaha, a two-day event held each fall that screens FilmSlam winners (champions of a monthly, juried showcase at Enzian), student works and independent shorts. Eleven of the winning films were selected by a three-member jury consisting of movie critic Roger Moore; Robin Wright of Women in Film and Television; and Sylvia Caminer, a filmmaker and producer. This year, for the first time ever, the Brouhaha audience also awarded a favorite, making the lineup an even dozen. The Best of Brouhaha films will be shown at a special event during the festival; don’t miss this opportunity to see Florida’s finest.


Familiar Face T

he Metro Orlando Economic Development Commission (EDC) recently named Sheena Carlisle Fowler the associate director of the Metro Orlando Film & Entertainment Commission. Part of Fowler’s role is serving as the region’s film commissioner, and she’ll spearhead EDC efforts to attract productions to our area. She also works to support the growth of local production companies and crews. Fowler graduated from Florida State University with a B.A. in Arts and Humanities, holds a bachelor’s degree in Entertainment Business from Full Sail University, and has worked for several commercial producers, as well for the Downtown Arts District. Before she joined the EDC’s film and entertainment division in 2009, she worked as an associate producer for Orlando’s WMFE Public Broadcasting System. Fowler is currently the vice president of Women in Film and Television-Florida. “From production assistant to producer, I have always worked in the film industry. This is my world. Taking on the role of Metro Orlando Film Commissioner allows me to support the industry I love so much,” says Fowler. “We have a strong production community in Orlando with a rich history, and I am committed to continuing its growth by attracting more productions and infrastructure establishment. Since Orlando is a community filled with art supporters and creators, it is only natural that the Florida Film Festival is hosted here.”

LOCAL CHEFS John Rivers (left) of 4 Rivers Smokehouse and James and Julie Petrakis from The Ravenous Pig will be participating in this year’s FFF culinary events.

siblings by bringing his new boyfriend, William, to the weeklong event. Oldest brother Thomas, a pious married man of the cloth, deals with the situation by escaping to work instead of enjoying the vacation. The rest of the family tries to carry on as normal as the tension between Seth and Thomas escalates into a confrontation that could cause a permanent rift. The family works towards helping the battling siblings reconcile and preserving the family unit. “It’s a very smart, very clever film that I think people will like,” says Curtis. The final film on his list is Original Madman, a competition documentary feature by director Shannah Laumeister that profiles legendary photographer Bert Stern, whose iconic portraits of Marilyn Monroe during her last days helped to establish Stern as one of the original

PHOTOGRAPHER BERT STERN is the subject of the documentary Original Madman.

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Madmen, photographers who emerged from behind the lens to become celebrities themselves. Other Madmen include Irving Penn and Richard Avedon. Says Curtis, “The photographs in this film are jawdropping; this is a very entertaining and informative film.” Original Madman chronicles Stern’s relationship with a young model who serves as his muse as it reveals the bad-boy photographer’s success and his decline into relative obscurity that followed. Fun for Everyone With more than 160 films slated for the silver screen during the festival, these three can only give a sneak peek at the variety of offerings. This year, there are a number of selections that focus on music, and several more that feature the Middle East, reflecting the region’s current impact on the international cultural scene. For the more than 25,000 film fanatics who will attend the FFF in 2012, there truly is something for everyone—even a couple of Oscar contenders. Film, food and fun have top billing—don’t miss the blockbuster event of the year! Individual film tickets are generally $10 and will go on sale March 21. Festival passes and ticket packages, which range from $50 to $450, are currently available online, in person and over the phone. Everyone who buys a package by March 20 will be entered in a raffle to win a Golden Ticket, which is good for one of three unique Enzian VIP Experiences. For more information, call the Enzian box office at 407.629.1088, x230 or visit floridafilmfestival.com.


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Kieshalia Stephens

advanced dance students thrive at the Center for Contemporary Dance’s Summer Dance Intensives, which are designed for ages 12 and up.

Creative Kids Central Florida cultural venues roll out summer camps for every age and interest.

I

f you’ve got an aspiring actor or a budding ballerina at home, then summertime doesn’t have to mean downtime. The region’s cultural organizations offer numerous camps designed by professionals to keep your creative kids learning even when they’re not in school. From novices to pre-professionals, these programs accommodate all levels of students. So grab your drama queen and your soon-to-be scientist and pick out the summer camps that suit them best.

Dance Camps The Center for Contemporary Dance, Inc.

407.695.8366, thecenterfordance.org Note: There is a one-time registration fee of $20 for all students. June 11-29 Summer Dance & Arts Camp Ages 6-11; 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. This beginner’s camp emphasizes the principles of ballet and modern dance. Curriculum includes music, the arts and other dance forms and is separated into Primary Camp for children ages 6-8 and Elementary Camp for students ages 9-11. Weeks are themed as follows: Week 1— Ballet/Modern/Hip-Hop; Week 2—Ballet/

Modern/Broadway Jazz; Week 3—Ballet/ Modern/World Dance. Tuition: $150/one week; $275/two weeks; $400/three weeks July 9-27 Summer Dance Intensive–– Intermediate/Advanced Division Ages 12-22; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Intermediate, advanced and pre-professional dancers participate in a focused curriculum supplemented by workshops and coursework in professional development. The program concludes with a formal performance. Admittance is based on audition/application. Tuition: $300/one week; $575/two weeks; $850/three weeks July 30-August 10 Summer Dance Intensive–– Preparatory Division Ages 12 to adult; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. This program introduces fundamental Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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artistic and technical skills to dancers with little or no formal training. Students take core curriculum classes, supplemented by workshops. Tuition: $300/one week; $575/ two weeks

Central Florida Ballet

407.849.9948, centralfloridaballet.com June 18-23 and June 25-30 Extended Session Ages 8-18; 9-11:30 a.m. This camp is for preparatory- to advancedlevel students who want to improve their ballet technique. Tuition: $25-$170 June 25-29 and August 13-17 Mini Dance Camp Ages 3-6; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Students will enjoy ballet, tap, music, art, theater, and more. Each session has a Disney movie theme. Tuition: $125/one week; $225/two weeks


Centre for Dance & the Performing Arts 407.877.3388, dancecdpa.com

June 11-15 Pretty, Pretty Princess Ages 4-6; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers enjoy daily ballet classes, crafts, introduction to “Princess Etiquette,” dance, storytime, movies, and more. No prior dance experience necessary. Tuition: $155 June 18-22 StoryBook Dance and Play Camp Ages 6-10; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids enter the world of storybook play using dance, music, character play and art. Tuition: $155 June 25-August 10 Dance-Focused, Integrated Arts Experience Ages 10-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Using different dance classes, students will focus on developing ideas, choreographing, designing, directing, writing, dancing and performance art. Creative writing, academics, health and nutrition also will be incorporated. Tuition: $6/day or $275/ week; multiweek discounts available

NuLook School of Performing Arts

407.453.0830, nulookdancetheater.com June 11-August 16 Full Theater Production–-Shark’s Tale All ages; 7 a.m.-6 p.m. This full-day camp includes a variety of dance genres and theater classes. Campers also do crafts while building costumes. Tuition: $95/week, including breakfast, lunch and snacks

Russian Academy of Ballet 407.896.0309 RussianAcademyofBallet.com

June 27-July 28 Russian Academy of Ballet Summer Intensive Program Ages 7 and up; 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. This camp offers intensive classes in classical Russian-method ballet, pointe, variations, partnering, stretch classes and fitness, and ballet history. Music and voice classes are available. Tuition: $135 and up (based on level, age and living expenses)

Valencia College

407.582.2954, valenciacollege.edu/ artsandentertainment/dance/VSDI.cfm

June 18-July 14 Valencia Summer Dance Institute Grades 9-12; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. This four-week dance program has a multidisciplinary approach and offers learning and assessment of interrelated arts disciplines. Components include hands-on, field and classroom instruction. Students will participate in choreography, music and stagecraft practices, assessment, and a dance performance. Tuition: Free. Auditions are May 12, 9–10:30 a.m. at the East Campus Dance Studio, Building 6-104.

Film Camps Enzian Theater

407.629.1088 x236, enzian.org July 23-August 5 2012 KidFest Young Filmmakers’ Two-Week Summer Camp Grades 5-8; 9 a.m.-3 or 5 p.m. Campers produce an independent film while learning script writing, character development, shooting, editing and film history. Films will be projected on the big screen at the red carpet graduation ceremony on August 5. Full Tuition: $500, $475 for Enzian Film Society members, including supplies, lunches and snacks

History Camps Orange County Regional History Center

407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org Tuition is $110/week for members; $140/ week for nonmembers. There are multiweek and multi-sibling discounts. There are no camps July 4. June 11-15 Mummies, Tombs, and More Grades K-1, 2-3, 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids travel back in time to unwrap a mummy, write in hieroglyphs, and build a tomb!

June 25-29 America’s Ancients Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. What is the oldest city in North America? Who constructed the first pyramids in North America? Kids find the answers at this camp. June 25-29 America’s Wonders Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers visit the Statue of Liberty, the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone National Park, Mount Rushmore and Niagara Falls to learn what makes these places wonders. June 25-29 Under the Sea Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children learn about creatures in the ocean, from brightly colored corals to endangered marine mammals. July 2-6 Birth of a Nation Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Where was the Declaration of Independence signed? Why is the Liberty Bell cracked? Kids find these answers and more. July 2-6 Bugs and Slugs Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Get the buzz on bugs! Campers examine insects from butterflies to worms, and the habitats these creatures call home. July 2-6 Grossology Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Belches, boogers, and blisters! Creepycrawly worms! Kids discover the biology and chemistry behind disgusting things. July 9-13 CSI Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers learn how to lift and develop fingerprints, sample soils, cast footprints and teeth, and make rope impressions. July 9-13 Native Americans Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers investigate the legends and lifestyles of several Native American tribes, past and present.

June 18-22 Inventor’s Workshop Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Who are some famous U.S. inventors and what did they invent? Campers recreate experiments and make their own invention. June 18-22 Seussimania Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Dr. Seuss is loose at the History Center for a week of silly stories and ringing rhymes. June 18-22 Toys, Toys, Toys Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers take an adventure through time with games and toys to experience American history like never before. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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OCRHC

July 9-August 11 Summer Intensive Dance Program Ages 8-20; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This program offers ballet training for preparatory to pre-professional students. The two- to five-week term includes ballet, pointe, modern and jazz and weekly seminars. Tuition: $170-$1,070 (based on age, level and number of weeks enrolled)

Hands-on educational activities bring history to life at the Orange County Regional History Center.


July 9-13 Once Upon a Time Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids step into the world of folk tales, legends, myths and tall tales as they travel to mystical and faraway lands. July 16-20 School of Rock Grades K-1, 2-3, 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers hop on the tour bus to learn about the legends of rock ‘n’ roll, working in a band, and how to be a real performer.

July 23-27 Sensing the Museum Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids discover how they use their five senses every day. They will find out how their eyes can play tricks on them, make instruments, create scented gifts, and more. July 23-27 Spy Camp Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Participants develop a disguise, make and break codes, discover escape techniques, and use spy gadgets to uncover the history and science behind spying. July 23-27 The World of Wizards Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers’ studies will be devoted to the “behind-the-scenes” look at the world of magic done by some famous wizards. July 30-August 3 Da Vinci Science Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. It’s a week of gizmos, gadgets and ingenious inventions! Discover Leonardo and all of his amazing contraptions. July 30-August 3 Superheroes Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids learn what makes a hero. From make-believe to real life, heroes battle the forces of evil and injustice. July 30-August 3 Survivor Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids learn to distill drinking water, navigate by the stars, tell time with the sun, build compasses, make sunscreen, and find out which bugs make good snacks. July 30-August 3 Weather Forecast Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers become junior meteorologists and investigate clouds and weather patterns, as well as create rain sticks, weather vanes, sun prints and more.

