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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 $3.95 The Official Publication of

Nonprofit Holder 2450 Maitland Center Pkwy. Suite 201 Maitland, FL 32751-4140

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what’s inside

NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012 VOL. 15 NO. 6

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Departments From the Editor | 6 Gifts of All Shapes & Sizes

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PHELAN M. EBENHACK (2); NORA FLEMING; LISA KELLNER

Looking Back | 8 The Telephone Museum dials up a slice of Central Florida’s past.

People | 10

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Conductor Joel Revzen, gallery owner Jeanine Taylor, and John Rife, founder of the Winter Park Harvest Festival and East End Market.

Cultural Eye | 12 We’re out on the town capturing the excitement of Central Florida’s cultural scene.

Dr. Phillips Center Update | 17 The latest on the Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts.

UA Insider | 18 A Letter to Cultural Supporters by Flora Maria Garcia, Business Buzz, and Small Grants Have a Big Impact

Brush Strokes | 22 Seven performances premiere during PlayFest! The Harriett Lake Festival of New Plays.

Features

Brush Strokes | 23

A Touch of Glass |30| The Orlando Museum of Art mounts a major exhibition of glassworks.

Orlando Ballet and Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra join forces to present The Nutcracker.

Arts Education | 24

Fiber Art |32|

A Rollins professor uses filmmaking to teach the principles of business.

An exhibition at the Cornell Fine Arts Museum explores the power of textiles.

Decor | 26

Celebrate the Season |34|

Cultural Calendar | 42

Great gifts, holiday happenings and delightful date nights.

Galleries Galore |38|

Architect Phil Kean designed his Winter Park home with artistic flair. What’s happening in November and December

Artist’s Space | 54 Dale Wayne

Local galleries keep art close to home.

On the cover: Gilded Poppy Red Ikebana with Green Stem and Speckled Pomegranate Ikebana with Russet Frog Foot, 2002, Dale Chihuly, blown glass, 61” x 32” x 18” each, collection of Alan H. Ginsburg. Photograph by Teresa Nouri Rishel

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from the editor

ORLANDO ARTS MAGAZINE

Gifts of All Shapes & Sizes W

Cindy Bowman LaFronz Editor Orlando Arts Magazine

PHELAN M. EBENHACK

hile standing under a canopy of trees at a special event earlier this month, I had the pleasure of listening to a college choir sing the “Star Spangled Banner.” In addition to enjoying the melodic sound, I began looking at each individual and thinking what a gift each had been given and what a gift they were giving to the crowd. The students represented different sizes, genders and nationalities, but all had one thing in common—the tremendous gift of a beautiful voice. I also met a single mom of four who decided to go back to school to pursue her love of music, thanks, in part, to a generous donor. The arts create kinship and collaboration. In a recent workshop in a Title I school, a handful of students were offered a writing tutorial. They soon became enamored by the new skills they had developed. They wrote about broken families, broken hearts, broken promises and hope. They now have a cathartic way of expressing emotions. Art transcends all socioeconomic levels and is blind to age. It does not discriminate and can illuminate the shy, foster creativity and bolster confidence. The inception of art is estimated at 40,000 years ago as a way for early civilizations to express thoughts. Has art really changed that much? It’s still used to communicate in every way, every day to convince us to buy, sell or consume. It makes us cry, laugh and smile. Where would society be without the inspirations of the great artists of our time? During this holiday season, consider giving a gift to the arts, and giving a piece of art as a gift. The artists will thank you, the arts organizations will thrive, and just maybe a new painting will grace your living room wall. Convince your friends, family and neighbors why they should give to the arts and what that gift can actually accomplish. It’s gotta be better than the hair brush for bald men I just saw advertised! This holiday season give the gift that truly keeps on givin’! Make it an artful holiday season.

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Editor Cindy Bowman LaFronz Managing Editor Jessica Chapman Contributing Writers Justin Braun, Sandra Carr, Denise Bates Enos, Michael Haun, Sarah Kinbar, Kristen Manieri, Esteban Meneses, G.K. Sharman and Julia Tilford Contributing Photographer Phelan M. Ebenhack Graphic Designer Michele Mitchell Senior Publications Advertising Coordinator Shelley Hampton Vice President, Print & Interactive Services Deborah Henrichs Vice President, Partner Development Sheryl Taylor 407.354.5568 Associate Director, Partner Development Sandi Daugherty Sr. Managers, Partner Development Terri Dougherty, Dottie Healy Managers, Partner Development Laura Bonniville, Timothie Tinsley Subscriptions Interactive/Print Support Services 407.354.5552 Publisher Visit Orlando

UNITED ARTS

OF

CENTRAL FLORIDA OFFICERS

Chair Linda Landman Gonzalez, Orlando Magic Vice Chair Bob McAdam, Darden Restaurants, Inc. Treasurer Jean Nowry, Massey Services, Inc. President & CEO Flora Maria Garcia

TRUSTEES The Martin Andersen-Gracia Andersen Foundation, Inc. Thomas P. Warlow, III City of Orlando The Honorable Buddy Dyer Darden Restaurants, Inc. Clarence Otis, Jr. Florida Blue Tony Jenkins Elizabeth Morse Genius Foundation, Inc. Alan Ginsburg Family Foundation Alan H. Ginsburg Orange County, Florida The Honorable Jennifer Thompson Orange County Public Schools Seminole County, Florida The Honorable John Horan University of Central Florida Dr. John C. Hitt Walt Disney World Resort Jill Estorino

Orlando Arts Magazine is produced by everything ink, a division of Visit Orlando速, for United Arts of Central Florida. Visit Orlando: 6700 Forum Drive, Suite 100, Orlando, FL 32821, Phone: 407.363.5805, Fax: 407.370.5018. Subscriptions: $18 for six issues, $25 for 12 issues. Orlando Arts Magazine is published bi-monthly. Orlando Arts Magazine assumes no responsibility for the return of unsolicited manuscripts, photographs, negatives or transparencies. United Arts of Central Florida, 2450 Maitland Center Pkwy., Suite 201, Maitland, FL 32751-4140, UnitedArts.cc. Telephone: 407.970.2831, Fax 407.628.9110. Email: Cindy@UnitedArts.cc. This publication is sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, and the Florida Arts Council. Advertising information: 407.354.5568. Copyright 2012 United Arts. All rights reserved. Any reproduction in whole or in part without the express written consent of United Arts is prohibited. Printed in the U.S.A. ORLANDO ARTS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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looking back

OUR CULTURAL PAST

History Calling THE TELEPHONE MUSEUM DIALS UP A SLICE OF CENTRAL FLORIDA’S PAST. BY MICHAEL HAUN

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What happened next is chronicled at the coolest local museum you’ve probably never heard of—the Telephone Museum in Maitland. It’s just part of the city’s larger Art & History Museums—Maitland (A&HM—M) organization. While it might be small, local history buffs will find that the Telephone Museum packs a big punch. That’s because it offers a slice of Central Florida history we don’t often hear much about. It all starts with Galloway, a handful of used telephones and an old switchboard. He had nine phones installed at the homes of his father’s top customers and had one set up at the store. He wanted customers to order groceries and supplies with ease (and thus be inclined to place more orders), simply by picking up a phone. This was an incredibly novel concept at the time. In fact, Galloway’s phones were among the very first in the Orlando area, according to Jill Nash, curator of history and director of museum education at A&HM—M. It was a gamble. But one that paid off royally. The success spurred Galloway to later establish the Winter Park Telephone Company, which became one of the biggest non-Bell phone companies by the time it merged with a larger system in 1979. The museum not only documents the rise of the Winter Park Telephone

PHELAN M. EBENHACK

arl Galloway was as tech savvy as they come. His father ran the local market, and when business needed a boost, Galloway did for his parents what all kids do: hook them up with the latest technology. Of course, since it was 1910, Galloway didn’t set up a Facebook page or create a Twitter account. No, he turned to the day’s most cutting-edge device: the telephone.

SMALL BUT SIGNIFICANT: The Telephone Museum in Maitland traces the local history of the device to the Galloway family, who were among the first in Central Florida to use phones.

Company, but also the rise of telephony through the years. The small building on Packwood Avenue is filled with a century’s worth of phones, switchboards and other electronics. There’s even a phone booth— something sure to mystify anyone under the age of 25. Much of the museum’s collection has been donated (and lovingly maintained) by a group of former and current telecom workers known as the Telephone Pioneers. These folks have a soft spot for the telephone, and with good reason. Stop for a moment and think where you’d be without it. Few technologies have changed the way we live more than the telephone, Nash says. And here in Central Florida, that change all began at a small store in Maitland.

“Carl Galloway loved this technology, and he wanted to make sure people had access to it,” Nash says. “And it’s that story, and stories like it across the country, that make up our larger American history.” The Telephone Museum is open from noon to 4 p.m., Thursday through Sunday. Admission is $3 for adults; $2 for seniors and children ages 4 to 18; free for children 3 and under, and includes access to the Maitland Historical Museum, which will be showcasing exhibits from the Telephone Museum from December 20, 2012, to August 4, 2013. To learn more, call 407.644.1364 or visit artandhistory.org. Michael Haun is a freelance writer who lives in Orlando.

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oam people

WHO’S NEWS IN THE ARTS

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n incandescent passion for opera has been the propelling force behind the career of conductor Joel Revzen, who has worked with the Arizona Opera since 2003. This November, Revzen will lead the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra (OPO) in a special concert version of Mozart’s classic opera The Marriage of Figaro. “I feel that opera is the most comprehensive of all the performing arts, bringing together music and drama,” says Revzen. The versatile conductor first sat at the piano at age 5. He was influenced by his mother, an amateur violinist, who would invite friends over to play in string quartets. After deciding against a career in clinical psychology, Revzen went on to earn his music degree from Juilliard, where he studied choral conducting. As the dean of the St. Louis Conservatory of Music from 1972 through 1984, he helped the institution reach national recognition. This academic stint was followed by a five-year appointment as assistant conductor of the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. He was appointed artistic director of the Berkshire Opera in 1991 and, more recently, named the artistic director and principal conductor of the Lake Tahoe Summerfest. Revzen’s active recording career includes two releases with the London Symphony Orchestra, Haydn’s famous Creation oratorio with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the Grammy award-winning The Art of Arleen Auger. Maestro Revzen, who last conducted the OPO in March for two performances of Verdi’s Rigoletto, is excited about Mozart’s Figaro, this most classic of operas. “Societies throughout the world struggle with the imbalance of wealth and power. This opera illuminates this common and relevant theme,” explains Revzen. The comic opera is rich with distinctive human traits and emotions that are as relevant today as they were in the late 18th century. Performances will take place at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre on November 9 at 8 p.m. and on November 11 at 2 p.m. For more information, call 407.770.0071 or visit orlandophil.org. —Esteban Meneses

For the Love of Opera JOEL REVZEN conductor

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Southern Territory JEANINE TAYLOR FOLK ART

JEANINE TAYLOR, gallery owner

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eanine Taylor was born and raised in Miami, Florida, and remembers her childhood as an enchanting time when she rode her bike to the beach with her siblings and friends. Her mother was “very artistically minded” and collected art portraying Florida landscapes. “My mother raised us to be very creative,” she says.

When Taylor graduated from Florida State University with a degree in education, she began teaching. After 14 years, she got a job as an educational consultant and sold computers to schools. “My territory was Florida, northern Georgia and Alabama. That’s where I became aware of southern folk art.” Taylor says she would explore her surroundings, searching for art while driving from school to school. “I might see something out in a yard [or]... go to the post office and ask if there is anyone making strange art out there.” “I have strong southern roots,” she continues. “Folk art and a love of southern traditions go together. This is how I formulated the business, or it formulated me.” In 1997, after leaving that job, Taylor started her first gallery out of her home office in Winter Park. She wrote a newsletter, developed a mailing list and started

doing pop-up art shows. She then ran Park West Folk Art in Winter Park for three years. In 2005, she moved her gallery to Sanford, opening Jeanine Taylor Folk Art in the historic Hotchkiss building, where artists come from all over the country to sell their work, stay in the apartments above the gallery, and create new art. Jeanine Taylor Folk Art celebrated its 15th anniversary this year, and Taylor shares the credit for her success. “To be able to be doing this for 15 years, I have got a lot of help. I have made some dear friends with costumers, collectors, and artists,” she says. In the 15 years to come, Taylor hopes to strengthen her Artist in Residence program and to help with the redevelopment of downtown Sanford. For more information about Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, call 407.323.2774 or visit jtfolkart.com. —Julia Tilford

Local Motion

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hen John Rife looks back at the seemingly disparate elements of his life, it becomes clear that they led him to where he is today. Rife, one of the developers that brought us The Mall at Millenia, is creating another kind of shopping experience: Opening in February 2013, East End Market in Audubon Park will be a year-round indoor market, selling all things local. The first floor of the market, housed in the former Baptist church at 3201 Corrine Drive, will house purveyors of locally grown and produced foods. The second floor will include an event space and a demonstration kitchen, and the garden outside, designed by Henry Melendy of My Yard Farm, will contain 100% edible plants. Rife studied environmental science as an undergrad at Furman University in Greenville, S.C., where he says he earned his “hippie badge.” He graduated in 1998, traveled a lot, lived abroad for a while, and then returned to his hometown of Winter Park in 2003. He went to work for his father’s commercial development firm, earning his “yuppie card.”