Atlantic Center for the Arts

July 23-27 Prehistoric Creatures Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saber-tooth tigers, giant beavers and sloths are just some of the prehistoric creatures that once roamed Florida. Campers will learn all about fossils and paleontology.

Kids ages 4-13 explore art and culture, including theater, at Atlantic Center for the Arts’ Summer Art Camp.

August 6-10 Build It Big Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Participants discover which shapes make the strongest structures and build and demolish bridges to learn how architects make buildings strong.

June 18-22 Diggin’ Up History Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers embark on an adventure into Florida’s ancient past. Activities include digging for fossils and relics of lost civilizations.

August 6-10 Cosmic Fury Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids learn all about U.S. space history as they enjoy experiments related to the design and science of space flight.

June 25-29 History’s Mysteries Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants will try to solve one of Osceola County’s oldest mysteries

August 6-10 Creature Feature Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers journey through the museum and discover strange animals, from meat-eating predators to tiny amoebas. August 6-10 Freeze Frame Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Point, click and shoot! Kids learn the history of photography from Daguerreotype to Brownies to Polaroid instant cameras. August 13-17 Pirates Life for Me Grades K-2, 3-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Participants learn about the pirate life from the way they spoke, to the food they ate, to the types of ships they sailed.

Osceola County Historical Society

407.396.8644, osceolahistory.org Tuition: $130/week; $100 for OCHS members or additional campers Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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July 16-20 Civil War Adventure Camp Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids enter the world of a Civil War soldier, shouldering a musket, donning a uniform, and marching off to a new adventure. July 16-20 Miss Ruth’s Girl Academy Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Ever wonder what it was like for a woman during the Civil War? Campers take charge of the home front, tend to wounded soldiers and spy on the enemy. July 30-August 3 Survivor Osceola Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers learn how early pioneers and Seminoles survived in Florida’s Wilderness. August 6-10 Blast from the Past Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. From poodle skirts and gas rations to tie-dye and Trans Ams, this retro camp is a time traveller’s dream.


Multi-disciplinary Camps Atlantic Center for the Arts

386.423.1753, atlanticcenterforthearts.org June 16-August 10 Atlantic Center for the Arts Summer Art Camp Ages 6-12; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Each weekly session features three classes designed to give participants an opportunity to explore art and culture through a variety of art forms. Tuition: $105; $95 for members. Scholarships available.

Capoeira Brazilian Pelourinho

407.226.3195, capoeirabrazilpelo.com June 11-August 17 Capoeira Kids Camp Ages 4-14; 8:30 a.m.-6:45 p.m. Campers will enjoy different activities focused on elements of Capoeira (selfdefense, music, acrobatics and dance), as well as a variety of other activities. Field trips included. Tuition: Before May 11: $110/week; after May 11: $135/week; $35/day

In the LimelighT

407.340.0920, inthelimelightorlando.com Additional summer camps will be offered; please call for details. June 11-15 Disney’s Sleeping Beauty Kids Musical Production Grades 1-5; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This classic fairytale is told Disney-style and features songs from the beloved film, accompanied by fun new songs. Performances are June 16 at 1 and 7 p.m. Tuition: $215 June 11-15 The Method Grades 6-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This intermediate/advanced acting camp uses the Sensory Stanislavski Method, the most famous acting method in the industry. Tuition: $200 June 18-22 Party in Pixie Hollow Grades 1-3; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers join Tinker Bell and her friends in their beautiful world of fairies. Art, singing, dancing, writing and acting are included. Tuition: $175 June 18-29 Guys and Dolls Musical Production Grades 4-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This camp introduces kids to colorful characters who have become legends in musical theater as they rehearse and perform a junior version of the production. Audition required. Tuition: $425

June 25-29 Camp Half Blood (Percy Jackson) Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids enjoy adventures based on favorite Percy Jackson Adventures. Art, acting and writing bring stories to life! Tuition: $175 July 9-20 Into the Woods Musical Production Grades 4-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. The Brothers Grimm “go Broadway” as Sondheim and Lapine offer up a cockeyed fairy tale with favorite characters. Audition required. Tuition: $425 July 23-27 Pop Sensations: Beiber/Swift/Gomez Grades 4-10; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers take favorite songs from these popular artists and produce a show, complete with costumes, lighting effects and professional sound. Tuition: $200 July 23-27 Ultimate Disney Movie Magic Grades 1-3; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids work with a music director and dance instructor to put on a magical show, complete with lights, music and costumes. Tuition: $200 July 30-August 10 Fame Musical Production Grades 6-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers rehearse and perform the international stage success, Fame. Audition required. Tuition: $425

The Master Class Academy 407.645.4000 themasterclassacademy.org

June 11-15 Pirates and Princesses Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Students will explore the wonder of theater through creative drama, dance, music and art. Tuition: $140 June 18-22 Get Down with Your Buggy Self Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Campers will explore the wonder of theater through creative drama, dance, music and art. Tuition: $140 June 18-29 The Magical World of Harry Potter Ages 7-10 and 11-16; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Kids dive into Harry’s world of wizards, magic and more with drama, dance, music and art. Tuition: $425 June 25-29 Under the Big Top Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Themed around the greatest show on earth, this camp allows students to explore theater through creative drama, dance, music and art. Tuition: $140 July 9-13 Muppet Time Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Kids will explore the wonder of theater Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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through creative drama, dance, music and puppetry. Tuition: $140 July 16-20 Dungeons and Dragons Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Campers will explore the wonder of theater through creative drama, dance, music and art in this medieval-themed program. Tuition: $140 July 16-27 Top Pop Icons: From Elvis to GaGa Ages 11-16; 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Students will learn songs and choreography created by some of the top pop music icons. Tuition: $425 July 16-27 You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers will study acting, choreography and voice with professional instructors. Tuition: $425 July 23-27 League of Superheroes (boys)/ Pixie Dust Fairies (girls) Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Kids use creative drama, dance, music and art to explore the wonder of theater in these themed camps. Tuition: $140 July 30-August 3 Lion King Ages 3-6; 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Please call for more information. Tuition: $140

Museum of Arts & Sciences 386.255.0285 x333, moas.org June 11-August 3 MOAS Summer Learning Institute 2012 Ages 4-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Weekly sessions include half-day and fullday options, with activities that range from discovering reptiles to building with Lego®s to art discovery to aviation. Tuition: $90/ class/week; $80 for members

Orange County Library System 407.835.7323, ocls.info June 9–August 4 Dream Big! Kids Summer Reading Program Ages 6-12; various times Kids can reach for the stars this summer with special events featuring science, animals, arts and storytelling. Kids can grab a reading and activity calendar for a chance to win prizes at the End of Summer Celebration. Tuition: Free June 9–August 4 It’s a Dream Big Time for Preschoolers Ages 3-5; various times Preschoolers can bring their dreams to life while listening to stellar stories and making crafts. Registration required. Tuition: Free


June 11–August 4 Camp Savvy Ages 6-12; various times Kids learn about new and exciting computer programs and enter to win cool prizes. Tuition: $10; free for card holders June 11-August 4 TechKrew Ages 13-18; various times Teens build their own apps and video games, mix music, design graphics, edit and add special effects to movies, and much more. Tuition: $10; free for card holders June 16-August 8 Imagine That: Teen Summer Reading Program Ages 13-18; Various Teens come to the library for art, gaming, improv and book clubs, and take part in the Snapshot: Teen Photo Contest. Tuition: Free

Orlando Youth Circus LLC

407.855.5457, whoisbankshelfrich.com/ Orlando_Youth_Circus.html July 16-20 Orlando Youth Circus Camp Ages 8-teens; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Discover the fun of circus arts! This camp is for beginners and teaches juggling, plate spinning, stilt walking, basic acrobatics and clowning. Tuition: $170 July 23-27 Orlando Youth Circus 2 Ages 8-teens; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. This camp is for kids who have attended at least one week of circus camp or 6 months of class. Skills taught include juggling and object manipulation, strap-on stilt walking, acrobatics, and more. Tuition: $170

Osceola Center for the Arts

407.846.6257, ocfta.com

MOAS

June 11-22 Drama Camp 1 Ages 7-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers will have fun learning the art of putting on a show, including acting, singing and dancing. Tuition: $220

The museum of arts & sciences offers half and full-day camps.

June 25-29 Visual Arts Camp 2 Ages 7-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids will create unique works of art in pottery, drawing, painting, and more. Tuition: $110 July 9-20 Drama Camp 3 Ages 7-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants will love learning the art of show business as they act, sing and dance their way through camp. Tuition: $220 July 23-27 Visual Arts Camp 4 Ages 7-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers will create beautiful pottery, drawings and paintings. Tuition: $110 July 30-August 10 Drama Camp 5 Ages 7-14; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids will create and perform a live show on the Center’s main stage, as they fine-tune their acting, singing and dancing skills. Tuition: $220

June 25-29 Kids Dance Camp Ages 8-11; 2-5 p.m. All skill levels are welcome for this fun-filled week of dance. Tuition: $120

Starving Artist Studios

July 23-August 3 Young Artists Session 2 Ages 11-16; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Students will write, direct, choreograph and perform a musical theater showcase. Camp includes classes in music, dance, acting and theater design. Tuition: $450

407.370.4909, starvingartiststudios.com June 4-August 3 Rising Stars Ages 5-6; 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Camp will follow a different theme that will be incorporated into music, dance, acting and crafts. Tuition: $180/week June 4-August 3 Summer Theatre Tots! Ages 3-4; 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. This camp includes music, dance, acting and crafts. Each week will have a different theme, and each Friday students will perform for family and friends. Tuition: $140/week June 7-August 2 Summer College Boot Camp Grade 12; Thursdays, 6-8 p.m. This class will guide students who want to study musical theater, voice or acting through through the process of selecting and applying to arts colleges. Tuition: $325 June 11-22 Shooting Stars Session 1 Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids put together their own theatrical review, including scenes and songs from musicals, as well as build their own props and costumes. Tuition: $380 June 11-22 Young Artists Session 1 Ages 11-16; 10 a.m.- 4 p.m. Students will write, direct, choreograph and perform a musical theater showcase. Camp includes classes in music, dance, acting and theater design. Tuition: $450 June 25-29 Improv Intensive Ages 12-18; 12:30 p.m.-4 p.m. This camp offers an intro to improvisational theater, long form, short form and musical improv. Tuition: $150 Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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July 9-20 Music Theatre Dance Intensive Ages 12-18; 12:30-4 p.m. Campers participate in ballet, tap, jazz and others styles of dance seen on Broadway stages. Tuition: $300 July 9-20 Teen Acting Intensive Ages 12-18; 2-5 p.m. Serious actors only need apply. Camp offers two weeks of intense monologues and scene study. Tuition: $250 July 23-August 3 Shooting Stars Session 2 Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids put together their own theatrical review, including scenes and songs from musicals, as well as build their own props and costumes. Tuition: $380

UCF Literary Arts Partnership (Continuing Education) 407.882.0260 english.ucf.edu/outreach and ce.ucf.edu/Program/3112/ Creative-Writing-For-Teens/

July 9-13 Creative Writing: Poetry and Creative Nonfiction Grades 6-12; 1:30-3:30 p.m. Students will learn tools of poetry and creative nonfiction and learn how to use their senses to create vivid poems and real-life stories. Tuition: $100 July 9-13 Creative Writing: Story and Script Writing Grades 6-12; 9-11 a.m. Students will study the basic structure of a Hollywood screenplay and learn the principles of screenwriting and apply it to reading and writing fiction. Tuition: $100

Music Camps Classic Rock School Of Music

407.306.8099 classicrockschoolofmusic.com June 11-August 10 Music Camp Ages 5-early teen; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Full-time and part-time camps, group classes and private lessons available. Tuition: $75 to $275


407.999.7800, fsyo.org

July 23-August 3 Stringmania Ages 6-15; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. This program is for string players at Suzuki Book 2 Level or higher. Camp includes orchestra and chamber ensemble experiences, chamber group coaching, private lessons, instruction in fiddling and improvisation, and more.

Florida Young Artists Orchestra (FYAO) 407.257.8886, fyao.org

June 18-22 FYAO Summer Camp 2012 Ages 7-18; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. This camp takes young musicians to the next level. Students receive small group instruction, as well as the opportunity for orchestral performance. Camp will be held at Trinity Preparatory School. Tuition: $250

Music with Mar.

407.739.4586, musicwithmar.com June 11-August 17 “Music with Mar.” a preschool Music Class Ages 8 mos.-5 years; 10-10:45 a.m. This class involves children and parents in educational music activities. Songs teach basic social, motor, language and cognitive skills and are based on brain research. Classes are held on different days in different venues; call for details. Tuition: $7/day/per family; five classes/$30; or 10 classes/$55.

Orlando Community School of the Arts

407.956.5869, musicandartsorlando.com May 11-15 SummerSing 2012 Grades 6-12; 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. This holistic vocal curriculum offers young singers the freedom to experiment vocally, dramatically and physically. Camp includes individual and group vocal instruction, dramatic interpretation, a bio workshop and visits from professional guest artists. Tuition: $235; registration is $15. Early registration and sibling discounts available.

Valencia College

407.761.7730 valenciacollege.edu/artsandentertainment/ Campsandrockandrollcamp.net June 11-15 and July 30-August 3 Rock and Roll Camp Grades 6-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers create, rehearse and perform a rock ‘n’ roll show with guitar, bass, drums, voice and keyboards. Activities include instrumental classes, band rehearsals, clinics and guest performers. Tuition: $320/week

Science & Nature Camps Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens 407.323.4450 x123 centralfloridazoo.org

June 11-August 17 Summer Camp Adventures at the Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens Ages 6-12; 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Exciting programs include half- and full-day camps, such as Pirates of the ZOOribbean, Jr. Zoo Keeper, Jungle to Jungle, and more. Tuition: $130/week, half days; $185/ week, full days; $110 and $165 for members, respectively. June 12-August 17 Cub Club Preschool Programs at the Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens Ages 2-5; 9:30-10:15 a.m. Kids and their parents can choose from a variety of fun animal-themed series that they will enjoy together! Each series includes three classes. Tuition: $50/series; $40 for members

City of Orlando

407.246.2283 cityoforlando.net/fpr/html/ summerprograms.asp June 13 - July 3 Natural Expression Session 1A Grades 1-6; 9:30-11:30 a.m. Kids enjoy nature classes at the beginning of the workshop, followed by an art class. Tuition: $30; $25 for city residents June 13 - July 3 Natural Expression Session 1B Grades 1-6; 1:30-3:30 p.m. July 10-31 Natural Expression Session 2A Grades 1-6; 9:30-11:30 a.m. July 10-31 Natural Expression Session 2B Grades 1-6; 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Harry P. Leu Gardens 407.246.3621, leugardens.org

June 11-15 Junior Garden Detective Camp Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers will go on a morning hunt in the gardens, and then come inside for activities. Snacks provided. Tuition: $80; $60 for members July 16-20 Garden Detective Camp Grades 3-4; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers will go on a morning hunt in the gardens, and then come inside for activities. Brown bag picnic lunch will be followed by a scavenger hunt. Tuition: $100; $80 for members Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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RFPhotography.com

Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra

Participants in the florida symphony youth orchestra’s Stringmania get intensive orchestra and chamber experience.

August 6-10 Garden Explorer Camp Grades 5-6; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers will go on a morning hunt in the gardens, and then come inside for activities. Brown bag picnic lunch will be followed by a scavenger hunt. Tuition: $100; $80 for members

iBrick Academy 407.230.6100, ibrickacdemy.com iBrick Academy Certified Lego® RoboCamps take place throughout Central Florida and take students from Simple Machines through the Lego® NXT Robots. Students use Lego® Education Sets. June 11-15, June 18-22 and June 25-29 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: East Orlando Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers June 11-15, June 18-22, June 25-29, July 9-13, July 16-20 and July 23-27 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: LEGOLAND, FL Grades 3-8; 8:45 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $295, including park admission June 18-22 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: Apopka Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers June 25-29 and July 30-August 3 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: Kissimmee Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers July 9-13 and July 16-20 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: Lake Mary Prep Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers


July 9-13, 16-20 and 23-27 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: Windermere Prep Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers

June 4-August 17 Sr. Science Academy Grades 7-9; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers build aquatic robots, learn about Florida’s oceans, discover the human body through animal dissection, or experience the science behind cooking. Sr. Academy Camps immerse kids in a world of cooperative learning, science exploration, and thought-provoking discussions. Sr. Science Academies include two unique one-day field trips. Tuition: $380; $335 for members

July 30-August 3 Lego® RoboCamp——iBrick Academy: Orlando Science School Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $235 for new students; $210 for returning campers

SeaWorld Orlando

MASA Center for High Achieving and Talented Youth

800.406.2244, seaworld.org/camps June 11-August 10 Animal Addresses Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers find out how killer whales, sea lions and penguins adapt to their surroundings. Tuition: $289

407.924.4522, masaflorida.org June 11-15 and 18-22 MASA Hands-On, Interactive and Innovative Summer Camps for Gifted and Talented Youth Ages 5-13; 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. These camps offer students challenging educational opportunities through handson activities that allow them to develop intellect and use higher cognitive skills to create and to invent. Tuition: $265/one week; $245/week, two weeks or more; multiple siblings: $245 per child per week

June 11-August 10 Animal Antics Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids get up-close encounters with dolphins, penguins, and more as they discover how SeaWorld trains its animals. Tuition: $289 June 11-August 10 Animal Sciences Grade 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers explore the world of SeaWorld’s animals through the eyes of scientists. Learn how biology, geography and other scientific fields help us better understand marine animals and habitats. Tuition: $289

Orlando Science Center 407.514.2112, osc.org

June 4-August 17 Full-Day Camp Grades K-4; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Driven by our mission to “inspire science learning for life,” these camps focus on early childhood and developmental concepts while instilling an understanding of and curiosity for science. Tuition: $225; $195 for members

June 11-August 10 Do You See What I Sea? Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids find out how their senses compare to those of sharks, whales and dolphins. Tuition: $289

June 4-August 17 Jr. Science Academy Grades 5-6; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Jr. Academy Camps are the next level of the Orlando Science Center camp experience. Looking at the past, but using tomorrow’s technology, these camps help drive curiosity and inquiry based learning. To ensure real-life applications there is a one-day field trip experience. Tuition: $290; $250 for members

June 11-August 10 Marine Biology 101 Grade 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers learn what it’s like to be a marine biologist. Tuition: $289

Orlando Science Center

June 11-August 10 Ocean Commotion Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. This camp shows how penguins and sea lions find food while staying away from predators, as kids explore the world of animal defenses. Tuition: $289

From learning with legos to making realistic robots, camps at the Orlando Science Center keep kids coming back for more.

June 11-August 10 Ocean Odyssey Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. From the warm Florida waters to frigid Arctic habitats, campers discover why some animals migrate, where they go and what special adaptations they need to survive. Tuition: $289 per participant June 11-August 10 Sea Hideaway Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids explore animal camouflage as they check out all the ways whales, sharks, Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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dolphins and penguins blend in with their surroundings. Tuition: $289 June 11-August 10 Seafari Sea Camp Ages 3-4 with adult; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Parents and their preschoolers will work with each other to create crafts, make snacks and explore the worlds of penguins, dolphins, manatees and sharks. Tuition: $210/adult and child June 11-August 10 Secrets of the Sea Grades K-1; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers uncover the secrets of killer whales, polar bears and other sea critters. Tuition: $289 June 11-August 10 Walk on the Wild Side Grades 4-5; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Participants enjoy SeaWorld’s exhilarating rides, spectacular shows and hands-on encounters with dolphins and penguins. Tuition: $289 June 11-August 10 What’s for Lunch Grades 2-3; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. This is your child’s chance to find out how much, how often and what types of foods SeaWorld’s animals eat. Then, they help serve lunch to dolphins, flamingos and rays. Tuition: $289 June 11-August 10 Wild Careers Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Campers discover what it’s like to work with amazing animals as they go behind the scenes at SeaWorld and visit Aquatica. Tuition: $289

Theater Camps Bay Street Players 352.357.7777, baystreetplayers.org July 9-August 1 Summer Production Camp Ages 7-18; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Students learn the skills to produce and perform a live, fully staged musical, Into The Woods Jr. Students rehearse in the mornings and participate in theatrical workshops in the afternoons. Improv, voice and audition technique are some of the workshops hosted by visiting artists. Tuition: $350

Breakthrough Theatre of Winter Park 407.920.4034, breakthroughtheatre.com June 11-July 6 Breakthrough’s Summer Theatre Camp Ages 6-13; 9 a.m.- 1 p.m.


Students will learn acting, improv, musical theater, audition and technical theater skills. Tuition: $300

Garden Theatre

407.877.4736, gardentheatre.org

June 11-15 Improv Mania Ages 9-14; 1-4 p.m. This camp delves into techniques of improvisation for beginners and skilled performers. Tuition: $200 June 18-22 ABC’s of Acting: Kids on Camera Ages 9-14; 1-4 p.m. This camp offers an inviting and fun environment to learn beginning acting and commercial techniques. Tuition: $200 June 18-22 Wizards, Magicians, Pirates and Princesses Ages 4-8; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. This camp takes students on a journey with exciting songs, movement and acting from favorite stories and fairytales. Tuition: $200 June 25-July 13 Youth Theatre Production: OLIVER! Ages 5-17; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This three-week program gives students a chance to perform in a fully staged production of Oliver! No prior experience necessary. Tuition: $395 July 16-20 Broadway Lights: Musical Theatre Camp Ages 5-17; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This camp explores Broadway musicals and acting for the stage. Tuition: $275

L.A. Acting Workshop

Leu gardens

June 11-15 Action Station Ages 4-8; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. This dynamic camp explores creative play, music and movement, with an introduction to commercial acting. Tuition: $200

Kids explore the great outdoors at Leu Gardens’ Garden Detective camps.

learns how to harness his abilities just in time to battle the forces of evil! Tuition: $150 June 18-22 Mary Poppins——A Musical Ages 5-15; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Unusual nanny Mary Poppins comes to the rescue of the Banks children. She puts things right using her rather extraordinary magical powers. Tuition: $150 June 25-29 Glee——A Musical Ages 5-15; 1-4 p.m. The optimistic Spanish teacher of McKinley High rallies a rag-tag group of students to make it to the biggest competition of them all: nationals! Tuition: $150 June 25-29 Matilda Ages 5-15; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Matilda is very different from her greedy, ignorant parents. When a teacher shows her kindness, she uses her rare abilities to teach the grown-ups a lesson! Tuition: $150

Magic Curtain Productions, Inc.