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A graduate degree in Film and Digital Media from the University of Central Florida was followed by a trip around the U.S., which he and his wife, Kamrin, documented at FindingAmerica.tv. “I like to joke that I’m a hippie and a yuppie, also known as a ‘yippie,’” says Rife. After their first child was born in 2009, Rife and his wife planted an edible garden beside their house. Rife got involved with the “locavore” movement and befriended local farmers and food producers. His desire to share their treasures with the community led him to launch the Winter Park Harvest Festival in 2010. “I started feeling a need to find ways to get the deep roots organizations of Winter Park involved with something that, up until that point, were smaller, grassroots efforts,” says Rife. The concept has been a success, and the 3rd annual Harvest Festival takes place on November 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Central Park. The festival will showcase the amazing variety and quantity of locally grown and produced

FRAZIERFOTO

JOHN RIFE, founder, Winter Park Harvest Festival and East End Market

foods. In the evening, a farm-to-table event will take place from 7 to 9 p.m., when some of the area’s best chefs will create amazing appetizers and entrées. “When people taste a meal made from local ingredients, they are amazed by how good the flavors are. When they try to recreate those recipes at home using ingredients they bought from the grocery store, they notice the difference. We want this difference to inspire them to buy local,” says Rife. To learn more, call 321.236.3316 or log onto WinterParkHarvestFestival. com or EastEndMkt.com. —Sarah Kinbar

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culturaleye

EYE ON THE TOWN

Giving the Gift of Art

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et in on one of Central Florida’s most popular holiday traditions by attending the 26th Annual Festival of Trees at Orlando Museum of Art (OMA). Scheduled for November 10 to 18, this signature fundraiser will transform the museum into a winter wonderland with more than 50 extravagantly decorated Christmas trees and holiday scenes. This year’s theme is “Once Upon a Time … A Fairy Tale Festival.” Decorators will incorporate elements from favorite fairy tales and the latest trends into their designs, turning their trees into amazing holiday creations. Trees are available for purchase, and patrons can also shop in the Holiday Boutique and Gingerbread Village, which offer unique crafts and other items. In conjunction with the festival, there are special events for all ages, including an opening night gala, The Glass Slipper Ball, on November 9; a Jazz Stroll on November 16; and the family-friendly Reindeer Romp: Peter Pan’s Pajama Party on November 14, which will feature live entertainment, face painting and pictures with Santa Claus. Festival hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily; admission is $10 for adults; $6 for children ages 3-11; ticket prices to special events vary. Proceeds benefit OMA’s children’s art education programs. Call 407.896.4231 or visit omart.org for more information.

BY PAUL TANG

elieve it or not, the holiday season is right around the corner. In Orlando, that means events and parties, outdoor festivals, and plenty of arts and cultural activities to participate in. It is also the perfect opportunity to visit and reconnect with some old friends—the wonderfully inspired art and history museums that are longtime members of the community. And while you’re there, you might want to bring along your gift-giving list. Why? Well, many of our beloved museums include a retail shop as part of the overall experience. The Cornell Fine Arts Museum, The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, Orlando Museum of Art and Orange County Regional History Center and are all worthy day trips that feature shopping along with their extensive exhibitions and collections. Here you’ll find relatively inexpensive items, from reproductions and books to jewelry to crafts, that reflect the importance of art and history in our everyday lives. And these items also make great holiday gifts. While you’re crossing friends and family off your list, don’t forget about another type of gift giving—donations to the arts and cultural organizations that repre-

sent the Central Florida region. The end of the year is the perfect time to make a donation, and you can even claim it as a deduction on your 2012 taxes. One of the easiest ways to help is to donate through United Arts of Central Florida, the umbrella organization that streams funding to more than 50 local arts and cultural groups. Many of these are familiar names—Crealdé School of Art, Enzian, Bach Festival Society, Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra and Orlando Shakespeare Theater. Go to UnitedArts.cc to see how you can assist today. This holiday season, let’s celebrate our family, our loved ones and the Orlando arts that inspire us. And if your house is overflowing with guests, don’t forget to let them know about Orlando’s diverse selection of hotels and resorts.

Paul Tang Chair, Visit Orlando Board of Directors Vice President & Managing Director, Hyatt Regency Grand Cypress

ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART

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Eye on

RED CHAIR AFFAIR

Society

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RED CHAIR AFFAIR 2012 – PHOTOS BY PHELAN EBENHACK (3)

he 8th Annual Red Chair Affair was held Saturday, August 25, at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre. The event served as Central Florida’s kickoff to the 2012-2013 cultural season and showcased more than 20 art organizations. More than 1,600 people enjoyed roaming entertainment in the lobby and the Main Stage Performance. Red Chair Affair is presented by RedChairProject.com, a program of the Arts and Cultural Alliance of Central Florida.

FROM LEFT: Autumn Ames, executive director of the Arts & Cultural Alliance of Central Florida; Enzian President Henry Maldonado and his wife, Jo; and Becky Stafford, president of the Garden Theatre board of directors.

TRINITY PREP

FSYO

DAVID ODAHOWSKI, president and CEO, Edyth Bush Charitable Foundation; Mark Armstrong; Flora Maria Garcia, president and CEO of United Arts of Central Florida; Terry Olson, director of Orange County Arts & Cultural Affairs; and Heather Odahowski.

JANINE PAPIN

RFPHOTOGRAPHY.COM (2)

PERFORMERS FROM GARDEN THEATRE/ THEATREWORKS FLORIDA sing “Omigod You Guys” from Legally Blonde: The Musical.

ON AUGUST 27, the City of Winter Park, Mead Botanical Garden, Inc. and the Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra (FSYO) held a ground-breaking ceremony for Phase I of The Grove at Mead Garden. The new multipurpose public performance venue will serve as FSYO’s preferred site for outdoor concerts. Winter Park Mayor Kenneth Bradley was on hand to speak about the importance of this collaboration.

OCFTA

OST

ON SEPTEMBER 6, the Osceola Center for the Arts (OCFTA) held its 4th Annual Celebrating Hispanic Artists & Culture art show reception. City of Kissimmee Commissioner Wanda Rentas stands with first-place winner Felipe Ponzoa next to his piece, entitled Aguila del Sol (Sun Eagle).

FROM LEFT: FSYO President Donna McCue; FSYO Board member Robert Teegarden; FSYO Executive Director Heide Evans Waldron; FSYO Production Manager Carl Rendek; and FSYO Artistic Director Andrew Lane.

ON SEPTEMBER 7, Orlando Shakespeare Theater (OST) held its 2012 Season Opening Gala. Pictured here are Gala Chair Patricia Strasberg and her husband, Ronald Strasberg.

IWONA.COM

BRION PRICE

OSCEOLA STAR NEWS

LAST SUMMER, 26 Trinity Preparatory School students performed Candide at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland as part of the American High School Theatre Festival. Trinity was nominated to participate by the Musical Theatre Department at the University of Central Florida.

LOCAL ARTS PATRONS Harriett Lake (left) and Rita Lowndes enjoyed the gala, which included a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Santos Dantin Studio Theater.

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EYE ON THE TOWN

PINOCCHIO’S MARIONETTE THEATER

he City of Winter Park and the Public Art Advisory Board recently launched Art on the Green 2012, an exhibition of large-scale sculptures that will be on display in Central Park and on the lawn of City Hall through March 1, 2013. Featuring works by eight noted sculptors, including Barbara Sorensen, Dale Rogers, Chris Scala and Allie Pohl, the exhibition was curated by Olga Viso, a graduate of Rollins College and director ART ON THE GREEN 2012 features large-scale sculptures, including Ain’t of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. Gonna Work on Maggie’s Farm No More “I think it’s a nice mix of figurative by Doug Makemson. and abstract works, and everything kind of minds that line between abstraction and representation,” she says. Viso and Winter Park Mayor Ken Bradley were on hand for the opening ceremony. Viso sees teamwork between public and private entities as an essential element to the project’s success. “It’s so important to have leadership on these kinds of projects, both at the city level to give the support and the access to using public sites, but there’s also a team of volunteers who are really passionate, and who are raising private funds to enhance and support that. … I’m encouraged and hopeful that it will just keep blossoming and growing.” Exhibition catalogs are available at City Hall and at the Winter Park Welcome Center. Patrons can also vote for their favorite piece online, and the People’s Choice award will be announced at the end of the exhibition. For more information or to cast your vote, call 407.599.3399 or visit cityofwinterpark.org/AOG.

Stringing Along E

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SARAH SMALL

xplore one of the oldest art forms by attending the 8th Annual Orlando Puppet Festival, taking place November 2 to 4 at Pinocchio’s Marionette Theater, located at the Altamonte Mall. The event will feature shows and performances, workshops and family-friendly activities, as well as special exhibitions. The main performance will be the premiere of Pinocchio’s new string puppet musical Beauty & the Beast, based on the classic French fairy tale, but set in Victorian England. Other shows include The Jellybean Kid string puppet show from West Puppets; the hand-and-rod puppet piece Bird Call from Central Florida puppeteer Calvin Mack Lester and friends; and a Frenchinfluenced glove-puppet show from Sean Keohane and his Terrible Polichinelle Theatre, a Jim Henson Foundation grant recipient. Also, the 3rd Annual Día de los Muertos & Monster Factory exhibition will be on display at CityArts Factory through November 8. It features the work of local, national and international artists, as well as a 15-foot installation by IBEX Puppetry. Ticketed shows are $6 for adults and children two years and older, but some events are free. For pricing and schedule details, call 407.834.8757 or log onto pinocchios.net.

CITY OF WINTER PARK

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Full Ride

n partnership with the Bach Festival Society, renowned string quartet Brooklyn Rider is coming back to Central Florida this November for another residency with A Gift for Music, followed by a public performance at Rollins College. Known for its creative programming and exciting collaborations, Brooklyn Rider was last here in 2010, when it visited the six Orange County schools served by A Gift for Music, a program of A Gift For Teaching that provides instruction in stringed instruments for third-, fourth-, and fifth-graders at Title One schools. From November 1-3, the quartet will work with the 450 students in A Gift For Music, more than 2,500 of their school peers, and more than 65 musicians in the program’s orchestras. The focal point of the residency is a short piece composed by Vijay Iyer and commissioned by the Bach Festival Society. This original work will be a part of a larger collection of pieces for performing and recording titled The Brooklyn Rider Almanac. On November 4, Brooklyn Rider will perform at 3 p.m. at Tiedtke Concert Hall. Call 407.646.2182 or visit BachFestivalFlorida.org for more information.

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New Addition A

rt & History Museums——Maitland recently welcomed a new curator of art and art school director. Artist, photographer and educator Rebecca Sexton Larson came from the Leepa-Rattner Museum of Art in Tarpon Springs, where she worked as the associate curator and registrar. She also served as curator of education at the Polk Museum of Art in Lakeland and museum educator for community programs at the Tampa Museum of Art. Larson has been the recipient of major grants and fellowships, has taught and exhibited at various cultural institutions, and her photographs are included in notable collections throughout the country. Her first installations, The Power of Two and Spatial Relationships, will be on view at Maitland Art Center through December 30.

Political Powerhouse

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BEST IN SHOW AT THE 2011 CONCOURS D’ELEGANCE was won by Richard Mitchell, pictured here in his 1932 Stutz Bearcat DVD-32.

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xperience the art of the automobile at the 11th annual Winter Park Concours d’Elegance on Sunday, November 11. One of the most prestigious, ranked car shows in the United States, the event showcases exotic classic automobiles and is free and open to the public. Festivities take place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on six blocks along Park Avenue, which will be blocked off to allow up-close access to the more than 120 participating vehicles. Makes that will be represented include Lincoln, Porsche, Thunderbird, Aston Martin, Bentley and Ferrari, with categories including Hot Rods, Muscle Cars, American Classics and Special Interest. Two prizes will be awarded for the best vintage and the best contemporary car at a special ceremony in Central Park at 3 p.m. For more information, call 407.649.9190 or visit winterparkconcours.com.

ollins College’s Winter Park Institute is bringing civil rights activist and humanitarian Martin Luther King III to Central Florida to give a special lecture on November 15. The oldest son of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mrs. Coretta King, King has followed in his parents’ footsteps, dedicating his life to implementing nonviolent means of eliminating social, political and economic injustice. A graduate of Morehouse College, King has served political and community organizations and traveled the globe sharing his father’s vision of justice for all people. His speech will focus on global injustices and the steps needed to make equality for all a reality. The event will take place at 7:30 p.m. in the Knowles Memorial Chapel. For more information, call 407.691.1995 or visit winterparkinstitute.org.

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FESTIVAL SINGERS OF FLORIDA

all into fine art this season at the 11th Annual Winter Garden Art Festival. Taking place November 24 to 25 on Plant Street in downtown, the juried show will feature more than 100 artists from across Florida and the Southeast. Works will be for sale and will include paintings and drawings, sculptures and ceramics, fiber arts, photography, mixed media, and more. There also will be musical entertainment, a variety of food vendors representing some of Winter Garden’s best restaurants, and a relaxing beer and wine stroll. Festival hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday. For more information, visit wintergardenartfestival.com.

ONE VOICE

PAM CANAVAN

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Last Laugh

ots of laughs are in store when the Humor Resources Improv troupe brings its interactive, family-friendly shows to area venues. Formed in Lake County in December 2010, the group consists of five local actors whose act is done in the same vein as the TV show, “Whose Line Is It Anyway?,” with comedic routines that are made up on the spot and based on audience suggestions. They also perform a children’s show called “A Book Can Take You Anywhere” at schools, libraries and museums throughout Central Florida. This theater-style musical takes kids on a journey all over the world and explores the joys of reading. You can catch its improv show at the Masonic Lodge in Groveland on November 9 and December 14, or at the 33rd Annual Montverde Day Festival on November 10. Check out “A Book Can Take You Anywhere” on December 8 at Orange County Library’s Washington Park branch at 11 a.m. or the Hiawassee branch at 2 p.m. For more information, go to HumorResourcesImprov.com or visit the group’s Facebook page.

alented vocalists of all ages and backgrounds are making beautiful music together as part of the Festival Singers of Florida. This nonprofit organization was founded in 2007 and is made up of music teachers, graduate music students, private voice instructors, opera company members and other professionals throughout the state who come together to put on choral performances. It’s an entirely volunteer organization, with members participating because they love performing and sharing their passion for music. Participants are not paid and they learn the music on their own time, meeting up for rehearsals and concerts several times of year. At least 20 of the performers are Central Florida teachers. Upcoming performances include “The British Way” concert at the Winter Park Presbyterian Church on January 19 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased online or at the door. For tickets or more information, visit fsof.org.