407.876.0006, LAActing.com

407.282.8368, mcptheater.com

June 11-15 Annie——A Musical Ages 5-15; 1.-4 p.m. Annie believes her parents left her in an orphanage by mistake. Daddy Warbucks lets her live in his home, but when a reward is announced, a series of surprises follows. Tuition: $150

June 18-22 I Want to Be a Star Grades 1-3 and 4-7; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers will star in the scene or song of their choice from popular television, movie, or Broadway shows. Tuition: $175

June 11-15 Shrek Forever After Ages 5-15; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Rumpelstiltskin tricks Shrek into being erased from existence. Shrek is then hurled into a different dimension where Rumpelstiltskin rules supreme. Tuition: $150 June 18-22 Harry Potter Ages 5-15; 1-4 p.m. While attending the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, Harry Potter

June 25-29 Lights, Camera, Action! Grades 1-3 and 4-7; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids learn what it takes to be a star. Camp includes slating for an audition, preparing a monologue and making a commercial. Students get a headshot and resume. Tuition: $175 July 16-27 Oz! Grades 1-7; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers will rehearse and perform this version of The Wizard of Oz. No experience necessary. Tuition: $325 Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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July 23-27 Nickelodeon Week with SpongeBob, Kung-Fu Panda, Power Rangers and More Grades 1-5; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kids build a papier-mâché SpongeBob and recreate scenes and action sequences from favorite Nick shows as they learn basic principles of stage combat. Tuition: $175 July 23-August 3 Footloose! Grades 7-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Everyone in camp will receive a role, rehearse and perform Footloose! Tuition: $325/two-week camp July 30-August 3 Princess Camp Ages 4-9; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. With more 100 Disney princess costumes, shoes and accessories, little princesses will be the belle of the ball. Campers learn tea party etiquette, make crafts, sing and dance in a princess fantasy. Tuition: $150

Orlando Repertory Theatre 407.896.7365, ext. 219, orlandorep.com June 11-August 5 Summer Stock 2012 Grades 7-college freshmen; 2:30-6:30 p.m. The REP will produce a fully staged musical production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s State Fair. Audition required. Tuition: $475 June 11-August 17 Theatre and Musical Theatre Camps Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuition: $160-$215. No camp July 4. June 11-15: Disney’s CineMagic June 18-22: Seuss on the Loose! June 25-29: Can’t Stop the Pop! July 2-6: Mystery A-Z July 9-13: Let’s Rock (You Rock!) July 16-20: Performing Pixar July 23-27: Can’t Stop the Pop! July 30-August 3: What’s New Scooby Doo? August 6-10 : Broadway Blast August 13-17: Disney’s CineMagic


The Power Chords seek experienced performers who can sing musical theater and pop music, as well as execute precise choreography. The Power Chords perform throughout the year throughout Central Florida. Audition required. Tuition: None

Michael Cairns/Wet Orange Studios

Orlando Shakespeare Theater

Students in grades K-12 can learn all about stage production at the REP’s in-depth theater camps.

June 11-August 17 Theatre and Musical Theatre Camps Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. No camp July 4. Tuition: $160-$215. June 11-15: Hogwarts Academy June 18-22: Diary of a Wimpy Kid June 25-29: iCarly’s Webshow June 25-29: LOL! Comedy Camp July 2-6: American Girl Experience July 2-6: SuperHero Headquarters July 9-13: Twisted TV, Jr. July 16-20: Hogwarts Academy July 16-20: Victorious! July 23-27: Diary of a Wimpy Kid July 30-August 3: Planet Pop! August 6-10: Animation SuperStation! August 6-10: Musical Pop! August 13-17: Stand Up! Comedy Camp June 11-August 17 Theatre and Musical Theatre Camps Grades 6-10; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. No camp July 4. Tuition: $175-$215. June 11-15: How Do I Get That Part? June 18-22: Twisted TV June 25-29: Victorious! July 2-6: That’s So Random July 9-13: Welcome to the A.N.T. Farm July 16-20 : On Location, Live! July 23-27: Contemporary Puppetry July 30-August 3: Planet Pop! August 6-10: SMASH Hits! August 13-17: Pop! Goes Broadway June 18-July 14 Youth Academy Production Camps Grades 3-8; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Audition required. Tuition: $250 June 18-23: Disney’s Mulan Jr. July 9-14: Roald Dahl’s Willy Wonka Jr. July 23-August 4 Youth Academy Production Camp: The Bully Plays Grades 6-10; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Audition required. Tuition: $300

407.447.1700 x208, orlandoshakes.org June 11-15 Will’s Worlds Age 4-Grade 2; 9 a.m.- 12 p.m. Campers get hands-on experience with musical instruments and costumes as they act out Shakespeare stories through movement and creative play. Tuition: $180 June 11-July 8 The Young Company——Twelfth Night Grades 9-college freshmen; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. High-school students receive voice, movement and character training while working on a fully produced play. Tuition: $455

June 18-29 The REP@UCF Advanced Performance Camps Grades 9-college freshmen; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuition: $215

June 18-29 Shakespeare Bards Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This camp culminates in a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Tuition: $330

June 18-22: Musical Theatre Intensive June 25-29 : Acting Intensive

June 18-29 Shakespeare Players Grades 2-5; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. This camp culminates in a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Tuition: $330

June 18-August 3 The REP Summer Camps at UCF Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. No camp July 4. Tuition: $175-$215. June 18-22: Disney’s CineMagic June 25-29: Performing Pixar July 2-6: Let’s Rock (You Rock!) July 9-13: Seuss on the Loose July 23-27: Can’t Stop the Pop! July 30-August 3: Mystery A-Z June 18-August 3 The REP Summer Camps at UCF Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuition: $160$215. No camp July 4. June 18-22 and July 2-6: Hogwarts Academy June 25-29: Diary of a Wimpy Kid July 9-13: Planet Pop! July 23-27: Animation SuperStation! July 30-August 3: LOL! Comedy Camp June 18-August 5 Design & Tech Academy Grades 7-college freshmen; 2:30-6:30 p.m. Students learn industry secrets to design, technical theatre and stage management. Interview required. Tuition: $300 June 25-July 27 KinderDrama: Theatre Classes for Families Pre-K-K with parent or guardian; 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Tuition: $110 June 25-29: Hippity Hop with Aesop July 23-27: If You Give a Kid a Camp August 6-10 Power Chords Grades 8-12; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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July 2-6 Magical Shakespeare! Grades 2-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Students learn basic magic tricks while exploring scenes from Shakespeare’s most magical plays. Tuition: $225 July 2-6 Puppet Play! Age 4-Grade 2; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Using puppets kids make themselves, campers tell stories with words, notes and rhythms. Tuition: $180 July 9-20 Shakespeare with Heart Grades 6-12; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Students with and without special needs work together to produce Much Ado About Nothing. Students have daily voice, movement and warm-up activities before rehearsing. Tuition: $180 July 16-20 Musical Adventures! Age 4-Grade 2; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers use music, movement and imaginative play to create their own exciting adventures. Tuition: $180 July 23-27 Zombie Shakespeare Grades 9-12; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Campers speak the words of Shakespeare’s ghosts and goblins while creating their own fake scars, bruises and blood. Tuition: $330, including special effects make-up kit


July 30-August 3 Playing with Heart Grades 6-12; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Students with and without special needs work together. Students have daily voice, movement and warm-up activities before rehearsing; program culminates in a showcase of scenes. Tuition: $155 August 6-10 Lights, Camera, ACTION! Grades 6-8; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Kids make their own action movie combining stage combat, acting and video! Tuition: $305 August 6-10 Shakespeare SmackDown! Grades 2-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers explore some of Shakespeare’s famous fight scenes, learning the basics of hand-to-hand stage combat, safely throwing punches and dramatic slaps. Tuition: $225 August 13-17 Folksongs and Fairytales Age 4–Grade 2; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers bring to life classic stories, songs and dances using costume pieces, movement and imaginative play. Tuition: $180

SUMMER DRAMA CAMP

407.489.4870, summerdramacamp.org June 11-23 Fame, Jr. Ages 10-18; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Campers learn and perform a show in two weeks utilizing an arts conservatory-style training technique to resemble a professional environment. Tuition: $345 July 9-13 Disney Pooh Bear for Kids Ages 7-10; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Children learn to make “drama” productive while rehearsing a kid-friendly production. This camp is a perfect fit for beginners to experienced students. Tuition: $195

Theatre South Orlando

407.489.4458, TheatreSouthOrlando.com June 18-29 “Camp Wicked” Grades 1-7; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers will audition, rehearse and learn how to become all things Wicked in this two-week camp led by theater professionals. Tuition: $507; $423 for members July 9-13 Backstage Pass: Acting on Camera Camp Grades 1-7; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers learn the art of acting for film and television and leave with professional head shots and resumes. Guest instructors include local industry insiders. Tuition: $282; $235 for members July 23-27 Build Your Own Production Camp Grades 1-7; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Participants direct, produce and star in

their own scene from a musical or play. They also design costumes, scenery and create makeup. Local industry insiders will be on hand each day. Tuition: $282; $235 for members August 6-10 CAMP GLEE! Grades 2-8; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers show their star power in this fast-paced pop and musical theater performance camp taught by professionals. Tuition: $282; $235 for members

Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center 407.321.8111, wdpac.com

July 9-27 Senior Camp: Thoroughly Modern Millie Jr. Grades 5-12; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $335 July 30-August 3 Fractured Fairy Tales Grades 1-4; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Tuition: $130

Visual Art Camps Art & History Museums—— Maitland 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org

June 11-August 10 Summer Art Classes at the Art & HIstory Museums——Maitland Ages 6-17; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Classes are two hours and run three days a week, for two weeks at a time. There are multiple sessions throughout the summer running: June 11-22; July 9-20; and July 23-August 3. Classes include pottery, drawing, painting, cartooning, and more. Tuition: $90-$125

CHERIE DACKO AT Jeanine Taylor Folk Art 407.496.9524, jtfolkart.com

June 4-8 Arts and Crafts from Around the World Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids make fantastic arts and crafts as they explore the cultural celebrations of China, Mexico, India, Africa and Japan. Tuition: $125 June 11-15 Native American Crafts Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. From learning Indian sign language, to making an Apache war bonnet, students will explore the Native American tribes of the Shoshone, Cheyenne, Apache, Mohawk and Inuit. Tuition: $125 June 18-22 Old World American Folk Art Ages 7-10; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Students will make a Hawaiian honu wall hanging, Pennsylvania hex signs, memory Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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jars from Africa and much more. Tuition: $125 July 2-6 Optical Illusions Ages 11-14; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids create unbelievable two- and threedimensional optical illusions using pen and ink, paint, markers and mixed media. Tuition: $125 July 16-20 Pop Art Ages 11-14; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids discover and create brilliant works in paint, mixed-media and markers, inspired by pop artists Jim Dine, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, and others. Tuition: $125 July 30-August 2 Tell Your Story Ages 11-14; 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Kids celebrate their uniqueness by creating a three-dimensional self-portrait, cartoons, custom journals, and more. Tuition: $125

Cornell Fine Arts Museum 407.646.1536, rollins.edu/cfam/education/ index.html June 11-15 Art Activities and Museum Appreciation Grades K-8; 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children can explore their creativity with painting, drawing, clay, sculpture and photography. This camp provides an overview of the fundamentals of artmaking. Tuition: Please call

Crealdé School of Art 407.671.1886, crealde.org June 11-15 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 1 Ages 4-5; 9-11:45 a.m. This new program is designed to nurture creativity in the youngest children at a pace that permits self-expression and success. Tuition: $170; $150 for members June 11-15 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 2 Ages 5-8; 9-11:45 a.m. These young artists enjoy three classes a day in sculpture, clay art, and painting and drawing. Tuition: $170; $150 for members June 11-15 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 3 Ages 13-17; 12:30-4:30 p.m. Crealdé’s Advanced Art studio program gives students the opportunity to concentrate on one medium: painting and drawing, film or digital photography, wheel throwing or hand-building clay. Tuition: $220; $200 for members June 18-28 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 4 Ages 8-12; 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Camp includes classes in painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics and sculpture. Camp meets Monday-Thursday. Tuition: $400; $380 for members


July 2-12 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 5 Ages 8-12; 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Camp includes classes in painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics and sculpture. Camp meets Monday-Thursday. No camp on July 4. Tuition: $350; $330 for members

Non-denominational classes are offered in clay, drawing, mixed media, painting and printmaking. Emphasis is on creative expression and exploration of the media. Each week features a different project. Tuition: $150/week

Mount Dora Center for the Arts

July 16-26 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 6 Ages 8-12; 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m. Camp includes classes in painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics and sculpture. Camp meets Monday-Thursday. Tuition: $400; $380 for members

352.383.0880 mountdoracenterforthearts.org June 11-August 3 Experience the World of Art ... Your Passport to Creativity Ages 5-12; 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Campers explore art materials and methods from around the world, including collage, drawing, painting, watercolor, fiber art, and more. Tuition: $85/half day; $150/full day

July 30-August 3 Crealdé Summer ArtCamp Session 7 Ages 5-8; 1-3:45 p.m. Young artists enjoy three classes a day in sculpture, clay art, and painting and drawing. Tuition: $170; $150 for members

Museum of Florida Art 386.734.4371, museumoffloridaart.org

Cup O’ Pottery

June 18-August 3 Meet the Masters Ages 4-5; 9-11:30 a.m. Children will develop their artistic talents by experimenting with a variety of media and age-appropriate projects and activities. Tuition: $75/week; $50 for members

407.421.5460, cupopottery.com July 30-August 3 Summer Pottery Camp Ages 6-16; 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m. Using clay, campers will build threedimensional pieces concentrating on basic ceramic hand-building techniques and emphasizing aesthetics, form and function. Tuition: $125

June 18-August 3 Meet the Masters Ages 6-12; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants will develop their artistic talents by experimenting with a variety of media, including painting, drawing, printmaking, mixed media and sculpture. Tuition: $175/week; $150 for members

First Presbyterian Church of Maitland 407.644.3455, fpcmaitland.org June 9-13, June 11-15, June 25-29 and July 9-13 Summer Art Camp Grades 1-8; 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

Orlando Museum of Art 407.896.4231 x262, omart.org June 11-15 African Adventure Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers create a mask, fashion a fabulous headdress, learn dyeing and weaving techniques, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members June 11-15 Digital Storytelling Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. In addition to basic photography tips, this class will touch upon cyanotype, lettering in images, and hand tinting. Tuition: $110; $100 for members

Crealdé

June 11-15 Interior Design Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Participants learn how color, texture and other elements help express their personality. Tuition: $110; $100 for members

CrealdÉ SCHOOL OF ART offers a variety of visual arts camps for all levels of students.

June 11-15 Simple Animation Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Campers learn simple animation techniques using zoetropes, shadow puppet theaters, flip books and stop-action with “claymation.” Tuition: $110; $100 for members Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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June 11-15 Storytellers of the Southwest Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids create a “storyteller” sculpture in clay, dye yarn with natural materials to make a weaving and create jewelry. Tuition: $110; $100 for members June 18-22 Art to Live With Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers design T-shirts using stamping, stencilling and screen printing. They learn fabric batik, create a journal, make a paper luminary and weave items. Tuition: $220; $200 for members June 18-22 Mixed Media Intensive Workshop Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This workshop includes two-dimensional collage, three-dimensional assemblage, textiles and weaving, and more. Tuition: $220; $200 for members June 18-22 Wonders of the World Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants learn about Pre-Columbian cultures, “build” the Great Wall of China, create a pyramid, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members June 25-29 Drawing Basics Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers learn basic drawing skills such as contour, hatching and shading as they focus on line, form, value and texture. Tuition: $110; $100 for members June 25-29 Passion for Pattern Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Kids learn how to create patterns with stamps, block prints, monoprints, in weavings, and more. Tuition: $110; $100 for members June 25-29 Printmaking Basics Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers learn basic printmaking methods, including monoprints, block prints, and etchings, and learn how to combine them. Tuition: $110; $100 for members June 25-29 Simple Book Making Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Kids create write, illustrate and bind their own books. Tuition: $110; $100 for members June 25-29 Towers, Ceilings and Chandeliers Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers learn about the sculpture of Dale Chihuly and other glass artists. They will design a tower, a chandelier, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members July 2-6 Art Sampler Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Every afternoon presents a new adventure


or two as kids explore painting, drawing, sculpture, origami and weaving. Tuition: $88; $80 for members July 2-6 Cartoon Creations Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Participants learn how to draw cartoon characters, develop the elements of setting, and build a storyline through sequence. Tuition: $88; $80 for members

July 2-6 Rehab, Recycle and Upcycle Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids explore recycling materials to create weavings, sculpture, items to wear, and more. Tuition: $88; $80 for members July 2-6 Sew, Sew Arty Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Participants learn about hand sewing, embroidery, felting and fibers and try weaving and knitting on handmade looms as they rehab an old piece of clothing into an arty design. Tuition: $88; $80 for members July 9-13 Art of the Americas Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers weave a terrific textile, craft a spouted water vessel, design an awesome mask and make jewelry. Tuition: $200; $180 for members July 9-13 Drawing Dynamic Portraits Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Using the techniques of contemporary artists such as Chuck Close and others, kids learn to create portraits and self-portraits. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 9-13 Playful Portraits Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Campers explore portraits in a variety of media and techniques, including contour line drawing, collage, pastel, and thumb printing. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 9-13 Printmaking Potpourri Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Kids learn techniques to create engraved prints, monoprints, block prints and transfer prints. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 9-13 Watercolor Workshop Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Campers learn watercolor and gouache techniques to capture depictions of objects,

Mofa

July 2-6 Fun with Folk Art Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers create a quilt square, a landscape painting using unexpected materials, and a sculpture using found objects. Tuition: $160; $144 for members

Students Explore a variety of age-appropriate media at the Museum of Florida Art.

water, light and atmosphere. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 16-20 Airbrush and More Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids explore color theory, hand lettering, stenciling and airbrush painting to create graffiti-style art. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 16-20 Art Around the World Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Participants create a weaving from Africa, a tin repoussé from Mexico, paper cutouts from Eastern Europe, and more. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 16-20 Plaster Sculpture Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Inspired by American artists John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres, this camp offers sculpture projects that feature plaster as kids explore casting, wrapping, and carving. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 16-20 Strut with Tut Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Campers design a mural for a pyramid wall, create a headdress, make a miniature sarcophagus, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members July 16-20 Whimsical Clay Containers Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Kids learn clay hand-building techniques to create and glaze a fanciful teapot, cups and other containers. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 23-27 Collage Craze Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Participants create painted papers and make a story shadow box, while working with tissue paper, buttons, found objects, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members July 23-27 Collage Craze Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Attendees learn to layer a variety of media, such as paint, paper, ink and embellishments to create beautiful figurative works. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 23-27 Clay Portraits Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Kids use hand-building clay techniques to create realistic facial features and make a portrait bust. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 23-27 Fabulous Fibers Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Campers experiment with thread, yarn, basketry and other materials as they weave, dye, coil and sew. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 23-27 Mask Making Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Let your kids’ creativity come alive as they explore the art of mask making with clay and papier-mâché. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 30-August 3 Artes Mexicano Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants create folk masks, traditional Huichol yarn paintings and animal sculptures and learn indigenous hand-building in clay. Tuition: $200; $180 for members


July 30-August 3 Drawing Basics Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids learn basic drawing skills to create still life compositions, portraits, landscapes and abstracts. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 30-August 3 Linoleum Block Printing Grades 6-9; 1-4 p.m. Campers explore basic linoleum block printing as they carve and print to create images in black and white and in color. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 30 - August 3 Multicultural Mayhem Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. This camp explores painting, weaving, mask making and printing, inspired by peoples and traditions of different times and places. Tuition: $110; $100 for members July 30 - August 3 Watercolor Wonders Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Kids learn basic watercolor painting techniques to capture depictions of objects, water, light and atmosphere. Tuition: $110; $100 for members August 6-10 Animals in 3D Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Let your child’s imagination “run wild” as they create three-dimensional animals using clay, papier-mâché, origami, and more. Tuition: $110; $100 for members August 6-10 Formulas for Fun Grades 1-2; 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Campers put on lab coats and goggles to make paints, tie-dye without dyes, create new crayons, and more. Tuition: $200; $180 for members

$220; $200 for members August 13-17 Pinch Pot Critters Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Campers learn clay hand-building techniques to create their own ceramic menagerie. Tuition: $110; $100 for members

August 6-10 Intensive Painting Workshop Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This workshop explores a variety of painting media, including acrylic, watercolor and gouache, and teaches color theory and composition fundamentals.  Tuition: $220; $200 for members

The Parke House Academy 407.325.6385, theparkehouseacademy.com

August 6-10 Linoleum Block Printing Grades 3-5; 1-4 p.m. Campers explore basic linoleum block printing as they carve and print to create images in black and white and in color. Tuition: $110; $100 for members

June 4-8 Mud Island Grades K-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers create their own clay masterpieces using hand-building techniques and the pottery wheel, plus two- and threedimensional art projects. Tuition: $200

August 13-17 An African Adventure Grades 3-5; 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Kids create handstamped and dyed fabrics, mirror pouches, hats, headdresses and masks. Tuition: $110; $100 for members

June 11-15 Mud Slingers Grades K-5; 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Campers create original clay masterpieces using hand-building techniques and the pottery wheel, plus art projects inspired by artists from other countries. Tuition: $200

August 13-17 Bugs, Bugs, Bugs Grades 1-2 ; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Participants explore the world of insects as they draw, paint, print and sculpt with incredible insects as subjects. Tuition: $200/week; $180/week for members

Super Awesome Cool Pottery 407.452.2452, superawesomecool.com June 11-15, 18-22, July 16-20, July 23-27 and July 30-August 3 Clay Camp Ages 5-12; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Campers use the potter’s wheel as they mold clay into bowls, cups and more. Tuition: $100; $75 for members

August 13-17 Graf and Street Art Grades 6-9; 9 a.m.-4 p.m. This workshop explores graffiti and street art while teaching techniques such as spray stencils and image enlargement. Tuition:

June 25-29 Mosaic Art Ages 5 and up; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Campers explore this ancient art by making original tiles and trying other cool forms of mosaics, such as paper mosaics. Tuition: $100; $75 for members July 9-13 Tween/Teen Clay Camp Ages 9-14; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Kids will use the potter’s wheel to make bowls, cups, and more. Tuition: $100; $75 for members

OMA

August 6-10 Watercolor Painting Ages 7 and up; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Campers learn to prepare paper, apply colors and create one-of-a-kind paintings. Tuition: $110; $85 for members

Cultural Camps at Orlando Museum of Art include hands-on activities and gallery tours.