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DPCupdate

THE LATEST FROM THE DR. PHILLIPS CENTER

Q&A DR. PHILLIPS CENTER PRESIDENT KATHY RAMSBERGER REFLECTS ON 2012. he president of the Dr. Phillips Center, Kathy Ramsberger, reflects on the Center’s progress this year and takes a look ahead at what’s new and next for 2013: What are some of the highlights of 2012? Construction remains on schedule and on budget. From our construction fence unveiling to the demolition/siteclearing event for the Multi-Form, Acoustical Theater, we’ve had great opportunities to engage students, arts groups and the community at large. What’s new? We continue to build our team, bringing proven levels of expertise to this project. In addition to recruiting two well-regarded professionals, Vice President of Operations Ellery Brown and Vice President of Philanthropy Anne Beaulieu, we are aggressively filling other philanthropy staff positions. This is essential for the new

MARK ENGLERT

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A YEAR IN REVIEW: Highlights of 2012 include the fact that construction of DPC remains on schedule and on budget.

fundraising goal we announced earlier this year. Our next phase of recruiting focuses on programming and education. What’s next? Our focus remains on delivering an innovative performing arts center to the region. We are “Committed to the Project. Committed to the Partnership. Committed to Completion!” What are you most encouraged by? The chance to build and open a center that will bring new opportunities for artistic programming and create a new destination for all. This project is about leadership, community-building and philanthropy. We are confident that the support of our public partners—the City of Orlando, Orange County, State of Florida, the University of Central Florida—as well as donors and future donors will see this project through.

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UA insider

NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

A Letter to Cultural Supporters BY FL ORA M ARIA G ARCIA

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We were recently very pleased to receive a $100,000 gift from a major local foundation. It was gratefully received after a spirited discussion on why United Arts is of value to this community. United Arts serves a unique function as a “one-stop shop” that supports the arts, sciences and history throughout Central Florida. As such, it is the only area agency that works to support a broad array of institutions, from Orlando Museum of Art to Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, from Bay Street Players to Orlando Science Center, and more. Our funding also supports individual artists, who are vital to maintaining a creative and innovative region. United Arts is also an advocate on behalf of the cultural community and, through this group as a whole, we are able to initiate programs that ultimately serve the general public. One program that is singularly distinctive is our partnership with Orange County Public Schools. In conjunction with the school district’s fine arts coordinator, United Arts works with the cultural institutions that design programs to integrate art, science, history and literacy into an enriched curriculum. Many of these programs meet Sunshine State

PHELAN M. EBENHACK

s I write this, I am just entering my fourth month as president and CEO of United Arts of Central Florida (UA). My first three months have been spent focusing both externally and internally as I continue to meet a wide array of public and private-sector leadership. Their input and perspective is invaluable as I consider the direction of UA, particularly as we begin development of a strategic plan that will be completed by the end of January 2013.

FLORA MARIA GARCIA, president & CEO of United Arts of Central Florida

Standards and so become a part of the core curriculum. Last year, United Arts funding supported more than 676,000 educational experiences. These included sending every second grader in Orange County to the Orlando Ballet and every third, fourth, and fifth grader to the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra … many for the first and only time in their young lives. I remember attending the Richmond Symphony Orchestra as a third grader. I had never experienced live performing arts before. It was a life-changing moment. And that single experience of being in a beautiful hall, listening to the overwhelming sounds of symphonic music, instilled a passion for the arts that remains with me today. I hear similar stories from people— young and old alike—on many of my visits. And I’m delighted to know about

them! Particularly when many studies show that exposure to the arts improves overall test scores and encourages creativity and critical thinking (skills highly sought after by CEOs in Fortune 500 companies, according to an IMB research study completed last summer). The arts inspire children and make them more tolerant of differences. They allow self-expression, and in our complex world, the ability to express oneself creatively is an avenue that many children simply do not have. United Arts’ partnership with the Orange County school system has been so impactful on our region’s children—and their families—that we hope to expand it in Orange County and beyond, into Seminole, Lake and Osceola counties as well. In September, United Arts kicked off a direct mail campaign to raise funds for educational experiences for children in grades K-12. If you received one of our mailings, I hope you will consider supporting this important initiative. Our goal is, and must remain, the best possible education for our region’s future: our school kids. Over the coming months, I will write more about the many unique and exciting opportunities that an agency such as United Arts offers to both our cultural colleagues and to the general public.

Flora Maria Garcia President & CEO United Arts of Central Florida

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UA insider

NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

BUSINESS BUZZ

Baker Barrios E

stablished in 1993, Baker Barrios is a commercial planning and design firm with a focus on architecture, interior design and landscape architecture. It collaborates with clients to create environments that enhance performance, achieve measurable business goals and enrich their communities. Consistently ranked among leading firms, the company most recently received two American Business Awards. Baker Barrios’ core giving areas include charitable nonprofit organizations that reflect its dedication to the treatment of life-threatening illnesses, families in immediate need and the arts. “The most common ground between architecture and the arts is that both are

experiential and potentially interpreted by all five senses,” says Creative Director Monte Olinger. “Conceptually, expression in architecture and art both have a basic foundation in the elements and principles of design and composition.” As a company known for its creativity and innovation, Baker Barrios applies these concepts not only to its designs, but also to its community investment initiatives. Its philosophy of giving is embraced at every level of the firm. Last year alone, Baker Barrios contributed more than 2,500 hours of service to enrich our community and bring programs to life. In addition, it contributed more than $225,000 in cash, design services and in-kind donations to support United Arts-affiliated organizations that share the firm’s commitment to the arts. The Artists-in-Residence program that Orlando Health administers at MD Anderson Cancer Center-Orlando in part-

nership with United Arts will continue to make an impact on cancer patients, thanks to a generous donation from Baker Barrios. The program allows artists to work one-on-one with patients on a variety of projects, from painting to photography to journaling and beyond. “The partnership with MD Anderson and United Arts is a natural fit for Baker Barrios because the organizations share the vision of building stronger, healthier communities through sustainable programs,” says Shanon Larimer, associate principal and vice president of marketing for Baker Barrios. “We take great pride in supporting the creative process as a survivorship tool, and we felt the need to step up and support a program that will continue to have a powerful impact on thousands of patients who are fighting the toughest fight of their lives.” For more information about the firm, visit BakerBarrios.com.

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UA insider

NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

Small Grants Have a Big Impact UNITED ARTS CELEBRATES 10 YEARS OF ARTIST DEVELOPMENT GRANTS. BY MARY PAT R ICK GIRAULO

UA GRANT RECIPIENT LARISSA HUMISTON addresses social issues in her choreography for Emotions Dance.

2003

2005

Geeta Karkera of Nritya Dance Academy brought a guru from India to learn the latest in Bharatanatyam, a traditional dance form which “is handed from guru to student. This opportunity to enhance my knowledge is limited in the U.S.” Photographer Rick Lang documented regional history and culture in southern states. “The years that I have received United Arts support were banner years in productivity and quality of images.”

Elena Day, formerly with Cirque du Soleil, attended a clowning workshop. Later grants benefited on the nOse—a documentary about contemporary clowns which “affirms the clown’s vital role” in society. Lynn Tomlinson worked with fifth graders on short, animated pieces about remarkable girls. “It was a very successful project, not just for myself, but for the girls who learned a lot about art, technology, perseverance and girls’ history.”

2004 Aurora Rincon produced a figurative sculpture for the city of Casselberry, making “the transition from small-scale to lifesize sculptures … this [was] the first commission of my professional career for a public agency.” Minda Stephens attended a marketing conference and submitted copies of her scripts to competitions. “My United Arts grant really got the ball rolling for my scriptwriting career.”

woman playwright, I’m among the great underserved in live theater today. WPI now has connections to a larger group of producers and writers who can help advance the work of women.”

2007 Cathy Hempel purchased a tent and display walls for exhibiting in festivals. “I gained experience in the local art show

2006 Actor and filmmaker Gail Grate compiled oral history, photographs and footage for a documentary account of her family’s life in slavery on the Arcadia Plantation in SC. “I know that these individual pieces of history that I am gathering will bring greater understanding to us all.” Lyndol Michael, then director of Women Playwrights’ Initiative (WPI), attended a festival of new plays. “As a

ELIZABETH ST. HILAIRE NELSON

ver the past 10 years, United Arts has awarded 220 grants totaling $285,058 to 184 artists.* Many are repeat grantees, representing United Arts’ investment in their career over time, and several have served as panelists. Projects may involve cross-pollination with other artists’ ideas, creation of marketing brochures and websites, or experimentation with new materials and methods. What’s good for the artist is good for Central Florida. Projects culminate in exhibits, performances, public art, demos, and workshops. Exposure to new audiences (regionally, nationally and internationally) increases Orlando’s reputation for great art. *The program also awarded 64 grants totaling $29,343 to 58 arts administrators.

TISSE MALLON

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JAZZ SINGER, by Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson, 2007 UA grant recipient.

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NEWS FROM UNITED ARTS OF CENTRAL FLORIDA

ARADHANA TIWARI

circuit, experienced growth in contacts within the local arts community and also had a lot of incentive to create enough new work to do a solo show. You can Google me now!” Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson “gave a gallery talk to 42 attendees and a demonstration of my collage technique … I [had] never given gallery talks or workshops before, so I have expanded what I can offer.” This continues to be a source of income. Her second grant funded her first Orlando-area solo exhibition.

2008

2009 Carolyn Blice arranged a regional French horn workshop, with performance opportunities and seminars. “It was a major project” arranging the details for the event, “and since I was also performing, I had to keep and maintain my musical skills. … A 76-year-old lady was inspired to take up the horn again after a 50-year lay-off and told me that this was a life-changing event for her.” Larissa Humiston addressed social issues in her choreography for Emotions Dance. Performances included Element Earth, about protecting the environment, and Untold Stories, about disease, abuse, addiction and despair. The talkback with the audience “was an amazing experience to speak publicly about the work and the inspiration behind it.”

ARADHANA TIWARI, a 2010 UA grant recipient, brings what she learned in a Viewpoints and Suzuki intensive workshop to a variety of projects.

2010

2011

Stefanis Alexandres updated his tools for making filigree jewelry and repoussé (bas relief sculpture on metal). An earlier grant funded a brochure about the art of repoussé to attract potential clients, who are often surprised that his work is done by hand. Aradhana Tiwari of Play the Moment Productions participated in a Viewpoints and Suzuki intensive workshop and “felt confident and comfortable employing both these techniques in a myriad of projects as a director, teacher, and co-collaborator.”

Mauricio Cespedes brought viola performances to residents of assisted living communities. “People’s reactions were very positive. Asking questions, making great comments and, most of them, remembering moments in the past where they heard some melodies.” Cecilia Rodriguez-Milanes traveled to Cuba to study the décima (a stanza made of up ten octosyllabic lines), Cuban folk culture and music. “It was an incredibly enriching experience, professionally and artistically. Watching the performers, I was able to more intensely study their art and find ways to make the form my own.”

2012

KATHY CRAVEN

Molly Conole recorded original songs and trained on new software that helped her generate new artistic opportunities, from website sales and attention for her TV show pilot (with the first grant) to an original musical revue and the theme song for a radio show (with the second). Kathy Craven traveled to Guinea, West Africa, to film Sidiki Conde, who lost the use of his legs but taught himself to dance on his hands. Conde performs in villages “to dispel the belief that [persons with disabilities] bring bad luck and shame … This demanding and rewarding shoot boosted my ability, resumé and confidence.”

FOR HER PROJECT, grant recipient Kathy Craven filmed Sidike Conde of West Africa.

Courtney Grile learned techniques for developing community-engaged theater projects, “bringing people together in order to share their stories in a theatrically inspired environment. [A story] ... has the power to inspire and foster empathy— something the world needs more of.” Orit Reuben says that “attending the Henry Yan Figure Drawing Workshop has helped me grow as an artist. However, the preparation to become eligible for the grant pushed me most of all. I worked hard to build my resumé by continuously showing and selling my work.”

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brush strokes

WHAT’S NEWS IN CULTURE

Dramatic Destiny SEVEN PERFORMANCES PREMIERE DURING PLAYFEST! THE HARRIETT LAKE FESTIVAL OF NEW PLAYS. BY SANDRA CARR

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The festival began in 2000 as PlayLab, featuring seven monthly readings and workshops. Three years later, the event became a nine-day showcase and was called PlayFest: The Orlando Festival of New Plays. Local arts supporter Harriett Lake became the presenting sponsor of the festival in 2005, when OST honored her by changing the title of the event. Today the series continues to introduce new works to audiences. “The new play festival allows us to hear a bunch of new plays as staged readings in front of an audience, as well as observe the audience’s responses,” explains Mark Routhier, director of new play development. Plays to be performed include Leveling Up on Friday, November 2, at 7:30 p.m. This tale by playwright Deb Laufer is about three video-game-playing college graduates who become the government’s experts for launching remote missiles. For submissions, OST requested fulllength plays or musicals based on or inspired by works of classic literature, historic events, famous people or advances in science. This year, Routhier was looking for works with mass appeal. “PlayFest received more than 250 submissions and was seeking plays with socio-issue and -political content and a global aspect.” Renowned playwright, director and producer Jon Jory will be instructing a master class in acting on Saturday, November 3, at 9:45 a.m. and presenting

ROB JONES; COURTESY OST

even new plays with diverse subjects ranging from the Internet to peace will be introduced to audiences during the ninth annual PlayFest! The Harriett Lake Festival of New Plays at the Orlando Shakespeare Theater (OST).

THIS NOVEMBER, the Orlando Shakespeare Theater brings seven new plays to local audiences during the ninth annual PlayFest! The Harriett Lake Festival of New Plays.

a keynote speech that evening at 7 p.m. Right afterwards, there will be a reading of his adaptation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones at 8 p.m. Jory has directed more than 125 plays and produced more than 1,000 during his 32-year tenure as the producing director at the Actors Theatre of Louisville in Louisville, KY. He also formed several renowned play festivals. “Jon Jory is one of the most brilliant and formidable theater artists working in the U.S. today,” says Routhier. “He has an amazing history about the things that he has given to the theater landscape.” Routhier also says that one of the great things about the festival is that it gives Orlando’s theater community a voice. “PlayFest is an incredible and exciting process that brings together people that

are interested in new plays. They tell the playwrights and the Orlando Shakespeare Theater what they think, and have a little bit of a stake in what we’re going to bring to audiences the following year.” PlayFest is November 2 at 7:30 p.m., November 3 at noon and November 4 at noon, with a free Playwrights Panel on November 4 at 2:15 p.m. General admission is $5 per reading or $28 for all seven; a patrons’ pass can be purchased for $250 and up, which includes reserved seating and access to private events. Jon Jory’s master class in acting is $50. Tickets are available by calling 407.447.1700, x1, or visiting orlandoshakes.org. Sandra Carr freelances for Destination Hyatt, Us Weekly and Orlando Sentinel.