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August 13-17 Semi-Private Potters Wheel Camp Ages 9 and up; 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Camp will start with the basics to create cereal bowls, mugs, and more. Limited to five campers. Tuition: $175


Special Advertising Section

2012 Summer Camps

A

re you looking for something new for your children to do this summer? Leave it to the pros! Select Central Florida venues offer a wide variety of cultural camps and workshops for every age and interest. Led by experienced educators, these programs are designed to keep kids learning in fun, engaging ways. Whether focused on arts, athletics or animals, the summer programs at the following organizations are sure to make your child’s vacation a memorable one. Special Advertising Section

Atlantic Center for the Arts

Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens

Our camp provides children the opportunity to explore their creativity; June 19—August 10.

From primates to predators, animals are the main focus of our award-winning summer camps.

386.423.1753 • atlanticcenterforthearts.org

407.323.4450 x123 • centralfloridazoo.org

Crealdé School of Art

Orange County Regional History Center

Summer ArtCamps offer your child artistic growth; June 11—August 3 for ages 4—17.

Bugs and slugs, mummies, wizards, pirates, and more—— adventures in history for grades K—8! Best value.

407.671.1886 • crealde.org

407.836.8580 • thehistorycenter.org

Super Awesome Cool Pottery

Trinity Prep Summer Programs

Have a super awesome cool summer by joining our summer camp program, starting at $80.

We have it all——academics, athletics, and arts! Enriching, fun summer camps and courses, grades K—12.

407.452.2452 • superawesomecool.com

321.282.2561 • lusem@trinityprep.org

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cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

n My Fair Lady Osceola Center for the Arts,

Clock In

407.846.6257, ocfta.com

n On and Off the Wall: The Theresa

T

his spring, Fantasyland Theatrical Productions at POINTE Performing Arts Center will present the Orlando premiere of Dolly Parton’s smash Broadway musical 9 to 5: The Musical. Nominated for four Tony Awards and 15 Drama Desk Awards, 9 to 5 takes audiences into the fast-paced world of corporate America as Dora Lee, Violet and Judy show their lying, hypocritical, sexist, egotistical bigot boss Franklyn Hart just who is really in charge. Based on the 1980 movie of the same name and featuring music and lyrics by Dolly Parton, 9 to 5 opens March 30 and runs through April 15. Shows are Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 7 p.m.; tickets are $15-$20, with dinner packages available. For tickets or more information, call 407.374.3587 or visit pointearts.org.

March March 1 n 1st Thursdays: Fervent for Flora: Art in the Botanical Realm Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Bach’s Lunch: Dr. Eladio Scharron, Guitar The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org

n Exhibition Film Series: Cleo from 5 to 7 Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

n Master Class: Artist from Bach Festival Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.2233, rollins.edu/music

n Music at the Casa: Bach’s Lunch——The Three Sonatas Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, Bach Festival, 407.646.2182, bachfestivalflorida.org

n Reading Between the Wines, featuring Author Lisa See Adult Literacy League, DoubleTree by Hilton Downtown Orlando, adultliteracyleague.org

n Visiting Artist Master Class: Bach Festival Soloist Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music

March 1 - 4 n 77th Annual Bach Festival Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org

n Biennial Six: Featuring the Juried Work of Florida Artists Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n Dancing at Lughnasa Mad Cow Theatre, 407.297.8788, Madcowtheatre.com n To Kill a Mockingbird Fantasyland Theatrical Productions, POINTE Performing Arts Center, 407.374.3587, pointearts.org March 1 - 9 n New Orleans Portfolio: Works by Barbara Brainard Valencia College East Campus, Anita S. Wooten Gallery, 407.582.2298, valenciacollege.edu n Central Florida Watercolor Society’s Annual Members’ Show Gallery at Avalon Island, centralfloridawatercolor.com

Disney Spring Collection Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com March 1 - 16 n Central Florida Watercolor Society Gallery at Avalon Island, 407.312.0708, galleryatavalonisland.com March 1 - 17 n Glass Fascination: Form, Function and Art Museum of Seminole County History, 407.665.2489, seminolecountyfl.gov/museum March 1 - 18 n Beyond Baseball: The Life of Roberto Clemente Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8500, thehistorycenter.org n Buddy, The Buddy Holly Story Theatre Winter Haven, 863.294.7469, theatrewinterhaven.com n Cymbeline Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Margeson Theater, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org n Romeo and Juliet Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Margeson Theater, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org n Style & Grace: The Michael & Marilyn Mennello Collection The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com n William H. Johnson: An American Modern The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com March 1 - 22 n Exhibition by Donte K. Hayes and Idith Levy Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Gallery, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts March 1 - 24 n Hunt Slonem: An Expressive Nature Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org

March 1 - 10 n Beyond the Vessel——Figures and Urns by Helene Schneider Crealdé School of Art, 407.671.1886, crealde.org

March 1 - 25 n Hedda Gabler Mad Cow Theatre, 407.297.8788, Madcowtheatre.com n Lyle the Crocodile Orlando Repertory Theatre, 407.896.7365, OrlandoRep.com n pARTicipation: Selected Works Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org n Reflections II: Watercolors of Florida 1835-2000, from the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org

March 1 - 11 n For the Love of the Sea: Watercolors of Philip Steel Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org

March 1 - 28 n Illuminated Manuscripts from the Collection of Ronald R. McCarty Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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n Sacred Icons from the MOAS and Private Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org March 1 - 29 n Celebration of Lake Wales Ridge Art Exhibit Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org March 1 - 30 n BESA——Albanian Muslim Rescuers During the Holocaust Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, 407.628.0555, holocaustedu.org n The Boy Friend Spotlight Theatre of Central Florida, spotlighttheatrecf.com March 1 - April 1 n Barbara Sorensen: Topographies Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Historic Portraits from the Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org n Three from Cuba: The Art of Vicente, Miguel and Sandro——The Fantastic to the Sublime Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org March 1 - April 7 n The Magic Garden——Art by Candice Knapp Mount Dora Center for the Arts, 352.383.7753, mountdoracenterforthearts.org March 1 - April 8 n Leigh-Ann Pahapill Installation Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu March 1 - April 12 n British & Modern: Art by the Bloomsbury Group and Their Contemporaries Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Dust and Shade: Drawings by Charles Ritchie Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Romare Bearden at 100 Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Sam Gilliam: Contingencies Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Watercolor Art Classes with Owen Jolly Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Winslow Homer, Julian Scott, and the Civil War Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu March 1 - April 15 n Artful Strings: Four Centuries of Harp Making Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org n Emerge! Molly Chism Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org March 1 - April 21 n The Art of Missionary Mary Proctor Hannibal Square Heritage Center, 407.671.1886, hannibalsquareheritagecenter.org Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

March 1 - April 22 n Curtis Wehrfritz——Fluidrive: Modern Daguerreotypes Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Joni Sternbac——Surfland Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

n Crosscurrents of Design: Asian

March 1 - April 28 n Director’s Choice II Crealdé School of Art, 407.671.1886, crealde.org

March 1 - February 3 n Watercolors by Otto Heinigke The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of America Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org

Export Ceramics Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org March 1 - September 1 n DeLand Sculpture Walk Museum of Florida Art, Historic Downtown DeLand, 386.734.4371, museumoffloridaart.org

Jeanine Taylor Folk Art

March 1 - April 29 n New Work: A Series of Bimonthly Exhibitions of Contemporary Art——Michael Dax Iacavone & Billy Friebele Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n The Serious Art of Make-Believe Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8500, thehistorycenter.org March 1 - May 13 n Bob the Builder Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org March 1 - May 14 n The Arts of Africa from the MOAS Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org March 1 - May 29 n Director’s Choice: Favorite Artworks from the Collections, as Selected by Dr. Gary R. Libby Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org March 1 - June 3 n Peter Paul Rubens: Impressions of a Master Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org March 1 - June 16 n The Art of Doris Leeper Atlantic Center for the Arts, 386.427.6975, atlanticcenterforthearts.org March 1 - June 30 n African Art Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Aztec to Zapotec II: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Common Ground: The Art of the American Landscape Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Life Stories: American Portraits Past and Present Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Monumental Outdoor Sculpture Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Tricks of the Trade: Trends and Techniques in Contemporary Art Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org

Sweetheart figures by Debbee Thibeault will be included in the 6th annual heart of Winter show at Jeanine Taylor Folk Art on March 2.

March 1 - July 21 n I Am Going to Eatonville Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Arts, 407.647.3131, zoranealehurstonmuseum.com March 1 - July 30 n The Way We Were: Park Ave. in the 60s and 70s Winter Park Historical Museum, 407.647.2330, wphistory.org March 1 - August 30 n Florida Artist’s program Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org n Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Laurelton Hall The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Louis Comfort Tiffany’s Life and Art The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n The Mural Project Seminole State College Planetarium, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Photographs from the Collection Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org March 1 - August 31 n 20th Century Abstract Art from the Ringling Collection Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org n The Art of Jade Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org

March 2 n 6th Annual heART of Winter Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com n Date Night at Leu Gardens: Adjustment Bureau Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, LeuGardens.org n Film Movement Feature Series: Karen Cries on the Bus Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n First Friday Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Romeo Santos Amway Center, 800.745.3000, amwaycenter.com March 2 - 3 n heART of Winter with the Earth Angels Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com March 2 - 4 n Concert Opera Series: Rigoletto Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org March 2 - 11 n The Boyfriend Spotlight Theatre of Central Florida, The Princess Theater, 407.452.4526, spotlighttheatrecf.com March 2 - 24 n The Andrews Brothers The Winter Park Playhouse, 407.645.0145, winterparkplayhouse.org March 2 - April 8 n Dancing with Light: Barbara Tiffany Lake Eustis Museum of Art, 352.483.2900, LakeEustisMuseumofArt.org March 2 - May 2 n Keliy Anderson-Staley——Americans: Contemporary Tintype Portraits Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n A Tale of Two Cities: Eugene Atget’s Paris and Berenice Abbott’s New York Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org March 3 n 33rd Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade City of Winter Park, 407.643.1627, cityofwinterpark.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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n Concertos by Candlelight Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org n Hope and Help Center’s Seminole Stroll Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org March 3 - 4 n 3rd Annual The Villages Craft Festival La Plaza Grande in the Villages, 561.746.6615, artfestival.com n Secrets The Center for Contemporary Dance, 407.695.8366, TheCenterForDance.org March 3 - 11 n 21st International Carillon Festival Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org March 4 n CFAMilies Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n J.S. Bach’s St. Matthew Passion Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org n Live at the Gardens! Curtis Institute of Music String Quartet Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org March 6 n John Leguizamo——Live on Stage Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 800.745.3000, ghettoklown.com March 7 n Wednesday Night Pitcher Show Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org March 8 n Bach’s Lunch: Matthew Gender, Organist The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Popcorn Flicks in the Park Enzian, Central Park, Winter Park, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org March 9 n Culture & Cocktails Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org n Funny First Friday Comedy Jam Key Entertainment, Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com n Midori with the Minnesota Orchestra Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org March 9 - 18 n The Way of the Cards Beth Marshall Presents, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, Mandell Theater, 561.715.1225 March 10 n 2nd Annual Family Festival Crealdé School of Art, 407.671.1886, crealde.org n Carpe Diem Mount Dora Community Concert Series, Mount Dora High School Auditorium, 352.383.1165, mountdoraconcerts.com Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