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brush strokes

WHAT’S NEWS IN CULTURE

Holiday Favorite ORLANDO BALLET AND ORLANDO PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA JOIN FORCES TO PRESENT THE NUTCRACKER. BY KRIST EN MANI ERI

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For 25 years, Orlando Ballet (OB) has brought Clara’s fantasyland to life in various forms; this year, Orlando’s only professional ballet company will once again tell this classic Christmas Eve tale that has become a staple in the holiday arts calendar. The annual presentation of The Nutcracker, which runs from December 20 to 23 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, brings a 75-person cast to the stage, including many from the Orlando Ballet School, as well as a cameo performance by Gary Lambert, one of the company’s staunchest supporters. This year, Tchaikovsky’s legendary score will be brought to life by the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra (OPO), which will perform each note live in the orchestra pit in front of the stage. “I’m looking forward to bringing the magic of Nutcracker on stage this year with live music from the Philharmonic,” says Robert Hill, who has been OB’s artistic director since 2009. “The atmosphere created with a live orchestra produces such a warmth of sound.” The Nutcracker, a libretto adapted from E.T.A. Hoffmann’s story “The Nutcracker and the Mouse King,” was originally written as a performance alongside a live orchestra. First performed in 1892 at the Imperial Mariinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg, Russia, the ballet was the result of collaboration between legendary composer Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky and choreographers Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov.

MICHAEL CAIRNS

here is something about the delicate tap of feet gliding across the stage for the “Dance of the Sugarplum Fairies” that seems to signal that the holiday season is undeniably upon us.

FROM DECEMBER 20-23, Orlando Ballet presents one of the most beloved ballets of all time when it performs The Nutcracker, accompanied by live music from the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra.

As arts budgets have dwindled over recent years, many ballet companies across the country have been forced to settle for a recorded version of the score. The return of OPO for these performances marks a welcome revival of The Nutcracker’s original rendering. “The Orlando Philharmonic is pleased and proud to return as the resident orchestra for Orlando Ballet, and we look forward to performing Tchaikovsky’s spectacular score,” says David Schillhammer, OPO’s executive director. “We salute Artistic Director Robert Hill and the Ballet’s talented dancers, and are excited to collaborate on this production.” In order to meet the needs of a wide variety of audiences, The Nutcracker will be performed in three different lengths,

including the two-hour, full-length version and a 45-minute version designed for school field trips. As part of the Family Series, Orlando Ballet will offer a 60-minute presentation of The Nutcracker, which will include activities such as face painting, arts and crafts, meet and greets, storytelling, and demonstrations an hour before the show. Both young and old are sure to be captivated when the whimsical fairies, whirling snowflakes, and toy soldiers once again float across the stage in this annual holiday fixture. For tickets or more information, call 407.426.1739 or visit orlandoballet.org. Kristen Manieri is a freelance writer based in Orlando.

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arts education

WHAT’S NEWS IN EDUCATION

The Art of Leadership A ROLLINS PROFESSOR USES FILMMAKING TO TEACH THE PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS. BY JUST IN BRAUN

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reativity and business graduate school may not seem like the most natural combination, but a leadership elective for Rollins MBA students at the Crummer School of Business is changing that. Deviating from the traditional case analysis method and adopting a liberal arts approach to teaching business concepts, Associate Professor Ron Piccolo is pushing students out of their comfort zones with the assignment of creating an original script and corresponding film to demonstrate their grasp of course topics.

“My rationale behind it was to give the students an assignment that had them bring the information to life in some entertaining and alternative way,” says Piccolo. He has been experimenting with this type of blended learning in both organizational behavior and leadership classes since 2006, when he first gave the assignment while teaching at the University of Central Florida. Since then, both he and his students have found the experience engaging and enlightening. “This assignment was designed to exhibit the power of story in persuasive communication,” Piccolo says. “Students who have graduated and gone on to lead companies tell me that the exercise helped them understand how to communicate effectively.” The impact of Piccolo’s creativity on students is evidenced by comments on course evaluations: “I appreciated the opportunity to think outside the box and explore the concepts through creativity.

GRADUATE STUDENTS AT THE CRUMMER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS are tasked with writing and filming an original script to demonstrate their understanding of topics in Ron Piccolo’s leadership class.

This was the most that we laughed all semester. Thank you for an enlightening experience,” wrote one student. Yet, Piccolo says, there are always a few students who find the unconventional nature of the assignment unprofessional. Little do they know that some of the most elite MBA programs across the nation, including those at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business, MIT Sloan School of Management and Harvard Business School, are employing similar techniques. Lakshmi Balachandra, who teaches Improvisational Leadership at the MIT Sloan School of Management, told CNN in a 2010 article titled “Why Using

Improvisation to Teach Business Skills Is No Joke,” “Improv teaches you how to think on your feet and how to react and adapt very quickly to unexpected events and things you may not have planned for. ... It applies to leadership and it applies to negotiation, where you never have control over what happens.” According to Piccolo, the film assignment captures the spirit of leadership— combining showmanship, influence and emotional connection. Even more, he continually has been surprised by the amount of personal growth that takes place in the students who rise to the challenge. “When you put a student in front of the camera, it’s like a whole new person immerges. Hidden talents of visual artistry, graphic design and film editing are illuminated by this assignment. You would never know someone has the vision to make multiple forms of media come together until you see them work together to make a film.” Piccolo has truly embraced the principles of liberal arts education in his style of teaching. He says that his mission is to help MBA candidates develop a concern for critical thinking, obtain a broad-based view on problem solving, and appreciate alternate forms of development and delivery. “I want my students to hold these concepts dear, but I also want them to enjoy learning.” For more information, visit rollins.edu/mba. Justin Braun works as a writer in the Office of Marketing & Communications at Rollins College.

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oam decor

LIVING WITH ART

DESIGNING OUTSIDE OF THE BOX: Architect Phil Kean’s home pays homage to the classic White Box style of a half-century ago.

Building an Artistic Legacy ARCHITECT PHIL KEAN DESIGNED HIS WINTER PARK HOME WITH ARTISTIC FLAIR. DENIS E BA TES E NOS | PHOT OGRAPHY BY PHE L AN M. EBE NHACK

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ising from its Winter Park lot like a piece of Cubist sculpture, the home shared by Phil Kean and his partner Brad Grosberg is a stunning work of both art and architecture. Built as the 2012 New American Home, which is produced and presented by the National Association of Home Builders Leading Suppliers Council and Builder magazine to showcase cutting-edge building products, techniques and trends, the home is Kean’s take on the Classic White Box design of the 1960s and ’70s championed by such notable architects as Le Corbusier and Richard Meier.

Remarkable from the curb, the home is even more remarkable when one enters the front door—and discovers that the entrance leads outside ... and inside. Kean has created a seamless transition from the

indoors and out by creating floor-to-ceiling walls of glass that embrace the pool and lanai area. The glass walls slide open, telescoping into side pockets and leaving the gallery, living, kitchen and dining areas

exposed to the alfresco entertaining space. A poolside table features a cascade water feature that transforms an ordinary piece of furniture into a kinetic sculpture, adding movement, light and ambient sound to the atmosphere. Highly polished “planks” of limestone chenille stone flooring create visual continuity between the home and the lanai, which can be protected from insects in an instant by lowering screens concealed in the ceiling above. Kean faced some challenges when building on this small infill lot in an

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LIVING WITH ART

KEAN BLURS THE LINE between indoor and outdoor spaces with his innovative, inside-out architectural design.

established Winter Park neighborhood. The west side of the property faced an unattractive alleyway that cars frequently rumbled through, as well as a block of condos that compromised the new home’s privacy. Kean ingeniously solved the problem by designing a solid wall of stone veneer, creating an expansive gallery wall to showcase notable works of art. For its stint as the New American Home, Lotus Series 29, a dozen limitededition prints by Robert Rauschenberg, were on display. More museum-worthy art was in the dining room, including The Rat Who Retired from the World by Kristopher Benedict and Fireman on a Pole by James Rosenquist. The art on display during the event was on loan from Universal Ltd., Art Editions, Inc., Bay Shore, NY. (continued on page 29)

CULINARY ARTS: Fine dining meets fine art in the Kean-Grosberg home, where the dining room table is crafted out of a massive slab of reclaimed wood.

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LIVING WITH ART

CAPPING ONE END OF THE GALLERY ROOM is an LED-lighted glass bar by Eric Mendelsohn of Signature Art Glass in Orlando.

FORM AND FUNCTION come together in Kean’s table-water feature.

THE HOME’S FURNISHINGS AND FINISHES complement the couple’s art collection, including this sculpture by Dale Rogers.

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LIVING WITH ART

(continued from page 27) And the dining room table could be considered a piece of art as well; crafted out of a massive slab of reclaimed wood by Robin Wade Furniture, its inherent flaws and fissures only increase its beauty. Kean and Grosberg, who is the principal at Phil Kean Designs, worked with Rob Turner, the firm’s president of interior design, on the home’s furnishings and finishes. Turner selected a muted palette of warm white, dove grey, charcoals and black. “When you add the art to the space, that’s where the color is,” says Turner. “The home’s color palette is soft and quiet, so as not to interrupt the dramatic art.” Turner applied the same artistic touch to the furnishings, choosing classic furniture pieces “intended to be used as sculpture, even though it’s furniture.” Anchoring one end of the gallery room is a one-of-a-kind glass bar created by Eric Mendelsohn of Signature Art Glass in Orlando. The bar is illuminated with color-changing LED lighting: “The color can be changed with a remote to create different moods,” says Phil Kean. It’s an attention-grabbing feature that helps to define the home’s fun and innovative vibe. Another show-stopping feature is the glass and stone staircase, which seems to float from the first floor to the second. Facing the staircase is a dramatic niche wall filled with colorful glass by Jonathan Poirier of Drayton Glassworks that Kean and Grosberg have collected over the years from a variety of sources, including the Winter Park Art Festival. “Building art niches for collections like art glass is a great way to personalize your home; there is a memory associated with each time you bought a piece,” says Kean. “Having a great spot to display it makes you feel good. Also, when it comes to showcasing glass pieces, I like to uplight the niches to intensify the colors.” This is a home that celebrates the marriage of art and architecture, simplicity and sophistication. For Kean, the art and design are inseparable: “Art is a part of the fabric of the architecture.” Denise Bates Enos is a regular contributor to OAM and Orlando magazine.

A DRAMATIC STAIRCASE AND NICHE WALL create dynamic architectural points of interest in the home.

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A Touch of Glass ORLANDO MUSEUM OF ART MOUNTS A MAJOR EXHIBITION OF GLASSWORKS.

O joining museums, galleries and

Divine Mantra, 2006, Jon Kuhn, optical glass on steel base, 14.5" x 10" x 10", collection of Stephen H. Goldman

ROBERT MICKELSEN

universities across the country in celebrating a major milestone in the art world. From December 22 to March 31, 2013, it presents Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass. The Studio Glass Movement was initiated in 1962 by Harvey K. Littleton and Dominick Labino, who developed innovative practices that allowed individual artists to create one-of-a-kind works in a studio setting. The exhibition will feature approximately 65 works by internationally renowned artists, including Dale Chihuly, Harvey K. Littleton, Dante Marioni and Therman Statom, as well as by emerging artists. Noted Florida artist Robert Mickelsen makes sculptures out of glass rods, while Tim Tate creates sculptural pieces under glass. There also will be several works on view by brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre, who create artwork about the clash of modern and ancient cultures. They are considered to be among the most cutting-edge artists working in glass today. Contemporary Glass Sculpture will explore the concepts and techniques of these artists and how each uses the intrinsic characteristics of glass—its mass, fluidity, color and transmission of light—for expressive purposes. A variety of special programming will take place in conjunction with the exhibition, including a gallery talk on January 2 with Associate Curator of Adult Programs Jan Clanton. On January 20, renowned glass-art scholar William Warmus will give a lecture and tour, and on February 24 there will be a Glass Collector’s Forum, featuring a roundtable discussion with noted Florida glass collectors. Hands-on, family-friendly workshops and a video series will also be offered. Contact the museum for complete details.

RAYMOND MARTINOT

rlando Museum of Art (OMA) is

Japanese 7.7mm "Type 99" Light Machine Gun, 2012, Robert Mickelsen, lampworked borosilicate glass, 22" x 51" x 16" ORLANDO ARTS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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MINDY SOLOMON GALLERY

ANYTHINGPHOTO.NET; HABATAT GALLERIES

Mermaids Past Their Prime, 2010, Tim Tate, blown and cast glass, electronic components, original video, 20" x 8" x 8"

Mass Extinction, 2008, Einar and Jamex de la Torre, blown glass and mixed media, 27" x 14" 11.5"

Suspended Artifacts, 1996, William Morris, blown and formed glass, 27" x 24" x 11" collection of Arnold and Susan Bierman

JAMES F. KANE

RAYMOND MARTINOT

Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass December 22 to March 31 • Orlando Museum of Art 407.896.4231 • omart.org

Desert Flower, 2009, Christopher Ries, optical glass, 43" x 18.125" x 9" collection of Stephen H. Goldman

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STEVEN MILLER

Locker Room, 2010, Nathan Vincent, crocheted yarn, foam, wire and polyester stuffing

Fiber Art

AN EXHIBITION AT THE CORNELL FINE ARTS MUSEUM EXPLORES THE POWER OF TEXTILES.