March 10 n Ed Sullivan Presents Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com n Girl Scout Hats, Teas, and History Waterhouse Residence Museum, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org n Laser Shows: Laseropolis, Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org n Saturday Matinee Classics Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n Super Series: Bond and Beyond—— Celebrating 50 Years of 007 Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org n UCF Opera in the Library: Merry Wives of Windsor University of Central Florida, 407.823.4680, music.ucf.edu/opera

March 12 n A Choreographers’ Showcase Cirque du Soleil® and Orlando Ballet, La Nouba Theater, Downtown Disney West Side, 407.426.1739, orlandoballet.org n Winners of the 2011 FIPC Competition: 2nd-Prize Winner Lu Shen-China Florida International Piano Competition, Grand Bohemian Hotel Orlando, 407.645.2525, FloridaPiano.org March 13 n Cult Classic Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n Encore! Music Student Recital Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

March 16 - May 26 n Natural Rhythms/Interlacing Forms: Florida Landscapes by Mollie Doctrow and Lee Dunkel Crealdé School of Art, 407.671.1886, crealde.org March 16 - July 15 n Architectural Counterpoints: Featuring works of Louise Lieber, Roxanne Horvath and Peter Rumpel Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org March 17 n St. Patrick’s Day Carillon Concerts Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org Mark Sims

March 11 n Central Florida Jazz Society Presents: Tribute to Nat & Cannonball Adderly—— John DePaola & Dave McKenzie The Abbey, 407.704.6261, AbbeyOrlando.com n Concerts in Winter Park Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Central Park, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org n Lenten Evensong: Orlando Deanery Boychoir and Girls Choir The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Seventh Annual Garden Fair and Florida Design Exhibit Sweetwater Oaks Garden Club, Sweetwater Square, 407.880.8758, swogc.info n SoundArt Music Series: Percussion The Ocala Symphony Orchestra, Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org, ocalasymphony.com n A Streetcar Named Desire: Free Reading Series Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org

March 16 - April 8 n The Marvelous Wonderettes The IceHouse Theatre, 352.383.4616, icehousetheatre.com

Dynamic duo: Acoustic Eidolon will perform at Bok Tower Gardens on March 18.

March 14 n ArtsMatters: Echoing Air Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Wednesday Night Pitcher Show Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org March 15 n Bach’s Lunch: Robert Kerr, Violin and Pianist Ben Lane The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Visiting Artists: Takacs Quartet with Pianist Garrick Ohlsson Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org March 16 n The Merry Wives of Windsor University of Central Florida, Pegasus Ballroom, 407.823.4680, music.ucf.edu/opera March 16 - 17 n Rollins Dance XXVI Annie Russell Theatre, 407.646.2145, rollins.edu/annierussell March 16 - 18 n 53rd Annual Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival 407.644.7207, wpsaf.org March 16 - April 1 n 40th Anniversary Volusia Students Create: Volusia County School Students Exhibit Works Completed in Various Art Programs Across the County Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n The Foreigner Garden Theatre, 407.877.4736, gardentheatre.org

March 17 - 18 n Annual Plant Sale Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, LeuGardens.org March 17 - April 15 n Raw Edges Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, spiritsinsanford.com, jtfolkart.com March 18 n Art and Dance: A Pas de Deux Orlando Ballet, Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n FSYO Concert at Bob Carr Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.999.7800, fsyo.org n Live at the Gardens! Acousic Eidolon Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Recital Featuring Julia Foster, Soprano, and Richard Kosowski, Tenor and Friends Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.2233, rollins.edu/music n UCF Opera: Merry Wives of Windsor University of Central Florida, Pegasus Ballroom, 407.823.4680, music.ucf.edu/opera n Vierne’s Messe Solenelle: St. Luke’s Cathedral Choir and Other Local Choirs The Cathedral of St. Luke, St. James Catholic Cathedral, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org March 20 n Bunky Echo-Hawk Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Encore! Music Student Recital Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n The Photograph As Icon: A Powerful Way of Seeing by Anthony Bannon Winter Park Institute, Rollins College, Bush Auditorium, 407.691.1995, rollins.edu/wpi n UCF Opera: Merry Wives of Windsor University of Central Florida, Resurrection Catholic Church - Winter Garden, 407.823.4680, music.ucf.edu/opera

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

March 21 n Movie Matinee: Late August, Early September Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Wednesday Night Pitcher Show Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n Writing With Light: An Evening Conversation About Photography and Poetry Featuring Billy Collins, Anthony Bannon and Ed Kashi Winter Park Institute, Rollins College, Bush Auditorium, 407.691.1995, rollins.edu/wpi

n Exhibition Film Series: Celine &

March 21 - April 13 n Orlando Magazine’s “Paint the Town” Gallery at Avalon Island, 407.312.0708, galleryatavalonisland.com

March 22 - April 1 n PRT Premiere Series Playwrights’ Round Table, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, theprt.com n Ragtime UCF Theatre, 407.823.1732, theatre.ucf.edu

March 21 - April 22 n Red Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Goldman Theater, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org March 22 n Bach’s Lunch: UCF Chamber Singers The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n An Evening with Maestro JoAnn Falletta Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, hosted by Jeanne Atkinson, 407.896.6700, FriendsOrlandoPhil.org

Julie Go Boating Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Far-Flung Places: Photographs from the Corners of the World, featuring Ed Kashi Winter Park Institute, Rollins College, Bush Auditorium, 407.691.1995, rollins.edu//wpi n Photography and Photojournalism: A Master Class Featuring Anthony Bannon and Ed Kashi Winter Park Institute, Rollins College, Bush Auditorium, 407.691.1995, rollins.edu//wpi

March 23 n Exhibition Film Series: The Present Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Film Movement Feature Series: Come Undone Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Return to the Ritz Free Movie Friday Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com

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n Sanford Art Walk Historic Downtown Sanford, 407.323.2774 March 23 - 24 n Valencia and Rollins College Spring Dance Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2900, valenciacollege.edu March 23 - April 8 n Grease Melon Patch Players, 352.787.3013, melonpatch.org March 24 n Alumni Series: Alumni Reunion Concert Rollins College Music Department, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n pARTicipation Circus of the Surreal Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org n Sanford Seminole Art Association SSAA, 121 First Street, Sanford, 407.416.3834 n Super Series: JoAnn Falletta Conducts Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org March 24 - 25 n Cape Canaveral Art Festival Cape Canaveral, Radisson Inn Field, 352.344.0657, tnteventsinc.com


cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

March 25 n 3rd Annual UCF Band Extravaganza Hagerty High School Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu n Applause: A Sunday Recital Series—— Erik Ettinger Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Ayako Yonetani at the Polasek: Exclusive Chamber Concert Series Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org n C. Daniel Boling: Backintyme Central Florida Folk, Villa ConRoy, 407.679.6426, cffolk.org n Live at the Gardens! Braun & Wolf Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Lutheran Cantata Choir & Chamber Ensemble St. Luke’s Concert Series, 407.365.3408, stlukes-oviedo.org n Sanford Jazz Ensemble Swing Fling Gala Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com n Spring Fling Florida Young Artists Orchestra, Trinity Preparatory School, 407.257.8886, fyao.org

n Family Series: The Swan Princess

Florida, Multipurpose Room, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

Orlando Ballet, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.426.1739, orlandoballet.org n UCF Book Festival, Orlando University of Central Florida, Main Campus UCF Arena, 407.882.6472, education.ucf.edu/bookfest n Virtuoso Concert Florida Young Artists Orchestra, First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 407.257.8886, fyao.org

March 28 n Lecture Series on Laurelton Hall: Richard Guy Wilson The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Movie Matinee: Same Old Song Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Wednesday Night Pitcher Show Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org March 29 n Bach’s Lunch: Matitiahu Braun, Violin, and Organist Ben Lane The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Exhibition Film Series: Breathless Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org March 29 - April 29 n Charlotte’s Web Orlando Shakespeare Theater, Margeson Theater, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org March 30 n Film Movement Feature Series: The Colors of the Mountain Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n MAYHEM Ivanhoe Village, Virginia Drive, email streetpartyonvirginia@gmail.com

March 27 n Cult Classic Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n Encore! SeminoleSounds and Friends Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

March 30 - 31 n American Cancer Society Relay for Life Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org n Family Night at the Museum Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.7010, thehistorycenter.org

art & history museums—Maitland

Running through April 15, Emerge at Maitland Art Center features works by Molly Chism, including this piece, Dead Meat of Convention.

n Tuesday Voices Seminole State College of

March 30 - April 1 n Swans: Black & White Orlando Ballet, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.426.1739, orlandoballet.org March 30 - April 15 n 9 to 5: the Musical Fantasyland Productions, 407.374.3587, pointearts.org

March 31 - May 31 n Expressions of Bok Tower Gardens Art Exhibit Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org March 31 - June 23 n Sketches & Steel Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org

April April 1 n 3rd Annual Symphony of the Arts Florida International Piano Competition, Grand Bohemian Hotel Orlando, 407.645.2525, FloridaPiano.org n Children Helping Children Family Concert Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, College Park Baptist Church, 407.999.7800, fsyo.org n Demonstration by Peggy Furlin Central Florida Watercolor Society, centralfloridawatercolor.com n Horsin’ Around Auction Atlantic Center for the Arts, 386.423.1753, atlanticcenterforthearts.org April 3 n Encore! Symphonic Band and Wind Ensemble Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Jazz Ensemble II Concert University of Central Florida, Rehearsal Hall Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu n Moonlight Carillon Concert Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Music at Midday Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music

March 30 - April 29 n Private Lives Mad Cow Theatre, 407.297.8788, Madcowtheatre.com

April 3 - 7 n Winner of Valencia’s 21st Annual Florida Playwright Competition Valencia College East Campus, Black Box Theater, 407.582.2900, valenciacollege.edu

March 30 - August 19 n Sanford Biggers Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org

April 4 n Movie Matinee: An American in Paris Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

March 31 n Central Florida SaxFest University of Central Florida, Rehearsal Hall Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu

April 5 n 1st Thursdays: Nihon: Reflections of a Classic Culture Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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n Encore! Guitar and Percussion Ensemble

n Hippity Hop Adventure Central Florida

Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Exhibition Film Series: A Woman Is a Woman Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Music at Midday Rollins College Music Department, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Night Hike Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Voices of Valencia Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu

Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org

April 5 - 27 n Osceola County Student Art Show Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com April 6 n Date Night at Leu Gardens Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, LeuGardens.org n Exhibition Film Series: One Track Mind Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Exhibition Film Series: Thicker Than Water Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Film Movement Feature Series: Protektor Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n First Friday Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Funny First Friday Comedy Jam Key Entertainment, Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com n Tenebrae for Good Friday: Cathedral Chamber Singers The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org April 6 - 8 n Easter Weekend Open House The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org April 6 - July 8 n Havana Revisited: An Architectural Heritage Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org April 7 n CFAMilies Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Faculty Recital: Dr. Jeremy Hunt, Tenor University of Central Florida, Rehearsal Hall Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu n Super Series: Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Carousel Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org April 7 - 8 n 16th Annual The Villages Craft Festival Lake Sumter Landing Market Square in The Villages, 561.746.6615, artfestival.com