F

iber techniques such as knitting, loom weaving and crochet have long helped people fashion personal identity, whether through the clothing they wear or their cultural traditions. In fact, the very nature of fiber—which can be soft and flexible, as well as rough and rigid— carries with it a unique metaphor for what it means to be human. Now, the Cornell Fine Arts Museum examines that relationship in an exhibition that runs through December 30. Bringing together 11 national and international artists in various stages of their careers, The Mysterious Content of Softness explores the transformative power of fiber and its connection to the human body. The title of the exhibition is inspired by the words of Polish

sculptor Magdelena Abakanowicz, whose fiber sculptures have made her one of the most celebrated artists of our time. Organized by the Bellevue Arts Museum in Bellevue, Wash., the show was curated by Stefano Catalani and consists of sculptures, installations and crafts. Featured artists include Diem Chau, Lauren DiCioccio, Angela Ellsworth, James Gobel, Angela Hennessy, Rock Hushka, Lisa Kellner, Miller & Shellabarger, Lacey Jane Roberts, Jeremy Sanders and Nathan Vincent. “The artists were selected for their emotional response to and understanding of fiber’s potential for capturing the fluidity of life,” says Catalani.

Exploiting the durability and fragility of the medium, a number of artists address issues of gender identity “by repositioning and humorously challenging the expectations from a medium so stereotypically feminine.” Whether employing time-honored techniques such as knitting, crochet, embroidery and loom weaving, or foraying into new uses of traditional textiles, these artists explore the physical, psychological and cultural associations of fiber to the body. The intrinsic qualities of fiber—its softness, sagginess and fragility, its ability to drape, protect and clothe, as well as to fabricate and express identity—make it possible for the textile medium to capture the nature of the flesh and convey an affinity for life.

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ANGELA HENNESSY

LISA KELLNER

Almost Perfect, 2011, Lisa Kellner, silk, pigment, paint, thread, embroidered text, surgical pins, 42" x 31" x 6"

Midnight Disease, 2010, Angela Hennessy, crocheted thread, hairnets, velvet fuzz, 12" x 15"

Seer Bonnet XIX (Flora Ann), 2011, Angela Ellsworth, bonnet, pearl corsage pins, fabric, steel, 60" x 13" x 16"

ROCK HUSHKA

LISA SETTE GALLERY

The Mysterious Content of Softness November 1 to December 30 • Cornell Fine Arts Museum 407.646.2526 • cfam.rollins.edu

Disrupt/Interrupt (Attempts to Construct a New Herbal) detail, 1995-99, Rock Hushka, embroidered cotton mounted on linen, 40" x 21.25"

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Celebrate the Season GREAT GIFTS, HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS AND DELIGHTFUL DATE NIGHTS

NORA FLEMING

BY DENISE BAT ES ENOS

T tivities. Here in Central Florida, stores is the season for family, fun and fes-

stock their shelves, cultural venues put on holiday-themed productions, and special events and just-for-couples soirees can be found all around town. So get out your shopping lists and calendars and start planning for the best season ever.

Perfect Presents Feather Your Wrist: The peacock, Winter Park’s iconic bird, is reinterpreted in an elegant watch with enamel peacock feather band and mother-of-pearl face; $150 at The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art. A Glass Act: Artist Tracy Glover shapes glass into beautifully ethereal vessels. Handblown Ombré Primavera Vases come

in olive/celery, plum/berry, turquoise/light blue and aurora/gold; $295 each at Interiors on Morse Boulevard in Winter Park. Set the Table: Nora Fleming’s tabletop collection pairs understated serving pieces together with “minis,” decorative accents that represent a holiday or special occasion; $12.50 to $60 at Annabelle Hart, College Park; Bella Home Collection, Winter Springs; Chloe Lane, Winter Park; and The Pink Chalet, Orlando. Dig It: Excavate a T. Rex “fossil,” then assemble the skeleton and display it. The Dinosaur Skeleton Excavation Kit: Tyrannosaurus Rex! is $14.99 at the Orlando Science Center gift shop. A Penny Saved: “Bank in the Form of a Pig” comes in a variety of colors, including the gold shown here and a limited

THE CHARLES HOSMER MORSE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

NORA FLEMING’S FUN LINE OF HOLIDAY SERVING PIECES AND MINIS are perfect for entertaining and also make great gifts. Items can be purchased online, as well as at select local merchants.

THIS ELEGANT, PEACOCK-INSPIRED WATCH features an enamel band and mother-of-pearl face; $150 at the Morse Museum.

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TED MAINES INTERIORS

“glow in the dark” edition; $125 to $200 at Ted Maines Interiors in Winter Park. Flock Together: Show your school spirit while paying homage to your Sunshine State status with a pair of Gator or Seminole lawn flamingos; $19.95 at the Orange County Regional History Center. The Art of Accessorizing: Glass artist Dale Wayne (see Artist’s Space, page 54) crafts exquisite jewelry pieces using Venetian and borosilicate glass with antique, copper and silver findings and found objects; $25 to $400 at the Orlando Museum of Art and the Morse Museum.

Yuletide Delights

Old-Fashioned Festivities: The annual Holidays at the Waterhouse begins on November 23, 2012, and continues through January 13, 2013. Each room in the historic home features Victorian-era holiday decorations; be on the lookout for the Waterhouse Mouse. Each year, the mouse has a new hiding place. Admission is $3 for adults, $2 for seniors and children ages four to 18. Visit artandhistory.org for more information. God Bless Us, Every One: Theatre Downtown’s A Christmas Carol is as classic as figgy pudding. Performances are on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from November 23 through December 23; tickets are $20; admission for seniors and students is $16. Go to theatredown.net for details. Free Parking: Mark your calendar for Thursday, December 6, from 6:15 to 8 p.m. for the 34th annual Christmas in (continued on page 37)

THE DINOSAUR SKELETON EXCAVATION KIT: TYRANNOSAURUS REX! is $14.99 at the Orlando Science Center gift shop.

INTERIORS

DALE WAYNE

GATOR AND SEMINOLE LAWN FLAMINGOS are just $19.95 a pair at the Orange County Regional History Center Emporium.

ORLANDO SCIENCE CENTER

ORANGE COUNTY REGIONAL HISTORY CENTER

“BANK IN THE FORM OF A PIG,” by Harry Allen for Areaware, comes in a variety of colors, as well as a limited “glow in the dark” edition, and can be purchased at the new retail space at Ted Maines Interiors in Winter Park; $125 to $200.

HANDBLOWN GLASSWORKS by artist Tracy Glover come in balloon and dewrop shapes and sell for $295 at Interiors in Winter Park.

COLORFUL JEWELRY by local artist Dale Wayne features handblown glass beads. Her work can be purchased online at dalewayne.com, at the Morse Museum or at the Orlando Museum of Art, which offers unique holiday gifts that start at just $10.

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THE CHARLES HOSMER MORSE MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

THEATRE DOWNTOWN

ON DECEMBER 6, CHRISTMAS IN THE PARK will feature nine illuminated Tiffany windows.

ART & HISTORY MUSEUMS—MAITLAND

DON’T MISS A LIVE PERFORMANCE OF A HOLIDAY CLASSIC: Theatre Downtown will be presenting A Christmas Carol from November 23 to December 23.

THE VICTORIAN ERA COMES TO LIFE at the historic Waterhouse Residence Museum, and there’s no better time of year to visit. From November 23 to January 13, elaborate holiday decorations from that time period will be featured throughout the home.

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REFLECTIONS SPA

(continued from page 35) the Park. This free event marks the official start of the holidays for many. Nine Tiffany windows from the Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art are put on display in Central Park and illuminated as a stunning backdrop to a concert by the Bach Festival Choir, Youth Choir and Brass Ensemble. You can find out more at morsemusem.org. Still More Dickens: Another local tradition is Dickens by Candlelight, which has been performed at a variety of locations throughout Orlando since 1997. Now presented at the Dr. Phillips Center at Lake Ivanhoe, it’s a three-person, interactive show told as a ghost story. This year’s performances will be held December 14 to 17 and 19 to 23; come early for a chance to share a cup of wassail and join in caroling around the piano with the cast. Tickets are $35 per person; for more information, go to dickensbycandelight.com. Start Spreading the News: The TransSiberian Orchestra is debuting a new, live winter show, “The Lost Christmas Eve,” at Amway Center on December 16, at 2:30 and 7 p.m. With a musical score that combines rock, classical, folk, Broadway and rhythm and blues, the show takes the audience on a tour of a rundown hotel, an old toy store, a blues bar and a Gothic cathedral in New York City as the lives of their respective inhabitants collide on Christmas Eve. Tickets start at $30 and can be purchased at amwaycenter.com, the Amway Center box office, Ticketmaster retail locations, ticketmaster.com or by phone at 800.745.3000. Laser Focus: Starting in November, Orlando Science Center will offer Holidaythemed laser light shows in the Dr. Phillips CineDome. Visit osc.org for details.

THE HOLIDAY SEASON CAN BE STRESSFUL. Unwind with your sweetheart with specially themed treatments at area spas, including Reflections at the Lake Buena Vista Resort Village and Spa.

in the main galleries. Local artists Anna McCambridge-Thomas and Marabou Thomas, both featured in the museum’s The Power of Two exhibition, will be on hand to chat with couples about their work. Admission is $3 for adults and $2 for seniors, and there will be a cash bar; log on to artandhistory.org for details. Garden Variety: Date Night at Leu Gardens is a tradition for longtime couples and a perfect first-date option. A classic movie is screened outdoors, and people are encouraged to bring a blanket or chairs and a picnic dinner. The December 7 movie is the 1938 version of A Christmas Carol. Gate opens at 6 p.m., weather permitting, and the movie starts at 7:30 p.m. Admission is $5 plus tax for adults and $2 plus tax for children; free for members. For details, go to leugardens.org. Film Frolics: Grab your sweetie and catch a holiday-themed movie at Enzian.

It’s a Wonderful Life will screen as part of the theater’s Saturday Matinee Classics on December 8 at noon. And then there are the Popcorn Classics, shown outdoors in Winter Park’s Central Park. Elf and How the Grinch Stole Christmas are slated for December. Log on to enzian.org for details. Pampering for Two: Spas are getting into the spirit of the season with delectable holiday scents. The Spa at The Peabody Orlando has several seasonal treatments available, including a Mint-Chocolate Mistle-Toes pedicure ($79) and a Gingerbread Manicure ($55). Go to peabodyorlando.com/spa for details. And the Reflections Spa-Salon at the Lake Buena Vista Resort Village and Spa will be featuring a peppermint scrub, available in various treatments including massages, pedicures and manicures ($25 to $300). Visit reflectionsspaorlando.com to find out more.

Star-Gazing: Beginning on November 17, and on the first and third Friday and Saturday of the month through February 16, the Crosby Observatory at the Orlando Science Center will be open for seasonal nighttime viewing from 5 to 9 p.m. Spot stars, planets, and other celestial objects using the observatory’s 10-inch refractor telescope. $7 per person; free for members. Go to osc.org for more information. The Art of the Date: The Maitland Art Center is holding its very first Date Night on November 16 from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.

LEU GARDENS

Save the Date

DINNER AND A MOVIE WITH A TWIST: Leu Garden’s popular Date Night event features an outdoor screening of a classic film. Light fare is available there, or patrons can pack a picnic.

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LOCAL GALLERIES KEEP ART CLOSE TO HOME.

G

alleries bring art off the rarefied walls of museums and put it within reach of real people. They give people a way to admire and experience visual art, as well as an opportunity to purchase a piece of an artist’s vision. Offerings at Central Florida galleries range from funky folk items to fine art, and stretch the definition of art from traditional oils to abstract sculptures and from hand-crafted serving spoons or furniture to one-of-a-kind jewelry. Most dedicated galleries in the area are clustered in downtown Orlando, in Winter Park and on First Street in Sanford.

City Works

CITYARTS FACTORY is a collective of several galleries located in the heart of downtown.

KESSLER GALLERY

The showcase of Orlando’s Downtown Arts District (DAD)—formed in 2000 to promote the arts in the city’s urban core—

is CityArts Factory. A collective of galleries under one roof, CityArts showcases local and international works of art, many of which are rotated on a monthly basis. Housed in a historic building at Orange Avenue and Pine Street, CityArts opened in 2006. The first floor contains 10,000 square feet of space that is divided into specialty galleries, including the Kiene/Quigley Community Gallery, which allows local artists to rent space at a subsidized rate; Redefine Pop-Up Gallery, which specializes in urban art; and Nu Visions in Photography. CityArts regularly appears on local “best of” lists, says Barbara Hartley, executive director of DAD, but the real measure of success is showing that there is an interest in, and market for, art in

CITYARTS FACTORY

BY G . K . SHAR MAN

FREQUENTED BY GUESTS AS WELL AS LOCALS, Kessler Gallery at the Grand Bohemian Hotel features works by local, national and international artists and is an integral part of the hotel. All 10 Kessler properties across the United States include gallery space, a reflection of the company founder’s interests.

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TIMOTHY’S GALLERY

LOCATED ON WINTER PARK’S TRENDY PARK AVENUE, Timothy’s Gallery has works by more than 100 artisans from across North America.

“what’s that?” reaction to this type of art, “but we find the best abstracts still convey something to the customer,” he says. Some of the gallery’s standouts include artists Monte Olinger, Mark Mitchell, Reid Pasternack and Floridian Peter Pettegrew, who is known for his impressionistic landscapes.

Art on the Avenue Anchored by the Cornell Fine Arts Museum at one end and The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art on the other, Park Avenue in Winter Park

has long been a cultural haven. In between the two, the avenue is home to a number of spots that can satisfy the urge for art. Located on north Park Avenue, Timothy’s Gallery has been in operation since 1990 and represents between 120 and 150 artisans. It’s known for its colorful and whimsical fine crafts, including works in glass, wood and clay, as well as artistic jewelry and wearable art. American craft artists consider it to be one of the top 25 galleries in North America. Gallery director Jill Daunno says that people just have a good time when they

RICK STANLEY

downtown Orlando. “There’s a lot more art activity downtown,” she says. “It’s a little bit contagious.” And though many people consider art a luxury in lean economic times, Hartley says, “We’ve seen an increase in art sales in the past year.” CityArts is a place to display art, but just as importantly, it’s a place for locals to start or advance their careers. Some of the people whose work has graced the walls are well established, while for others, CityArts was the first place they showed. The art experience is a little more refined at the Kessler Gallery at the Grand Bohemian Hotel across from Orlando City Hall. The gallery is an integral part of the property, says Michael Hall, corporate director for gallery sales, and attracts both locals and travelers, including the hotel’s many celebrity guests. The Kessler Collection has 10 properties across the nation. All of them have either full galleries or gallery space, which is a natural outgrowth of company founder Richard Kessler’s interests. “He started by finding Indian artifacts as a boy,” Hall says, “antique furniture in college, and currently loves collecting many different types of artwork. His collections can be viewed throughout our properties. While you wander the lobby and the different floors of our hotels, you will be immersed in amazing artwork. For the hotels to have galleries was just the perfect fit.” The gallery features local, national and international artists, such as painters Jean Claude Roy and Stefano Cecchini, wood sculptor Phillippe Guillerm, and Woodrow Nash, who makes African figurative sculptures in clay. Orlando collage artist Elizabeth St. Hilaire Nelson got her start in the Grand Bohemian and is now featured in all Kessler galleries around the United States. Prices here range from an affordable $50 for some jewelry pieces to $250 for smaller artwork to the seriousmoney $50,000 range. Away from mainstream downtown, in more ways than one, is Gallery 17-92. Located on U.S. 17-92, it has been in business since 1974. Owner Tommy Cannalonga worked there for seven years before buying it about two years ago. If you’re into abstracts, this is your place. “Abstracts are just what go here in the gallery,” says Cannalonga, who estimates that his non-representational pieces account for 80 percent of sales. People often have a

THE SCOTT LAURENT COLLECTION in Winter Park carries a wide array of decorative household items, as well as original works by Central Florida artists.

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TRESOR GALLERY JEANINE TAYLOR FOLK ART

ONE OF THE AREA’S NEWEST GALLERIES, Tresor on Park Avenue is chock-full of an eclectic mix of handmade creations, from one-of-a-kind jewelry items to original paintings.

PAINTER CINDY STURLA works at Gallery on First, which offers open studio spaces that allow people to interact with the artists.

shop at Timothy’s. “It’s full of color and joy. We hear laughter and squeals of delight from shoppers.” But art is for more than just the eyes. “It’s not just visual,” says Daunno, “it’s things that people can touch and feel and use, and it’s art.” Also located on north Park Avenue, Scott Laurent Collection is the place to go for contemporary, high-end furniture and home accents, as well as various forms of original art. “This is the place in town to find the gift that you can’t find any place else,” says co-owner Rick Stanley. Small gifts can be had for as little as $20 or $30; larger works go for more than $5,000. The 3,500-square-foot gallery has been in business since 1990 and showcases work by locals, such as mixedmedia artist Donna Dowless, painter Donna Frank and mosaic artist Doug Powell. Different kinds of art are arranged in the gallery’s multiple rooms. Art glass is in one area, the black/white and silver items have their own space, and large pieces—including chandeliers and room

dividers, as well as large sculptures—are housed in the fine-art room. Stanley, who likes contemporary abstracts and brilliant color, is trying to take the gallery in a hipper, edgier direction. But no matter how trendy something is, he says, clever design always “has a classic aspect to its modernness.” The gallery also is known for its social conscience: It’s a popular spot for nonprofits to hold fundraisers and it also hosts programs supporting organizations that promote social awareness and environmental issues. Tresor Gallery on south Park Avenue proudly calls itself “eccentric” and showcases the work of about 100 artists whose efforts range from handmade jewelry to sculpture to traditional oil painting. Items range from $4 greeting cards to original artwork with a $5,000 price tag. Tresor features several locals, but also offers works by nationally and internationally known artists. Items that keep collectors coming back include surrealistic

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oils by Floridian Patrick Pierson and the mixed media and jewelry pieces by the Whipple family: John, his wife, Lynn, and his mother, Marty.

Creative Cluster

G.K. Sharman is a freelance writer and associate editor of Lake Mary Healthy Living.

Gallery Hopping Art Affair Gallery 407.878.2855 • artaffairgallery.com

CityArts Factory 407.648.7060 • cityartsfactory.com

Gallery 17-92 407.647.1792 gallery1792art.blogspot.com

Gallery on First 407.323.2774 • galleryonfirst.com

Jeanine Taylor Folk Art 407.323.2774 • jtfolkart.com

Kessler Collection 407.581.4801 grandbohemiangallery.com

Scott Laurent Collection 407.629.0278 scottlaurentcollection.com

Timothy’s Gallery 407.629.0707 • timothysgallery.com

Tresor Gallery 407.539.1199 • tresorgallery.com

G.K. SHARMAN

Lately, Sanford has been solidifying its reputation as a cultural tourism destination. Jeanine Taylor was one of the artistic pioneers (see People, page 11). She started her first gallery in Winter Park in 1997. At the behest of a couple of her best customers—who also happened to own a historic building on First Street in Sanford—she moved the operation north in 2005. Since she had considerably more space—some 5,000 square feet—she added galleries for working artists and called that Gallery on First. Today, Jeanine Taylor Folk Art and Gallery on First are complementary parts of the same operation. The folk-art gallery occupies the center of the shared space. Along the walls is Gallery on First, a series of private studios for artists working in a variety of genres, including watercolor, oil and mixed media. The idea is to let people see the creative process in action and interact with the artists. Jeanine Taylor Folk Art specializes in contemporary folk art from the South.

Featured artists include Ruby Williams, Theresa Disney, Purvis Young, Cornbread, Melissa Menzer and Ab the Flagman. Just half a block away, Art Affair Gallery showcases more than 30 artists in its multi-room, 2,800-square-foot store on the corner of First Street and Palmetto Avenue. It is as much a place to hang out as to buy art. It’s “where art and music mingle,” says owner Ronda Richley, quoting the shop’s updated motto. It’s primarily a gallery, but it also has a coffee bar in the morning and food and wine later in the day. At night, there’s a back room where musicians can jam.“We give artists a chance to hang out and be part of the community,” Richley says. Richley hand-selects the artists, most of whom are nationally or internationally known and collected. Many live in or come from Florida, including Tom Abbot, who does mixed media, painters Peter Cerreta and Ivaldo, and Mauricio Murillo, who made a name for himself with gummy bear art. Richley’s goal is “to bring art to the mainstream in Sanford.” She and her counterparts are succeeding. So the next time you have an itch to admire some art, check out what’s close to home.

ART WITH AMENITIES: Patrons of Art Affair Gallery in Sanford will find work by more than 30 emerging and established artists alongside food, wine and a coffee bar.

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cultural calendar

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

ROLLINS COLLEGE

T

November November 1 n 1st Thursdays: Día de los Muertos Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n ACA Celebrates 35 Years: Doris Leeper——Environmentalist/Visionary Atlantic Center for the Arts, Pabst Visitor Center & Gallery, 386.427.6975, atlanticcenterforthearts.org n Behind the Curtain: The Marriage of Figaro Friends of the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Home of John and Audrey Ruggieri, 407.770.0071, friendsorlandophil.org n Brass Quintet Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Building Community Bridges through the Arts Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Arts, 407.647.3307, zoranealehurstonmuseum.com n Dr. Phillips Cinedome: Rescue Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org n Dr. Phillips Cinedome: Tornado Alley Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org n Friends of The Mennello Museum Luncheon and Fashion Show The Mennello Museum of American Art, Neiman Marcus, The Mall at Millenia, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com

Singing Out

he spirit of the season comes alive November 30 to December 2 when the Rollins College Department of Music presents the 79th Annual Christmas Vespers, led by renowned conductor John V. Sinclair. The program takes place by candlelight in the Knowles Memorial Chapel and includes traditional music and carols performed by the Rollins Choir and Orchestra, as well as readings that reflect on the holidays. Tickets are $10 per person and can be purchased through the chapel office. Please call 407.646.2115 or visit its website at rollins.edu/chapel for more information. n Guitar on the Rocks Stetson University School of Music, Gillepsie Museum, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Movie Matinee: Badlands Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Popcorn Flicks: Chicken Run City of Winter Park, Enzian Theater, Central Park, 407.629.0054, enzian.org November 1 - 4 n The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Stetson University Theatre Arts, Museum of Florida Arts, 386.822.8920, SUM@stetson.edu n FLORAda And Flowering Waters: The Art of Mark Messersmith, Margaret Ross Tolbert and Anna Tomczak Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org n Million Dollar Quartet FAIRWINDS Broadway Across America, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 800.448.6322, OrlandoBroadway.com n Playfest! The Harriett Lake Festival of New Plays Orlando Shakespeare Theater, John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org n Side Show Theatre UCF, 407.823.1500, theatre.ucf.edu November 1 - 10 n Celery Soup Creative Sanford, Princess Theater, 321.578.1463, celerysoupsanford.com

November 1 - 11

n Delicate Creatures Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com

n Miscellaneous——New Works by Trent Manning Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org n Other Desert Cities Mad Cow Theatre, Black Box Theatre, 407.297.8788, madcowtheatre.com n Race Orlando Shakespeare Theater, John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org November 1 - 12

n 17th Annual Epcot International Food & Wine Festival Walt Disney World, Epcot, foodwinefest.com November 1 - 16 n Faculty Show UCF Art Gallery, 407.823.5470, gallery.cah.ucf.edu November 1 - 17 n A Year with Frog and Toad Orlando Shakespeare Theater, John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org November 1 - 18 n Chasing George Washington Orlando Repertory Theatre, 407.896.7365, orlandorep.com November 1 - 25 n The Florida Watercolor Society’s 41st Anniversary Exhibition The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com n From the Outside In: Featuring Works by Purvis Young Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n Related Alternatives: Featuring Works by KYLE and Jim Jipson Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n Survival Series: Featuring Works by Barbara Neijna Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org November 1 - 29 n Donald Stone Jr. “Old Florida Scents” Art Exhibit Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org November 1 - 30 n Kitchen Science Month Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org November 1 - December 2 n Beauty & the Beast Pinocchio’s Marionette Theater, 407.834.8757, pinocchios.net

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

November 1 - December 5 n Oscar Bluemner’s America: Walking Along a New Jersey Canal Stetson University, Hand Art Center, 386.822.7270, www2.stetson.edu/handartcenter November 1 - December 14 n Edge to Edge: Vintage Panoramic Photography in Florida Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n A Girl and Her Room: Rania Matar Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Selected Fine Art Faculty Valencia College East Campus, Anita S. Wooten Gallery, 407.582.2298, valenciacollege.edu November 1 - December 21 n The Civil Rights Struggle, AfricanAmerican GIs, and Germany Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, 407.628.0555, holocaustedu.org n Eatonville Embodied: The Photography of John Pinderhughes and Wendel White Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Arts, 407.647.3307, zoranealehurstonmuseum.com November 1 - December 29 n Keeping Haiti in Our Hearts: Interpreting Heritage in the Diaspora Crealdé School of Art, Jenkins and Community Galleries and Hannibal Square Heritage Center Visiting Exhibition Gallery, 407.671.1886, crealde.org n Storytellers XV: Parramore——Our Home Crealdé School of Art, Showalter Hughes Community Gallery, 407.671.1886, crealde.org

November 1 - January 12 n In Vibrant Color: Vintage Celebrity Portraits from the Harry Warnecke Studio Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org n PMoA Collects Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org n The Way We Were: Park Ave. in the 1960s and 1970s Winter Park Historical Museum, 407.647.2330, wphistory.org November 1 - January 14 n Now Appearing in Howard Bros. Circus The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, 941.358.3180, ringling.org n Treasury of Landscapes from the MOAS Collections Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org November 1 - January 31 n The Sage Project: Hannibal Square Elders Tell Their Stories Hannibal Square Heritage Center, 407.539.2680, hannibalsquareheritagecenter.org November 1 - February 3 n Watercolors by Otto Heinigke The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org November 1 - February 17 n Anthology 2012: Contemporary Photography Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org November 1 - February 28 n Crosby Observatory Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org

November 1 - March 1 n Art on the Green City of Winter Park, Downtown Winter Park, 407.599.3498, cityofwinterpark.org November 1 - March 17 n Apprehending Nature/Nature Apprehending: Eric Breitenbach Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Star Wars: Where Science Meets Imagination Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org November 1 - April 14 n Life in the Fast Lane: The Art of David Delong Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org November 1 - July 28 n Mythic Creatures of China Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org November 1 - August 30 n Aztec to Zapotec: Selections from the Ancient Americas Collection Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Common Ground: The Art of the American Landscape Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Focus Exhibition: Lockwood de Forest’s The Wreck The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Life Stories: American Portraits of Past and Present Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org

RAYMOND MARTINOT

November 1 - December 30 n The Mysterious Content of Softness Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n The Power of Two Exhibit Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org n The Prints of Gustave Baumann Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Spatial Relationships——Selected Works from the Permanent Collection Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org n Taming Summer at Home in Central Florida Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.7010, thehistorycenter.org November 1 - December 31 n Peanuts … Naturally Exhibition Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.7010, thehistorycenter.org November 1 - January 6 n Vignette: New Acquisitions The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org

WATERCOLORS BY OTTO HEINIGKE will be on view at The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art through February 3.

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November 3 - 24

n Works by Jeff League Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles, 386.428.1133, artsondouglas.net November 3 - December 31

n Feathered Fantasies Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org

n The Nature of Things: The Art of Edward C. Smith Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org KEITH STANLEY

November 4

ENJOY THE POLITICAL HUMOR OF THE CAPITOL STEPS at Peabody Auditorium on November 4.