April 8 n 85th Annual Easter Sunrise Service Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n CFAMilies Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Easter Sunday Carillon Concerts Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org April 9 n Winners of the 2011 FIPC Competition: 1st-Prize Winner Daniil Tsvetkov Florida International Piano Competition, Grand Bohemian Hotel Orlando, 407.645.2525, FloridaPiano.org April 10 n Encore! Community Chorus and Chorale Concert Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Music at Midday Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Spring Choral Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu n Wind Ensemble Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music April 11 n ArtsMatters: Center Stage Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Movie Matinee: The Last Metro Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Student-Directed Short Plays Valencia College East Campus, Black Box Theater, 407.582.2900, valenciacollege.edu April 12 n Exhibition Film Series: My Life to Live Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n House Band Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu n Jazz Ensemble Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Music at Midday Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music April 12 - May 17 n 42nd Annual Juried Student Art Exhibit Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Gallery, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts April 13 n Culture & Cocktails Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org n Exhibition Film Series: The Endless Summer Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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Who, What, Where, When

April 13 n Film Movement Feature Series: Illegal Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Spring Symphonic and Jazz Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu

n Encore! Final Bow Seminole State

April 13 - 22 n 21st Annual Florida Film Festival Enzian, 407.629.1088, floridafilmfestival.com n The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Theatre, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Leading Ladies Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com

April 17 - May 13 n The Lion King Fairwinds Broadway Across America——Orlando, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 800.448.6322, OrlandoBroadway.com

College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Music at Midday Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Tuesday Voices Seminole State College of Florida, Multipurpose Room, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

April 13 - May 27 n Monumental Monochrome: Josh Garrick & Jeff Pendergrass Lake Eustis Museum of Art, 352.483.2900, LakeEustisMuseumofArt.org April 13 - June 9 n Natures Moods——Art by Katayoun Stewart Mount Dora Center for the Arts, 352.383.7753, mountdoracenterforthearts.org April 13 - July 15 n Cosmic Dilemma: Paintings by Asser Saint-Val Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n Selected Figurative Works: Museum of Florida Art Permanent Collection Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org April 13 - September 7 n Imprints of Central Florida: 20 Years of Flying Horse Editions The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com April 14 n Brews Around the Zoo Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org n Jazz’n Blues Stroll Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, LeuGardens.org n Laser Shows: Laser Metallica, Led Zeppelin and U2 Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org n The Show That Never Happened Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com

MOAS

April 13 - May 18 n Annual Juried Student Exhibition Valencia College East Campus, Anita S. Wooten Gallery, 407.582.2298, valenciacollege.edu From April 20 to June 10, the Museum of Arts & Sciences (MOAS) presents treasures from Japan’s Meiji Empire.

n UCF Wind Ensemble Concert University of Central Florida, Visual Arts Building Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu April 15 n The Jazz Train, featuring Pat Gullotta The Abbey, 407.704.6261, AbbeyOrlando.com n A Knight of Soundtracks IV University of Central Florida, Visual Arts Building Auditorium, 407.823.2869, music.ucf.edu

n Visiting Artists: Chanticleer Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org

n Yom HaShoah Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, 407.628.0555, holocaustedu.org April 15 - October 30 n MOAS Antique Maps Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org April 16 n Encore! Final Bow Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

n Faculty Recital: Chuck Archard, Electric Bass Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music April 17 n Acoustic and Guitar Ensembles Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music

April 18 n Movie Matinee: Shoot the Piano Player Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n String Ensemble Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins. edu/music n Student-Directed Short Plays Valencia College East Campus, Black Box Theater, 407.582.2900, valenciacollege.edu April 19 n Choral Concert: Rollins Singer, Women’s Glee, Men’s Choir Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Exhibition Film Series: Band of Outsiders Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Making a Difference: An Evening with Dr. Jane Goodall Winter Park Institute, Rollins College, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.691.1995, rollins.edu/wpi n Music at Midday Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music April 19 - 22 n 6th Annual Dance Concert——Shove! Push! UCF Theatre, Orlando Rep, 407.823.1732, theatre.ucf.edu n Student-Directed One Acts Stetson University’s Stover Theatre, 386.822.8920, stetson.edu April 19 - May 20 n The Boxcar Children Orlando Repertory Theatre, 407.896.7365, OrlandoRep.com April 20 n Exhibition Film Series: Red Bull—New Wave Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Film Movement Feature Series: If I Want to Whistle, I Whistle Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Spring Opera Workshop Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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April 20 - 28 n Love’s Labour’s Lost Annie Russell Theatre, 407.646.2145, rollins.edu/annierussell April 20 - 29 n Sound of Music Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com April 20 - May 12 n Baby The Winter Park Playhouse, 407.645.0145, winterparkplayhouse.org April 20 - May 13 n The Music Man Garden Theatre, 407.877.4736, gardentheatre.org n Senior Student Art Show Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Social Security Bay Street Players, 352.357.7777, baystreetplayers.org April 20 - May 27 n Park Maitland Perspectives Maitland Art Center, 407.539.2181, artandhistory.org April 20 - June 10 n Treasures of the Chrysanthemum Throne: Bronzes, Porcelain and Ivory from the Meiji Empire Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org April 21 n 3rd Annual Hannibal Square Heritage Center Folk Art and Craft Festival Hannibal Square Heritage Center, 407.671.1886, hannibalsquareheritagecenter.org n 11th Annual Dinner on the Avenue City of Winter Park, 407.643.1627, cityofwinterpark.org n Community School of Music: Spring Recitals Rollins College Music Department, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n A Gathering of Angels Historic Ritz Theatre, Winter Haven, 863.294.7469, theatrewinterhaven.com n Symphony in HD at Full Sail Live Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, 407.896.6700, FriendsOrlandoPhil.org April 21 - July 15 n Picturing My Florida: A Grassroots Portrait of the Sunshine State Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Reflections: Paintings of Florida 1865-1965 From the Collection of Cici and Hyatt Brown Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org April 22 n Composition Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music April 22 - 23 n 11th Annual Celebration Art Festival Market Street, Celebration, FL, 561.746.6615, artfestival.com Orlando ARts MAGAZINE March/April 2012

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cultural calendar

Who, What, Where, When

April 22 - 28 n 2012 Winter Park Paint Out Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org

April 27 n Film Movement Feature Series: The Human Resources Manager Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Sanford Art Walk Historic Downtown Sanford, 407.323.2774

April 23 n Friends Music Academy: The Sounds of Music 2012——The Art of Conducting Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, 407.896.6700, FriendsOrlandoPhil.org

April 27 - May 13 n 10th Annual Orlando Cabaret Festival Mad Cow Theatre, 407.297.8788, madcowtheatre.com

April 24 n Encore! Jazz Ambassadors and SeminoleSound Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts April 25 n Annual Dinner of Tribute Honoring Dr. Richard Lapchick The Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, 407.628.0555, holocaustedu.org n Movie Matinee: Under the Roofs of Paris Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

April 28 n Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra St. Luke’s Concert Series, 407.365.3408, stlukes-oviedo.org n Paint Out Garden Party Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org n Sanford Seminole Art Association SSAA, 121 First Street, Sanford, 407.416.3834 n UCF Opera in the Library University of Central Florida, 407.823.4680, music.ucf.edu/opera

April 26 n Exhibition Film Series: Masculin Féminin Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Vocal Literature Recital Rollins College Music Department, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music

April 28 - 29 n 51st Apopka Art and Foliage Festival Apopka Woman’s Club and the City of Apopka, Kit Land Nelson Park, 407.886.1441, apopkawomansclub.org n Choral Masterworks: Spring in Vienna Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, BachFestivalFlorida.org April 28 - June 16 n Works by Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson Thrasher Horne Center, Orange Park, thcenter.org

Debbie Komanski

April 29 n Chamber Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Eastertide Evensong: Orlando Deanery Boychoir and Girls Choir The Cathedral of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Harpeth Rising: Jesse Sam Owens Central Florida Folk, Villa ConRoy, 407.679.6426, cffolk.org

Mary Jane Volkman is just one of the artists participating in the 2012 Winter Park Paint Out from April 22 to 28.

April 29 - May 13 n Bay Street Project: Dinner with Friends Bay Street Players, 352.357.7777, baystreetplayers.org n Florida Plein Air Masters Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org April 30 n Concert Choir Concert Rollins College, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.1517, rollins.edu/music n Focus Series: The Impressionist Prism Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, Margeson Theater, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org

IN THE NEXT ISSUE The May/June 2012 issue of Orlando Arts Magazine will include a preview of the 21st Annual Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival. Plus, meet the area’s top 10 cultural philanthropists in the Patron Saints of the Arts feature story. The deadline to advertise is March 7.

For ad rates and specs, call 407.354.5568 Please send your cultural events for the May/June 2012 issue by March 15 to Cindy@UnitedArts.cc.

AD INDEX ADVERTISER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College . . 51 Art & History Museums——Maitland . . . . . 23 The Arts at Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Atlantic Center for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Bach Festival Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Baterbys Art Auction Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bok Tower Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Center for Contemporary Dance . . . . . . . 57 Central Florida Zoo & . Botanical Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Charles Hosmer Morse Museum . of American Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Cornell Fine Arts Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Crealdé School of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49, 53 Enzian/Florida Film Festival . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Florida Distributing Company . . . . . . . . . . 19 Florida Mall, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Fogo de Chão Brazilian Steakhouse . . . . 64 The Mennello Museum of American Art . . 6 Metro Orlando Film Commission . . . . . . . . 3 National University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Orange County Regional . History Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Orlando Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra . . . . . . . 57 Orlando Science Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Orlando Utilities Commission . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Polk Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Russian Academy of Ballet . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Super Awesome Cool Pottery . . . . . . . . . . 49 Trinity Preparatory School . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Whole Foods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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artist’sspace

Where Creative People Work

Parker Sketch F

Phelan M. Ebenhack

or artist Parker Sketch, it’s all about connections——to viewers and to other artists. The Illinois native graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he majored in painting and minored in paper making and art history. A designer and an artist, he has worked as a performer and puppeteer at Walt Disney World, where he is employed full time. Sketch has lived in Orlando for more than seven years and his home is filled with pieces by other local artists. He even started an artists’ critique group that meets on the second Thursday of the month at different venues. “I’m very passionate about developing the art community, lifting people up and also using more established people as resources,” says Sketch, who is known primarily for his abstracts and fun cartoon portraits of characters, such as Homer Simpson. However, his upcoming exhibition at The Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Community Center of Central Florida, his fourth solo show there, will take a more introspective turn. On view from April 2 to 30, Biography will include approximately 50 pieces that represent some of Sketch’s significant memories and milestones. A series of self-portraits begins with a painting (shown here) of his parents walking to the courthouse on their wedding day, his mother pregnant with him. He says that he is excited to share this new body of work. “I’m really very passionate about communication and presenting my art to the audience,” he says. “I’m passionate about seeing what they take from it and getting a dialogue from that.” Everything in Biography will be for sale, with 20 percent benefitting The Center. For more information, search Parker Sketch on Facebook.

Orlando ARts MAGAZINE march/april 2012

62


Orlando ARts MAGAZINE march/april 2012

63



Orlando Arts Magazine - Mar/Apr12