November 1 - August 30 n Living in Style: African Art of Everyday Life from the Collection of William D. and Norma Canelas Roth Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Monumental Outdoor Sculpture Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n New Work: A Series of Bimonthly Exhibitions of Contemporary Art Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n New World Treasures: Artifacts from Hernando De Soto’s Florida Expedition Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org n Secrets of Tiffany Glassmaking The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org

November 2 - 3 n Opera Scenes Stetson University Opera Theatre, Athens Theatre, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music

November 1 - spring 2013 n Dr. Phillips Cinedome: Space Junk Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org

Center for the Arts, 352.383.0880, mountdoracenterforthearts.org n Gillespie Museum Homecoming 2012 Open House & Harvest Stetson University, Gillespie Museum, 386.822.7330, stetson.edu/gillespie n Neanderthal Ball Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org n Snoopy’s K-9 Friends Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.7010, thehistorycenter.org n Virtuoso Concert Florida Young Artists Orchestra, First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 407.257.8886, fyao.org n Wolf Scout Carpentry Crew Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

November 2 n Cinema Essentials: Wild Strawberries Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Date Night at Leu Gardens: Rear Window Harry P. Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, leugardens.org n First Friday: Merry Scully, Gustave Baumann Exhibition Curator Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n House Band Concert Valencia College East Campus, Black Box Theater, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu n Moonlight Carillon Concert Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Music at Midday Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music

November 2 - 4 n Once Upon a Mattress Osceola Center for the Arts, Center Children’s Theatre, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com n The Orlando Puppet Festival Pinocchio’s Marionette Theater, 407.834.8757, pinocchios.net, orlandopuppetfestival.com November 2 - April 26 n Friday Nights at the Morse The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org November 3

n Art of the Deal 2012 Mount Dora

November 3 - 4

n The 26th Anniversary Celebration Lake Mary-Heathrow Festival of the Arts Lake Mary, 407.323.1142, LakeMaryHeathrowArts.com

n Capitol Steps Peabody Auditorium, 386.671.3462, peabodyauditorium.com

n Choral Evensong for All Saints Sunday The Cathedral Church of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Demonstration by Don Andrews The Central Florida Watercolor Society, Art and History Museums, Maitland, centralfloridawatercolor.com n Family Adventure Day: American Heroes Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org n Guitar Ensemble Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Kristallnacht Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, 407.628.0555, holocaustedu.org n Visiting Artists: Brooklyn Rider Bach Festival Society, Tiedtke Concert Hall, 407.646.2182, Bachfestivalflorida.org November 5 n Story Time at Leu Gardens Harry P. Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, leugardens.org November 5 - 8 n Workshop with Don Andrews The Central Florida Watercolor Society, Webster University, 407.415.0594, centralfloridawatercolor.com November 6

n Chamber Orchestra Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Music at Midday Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Wind Ensemble Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music November 7

n Asteria Concert——”In Search of the Lost Song,” featuring Sylvia Rhyne, Soprano, and Eric Redlinger, Tenor and Lute Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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n Dinner and a Movie: It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad World Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Exhibition Film Series: The Squid and the Whale Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Music Student Recitals: Voice, Piano, Strings Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Woodwind Quintet Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music November 8 n Movie Matinee: Days of Heaven Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Viva Las Vegas Enzian, Central Park, Winter Park, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org November 8 - 11 n The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Stetson University Theatre Arts, Museum of Florida Arts, 386.822.8920, SUM@stetson.edu n Fame Jr. 2012 Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, Repertory Jr., 407.321.8111, wdpac.com November 8 - December 13 n Faculty Exhibit Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Gallery, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts November 8 - December 15

n Steppin’ Out with Irving Berlin The Winter Park Playhouse, 407.645.0145, winterparkplayhouse.org November 9

n Annual Veteran’s Day Celebration “Honoring Winter Park Heroes” City of Winter Park, Community Center Ruby Ball Amphitheater, cityofwinterpark.org n Art for Art’s Sake: Pollock Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Cinema Essentials: Cries and Whispers Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Culture & Cocktails: Featuring Artist Josh Garrick Art & History Museums—— Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org n Jazz Combos Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music November 9 - 11

n Opera Series: Mozart——The Marriage of Figaro Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org November 9 - 17

n The Drowsy Chaperone Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College, 407.646.2145, rollins.edu/annierussell ORLANDO ARTS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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November 9 - 18

n The 3rd Annual John Goring Memorial One-Act Festival Playwrights’ Round Table, The Mandell Theater, John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.761.2683, theprt.com n 25th Annual Festival of Trees Council of 101, Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org November 9 - 25

n Love! Valor! Compassion! FantasyLand VALENCIA COLLEGE

Theatrical Productions, Point Performing Arts Center, 407.374.3587, pointearts.org November 9 - December 5

n 23rd Juried Student Art Exhibition Stetson University, Hand Art Center, 386.822.7270, www2.stetson.edu/handartcenter November 9 - December 27

FROM NOVEMBER 16-17, Valencia College will present Choreographers’ Showcase at the Performing Ars Center at the East Campus.

n Plein Air Exhibit, featuring Carol Platt & Susan Kiss Mount Dora Center for the Arts, 352.383.0880, mountdoracenterforthearts.org November 9 - December 28 n Art Expressions: National League of American Pen Women Artists League of Orange County, Maitland Chamber of Commerce, 407.644.0741, maitlandchamber.com November 9 - February 3 n The Warren J. and Margot Coville Photography Collection Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org November 10 n Big Band Fall Concert Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com n Celery City Cruisers Annual Car Show Museum of Seminole County History, 407.665.2489, seminolecountyfl.gov n The Complete Beethoven Sonatas Series: Leonidas Lipovetsky Florida International Piano Competition, Margeson Theater at the Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, FloridaPiano.org n Giving Thanks Concert Florida Young Artists Orchestra, First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 407.257.8886, fyao.org n History Book Club with Eliot Kleinberg “War in Paradise: Stories of World War II in Florida” Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.7010, thehistorycenter.org n Saturday Matinee Classics: Nashville (1975) Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n Sunset & Symphony Concert, featuring Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org

n UCF Symphony Orchestra——Beethoven Forever St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, 407.365.3408, stlukes-oviedo.org/ concert-series November 10 - 11 n Florida Bandmasters Association Roll of Distinction Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Hansel and Gretel Garden Theatre, Orlando Ballet, 407.877.4736, gardentheatre.org November 11 n 7th Florida International Piano Concert Series Visiting Artists Festival: Leonidas Lipovetsky Florida International Piano Competition, Margeson Theater at the Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, FloridaPiano.org n The Annual Concerto Competition Finalists’ Recital Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, College Park Baptist Church, 407.999.7800, fsyo.org n Ayako Yonetani at the Polasek: Exclusive Chamber Concert Series Albin Polasek Museum & Sculpture Gardens, 407.647.6294, polasek.org n OJO Plays the Great American Song Book Orlando Jazz Orchestra, Plaza Live Orlando, plazaliveorlando.com n Veterans Day Carillon Concerts Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Winter Park Concours d’Elegance Downtown Winter Park, winterparkconcours.com

November 13 n Acoustic Ensemble Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Celebrating Friends and Heroes Friends of the Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Home of Jim and Alexis Pugh, 407.770.0071, friendsorlandophil.org n Leann Rimes Peabody Auditorium, 386.671.3462, peabodyauditorium.com n Music at Midday Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Women’s Chorale and Stetson Men Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music November 14 n Dinner and a Movie: Bottle Rocket Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Exhibition Film Series: Thirteen Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Friends of Casa Feliz Parlor Series: Dr. Gary Mormino, Professor of History at University of South Florida——“What Florida Was Like in the 1800s” Winter Park Historical Museum, Casa Feliz, 407.647.2330, wphistory.org, casafeliz.us n Jazz Ensemble, featuring George West Stetson University School of Music, Carlton Union Bldg, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music. n Music Student Recitals: Winds, Guitar, Bass, Percussion Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts November 15 n 3rd Thursday Gallery Hop & Art Walk Downtown Arts District, 407.648.7060, orlandoslice.com n Gems & Jewels Artist Market Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org n Martin Luther King, III——Continuing the Legacy: The Civil Rights Struggles of the 21st Century Winter Park Institute at Rollins College, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.691.1995, WinterParkInstitute.com n Movie Matinee: Thin Red Line Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Music at Midday Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music November 15 - December 2 n Zombie Town Theatre UCF, 407.823.1500, theatre.ucf.edu

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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November 15 - December 7 n Open Windows: Stained Glass Windows from the Citizens Bank Building Leesburg Center for the Arts, 352.365.0232, LeesburgCenter4Arts.com November 15 - December 14 n Exhibition Featuring Edson Campos and Kathleen Brodeur Gallery at Avalon Island, Guinevere’s ArtCafe, ArtistsRegistry.com November 15 - December 23 n Junior Claus Orlando Repertory Theatre, 407.896.7365, orlandorep.com November 16 n Art for Art’s Sake: David Hockney: A Bigger Picture Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

n Cinema Essentials: The Seventh Seal Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

n Date Night at the Museum Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

n Symphony Orchestra with Concerto Competition Winners Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music

November 16 - 17 n Choreographers’ Showcase Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2900, valenciacollege.edu November 16 - 18 n Into the Woods, Jr Osceola Center for the Arts, Center Children’s Theatre, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com November 16 - December 16 n Amahl and the Night Visitors The Moonlight Players at the Moonlight Warehouse Theatre, 352.319.1116, moonlightplayers.com n Osceola Crafters Holiday Gift Gallery Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com n The Winter Wonderettes The Sonnentag Theatre at the IceHouse, 352.383.4616, icehousetheatre.com November 16 - January 6 n “Winter in the Park”——Holiday Ice Skating Rink City of Winter Park, Central Park West Meadow, 407.599.3202, cityofwinterpark.org November 16 - February 10 n Old Master Drawings from the John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art Museum of Arts & Sciences, 386.255.0285, moas.org

November 16 - March 17 n The Big Dog Show The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com November 17 n Family Day at the Museum: Waterhouse Residence Museum Art & History Museums—— Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

n Holiday Open House Gallery on First, 407.323.2774, galleryonfirst.com

n The Long Run: A Tribute to the Eagles, Part 1 Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com

n Percussion Ensembles Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music

n Sanford Seminole Art Association Sanford Public Library, 407 416.3834

n Seminole State Music Days: Guitar Day Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

n Super Series Classics: Bronfman & Beethoven Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org

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November 19 - 21 n Discovery Days: Age of Discovery Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org November 19 - December 31 n Leu Holiday House Harry P. Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, leugardens.org November 20 n Choral Union Concert Stetson University School of Music, First Baptist Church, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n The Christmas Music of Mannheim Steamroller Peabody Auditorium, 386.671.3462, peabodyauditorium.com n Music at Midday Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music

ACROSS THE SEA BY ANNETTE MARGULIES

November 20 - June 14 n Living Communities Marion Cultural Alliance, Ocala City Hall, 352.369.1500, mcaocala.com

FROM DECEMBER 1 TO 31, The Steinway Piano Gallery presents Trio, an exhibition of artworks by Robin Maria Pedrero, Annette Margulies and Fern Matthews.

November 17 - 18 n 2012 Osceola Fall Art Festival Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com n 21st Brouhaha Film & Video Showcase Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n DeLand Fall Festival of the Arts Historic preservation district of downtown DeLand, delandfallfestival.com n Winter Park Harvest Festival Winter Park Harvest Festival, Winter Park Mead Botanical Garden and West Meadow of Central Park, 407.628.1230, winterparkharvestfestival.com November 17 - December 2 n Elves Shelves Gift Shoppe Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org November 17 - December 30 n Be Good for Goodness Sake! Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com

November 17 - January 20 n Sendak & Co.: Children’s Book Illustrations Since “Where the Wild Things Are” Appleton Museum of Art, 352.291.4455, AppletonMuseum.org November 18 n Brass Ensembles Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Composition Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Encore! Concerts: Messiah Sing-Along Performance Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Season Preview The Center for Contemporary Dance, Trinity Preparatory School, 407.695.8366, TheCenterForDance.org

November 22 n Thanksgiving Day Carillon Concerts Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org November 22 - December 30 n Surfacing Jeanine Taylor Folk Art, 407.323.2774, jtfolkart.com November 23 n Live Music at the Morse: Harpist Bizarre Quartet The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Sanford Art Walk Downtown Sanford, sanfordwelcomecenter.com November 23 - December 20 n Collective Art Works Sanford Seminole Art Association, Sanford’s Welcome Center, 407.416.3834 November 23 - December 23 n A Christmas Carol Theatre Downtown, 407.841.0083, theatredowntown.net November 23 - January 6 n Winter Walking Tours Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org November 23 - January 13 n Holidays at the Waterhouse The Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org November 24 n Super Series Pops: Home for the Holidays Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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November 24 - 25 n 11th Annual Winter Garden Arts Festival Downtown Winter Garden, wintergardenartfestival.com

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

November 25 n 40th Annual Performance of Handel’s Messiah Messiah Choral Society, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.415.4796 n Holiday Pops Concert Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Winter Park’s Central Park, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org November 26 n Art in the Chambers Orange County Government - Arts & Cultural Affairs, 407.836.0913, ocfl.net/arts November 26 - January 6 n Christmas at Bok Tower Gardens & Pinewood Estate Holiday Home Tour Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org November 27 n Artists’ Critique & Conversation Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org n Chamber Concert Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Tuesday Voices Poetry Readings Seminole State College of Florida, Multipurpose Room, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts November 27 - 30 n White Christmas the Musical Savannah Center, The Villages, 352.750.8075 November 28 n Dinner and a Movie: Napoleon Dynamite Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Exhibition Film Series: Ghost World Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org November 28 - December 30 n The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen’s Guild Dramatic Society’s Production of “A Christmas Carol” Orlando Shakespeare Theater, John and Rita Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.447.1700, orlandoshakes.org November 29 n Movie Matinee: The New World Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Winter Choral Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu November 29 - December 2 n Christmas Candlelight Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music November 29 - December 16 n The Winter Wonderettes Theatre Winter Haven, 863.299.2672, theatrewinterhaven.com ORLANDO ARTS MAGAZINE NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2012

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WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

November 30 n Annual Holiday Tree-Lighting Ceremony City of Winter Park, Central Park West Meadow, 407.599.3202, cityofwinterpark.org n Art for Art’s Sake: Jean-Michel Basquiat: The Radiant Child Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Cinema Essentials: The Magic Flute Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org n Live Music on Friday Nights: Pianist Lynn Peghiny and Curator Tour of the New Wing The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Moonlight Carillon Concert Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Popcorn Flicks: Elf and How the Grinch Stole Christmas Enzian, Central Park, Winter Park, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org

November 30 - December 16 n A Christmas Carol The Osceola Center for the Arts, 407.846.6257, ocfta.com n A Christmas Survival Guide Garden Theatre, 407.877.4736, gardentheatre.org n She Loves Me Melon Patch Theatre, 352.787.3013, melonpatch.org November 30 - December 23 n August: Osage County Mad Cow Theatre, The Harriett Theatre, 407.297.8788, madcowtheatre.com November 30 - January 13 n The Magic of Landscape: Kevin Boldenow Lake Eustis Museum of Art, 352.483.2900, LakeEustisMuseumofArt.org

December December 1 n 60th Annual “Ye Olde Hometown” Christmas Parade Winter Park Chamber of Commerce, Park Ave, 407.644.8281, winterpark.org n Clare and the Chocolate Nutcracker Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, ClareandtheChocolateNutcracker.com n IMAGES Tour of Homes Atlantic Center for the Arts, 386.423.4733, atlanticcenterforthearts.org n Members’ Only Wild Night! Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org n Webelo Scout Carpentry Crew Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

November 30 - December 1 n Brass Band of Central Florida—— Holiday Concert St. Luke’s Lutheran Church, 407.365.3408, stlukes-oviedo.org/concert-series n EcoCamp-In with Snoopy and Friends Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org November 30 - December 2 n Christmas Vespers Music at Rollins, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2115, Rollins.edu/music November 30 - December 9 n Cabaret Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Theatre, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts

December 1 - 29 n Small Things Considered Arts on Douglas Fine Art and Collectibles, 386.428.1133, artsondouglas.net

EATONVILLE EMBODIED: THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF JOHN PINDERHUGHES AND WENDEL WHITE will be on exhibit at the Zora Neale Hurston National Museum of Fine Arts from November 1 to December 21.

WENDEL WHITE

December 1 - 31 n Happy Holidays Month Orlando Science Center, 407.514.2000, osc.org n Seasonal Carillon Music Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org n Trio: Featuring Robin Maria Pedrero, Annette Margulies and Fern Matthews Steinway Piano Gallery, 407.339.1772 December 1 - January 31 n Susannah Herndon Peddie “From Edibles to Incredibles” Photography Exhibit Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org December 1 - February 28 n Going Places: Adventures in Art from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org

December 1 - June 30 n Darkroom to Digital: Photography from the OMA Collection Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Tricks of the Trade: Trends and Techniques in Contemporary Art Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org December 2 n Advent Lessons and Carols The Cathedral Church of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Family Adventure Day: Santa’s Stories Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org n Golden Dragon Acrobats College of Central Florida, Curtis Peterson Auditorium, 352.873.5810, tickets.CF.edu n Holiday Luncheon and Informal Art Show by Members The Central Florida Watercolor Society, Art and History Museums, Maitland, centralfloridawatercolor.com n Sanford Jazz Ensemble: The Dynamic Trumpet of Bill Carmichael, The Christmas Show Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com December 2 - 3 n 14th Central Florida Jewish Film Festival Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org December 3 n Golden Dragon Acrobats College of Central Florida, Charles R. Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala Campus, 352.873.5810, tickets.CF.edu n Story Time at Leu Gardens Harry P. Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, leugardens.org December 3 - 7 n Joyeux Noël, Polichinelle! Pinocchio’s Marionette Theater, 407.834.8757, pinocchios.net December 4 n Encore! Concerts: Holiday Gala Concert Seminole State College of Florida, Fine Arts Concert Hall, 407.708.2040, seminolestate.edu/arts n Fall Symphonic/Jazz Band Concert Valencia College East Campus, Performing Arts Center, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu n Stefano Catalani Lecture Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu December 4 - 9 n Sister Act FAIRWINDS Broadway Across America, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 800.448.6322, OrlandoBroadway.com December 5 n Dinner and a Movie: Kung Fu Hustle Southeast Museum of Photography, 386.506.4475, smponline.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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cultural calendar

n History Holiday in Heritage Square

WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org December 6 n 1st Thursdays: Art Under $200—— ’Tis the Season Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org n Christmas at the Casa Casa Feliz Historic Home Museum, 407.628.8200, casafeliz.us n Christmas in the Park The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, Central Park, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org December 6 - 16 n North Pole Musical FantasyLand Theatrical Productions, Point Performing Arts Center, 407.374.3587, pointearts.org December 7 n Community School of the Arts Youth String Orchestra Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Date Night at Leu Gardens: A Christmas Carol 1938 Harry P. Leu Gardens, 407.246.2620, leugardens.org n First Friday Cornell Fine Arts Museum, Rollins College, 407.646.2526, cfam.rollins.edu n Live Music at the Morse: Classical Guitarist Joshua Englert and Curator Tour of the New Wing The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org December 7 - 8 n Carols by Candlelight Orlando Circle of Friends Chorus, Orlando Museum of Art Auditorium, 321.345.6263, ocofchorus.com n Fall Opera Workshop Valencia College East Campus, Black Box Theater, 407.582.2332, valenciacollege.edu December 7 - 12 n Wally Doogan’s Holiday Review Creative Sanford, Princess Theater, 321.578.1463, celerysoupsanford.com December 7 - 30 n Mass Appeal Mad Cow Theatre, Black Box Theatre, 407.297.8788, madcowtheatre.com December 7 - April 7 n Duane Hanson Sculptures Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org n Works from the Permanent Collection Museum of Florida Art, 386.734.4371, MuseumofFloridaArt.org December 7 - April 14 n Paolo Veronese Ringling Museum of Art, 941.359.5700, ringling.org December 8 - January 6 n The Little Drummer Boy Pinocchio’s Marionette Theater, 407.834.8757, pinocchios.net

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WHO, WHAT, WHERE, WHEN

n Live Music at the Morse: Harpist Victoria Lynn Schultz with Family Tour and Art Demonstration The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org December 14 - 16 n Clara’s Nutcracker Dream School of Performing Arts, Trinity Preparatory School, 407.831.1770, balletsouth.org

JOAN MARCUS

December 14 - 23 n Dickens by Candlelight: A Christmas Carol Dr. Phillips Center on Lake Ivanhoe, 407.491.4663

FAIRWINDS BROADWAY ACROSS AMERICA will present Sister Act from December 4 to 9 at the Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre.

December 8 n 9th Annual Winter Park Boat Parade and Ski Show Rotary Club of Winter Park, Lakes Virginia and Osceola, Rollins College Jump Ramp, 407.647.6492, wpboatparade.com n Annual St. Lucia Festival Museum of Seminole County History, 407.665.2489, seminolecountyfl.gov n Breakfast (or Brunch) with Santa Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens, 407.323.4450, centralfloridazoo.org n Community School of the Arts The Young Singers Concert Stetson University School of Music, Elizabeth Hall, 386.822.8950, 386.822.8947, stetson.edu/music n Saturday Matinee Classics: It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) Enzian, 407.629.1088, Enzian.org n WKMG Local 6 Holiday Concert in Support of the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree Network Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, Lake Eola Band Shell, 407.999.7800, fsyo.org December 8 - 9 n Girl Scout Hats, Teas, and History Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org December 9 n Central Florida Folk Concert, featuring Stacey Earle & Mark Stuart and Asli Goncer Central Florida Folk, Villa ConRoy, 407.679.6426, cffolk.org

n Community Music School Fall Recitals Music at Rollins, Tiedtke Concert Hall, Rollins.edu/music n Drop and Shop Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org n Mead Botanical Gardens Amphitheater Inaugural Concert Florida Symphony Youth Orchestra, Mead Gardens Amphitheater, 407.999.7800, fsyo.org n Stacey Earle with Opening Act Asli Goncer Central Florida Folk, Villa ConRoy, 407.679.6426, cffolk.org December 10 n Focus Series: Bach’s Coffee House Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra, Margeson Theater, Lowndes Shakespeare Center, 407.770.0071, OrlandoPhil.org December 13 n Holiday Party Celebrating the City’s 125th Anniversary Winter Park Historical Association, Winter Park Country Club, 407.647.2330, wphistory.org n WPHA Annual Holiday Party Winter Park Historical Association, Winter Park Country Club, 407.647.2330, wphistory.org

December 15 n Live at the Gardens! Music Series, with Tammerlin Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org December 15 - 16 n Choral Masterworks: A Classic Christmas Bach Festival Society, Knowles Memorial Chapel, 407.646.2182, Bachfestivalflorida.org n Reasons for the Season Orlando Gay Chorus, The Plaza Live, orlandogaychorus.org December 15 - February 15 n Building History Winter Garden Heritage Foundation, City Hall, 407.656.3244, wghf.org December 16 n Christmas Lessons and Carols The Cathedral Church of St. Luke, 407.849.0680, stlukescathedral.org n Holiday Concert Performing Arts of Maitland, First Presbyterian Church of Maitland, 321.303.1404, PAMaitland.org n Trans-Siberian Orchestra——The Lost Christmas Eve Live Nation FL, Amway Center, 800.745.3000, amwaycenter.com December 17 n O Come, All Ye Faithful: Free Concert with Chancel Choir and Orchestra First United Methodist Church of Orlando, 407.849.6080, firstchurchorlando.org December 20 n 3rd Thursday Gallery Hop & Art Walk Downtown Arts District, 407.648.7060, orlandoslice.com

December 13 - 16 n Babes in Toyland 2012 Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, Repertory Jr., 407.321.8111, wdpac.com

December 20 - 23 n The Nutcracker Orlando Ballet, Bob Carr Performing Arts Centre, 407.426.1739, orlandoballet.org

December 14 n Culture & Cocktails: Featuring Artist Nathalie Chikhi Art & History Museums—— Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

December 20 - August 4 n Telephone Collection Spotlight Art & History Museums——Maitland, 407.539.2181, ArtandHistory.org

n Dance n Special Events n Film n History n Literature n Music n Science & Nature n Theater n Visual Arts

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December 21 n Live Music at the Morse: Beautiful Music——Three Flutes Only The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org December 22 n Joyful & Triumphant The Center for Contemporary Dance, Trinity Preparatory School, 407.695.8366, TheCenterForDance.org n The Nutcracker——Silent Auction Central Florida Ballet, Lobby of Linda Chapin Theater, Orange County Convention Center, 407.849.9948, CentralFloridaBallet.com December 22 - 23 n Holiday Weekend Open House The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n The Nutcracker Central Florida Ballet, Linda Chapin Theater, Orange County Convention Center, 407.849.9948, CentralFloridaBallet.com December 22 - March 31 n Contemporary Glass Sculpture: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Studio Glass Orlando Museum of Art, 407.896.4231, omart.org December 23 n The Nutcracker——Holiday Brunch Central Florida Ballet, Osprey Café, Orange County Convention Center, 407.849.9948, CentralFloridaBallet.com

IN THE NEXT ISSUE The Jan./Feb. 2013 issue of Orlando Arts Magazine will feature a preview of the 78th annual Bach Festival.

WHERE TO FIND OAM Orlando Arts Magazine is available at select locations in Lake, Orange, Osceola and Seminole counties, including The Abbey, FAIRWINDS Credit Union, Mount Dora Center for the Arts, Orlando Public Library, Polk Arts Alliance, Urban ReThink, the Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center and Winter Park Playhouse. Interested in distributing Orlando Arts Magazine? Please email OAMdistribution@VisitOrlando.com. For ad rates and specs, call 407.354.5568 Please send your cultural events for the Jan./Feb. 2013 issue by Nov. 15 to Cindy@UnitedArts.cc.

December 25 n Christmas Day Carillon Concerts Bok Tower Gardens, 863.676.1408, boktowergardens.org December 26 n Holiday Open House The Mennello Museum of American Art, 407.246.4278, mennellomuseum.com n Kwanza Celebration and Performance Polk Museum of Art, 863.688.7743, PolkMuseumofArt.org December 27 - January 4 n History Holiday Camp: Doing the Decades Orange County Regional History Center, 407.836.8580, thehistorycenter.org December 28 n Live Music at the Morse: Beautiful Music——Sweet Sounds Jazz Trio The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art, 407.645.5311, morsemuseum.org n Sanford Art Walk Downtown Sanford, sanfordwelcomecenter.com December 29 n Vox Audio Wayne Densch Performing Arts Center, 407.321.8111, wdpac.com December 29 - 30 n Arts & Crafts Festival at Flagler Beach Veterans Park, Flagler Beach, 352.344.0657, tnteventsinc.com Visit RedChairProject.com for additional listings.

AD INDEX ADVERTISER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PAGE Annie Russell Theatre at Rollins College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 ARDA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 The Arts at Rollins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Bach Festival Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Bok Tower Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Central Florida Zoo & Botanical Gardens . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Crealdé School of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Deland Festival of the Arts . . . . . . . . . 53 FAIRWINDS Credit Union . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 The Mennello Museum of American Art. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Orange County Regional History Center and Heritage Square. . . . . . . 45 Orlando Ballet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Orlando Museum of Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Orlando Philharmonic Orchestra . . . . 47 Orlando Premium Outlets . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Orlando Science Center . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Russian Ballet of Orlando . . . . . . . . . . 47 Southwest Airlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

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artist’sspace

WHERE CREATIVE PEOPLE WORK

Dale Wayne D

PHELAN M. EBENHACK

ale Wayne focuses on making jewelry these days, but she also draws, paints, writes and transforms plastic bottles into colorful decorations. “Any creative expression is about finding your voice,” she says. Wayne, who works out of a studio in her Altamonte Springs home, grew up in a creative household: her mom loved doing all kinds of crafts and her father, who was a naval officer, was a talented sculptor. She earned a degree in business, and later, after home schooling her own four children, she taught at The Geneva School. Wayne started working in glass in 2002. “Color is a huge part of my life. … I saw the glass rods and I loved the palette and I thought, ‘I don’t know what that is but I have to do that.’” Now she makes all the glass beads for her jewelry, which is available by appointment, on her website, and in the gift shops at The Charles Hosmer Morse Museum of American Art and the Orlando Museum of Art. Wayne also has become known for the bright creations she fashions out of plastic bottles, including a Christmas tree that will be on view at the Orlando Museum of Art’s Festival of Trees. She was inspired by a 2004 Chihuly exhibit at the museum and wanted to bring a similar, but safer, project to the classroom. Plastic bottles are painted, doused in custom holographic glitter and transformed into everything from towers to chandeliers to trees. “Anybody can do this project, but you can take it as far as you want,” she explains. Wayne readily shares her recycling techniques with a variety of audiences. Last summer, she led a public art project at the Annmarie Sculpture Garden and Arts Center in Dowell, M.D., where participants created a forest of bottle blossom trees. For more information, visit dalewayne.com.

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Orlando Arts Magazine - Nov/Dec12  

Orlando Arts Magazine - Nov/Dec12

Orlando Arts Magazine - Nov/Dec12  

Orlando Arts Magazine - Nov/Dec12

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